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1.
Int J Yoga Therap ; 34(2024)2024 Apr 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38640400

RESUMEN

A previous study discovered that two speakers with moderate apraxia of speech increased their sequential motion rates after unilateral forced-nostril breathing (UFNB) practiced as an adjunct to speech-language therapy in an AB repeated-measures design. The current study sought to: (1) delineate possible UFNB plus practice effects from practice effects alone in motor speech skills; (2) examine the relationships between UFNB integrity, participant-reported stress levels, and motor speech performance; and (3) sample a participant-led UFNB training schedule to contribute to the literature's growing understanding of UFNB dosage. A single-subject (n-of-1 trial), ABAB reversal design was used across four motor speech behaviors. A 60-year-old female with chronic, severe apraxia of speech participated. The researchers developed a breathing app to assess UFNB practice integrity and administer the Simple Aphasia Stress Scale after each UFNB session. The participant improved from overall severe to moderate apraxia of speech on the Apraxia Battery for Adults. Visual inspection of graphs confirmed robust motor speech practice effects for all variables. Articulatory-kinematic variables demonstrated sensitivity to the UFNB-plus-practice condition and correlated to stress scale scores but not UFNB integrity scores. The participant achieved 20-minute UFNB sessions 4 times per week. Removal of UFNB during A2 (UFNB withdrawal) and after a 10-day break during B2 (UFNB full dosage) revealed UFNB practice effects on stress scale scores. UFNB with motor speech practice may benefit articulatory-kinematic skills compared to motor speech practice alone. Regular, cumulative UFNB practice appeared to lower self-perceived stress levels. These findings, along with prior work, provide a foundation to further explore yoga breathing and its use with speakers who have apraxia of speech.


Asunto(s)
Afasia , Apraxias , Yoga , Adulto , Femenino , Humanos , Persona de Mediana Edad , Habla , Apraxias/terapia , Respiración , Afasia/terapia
2.
Klin Monbl Augenheilkd ; 241(4): 347-354, 2024 Apr.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38653289

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Various yoga positions may have an unfavorable impact on intraocular pressure (IOP) and may therefore be seen as a potential risk factor for the progression of glaucoma. The new "iCare HOME2" is a handheld self-tonometer for IOP measurements outside clinical settings. This is the first study to evaluate the immediate effect of common yoga postures on the IOP of healthy and glaucomatous eyes using the "iCare HOME2" self-tonometer and to compare the time of IOP recovery in both groups. METHODS: This is a single-center, prospective, observational study including 25 healthy and 25 glaucoma patients performing the following yoga positions: "legs up" (Viparita Karani), "bend over" (Uttanasana), "plough pose" (Halasana), and the "down face dog" (Adho Mukha Svanasana) for 90 s each, with a 2-min break in between. IOP was measured with the "iCare HOME2" before, during, and after each position. RESULTS: IOP significantly increased in all eyes in all positions (p < 0.05), showing no statistically significant difference between healthy or glaucomatous eyes (p > 0.05). The mean rise in IOP in healthy subjects was 1.6 mmHg (SD 1.42; p = 0.037), 14.4 mmHg (SD 4.48; p < 0.001), 7.5 mmHg (SD 4.21; p < 0.001), and 16.5 mmHg (SD 3.71; p < 0.001), whereas in glaucoma patients, IOP rose by 2.8 mmHg (SD 2.8; p = 0.017), 11.6 mmHg (SD 3.86; p < 0.001), 6.0 mmHg (SD 2.24; p < 0.001), and 15.1 mmHg (SD 4.44; p < 0.001) during the above listed yoga positions, repsectively. The highest increase in IOP was seen in the down face position, reaching mean IOP values above 31 mmHg in both study groups. IOP elevation was observed immediately after assuming the yoga position, with no significant change during the following 90 s of holding each pose (p > 0.05). All IOP values returned to baseline level in all individuals, with no significant difference between healthy and glaucoma participants. CONCLUSION: Our data show that common yoga positions can lead to an acute IOP elevation of up to 31 mmHg in healthy as well as glaucoma eyes, with higher IOP values during head-down positions. Given that IOP peaks are a major risk factor for glaucomatous optic neuropathy, we generally advise glaucoma patients to carefully choose their yoga exercises. If and to what extent practicing yoga leads to glaucoma progression, however, remains unclear and warrants further research.


Asunto(s)
Glaucoma , Presión Intraocular , Tonometría Ocular , Yoga , Humanos , Presión Intraocular/fisiología , Masculino , Femenino , Tonometría Ocular/métodos , Tonometría Ocular/instrumentación , Persona de Mediana Edad , Glaucoma/fisiopatología , Glaucoma/diagnóstico , Glaucoma/terapia , Reproducibilidad de los Resultados , Adulto , Diseño de Equipo , Sensibilidad y Especificidad , Análisis de Falla de Equipo , Anciano , Estudios Prospectivos
3.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1228271, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38590811

RESUMEN

Background: A nature-based social prescription (NBSP) is an approach to improving mental health outcomes that involves prescribing nature-based interventions as complementary or alternative therapy to traditional ones. A variety of advantages are available from NBSP for people looking to enhance their mental well-being. The effect size of the nature-based social prescriptions (NBSPs) has not been thoroughly evaluated by systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Objectives: The current study aimed to analyze existing studies and conduct a meta-analysis to determine the overall effect size of the nature-based social prescriptions (NBSP's) outcomes on mental health. Methods: By choosing the relevant papers from among those that were available, a meta-analysis was carried out in the current study. A systematic search of electronic databases (Pub Med, Web of Science, Scopus, Cochrane Library, Embase, CINAHL, and PsychINFO) was conducted to identify relevant studies. Studies were included if they evaluated the effects of NBSP on mental health outcomes. Effect sizes were calculated using the random effects model. Results: Meta-analysis of interventions statistics shows that CBT (SMD -0.0035; 95% CI: [-0.5090; 0.5020]; Tau^2: 0.1011; Tau: 0.318), digital intervention (SMD -0.3654; 95% CI: [-0.5258; 1.2566]; Tau^2: 0.2976, Tau: 0.5455), music intervention (SMD -2.1281; 95% CI: [-0.4659; 4.7221]; Tau^2: 3.4046; Tau:1.8452), and psychological interventions (SMD -0.8529; 95% CI: [0.3051; 1.4007]; Tau^2: 0.1224; Tau: 0.3499) do not significantly impact. The other interventions [social belongingness, communication training, blue intervention, nature-based education, cognitive behavior group therapy (CBGT), social prescribing coordinator, self-help intervention, participatory, organizational intervention, inpatient services, brief diet, internet-based intervention, prenatal intervention, yoga and meditation, ergonomics training program, yoga nidra intervention, and storytelling] highlighted above are significant. Conclusion: The conclusion of the meta-analysis supports the idea that incorporating nature-based social prescription interventions into mental healthcare plans can effectively complement traditional therapies and improve mental health outcomes. Systematic review registration: https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?ID=CRD42023412458, CRD42023412458.


Asunto(s)
Terapia Cognitivo-Conductual , Meditación , Yoga , Humanos , Salud Mental , Evaluación de Resultado en la Atención de Salud
4.
Psychiatry Res ; 335: 115879, 2024 May.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38579457

RESUMEN

The specialized field of forensic psychiatry deals with the care of criminal offenders who suffer from severe mental disorders. As this field is positioned at the intersection of illness, crime, and security, it poses complex challenges. While high-quality clinical studies in forensic psychiatry settings are limited, recent investigations have suggested yoga as a complementary clinical tool within correctional environments. This report of a quasi-experimental study examines the impact of a 10-week trauma-adapted yoga intervention on mental health, antisocial and aggressive behaviors, pain perception, cravings, and character maturity among 56 patients in various forensic psychiatry clinics across Sweden. In the current study, the yoga group demonstrated noteworthy reductions in negative affect states, anxiety, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideations, interpersonal sensitivity, hostility, and overall psychological distress. These reductions were not observed in the comparison group. Additionally, the yoga group exhibited a significant decrease in pain frequency and strengthened self-directedness. However, there were no significant changes in aggressive, antisocial, or self-harm behaviors or cravings in either group. The between-group analyses did not yield significant results, except for pain intensity. The trauma-adapted yoga intervention implemented within forensic psychiatry settings shows feasibility and results in multiple positive changes in patients' health.


Asunto(s)
Meditación , Yoga , Humanos , Yoga/psicología , Psiquiatría Forense , Ansiedad , Trastornos de Ansiedad
5.
Int J Yoga Therap ; 34(2024)2024 Apr 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38590153

RESUMEN

The present study aimed to analyze the extent to which yoga practitioners (n = 784) live by their faith/spirituality and how this influences their perceived prosocial behaviors. For that purpose, the model of transformational spirituality was applied. This model assumes that people who experience the sacred in their lives change their attitudes and behaviors and take responsibility in the world. Data from this cross-sectional anonymous online survey with standardized questionnaires (e.g., Franciscan-Inspired Spirituality Questionnaire, Awe/Gratitude Scale, World Health Organization Five Well-Being Index) showed that for most of the enrolled yoga practitioners, yoga is a conscious way of life and a path of spiritual development. Thus, they search for the Divine in the world, live in accordance with their spiritual convictions, and regard their faith/spiritual convictions as an orientation in their lives. Moreover, they score highly on peaceful attitudes and respectful treatment of others, and on commitment to disadvantaged people and the environment. Although the frequency of asana (postural) or pranayama (breathwork) practices was only marginally related to the indicators of spirituality, the frequency of meditation and studying the philosophical background of yoga was weakly to moderately related to Spiritual Experiences, Awe/Gratitude, and Living by Faith. Respondents' well-being was best predicted by experiential aspects of spirituality, inner congruence/emotional involvement with yoga, and with yoga seen as a spiritual path (R2 = 0.21). Regression analyses (R2 = 0.32) further showed that participants' inner congruence with yoga practices could best be predicted by the experiential aspects of spirituality and, to a lesser extent, by the frequency of asana practices, duration of yoga practice, and Peaceful Attitude/Respectful Treatment. The core dimension of faith and the related experiential aspect of spirituality were thus crucial for the ways the enrolled yoga practitioners behave in the world and interact with others and the environment.


Asunto(s)
Meditación , Yoga , Humanos , Yoga/psicología , Estudios Transversales , Espiritualidad , Actitud , Encuestas y Cuestionarios
6.
BMC Psychiatry ; 24(1): 267, 2024 Apr 09.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38594701

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Yoga can be used as a complementary intervention to conventional treatments, whether pharmacological or non-pharmacological. Sustained practice of yoga can generate a series of benefits for individuals' quality of life and improve their physical fitness. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the potential effects of yoga as an adjunct intervention in conditions involving impulse control issues, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), borderline personality disorder, bipolar affective disorder, and substance use disorders. METHODS: We performed a systematic review of placebo-controlled, randomized trials of yoga in patients with impulsivity. PubMed, Web of Science, and Science Direct databases were searched for trials published up to January, 2023. Data were extracted from published reports and quality assessment was performed per Cochrane recommendations. RESULTS: Out of 277 database results, 6 RCT were included in this systematic review. To assess the level of attention and impulsiveness, the following scales were analyzed: Barratt Impulsiveness, UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior scale, Conners' Continuous Performance Test IIª and Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised: Long. CONCLUSIONS: Yoga didn't have a significant improvement in impulsivity when compared to placebo. There are many tools to assess impulsivity, but they mean different concepts and domains consisting in a weakness on comparison of yoga effects. PROSPERO REGISTRATION: CRD42023389088.


Asunto(s)
Trastorno por Déficit de Atención con Hiperactividad , Trastorno Bipolar , Yoga , Humanos , Calidad de Vida , Trastorno por Déficit de Atención con Hiperactividad/psicología , Conducta Impulsiva
7.
Digit J Ophthalmol ; 30(1): 5-10, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38601897

RESUMEN

Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence of musculoskeletal (MSK) complaints in ophthalmologists and to assess whether participation in an online Iyengar yoga video program improves the baseline pain scores and awareness of proper posture in the clinic and operating room. Methods: Ophthalmologists were recruited from online professional forums for this nonrandomized, prospective study. A pre-intervention survey, including demographics, office and procedure volumes, wellness activities, and baseline MSK pain scores, was completed. A fifteen-minute instructional video focusing on simple yoga poses for the neck, shoulder, and lower back created by one of the authors, who is both an ophthalmologist and a certified Iyengar yoga teacher, was provided to participants to complete three times weekly for a total of 4 weeks. A post-intervention survey collecting MSK pain scores and information about ergonomics and compliance was completed. Results: Fifty ophthalmologists completed the pre-intervention survey, of whom 49 (98%) reported at least 1 episode of MSK discomfort in the preceding year. Of those, discomfort was cervical in 36 (72%), in the shoulder(s) in 15 (29%), thoracic spinal in 23 (46%), lumbar spinal in 23 (46%), and centered in the wrist, hand, or finger in 22 (44%). Of the 50 ophthalmologists, 22 submitted the post-intervention surveys. The post-intervention pain scores were decreased compared to baseline for cervical spine (P < 0.01), shoulder (P < 0.01), thoracic spine (P < 0.01), lumbar spine (P < 0.01) and wrist, hand, or finger (P < 0.01). 20 respondents (91%) reported improved awareness of their posture in the clinic and operating room, and 19 (86%) felt that this awareness would decrease their MSK symptoms. Conclusions: Among our small group of survey respondents, a fifteen-minute Iyengar yoga video program specifically designed for ophthalmologists reduced MSK pain and improving awareness of proper ergonomics for practicing ophthalmologists.


Asunto(s)
Dolor Musculoesquelético , Oftalmólogos , Yoga , Humanos , Dolor Musculoesquelético/terapia , Dolor Musculoesquelético/epidemiología , Proyectos Piloto , Estudios Prospectivos
8.
PLoS One ; 19(4): e0301028, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38574083

RESUMEN

BACKGROUND: Interest in the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions such as yoga in primary schools has grown. Evidence shows promise, as youth who engage in yoga to promote mindfulness show improved coping skills, increased socio-emotional competence and prosocial skills, academic performance, attention span, and ability to deal with stress. OBJECTIVE: This study reports the results of a program evaluation of a universal health and wellness curriculum, Pure Power, designed to teach youth yoga techniques, mindfulness, and emotion regulation. METHODS: A non-randomized comparison design examined outcomes among participants from schools that completed the intervention with highest fidelity of implementation (n = 461) and from students in matched comparison schools (n = 420). Standard measures of coping, emotion regulation and emotion dysregulation, spelling, and math achievement were collected. RESULTS: Analyses suggest the youth in the intervention schools demonstrated relative improvement on measures of emotion regulation, spelling, and math. CONCLUSIONS: Challenges in implementation in real-life settings are vital to identify. The data provide some real-world evidence for the effectiveness of a universal health and wellness curriculum on emotion regulation and positive academic outcomes. Training school staff to deliver the intervention may foster implementation. Future research should test the effectiveness of who delivers the intervention; for example, teacher-delivered groups vs. other wellness personnel.


Asunto(s)
Atención Plena , Yoga , Adolescente , Humanos , Yoga/psicología , Salud Mental , Atención Plena/métodos , Evaluación de Programas y Proyectos de Salud , Instituciones Académicas , Curriculum
9.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 67(6): 490-500, 2024 Jun.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38447621

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: Concurrent chemoradiation to treat head and neck cancer (HNC) may result in debilitating toxicities. Targeted exercise such as yoga therapy may buffer against treatment-related sequelae; thus, this pilot RCT examined the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a yoga intervention. Because family caregivers report low caregiving efficacy and elevated levels of distress, we included them in this trial as active study participants. METHODS: HNC patients and their caregivers were randomized to a 15-session dyadic yoga program or a waitlist control (WLC) group. Prior to randomization, patients completed standard symptom (MDASI-HN) and patients and caregivers completed quality of life (SF-36) assessments. The 15-session program was delivered parallel to patients' treatment schedules. Participants were re-assessed at patients' last day of chemoradiation and again 30 days later. Patients' emergency department visits, unplanned hospital admissions and gastric feeding tube placements were recorded over the treatment course and up to 30 days later. RESULTS: With a consent rate of 76%, 37 dyads were randomized. Participants in the yoga group completed a mean of 12.5 sessions and rated the program as "beneficial." Patients in the yoga group had clinically significantly less symptom interference and HNC symptom severity and better QOL than those in the WLC group. They were also less likely to have a hospital admission (OR = 3.00), emergency department visit (OR = 2.14), and/or a feeding tube placement (OR = 1.78). CONCLUSION: Yoga therapy appears to be a feasible, acceptable, and possibly efficacious behavioral supportive care strategy for HNC patients undergoing chemoradiation. A larger efficacy trial is warranted.


Asunto(s)
Cuidadores , Quimioradioterapia , Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello , Calidad de Vida , Yoga , Humanos , Masculino , Femenino , Cuidadores/psicología , Persona de Mediana Edad , Neoplasias de Cabeza y Cuello/terapia , Anciano , Resultado del Tratamiento , Proyectos Piloto , Estudios de Factibilidad , Adulto
10.
Sensors (Basel) ; 24(5)2024 Feb 29.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38475131

RESUMEN

We recently reported enhanced parasympathetic activation at rest throughout pregnancy associated with regular yoga practice. The present study presents a secondary analysis of data collected within a prospective cohort study of 33 pregnant women practicing yoga once weekly throughout pregnancy and 36 controls not involved in formal pregnancy exercise programs. The objective was to assess the impact of prenatal yoga on the autonomic nervous system stress response. Healthy pregnant women with singleton pregnancies were recruited in the first trimester. There was no significant difference in the maternal body mass index (BMI) between the yoga group and the controls (24.06 ± 3.55 vs. 23.74 ± 3.43 kg/m2, p = 0.693). Women practicing yoga were older (28.6 ± 3.9 vs. 31.3 ± 3.5 years, p = 0.005) and more often nulliparous (26 (79%) vs. 18 (50%), p = 0.001). We studied heart rate variability (HRV) parameters in the time domain (SDNN, standard deviation of regular R-R intervals, and RMSSD, square root of mean squared differences of successive R-R intervals) and frequency domain (ln(LF/HF), natural logarithm of low-frequency to high-frequency power), as well as synchronization indices of heart rate, blood pressure and respiration during and immediately following acute psychological stress of a standardized mental challenge test. Measurements were performed once per trimester before and after yoga or a 30 min moderate-intensity walk. Statistical comparison was performed using three-way analyses of variance (p < 0.05 significant). Time domain HRV parameters during and following mental challenge in the yoga group were significantly higher compared to the controls regardless of the trimester (F = 7.22, p = 0.009 for SDNN and F = 9.57, p = 0.003 for RMSSD, respectively). We observed no significant differences in the yoga group vs. the controls in terms of ln(LF/HF) and synchronization indices. Regular prenatal yoga practice was associated with a significantly reduced sympathetic response to mental challenge and quicker recovery after acute psychological stress. These effects persisted throughout pregnancy with regular practice.


Asunto(s)
Yoga , Femenino , Humanos , Embarazo , Sistema Nervioso Autónomo , Frecuencia Cardíaca/fisiología , Estudios Prospectivos , Estrés Psicológico , Caminata , Adulto Joven , Adulto
11.
Int J Yoga Therap ; 34(2024)2024 Mar 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38519849

RESUMEN

Functional neurological disorder (FND) is a heterogeneous condition of neurological symptoms that cannot be linked to a specific neurological cause. Yoga combines movement, breathing, and meditation and has established mind-body effects for people who are managing both psychological and neurological conditions. This case series describes key components of a yoga program for people with FND, evaluating feasibility, acceptability, and efficacy via self-report surveys, clinical assessments, and postintervention interview. Four individuals with FND participated in 45-minute, one-to-one virtual yoga sessions, two times a week for 8 weeks. We measured outcomes in four domains (healthcare utilization, FND symptoms, quality of life and self-efficacy, and function and mobility) at baseline, week 4, and week 8. Assessments included the Psychogenic Movement Disorders Rating Scale, timed up-and-go test, Patient Health Questionnaire-15, Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire, 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, and University of Washington Self-Efficacy Scale. Four participants completed at least 8 sessions, and two completed the full intervention (16 sessions). There were no adverse events. Two participants reported positive changes after yoga and improved on all clinical assessments (timed up-and-go test and Psychogenic Movement Disorders Rating Scale). Postintervention interview analysis revealed three themes: negative diagnosis experience, perceived health effects of yoga, and session format preferences. This was an exploratory case series describing a yoga intervention that was associated with some benefits for people with FND (decreased FND symptom severity and increased function, perceived health, quality of life, and self-efficacy). A larger case series is warranted to understand how to best select individuals who would benefit from the program.


Asunto(s)
Trastornos de Conversión , Meditación , Trastornos del Movimiento , Yoga , Humanos , Calidad de Vida
12.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 7019, 2024 03 25.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38528063

RESUMEN

This network meta-analysis investigated the effects of 8 types of physical exercises on treating positive symptoms, negative symptoms, general psychopathology, and the Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score in patients with schizophrenia. The methods adhered to PRISMA guidelines and used the Cochrane risk of bias tool for quality assessment, and Stata software for data analysis. Data were sourced from PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane database up to August 15, 2023, following PICOS principles. A total of 25 studies including 1441 participants were analyzed. Results showed that resistance exercise seems to be effective for improving positive symptoms, while Yoga was more effective for negative symptoms. Low-intensity aerobic exercise was optimal for general psychopathology, and Yoga was effective in improving the PANSS total score. The study concluded that yoga and aerobic exercise demonstrated superior performance, but the impact of exercise on patients with schizophrenia is also influenced by individual factors and intervention dosages. Therefore, a pre-assessment of patients considering factors such as interests, hobbies, and physical capabilities is crucial for selecting appropriate exercise modalities.


Asunto(s)
Esquizofrenia , Yoga , Humanos , Esquizofrenia/terapia , Metaanálisis en Red , Calidad de Vida/psicología , Ejercicio Físico/psicología , Yoga/psicología
14.
PLoS One ; 19(3): e0300105, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38451990

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVES: While previous research has utilized remote delivery of yoga interventions, no research has specifically interrogated the effectiveness of remote yoga intervention delivery. In this secondary analysis of weight-maintenance trial data, we examined participant perceptions of essential yoga properties across in-person and remote formats, hypothesizing that perceptions would not differ following remote delivery. METHODS: 24 women with overweight or obesity (34.6±4.1 kg/m2, 48.2±9.9 years) received a 12-week Iyengar yoga intervention (2x/week) following a 3-month behavioral weight loss program. Of 23 participants who completed follow-up questionnaires, 12 received the planned in-person intervention and 11 received a remote intervention (delivered live) due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Essential Properties of Yoga Questionnaire (EPYQ) was completed online by participants and by the instructors to measure the perceptions of the relative emphasis placed on the essential components of the yoga intervention via 14 subscales. Linear regression models were used to compare perceptions of each EPYQ dimension across in-person and remote delivery methods, as well as between participants and instructors, independent of delivery method. RESULTS: 13 of the 14 subscales did not differ between delivery modalities (p>0.05). Participants perceived more individual attention within in-person yoga (p = 0.003). For both delivery methods, instructors perceived breathwork, restorative postures, and body locks to be incorporated to a lesser degree compared to participants (ß = -1.28, p = 0.003; ß = -1.57, p = 0.019; ß = -1.39, p = 0.036; respectively). No other significant differences across the participant and instructor scores were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Findings provide preliminary support for the use of live remote delivery of yoga, effectively communicating most essential yoga properties when compared to in-person classes. However, participants perceived more individual attention with in-person versus remote delivery; thus, future remote-based yoga interventions may benefit from providing additional individualized feedback.


Asunto(s)
COVID-19 , Meditación , Yoga , Femenino , Humanos , Obesidad/terapia , Pandemias , Ensayos Clínicos como Asunto
15.
PLoS One ; 19(3): e0301283, 2024.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38547155

RESUMEN

OBJECTIVE: To study the white matter connections between anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula and amygdala as key regions of the frontal-limbic network that have been related to meditation. DESIGN: Twenty experienced practitioners of Sahaja Yoga Meditation and twenty nonmeditators matched on age, gender and education level, were scanned using Diffusion Weighted Imaging, using a 3T scanner, and their white matter connectivity was compared using diffusion tensor imaging analyses. RESULTS: There were five white matter fiber paths in which meditators showed a larger number of tracts, two of them connecting the same area in both hemispheres: the left and right amygdalae and the left and right anterior insula; and the other three connecting left anterior cingulate with the right anterior insula, the right amygdala and the left amygdala. On the other hand, non-meditators showed larger number of tracts in two paths connecting the left anterior insula with the left amygdala, and the left anterior insula with the left anterior cingulate. CONCLUSIONS: The study shows that long-term practice of Sahaja Yoga Meditation is associated with larger white matter tracts strengthening interhemispheric connections between limbic regions and connections between cingulo-amygdalar and cingulo-insular brain regions related to top-down attentional and emotional processes as well as between top-down control functions that could potentially be related to the witness state perceived through the state of mental silence promoted with this meditation. On the other hand, reduced connectivity strength in left anterior insula in the meditation group could be associated to reduced emotional processing affecting top-down processes.


Asunto(s)
Meditación , Sustancia Blanca , Yoga , Humanos , Meditación/psicología , Yoga/psicología , Giro del Cíngulo/diagnóstico por imagen , Sustancia Blanca/diagnóstico por imagen , Imagen de Difusión Tensora , Amígdala del Cerebelo/diagnóstico por imagen , Encéfalo , Imagen por Resonancia Magnética/métodos
16.
Saudi Med J ; 45(3): 323, 2024 Mar.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38438214
17.
Int J Yoga Therap ; 34(2024)2024 Mar 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38480466

RESUMEN

Individuals who are incarcerated likely experience trauma or exacerbate existing trauma, which has significant health risks. Trauma-informed care aims to address the experienced trauma. The current study explored the effect of a trauma-informed yoga and mindfulness curriculum in carceral settings. In this quasi-experimental study, participants (n = 326) were assigned to either six weekly sessions of 60-minute group trauma-informed yoga and mindfulness or a waitlist control condition. Stress and mood were measured pre- and postclass, whereas coping, emotional awareness, emotional regulation, anxiety, anger management, compassion, self-compassion, forgiveness, and posttraumatic growth were measured pre- and postcurriculum. The trauma-informed group showed a significant increase in mood and decrease in stress after participation in class. Participants were more likely to use positive coping skills, experienced greater levels of forgiveness, and were more likely to experience posttraumatic growth after completing programming as compared to a control group. Qualitative data highlighted perceived improvements in mood, physical health, communication with peers, coping with anxiety and anger, focus and self-control, optimism, acceptance, and open-mindedness. The qualitative data also demonstrated the importance of supportive relationships outside of participants' peers (i.e., instructors). Outcomes suggest benefit of a trauma-informed yoga and mindfulness curriculum in aiding people who are incarcerated in supporting mental and physical well-being and building resilience.


Asunto(s)
Meditación , Atención Plena , Resiliencia Psicológica , Yoga , Humanos , Yoga/psicología , Meditación/psicología , Curriculum
18.
Altern Ther Health Med ; 30(2): 6-12, 2024 Feb.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38518132

RESUMEN

Context: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is associated with a group of emotional, behavioral, and somatic symptoms that occur during the menstrual cycle. Laughter yoga involves a combination of laughter exercises and breathing techniques derived from more traditional yoga practice. No previous studies have examined the effects of laughter yoga on the symptoms of PMS. Objective: The study intended to assess the effectiveness of laughter yoga in coping with the premenstrual symptoms of women. Design: The research team performed a pretest and posttest, quasi-experimental study. Setting: The study took place in the nursing and midwifery departments at Marmara University, a state university located in Istanbul, Turkey. Participants: Participants were 80 female students in those departments at the university between February 2019 and May 2020 who had PMS. Intervention: The research team divided participants into two groups based on their departments: (1) an intervention group, the laughter yoga group, with 32 participants who took part in a twice-weekly laughter yoga program that included a weekly 30-min group session consisting of laughter and deep breathing, and (2) a control group with 48 participants. Outcome Measures: The research team collected the data using the Demographic and Descriptive Information Form (DDIF), Premenstrual Syndrome Symptom Scale (PMSS), and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Results: Between baseline and postintervention, the laughter yoga group's mean scores for the PMSS subdimensions depressive affection (P = .00), anxiety (P = .04), fatigue (P = .00), irritability (P = .01), depressive thoughts (P = .03), pain (P = .002), changes in sleep (P = .004), and bloating (P = .001) significantly decreased. The laughter yoga group's scores for fatigue (P = .03) and pain (P = .001) were significantly lower than those of the control group postintervention. Conclusions: Laughter yoga is a noninvasive complementary therapy that clinicians can use to reduce the PMS symptoms.


Asunto(s)
Risoterapia , Síndrome Premenstrual , Yoga , Humanos , Femenino , Yoga/psicología , Emociones , Síndrome Premenstrual/terapia , Dolor
20.
Am J Occup Ther ; 78(2)2024 Mar 01.
Artículo en Inglés | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38345946

RESUMEN

IMPORTANCE: Occupational therapy practitioners use yoga in practice to achieve holistic care, and the American Occupational Therapy Association has provided guidance on the use of yoga in occupational therapy. For people with acquired brain injury (ABI), however, it is unknown whether yoga affects occupational performance. OBJECTIVE: To explore the perceived impact of an adapted yoga intervention on occupational performance using the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process (4th ed.; OTPF-4) for participants with ABI. DESIGN: Qualitative descriptive study using virtual, semistructured interviews. An inductive, holistic, open-coding process, followed by a deductive process to map open codes to the OTPF-4. PARTICIPANTS: Nine individuals with ABI were recruited from a yoga intervention study. RESULTS: The theme generated from the data-"Yoga participants with ABI realized that they could still do quite a bit"-was supported by two major categories from the OTPF-4: Occupations and Performance Skills. Participants described improvements in their functional performance (i.e., motor skills, process skills) and how these factors were synergistically connected to their occupational performance (i.e., self-care, leisure). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study provides novel insight into how functional performance improved so participants could "still do things," such as engaging in occupations. When participants described improved performance skills, they simultaneously described re-engagement with their meaningful occupations. Participants also perceived an improvement in their mind-body connection, which should be further explored in future studies. This study generated original findings about participants' perceptions of an adapted yoga intervention as they relate to the OTPF-4. Plain-Language Summary: This study reports individuals' perceptions of their re-engagement with occupations and changes in occupational performance skills after participating in an adaptive yoga intervention. We highlight the distinct contribution that adaptive yoga-an intervention modality that can be used by occupational therapy practitioners-may have, using the OTPF-4 to connect the participants' perceptions about their improvements in occupational performance.


Asunto(s)
Lesiones Encefálicas , Meditación , Terapia Ocupacional , Yoga , Humanos , Actividades Recreativas
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