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1.
Complement Ther Med ; 82: 103040, 2024 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38608788

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Due to the inflammatory nature of multiple sclerosis (MS), the most widely used therapeutic approach targets the immune response but can comprise side effects (e.g. secondary immunosuppression). For these reasons, among non-pharmaceutical interventions without known side effects, physical activity (PA) gained importance because it is feasible, safe and a supportive complementary treatment strategy to alleviate symptoms in MS subjects. Consequently, the main aim of this systematic review is to analyze the effect of PA protocols, as a complementary therapy, on inflammatory status in MS patients. METHODS: Four electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and Cochrane CENTRAL) were systematically searched up to 01 June 2023 (Prospero Protocol ID=CRD42021244418). The refined search strategy was based on three concepts: "MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS" AND "PHYSICAL ACTIVITY" AND "INFLAMMATION". RESULTS: three main findings emerged: 1) untrained subjects showed a negative modulation of inflammatory biomarkers concentrations when compared to trained people (-0.74, 95 %C.I.-1.16, -0.32); 2) training modulated positively inflammatory biomarkers (+0.47, 95 %C.I. 0.24,0.71); 3) Aerobic PA protocol enhance higher positive influence on inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: Persistent, low-grade inflammation in MS could be upregulated by non-pharmacological complementary therapies, in particular by regular aerobic PA that could reduce and positively modulate inflammation.


Asunto(s)
Ejercicio Físico , Inflamación , Esclerosis Múltiple , Humanos , Biomarcadores/sangre , Ejercicio Físico/fisiología , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Esclerosis Múltiple/terapia
2.
J Orthop Sports Phys Ther ; 54(6): 391-399, 2024 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38602164

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to quantify the proportion not attributable to the specific effects (PCE) of physical therapy interventions for musculoskeletal pain. DESIGN: Intervention systematic review with meta-analysis. LITERATURE SEARCH: We searched Ovid, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus, PEDro, Cochrane Controlled Trials Registry, and SPORTDiscus databases from inception to April 2023. STUDY SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized placebo-controlled trials evaluating the effect of physical therapy interventions on musculoskeletal pain. DATA SYNTHESIS: Risk of bias was evaluated using the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool for randomized trials (RoB 2). The proportion of physical therapy interventions effect that was not explained by the specific effect of the intervention was calculated, using the proportion not attributable to the specific effects (PCE) metric, and a quantitative summary of the data from the studies was conducted using the random-effects inverse-variance model (Hartung-Knapp-Sidik-Jonkman method). RESULTS: Sixty-eight studies were included in the systematic review (participants: n = 5238), and 54 placebo-controlled trials informed our meta-analysis (participants: n = 3793). Physical therapy interventions included soft tissue techniques, mobilization, manipulation, taping, exercise therapy, and dry needling. Placebo interventions included manual, nonmanual interventions, or both. The proportion not attributable to the specific effects of mobilization accounted for 88% of the immediate overall treatment effect for pain intensity (PCE = 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.57, 1.20). In exercise therapy, this proportion accounted for 46% of the overall treatment effect for pain intensity (PCE = 0.46, 95% CI: 0.41, 0.52). The PCE in manipulation excelled in short-term pain relief (PCE = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.62, 1.01) and in mobilization in long-term effects (PCE = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.76, 0.96). In taping, the PCE accounted for 64% of disability improvement (PCE = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.48, 0.80). CONCLUSION: The outcomes of physical therapy interventions for musculoskeletal pain were significantly influenced by factors not attributable to the specific effects of the interventions. Boosting these factors consciously to enhance therapeutic outcomes represents an ethical opportunity that could benefit patients. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2024;54(6):391-399. Epub 11 April 2024. doi:10.2519/jospt.2024.12126.


Asunto(s)
Dolor Musculoesquelético , Modalidades de Fisioterapia , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Humanos , Dolor Musculoesquelético/terapia , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos
3.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 8402, 2024 04 10.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38600212

RESUMEN

To maintain current cognitive function and access greater cognitive reserves, nonpharmacological interventions may be a viable alternative for older adults with or without cognitive impairment. This study aimed to compare different nonpharmacological interventions for enhancing global cognition, including mind-body exercise, physical exercise, non-invasive brain stimulation, cognitive training intervention (CTI), acutherapy (ACU), meditation, and music therapy, by applying a network meta-analysis (NMA). Sixty-one randomized controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of interventions on global cognition in older adults with or without mild cognitive decline were selected. An NMA was conducted to compare the efficacy of different nonpharmacological interventions. The NMA revealed that mind-body exercise (standardized mean difference, 1.384; 95% confidence interval, 0.777-1.992); ACU (1.283; 0.478-2.088); meditation (0.910; 0.097-1.724); non-invasive brain stimulation (1.242; 0.254-2.230); CTI (1.269; 0.736-1.802); and physical exercise (0.977; 0.212-1.742), showed positive effects compared to passive controls. There were no significant differences between the efficacies of other interventions. Nonpharmacological interventions may potentially enhance and maintain global cognition through various pathways, such as memorizing movements and enhancing brain plasticity by reducing stress in the older adult population. Additional studies are needed to clarify the impact of other variables, including intervention methods or psychological variables.


Asunto(s)
Disfunción Cognitiva , Meditación , Humanos , Anciano , Metaanálisis en Red , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Disfunción Cognitiva/terapia , Disfunción Cognitiva/psicología , Cognición/fisiología , Terapia por Ejercicio
4.
Health Expect ; 27(2): e14033, 2024 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38556833

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Patient and public involvement (PPI) is essential for women's health research. Little is known about how women engage with humorous social media and behavioural health messaging targeting pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). This PPI aimed to understand how women engage with a humorous social media campaign encouraging PFMT. The study findings will influence the co-design of a digital intervention to support women's adherence to PFMT. METHODS: The Guidance for Reporting Involvement of Patients and the Public Version 2 short form was used to report the study's findings. The study examined public engagement with a humorous social media campaign encouraging PFMT in women. A healthcare professional and comedian ran the campaign following the national guidelines for engagement in PFMT. Instagram analytics gave insight into the demographics of the public who engaged, how they engaged and the most popular content. The behaviour change techniques (BCTs) used in the digital nudges that generated the highest levels of engagement were analysed using the Capability Opportunity Motivation Behaviour Change Wheel. RESULTS: The majority (96%) of the population showing the highest levels of engagement were women aged 35-44 years and were based in the United Kingdom (77%). The Instagram account saw an increase in engagement by 12% over the 3-month campaign, with 22,032 users seeing digital nudges and 2645 engaging with the digital nudges. The preferred way of engaging was using Likes (9723). The common themes in the digital nudges that generated the highest levels of engagement were BCTs associated with the 'social influences' theoretical domain framework that targeted the core behaviour opportunity. CONCLUSION: The study findings suggest humour may improve women's engagement with online PFMT programmes; however, more rigorous research is required to better understand diverse women's experiences of humorous online PFMT nudges. Future studies may use PFMT mobile apps instead of social media to capture true user engagement and adherence to PFMT more accurately. The insights gained from the study will be taken forward to co-design a digital behavioural intervention as part of a larger study. PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Members of the public were involved in the co-design of a digital health intervention that will be trialled as part of a larger research study. The public was involved using the social media platform Instagram. Public engagement with a humorous social media campaign to encourage women to engage with pelvic floor exercises was captured using Instagram analytics, for example, the timing of engagement.


Asunto(s)
Terapias Complementarias , Medios de Comunicación Sociales , Humanos , Femenino , Masculino , Diafragma Pélvico , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Reino Unido
5.
Altern Ther Health Med ; 30(3): 36-43, 2024 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38581338

RESUMEN

Background and Objective: In this review, we discuss evidence concerning the management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients with non-pharmacological interventions and additionally develop physical training protocols that could be prescribed to these patients. Methods: We selected 110 articles, published on PubMed and Google Scholar databases from 1972 to date, investigating the effects of generic hygienic-dietary recommendations and training programs in PsA or psoriasis (PSO) individuals. Results: Although data in support are limited, aerobic, endurance, and strength exercises as well as complementary techniques may all be useful in preserving or improving residual functional capacity, joint flexibility, and muscle strength. Exercise may reduce systemic inflammation, pain, and fatigue and additionally control PsA comorbidities, like dysmetabolism or obesity. Conclusions: The polyhedral clinical expression of PsA underlines the need for a multidisciplinary approach combining the synergistic effects of pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments. The latter range from preventive measures, like dietary modifications, weight loss, and cigarette smoking cessation, to personalized training protocols according to disease activity and phenotype, comorbidities, and individual tolerability. In these patients, we strongly encourage the regular practice of motor activity at progressively increasing intensity with combined supervised aerobic, strength, endurance, and stretching exercises.


Asunto(s)
Artritis Psoriásica , Humanos , Artritis Psoriásica/terapia , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Ejercicio Físico
6.
Neurol Res ; 46(6): 553-560, 2024 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38565199

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Inadequate trunk function is the underlying cause of many problems such as impaired balance and mobility. Although there have been trunk-based physiotherapy approaches in recent years, almost all of these approaches focus on motor problems. This study aims to investigate the effects of sensory training combined with trunk-centered Bobath exercises on trunk control and proprioception, balance, gait, and the activity of daily living (ADL). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study is a randomized controlled trial included with twenty-seven stroke patients. Participants were separated into two groups, Group 1; 'sensory training combined with trunk-centered Bobath exercises' and Group 2; 'trunk-centered Bobath exercises'. Trunk-centered Bobath exercises were used for motor training. Sensory training included transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation and a set of exercises that provide tactile and proprioceptive stimulation. Trunk Impairment Scale, Trunk Reposition Error, Berg Balance Scale, 2-minute walk test, and Barthel Index were used to assess trunk control, trunk proprioception, balance, gait, and ADL respectively. RESULTS: Intra-group analysis results showed that trunk control, trunk proprioception, balance, gait, and ADL improved in both groups after treatment (p < 0.05). The changes in the Trunk Reposition Error values of the participants in Group 1 before and after treatment was found to be significantly higher than Group 2 (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicated that the application of trunk-centered motor training is effective in improving trunk proprioception and trunk control, balance, gait, and ADL in stroke patients. Also, sensory training combined with trunk-centered motor training was found more effective in improving trunk proprioception than solely motor training.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Ejercicio , Equilibrio Postural , Propiocepción , Rehabilitación de Accidente Cerebrovascular , Accidente Cerebrovascular , Torso , Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Propiocepción/fisiología , Rehabilitación de Accidente Cerebrovascular/métodos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Método Simple Ciego , Accidente Cerebrovascular/fisiopatología , Accidente Cerebrovascular/terapia , Accidente Cerebrovascular/complicaciones , Torso/fisiopatología , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Equilibrio Postural/fisiología , Anciano , Actividades Cotidianas , Adulto , Resultado del Tratamiento
7.
BMJ Open ; 14(3): e073816, 2024 Mar 13.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38485170

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To explore the acceptability of an optimised physiotherapy (OPTimisE) intervention for people with lateral elbow tendinopathy (LET) and feasibility of comparing it to usual care in a randomised controlled trial. DESIGN: Semistructured interviews, analysed using thematic analysis and mapped onto the COM-B model of behaviour change. SETTING: Conducted as part of the OPTimisE Pilot & Feasibility randomised controlled trial within physiotherapy departments in the United Kingdom National Health Service. PARTICIPANTS: 17 patients with LET (purposively sampled to provide representativeness based on age, sex, ethnicity, deprivation index and treatment allocation) and all 8 physiotherapists involved as treating clinicians or site principal investigators. RESULTS: Four themes were identified. First, participants reported the OPTimisE intervention as acceptable. Second, differences between the OPTimisE intervention and usual care were identified, including the use of an orthosis, holistic advice/education including modifiable risk factors, forearm stretches, general upper body strengthening and a more prescriptive exercise-dosing regimen. Third, participants provided feedback related to the trial resources, which were viewed positively, but identified language translation as a need. Fourth, feedback related to trial processes identified the need for changes to outcome collection and reduction of administrative burden. From the perspective of adopting the OPTimisE intervention, we found evidence that participants were able to change their behaviour. Considering the findings through the lens of the COM-B model, the intervention is likely to be deliverable in practice and the trial can be delivered at scale with some additional support for physiotherapists. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the OPTimisE intervention was found to be different to usual care and acceptable to patients and physiotherapists. The study highlighted the need to refine trial processes and resources prior to a full-scale trial, to reduce administrative burden, increase support for physiotherapists, improve return rate of outcome questionnaires and provide language translation. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN database 19 July 2021. https://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN64444585.


Asunto(s)
Tendinopatía del Codo , Tendinopatía , Humanos , Terapia por Ejercicio , Estudios de Factibilidad , Modalidades de Fisioterapia , Medicina Estatal , Tendinopatía/terapia , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto
8.
Physiotherapy ; 123: 91-101, 2024 06.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38447497

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of two physiotherapeutic interventions - aquatic therapy (AT) and land-based therapy (LBT) - for reducing pain in women with fibromyalgia. DESIGN: Single-blind, randomised controlled, equivalence trial. SETTING: Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Association in A Coruña, Spain. PARTICIPANTS: Forty women with fibromyalgia were assigned at random in a 1:1 manner to two groups: AT (n = 20) and LBT (n = 20). INTERVENTIONS: Two therapeutic exercise programmes, with 60-min sessions, were undertaken three times per week for 12 weeks. Sessions were carried out in groups by a trained physiotherapist. OUTCOME: The primary outcome was pain intensity (visual analogue scale). The secondary outcomes were pressure pain threshold (algometer), quality of life (Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory) and physical ability (6-Minute Walk Test). Patients were evaluated at baseline, 12 weeks (post-treatment) and 18 weeks (follow-up). The statistical analysis was per-protocol. P < 0.05 was considered to indicate significance. Effect size was calculated. RESULTS: The mean age was 50 [standard deviation (SD) 9] years, with median body mass index of 27 [interquartile range (IQR) 25-30] kg/m2 and median symptom duration of 11 (IQR 6-15) years. No differences were observed between the groups post-treatment, but differences in favour of AT were found in pain intensity [2.7 (IQR 1.5-4.9) vs 5.5 (IQR 3.3-7.6); p= 0.023; large effect, Cohen's d= 0.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1-1.5] and sleep quality [12.0 (IQR 7.3-15.3) vs 15.0 (IQR 13.0-17.0); p= 0.030; large effect, Cohen's d= 0.8; 95% CI 0.1-1.5] at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that AT is better than LBT for reducing pain intensity and improving sleep quality after 6 weeks of follow-up. AT may be a good treatment option for women with fibromyalgia. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION NUMBER: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02695875 CONTRIBUTION OF THE PAPER.


Asunto(s)
Fibromialgia , Manejo del Dolor , Dimensión del Dolor , Calidad de Vida , Humanos , Fibromialgia/rehabilitación , Fibromialgia/terapia , Femenino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Método Simple Ciego , Manejo del Dolor/métodos , Adulto , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Hidroterapia/métodos , Modalidades de Fisioterapia , España , Calidad del Sueño
9.
Altern Ther Health Med ; 30(3): 10-14, 2024 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38518172

RESUMEN

Background: Low anterior resection syndrome (LARS) is a post-proctectomy consequence characterized by variable and unpredictable bowel function, including clustering, urgency, and incontinence, which significantly impacts the quality of life. Currently, there is no established gold-standard therapy for LARS. Primary Study Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the Paula method of exercise as part of an integrative treatment approach for patients with LARS. Design: This preliminary study utilized a single-arm pretest-posttest design. Setting: The study was conducted at a tertiary care medical center. Participants: Five patients diagnosed with LARS completed the study. Intervention: Participants underwent twelve weeks of individualized Paula method exercise sessions. Two questionnaires were employed to assess the severity of LARS and quality of life. Primary Outcome Measures: (1) Low Anterior Resection Syndrome (LARS) Score; (2) Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Bowel Function Instrument (MSK-BFI); (3) Global Quality-of-Life (QOLS) Score . Results: All participants completing the 12-week Paula exercise regimen reported no difficulty in engaging with the exercises. Statistically significant improvements were observed in both the LARS score and MSK-BFI (P = .039 and P = .043, respectively, Wilcoxon Rank Sum test). While there were improvements in the global quality-of-life score and functional scales of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire, these improvements did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: This preliminary study suggests that patients with LARS can successfully complete a 12-week exercise program using the Paula method, resulting in improved LARS scores. However, further investigation through larger, multicenter, randomized controlled trials is necessary to establish the efficacy of these exercises as a treatment for LARS.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Ejercicio , Calidad de Vida , Humanos , Femenino , Masculino , Persona de Mediana Edad , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Anciano , Síndrome , Proctectomía/métodos , Complicaciones Posoperatorias/terapia , Encuestas y Cuestionarios , Adulto , Resultado del Tratamiento , Síndrome de Resección Anterior Baja
10.
Curr Pain Headache Rep ; 28(6): 507-523, 2024 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38451393

RESUMEN

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This systematic review and network meta-analysis aims to compare the efficacy of different mind-body exercise (MBE) interventions, including Yoga, Pilates, Qigong, and Tai Chi, in managing chronic non-specific neck pain (CNNP). We searched randomized controlled trials in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Cochrane Library. After screening eligible studies and extracting relevant data, risk of bias of included studies was assessed by the Cochrane Risk of Bias assessment tool, and network meta-analysis was performed by the Stata software version 16.0. RECENT FINDINGS: Of the 1019 studies retrieved, 18 studies with 1442 subjects were included. Fourteen studies were graded as high quality. Yoga plus hot sand fomentation was the most effective in reducing pain intensity and functional disability, and improving the quality of physical life in patients with CNNP. Yoga achieved the most improvement in cervical mobility. And Pilates was the best MBE intervention for improving the quality of mental life. Overall, Yoga, Pilates, Qigong, and Tai Chi demonstrated considerable effectiveness in improving pain intensity, functional disability, cervical mobility, and quality of life in patients with CNNP. Yoga or Yoga plus heat therapy was the most effective method for patients with CNNP. Additional high-quality, large-scale, multi-center, long-term follow-up studies are necessary to fully understand the comparative effectiveness of different MBE interventions for CNNP, and to recognize the potential benefits of each MBE intervention and the need for individualized treatment approaches.


Asunto(s)
Dolor Crónico , Terapias Mente-Cuerpo , Dolor de Cuello , Humanos , Dolor de Cuello/terapia , Dolor Crónico/terapia , Terapias Mente-Cuerpo/métodos , Metaanálisis en Red , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Resultado del Tratamiento , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto
11.
J Cancer Res Ther ; 20(1): 118-125, 2024 Jan 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38554308

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Prevalence of radiation induced trismus in head and neck cancer (HNC) is 38% to 42% globally. Radiation induced trismus depends on the dosage of the radiation therapy and the surgical procedure. Myofascial release (MFR) and Matrix rhythm therapy (MaRhyThe©) are techniques used to treat the myofascial pain and muscular restriction. The present study aimed to compare the effect of MFR and MaRhyThe© on pain, mouth opening, TMJ disability index (TDI), Gothenburg Trismuus Questionnaire (GTQ), Functional Intraoral Glasgow Scale (FIGS) and quality of life in participants with Radiation induced trismus. MATERIALS AND METHODOLOGY: About 30 participants in age group of 18 to 65 years diagnosed with radiation induced trismus were included in the study. All the participants were randomly allocated in 2 groups MFR group and MaRhyThe© group. Both the group received structured exercise program. Primary outcomes were Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Vernier Caliper reading for maximum mouth opening. Secondary outcome measure viz. GTQ, TDI, FIGS and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-HN) all obtained values were analyzed at the end of 4th week. RESULTS: The present study demonstrated significant improvement in terms of reduction in pain, improvement in maximum mouth opening and in GTQ, TMD, FIGS, and FACT-HN scores in all the participants in both group (p ≤ 0.05). However, the groups showed equal effectiveness in the treatment of radiation induced trismus.


Asunto(s)
Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello , Trismo , Adolescente , Adulto , Anciano , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Adulto Joven , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello/complicaciones , Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello/radioterapia , Dolor , Proyectos Piloto , Calidad de Vida , Trismo/etiología , Trismo/terapia , Trismo/epidemiología
12.
J Bodyw Mov Ther ; 37: 170-176, 2024 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38432801

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: ː Early detection of loss of proprioception is essential to prevent injury and maintain professional work activities. However, although many different methods are present for wrist proprioception measurement, these methods' validity and reliability studies are quite limited. OBJECTIVE: To compare the validity and reliability of the goniometer, inclinometer, and joint position sense goniometer methods used in measuring wrist active joint position sense (AJPS). METHODS: ː Thirty-two volunteer healthy participants (64 wrists) between the ages of 19-31 (mean age:23,34 ± 3,84) were included in the study. Wrist AJPS was assessed with an isokinetic dynamometer as a reference standard in addition to an inclinometer, goniometer, and joint position sense goniometer (JPSG). Spearman's Correlation Coefficient was used for validity analysis, and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC3,1) was used to analyze test-retest reliability. RESULTS: ː It was found that the goniometer (p < 0.001, r = 0.529) is a moderately valid method to assess active wrist joint position sense. The JPSG (p < 0.001, r = 0.432) and inclinometer (p = 0.005, r = 0.350) have weak validity. According to the results of ICC3,1 analysis, the goniometer (p < 0.001, ICC3,1 = 0.422) and JPSG (p < 0.001, ICC3,1 = 0.369) were found to have poor reliability in assessing wrist AJPS, and the inclinometer (p = 0,183, ICC3,1 = 0,114) was not found as a reliable method. CONCLUSIONS: ː Our results suggest that the JPSG and inclinometer should not be used in the wrist active joint position sense evaluation because of weak validity and poor reliability. The goniometer can be used in clinics and academic research to evaluate wrist joint position sense if the rater lacks a reliable and valid measurement tool.


Asunto(s)
Articulación de la Muñeca , Muñeca , Humanos , Adulto Joven , Adulto , Recién Nacido , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Propiocepción , Terapia por Ejercicio
13.
J Bodyw Mov Ther ; 37: 226-232, 2024 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38432810

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of passive recovery (PR), active recovery (AR), and recovery through self-massage with the aid of foam rolling (FRR) on pain and physical capacity in healthy volunteers after a resistance exercise (RE) session. METHODS: The sample of this randomized crossover trial comprised 37 physically healthy men who underwent three sessions of RE (squat, leg press, and leg extension), involving four sets of 10 repetitions with 80% of 10MR, with an interval of seven days between sessions. PR consisted of sitting for 20min, AR included a cycle ergometer for 20min at 50% maximum heart rate, and FRR involved 10 repetitions per target body area, followed by 1min rest. Variables of physical capacity (strength, power, agility, joint range of motion, flexibility, speed, and fatigue resistance) were assessed 1h after RE, whereas pain was assessed 24h, 48h, and 72h after RE. RESULTS: In the dominant lower limb, the percentage of strength decreased (p < 0.001) by 16.3% after RE but improved (p < 0.001) by 5.2% after AR and FRR in relation to PR. Similar results were observed in the non-dominant lower limb. Agility was enhanced (p < 0.001) by 3.6% in AR and 4.3% in FRR compared with the baseline assessment. The recoveries for the other physical variables were similar. Only FRR reduced (p < 0.001) pain at 24h (22.8%), 48h (39.2%), and 72h (59.7%) compared to PR. CONCLUSIONS: Self-massage using a foam roll reduced pain and improved agility and muscle strength during recovery after exercise. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04201977.


Asunto(s)
Entrenamiento de Fuerza , Masculino , Humanos , Estudios Cruzados , Terapia por Ejercicio , Fuerza Muscular , Dolor
14.
J Bodyw Mov Ther ; 37: 296-307, 2024 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38432821

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE: According to the prevalence of balance disorders among children with hearing loss (HL), researchers used exercise programs to improve balance in children with HL. So, the present systematic review and meta-analysis briefly summarize findings regarding the impacts of exercise training programs on balance in children with HL. METHODS: Science Direct, MEDLINE/PubMed, SCOPUS, LILACS, CINAHL, CENTRAL, Web of Science, PEDro, and Google Scholar were searched from inception until November 11th, 2023. Two independent researchers analyzed and extracted the data from potential papers whose eligibility was confirmed. Then, the PEDro scale was used to obtain quality assessment scores. The total PEDro score is 11 and incorporates the presentation of statistical analysis and evaluation criteria of internal validity. Studies that scored 7-11 were considered methodologically "high", 5 to 6 were "fair", and ≤4 were considered "poor". RESULTS: 10 studies involving a total of 304 participations were included in the systematic review. Our results demonstrate that exercise training programs positively impact static balance (p = 0.001) with level 1a evidence, the postural sway (p = 0.001) with level 1a evidence, and dynamic balance (p = 0.001) with level 1a evidence in children with HL. CONCLUSION: The findings of this systematic review and meta-analysis related to studies with excellent methodological quality revealed that the intended training programs significantly impact postural sway along with static and dynamic balance in children with HL. It is recommended that future exercise training programs be paired with rehabilitation programs for children with HL.


Asunto(s)
Pérdida Auditiva , Niño , Humanos , Ejercicio Físico , Terapia por Ejercicio , Proyectos de Investigación , Investigadores
15.
J Bodyw Mov Ther ; 37: 372-378, 2024 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38432831

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Reliable and valid measurements for shoulder muscular endurance should be available for clinical use. The posterior shoulder endurance test offers a potential clinical assessment, but its construct validity isn't available. Since a criterion measure of muscular endurance is not available, this study's purpose was to determine a reliable method for testing shoulder muscular endurance using an isokinetic dynamometer. METHODS: The test-retest reliability, standard error measurement, and minimal detectable change were calculated on four different paradigms to quantify muscular fatigue using two isokinetic speeds (60°sec-1,180°sec-1). Calculation paradigms included peak torque fatigue index (FI), average torque FI, area-under-the-curve FI, and peak torque decay slope. Testing occurred on two days. Repeated measures analysis of variance compared the two peak torque decay slopes across both testing days. RESULTS: Superior reliability was found within the decay slope measurements at both 60°sec-1 (ICC = 0.941) and 180°sec-1 (ICC = 0.764) speeds, with the 60°sec-1 decay slope being the highest reliability between the two angular velocities. There was a greater amount of fatigue in the 60°sec-1 decay slope compared to the 180°sec-1 decay slope. CONCLUSION: Using the decay slope of isokinetic shoulder horizontal abduction at 60°sec-1 is a reliable method to validate other muscular endurance clinical measures. Rehabilitation specialists should utilize the decay slope of the isokinetic dynamometry to monitor responsiveness.


Asunto(s)
Fatiga Muscular , Hombro , Humanos , Terapia por Ejercicio , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados
16.
J Bodyw Mov Ther ; 37: 38-45, 2024 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38432833

RESUMEN

INTRODUCTION: Hypopressive exercises (HE) are postural and breathing exercises that activate deep muscles in the abdomen and pelvic floor. Despite this, there is still no consensus in the literature on its real effectiveness. The objective was to analyze the effects of HE on the abdominal and pelvic floor muscles in women with or without dysfunctions in these regions. METHODS: This is a systematic review of randomized clinical trials found in the PEDro, PubMed, Cochrane, LILACS, and Embase databases. We include studies that evaluate the effects of HE (with or without other techniques) on the pelvic floor and abdominal region for 8 weeks or more, in women over 18 years old, with or without dysfunction in these regions, with the presence of a control group (active or passive). RESULTS: HE were effective in improving strength, tone, and reducing symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunctions, in magnitude less than (in two studies) or equal (in one study) to the pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT). When HE were performed with PFMT in the same group, no additional benefits were found. Only one study evaluated abdominal muscles activation, where HE were effective in improving postural control and activation of the transversus abdominis muscle. CONCLUSIONS: The HE presented positive results to the evaluated parameters. However, the information is still preliminary and scarce. There are methodological divergences regarding the execution, follow-up and standardization of the method, which could affect the results. According to the existing information, HE cannot yet be reliably indicated for the treatment of the pelvic floor, despite pointing out relevant results in some studies. More randomized clinical trials and long-term studies are needed to analyze the effects of HE not only for pelvic floor, but also for other regions, such as abdominal muscles and related dysfunctions.


Asunto(s)
Terapia por Ejercicio , Diafragma Pélvico , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Adolescente , Ensayos Clínicos Controlados Aleatorios como Asunto , Ejercicio Físico , Equilibrio Postural
17.
J Bodyw Mov Ther ; 37: 392-398, 2024 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38432835

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: In the squat movement, the use of constant resistance (CR) generates greater compression and shear forces close to 90° of knee flexion, increasing joint overload. However, when used variable resistance (VR) there is no consensus about the effect of knee joint load. The aim of this study was to compare knee torques using constant or variable resistance during the squat exercise. METHODS: Twenty-one healthy male subjects (mean age, 24 [SD, 3] years; height, 1.76 [SD, 0.04] m), who practice squats during strength training routine. Were simultaneously record data from the platform force and tridimensional kinematic to obtain torques around knee. 15 repetitions were performed up to maximum knee flexion with the use of variable (RV) or constant (CR) resistance in a single session. RESULTS: Significant differences regarding the angles only in the sagittal plane at the end of the ascending phase of the squat, with less knee extension in the VR condition. In the sagittal and frontal planes, lower values of extensor and abductor torque were found in the VR condition at the angles of greater knee flexion. CONCLUSION: The use of variable resistance compared to constant resistance seems to be an alternative to be considered when the objective is to minimize the internal loads on the knee joint in exercises such as the squat in amplitudes of greater flexion. This study indicated that VR helps subjects who are learning the squat movement, enabling the application of this knowledge in physical therapy or physical training clinics.


Asunto(s)
Articulación de la Rodilla , Postura , Adulto , Humanos , Masculino , Adulto Joven , Ejercicio Físico , Terapia por Ejercicio , Movimiento
18.
J Bodyw Mov Ther ; 37: 379-385, 2024 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38432832

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Chronic mechanical low back pain (CMLBP) is one of the most prevalent and costly disorders. Determining its most effective treatment approach is a priority for researchers. PURPOSE: To examine the effects of including aerobic exercise within a conventional therapy regimen for young adults with CMLBP. METHODS: Fifty CMLBP patients (22 males and 28 females) were randomly and equally assigned to one of two groups to receive the prescribed treatment for 8 weeks. The control group received the traditional program only (infrared, ultrasound, burst TENS, and exercises); for the experimental group, an aerobic training program using a stationary bicycle was added. Back pain intensity was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included the Oswestry disability index, back extensor endurance measured by the Sorensen test, and physical performance indicated by the back performance scale and the 6-min walk test. A Two-way MANOVA was used for data analysis. RESULTS: Multivariate tests revealed statistically significant effects of group (p = 0.002, partial η2 = 0.182), time (p < 0.001, partial η2 = 0.928), and group-by-time interaction (p = 0.01, partial η2 = 0.149). Univariate group-by-time interactions were significant for back disability (p = 0.043), extensor endurance (p = 0.023) and results of the 6-min walk test (p = 0.023) showing greater improvement in the experimental group. However, back pain intensity and the back performance scale revealed no significant group-by-time interactions. Within-group comparisons were significant for all measured variables in both groups (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Although a traditional program of infrared, ultrasound, TENS, and exercises is beneficial for CMLBP treatment, adding aerobic exercises to the program leads to more beneficial outcomes.


Asunto(s)
Dolor de la Región Lumbar , Femenino , Masculino , Adulto Joven , Humanos , Dolor de la Región Lumbar/terapia , Ejercicio Físico , Terapia por Ejercicio , Rendimiento Físico Funcional , Investigadores
19.
J Bodyw Mov Ther ; 37: 417-421, 2024 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38432839

RESUMEN

Equine Facilitated Physical Therapy (EFPT) lacks consistent documentation due to being an unconventional physical therapy treatment to chronic low back pain patients (LBP) and lacking rehabilitation outcome measure tools for a stable (equestrian) environment. The objectives were to develop an online evaluation tool as well as to define inter- and intra-rater reliability to validate the outcome measurement tool "Evaluation of maintaining sitting position (on a horse) and walking (short distances)" designed for LBP patients in EFPT". A total of 48 movement related functions (n = 48), were derived from the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) and organized to an online evaluation tool. Depending on the state of validation two to six (2-6) raters scored randomized patient (n = 22) video material, recorded during a 12-week EFPT intervention, with the designed tool. Inter-rater agreement level between the experts reached good (α = 87) reliability for the scoring of the items and calculated per patient excellent (α = 100). Intra-rater reliability reached good (α = 87) and per patient good (α = 80) repeatability. For the healthy adults the reliability between raters reached acceptable (α = 72) levels and per rated excellent (α = 100). The developed assessment tool was found satisfactory to fulfil the requirement for the therapeutic practice. With the use of the tool physical therapist may detect postural changes for LBP patients as outcome report in EFPT. The tool may be used to identify treatment progress and to help design home exercises. The created tool will help to collect similar outcome measures from LBP patients in EFPT and to validate the treatment within industry.


Asunto(s)
Dolor de la Región Lumbar , Adulto , Humanos , Animales , Caballos , Dolor de la Región Lumbar/terapia , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Terapia por Ejercicio , Movimiento , Evaluación de Resultado en la Atención de Salud
20.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 103(13): e37319, 2024 Mar 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38552065

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Exercise is an important factor for the treatment and rehabilitation of depression. Traditional Chinese exercise is considered as an effective treatment for depression. In recent years, many studies have shown that Chinese exercise therapy may be safe in the treatment of depression. To evaluate the therapeutic effect of traditional Chinese exercise on depression using network meta-analysis. METHODS: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP shop Database, China Biomedical Literature Database, and Wan Fang Data Knowledge Service Platform were included in randomized controlled studies on traditional Chinese exercises for the treatment of depression from the establishment of the library to July 2023. The literature was extracted and assessed for risk of bias using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment and statistically analyzed using Review Manager 5.4 and Stata 14.2. RESULTS: A total of 25 studies involving 3 exercises with a total of 1605 cases were included. The results of the network meta-analysis showed that each exercise significantly reduced the 24-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD-24), Hamilton Anxiety Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Self-rating Depression Scale scores. However, conventional treatments have the advantage of improving the sleep quality of patients with depression. CONCLUSIONS: The 3 exercises included in this study were effective for depression. Baduanjin and Tai Chi were better at improving the outcomes related to depression and anxiety. The effect of sleep quality intervention was slightly worse. Larger, high-quality randomized controlled trials are needed to compare interventions across exercises in a more granular manner.


Asunto(s)
Depresión , Taichi Chuan , Humanos , Depresión/tratamiento farmacológico , Metaanálisis en Red , Terapia por Ejercicio/métodos , Ejercicio Físico
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