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Suite of activity-based probes for cellulose-degrading enzymes.

Chauvigné-Hines, Lacie M; Anderson, Lindsey N; Weaver, Holly M; Brown, Joseph N; Koech, Phillip K; Nicora, Carrie D; Hofstad, Beth A; Smith, Richard D; Wilkins, Michael J; Callister, Stephen J; Wright, Aaron T.
J Am Chem Soc; 134(50): 20521-32, 2012 Dec 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23176123
Microbial glycoside hydrolases play a dominant role in the biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass to high-value biofuels. Anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria are capable of producing multicomplex catalytic subunits containing cell-adherent cellulases, hemicellulases, xylanases, and other glycoside hydrolases to facilitate the degradation of highly recalcitrant cellulose and other related plant cell wall polysaccharides. Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome-producing bacterium that couples rapid reproduction rates to highly efficient degradation of crystalline cellulose. Herein, we have developed and applied a suite of difluoromethylphenyl aglycone, N-halogenated glycosylamine, and 2-deoxy-2-fluoroglycoside activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) probes to the direct labeling of the C. thermocellum cellulosomal secretome. These activity-based probes (ABPs) were synthesized with alkynes to harness the utility and multimodal possibilities of click chemistry and to increase enzyme active site inclusion for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. We directly analyzed ABP-labeled and unlabeled global MS data, revealing ABP selectivity for glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes, in addition to a large collection of integral cellulosome-containing proteins. By identifying reactivity and selectivity profiles for each ABP, we demonstrate our ability to widely profile the functional cellulose-degrading machinery of the bacterium. Derivatization of the ABPs, including reactive groups, acetylation of the glycoside binding groups, and mono- and disaccharide binding groups, resulted in considerable variability in protein labeling. Our probe suite is applicable to aerobic and anaerobic microbial cellulose-degrading systems and facilitates a greater understanding of the organismal role associated with biofuel development.