Your browser doesn't support javascript.
A Biblioteca Cochrane foi excluída da BVS por decisão da Wiley de não renovação da licença de uso com a BIREME. Saiba mais.

BVS Odontologia

Informação e Conhecimento para a Saúde

Home > Pesquisa > ()
Imprimir Exportar

Formato de exportação:

Exportar

Email
Adicionar mais destinatários
| |

Interplay between toothbrush stiffness and dentifrice abrasivity on the development of non-carious cervical lesions.

Turssi, Cecilia P; Binsaleh, Fahad; Lippert, Frank; Bottino, Marco C; Eckert, George J; Moser, Elizabeth A S; Hara, Anderson T.
Clin Oral Investig; 23(9): 3551-3556, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30607621

OBJECTIVE:

This study investigated the effect of toothbrush stiffness and dentifrice slurry abrasivity on the development and progression of simulated non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs). MATERIALS AND

METHODS:

Human maxillary premolars were allocated to 12 groups generated by the association between toothbrushes, soft, medium, and hard stiffness, and simulated dentifrice slurries, lower, medium, and higher; deionized water (DI) served as negative control. Teeth were mounted on acrylic blocks, and their root surfaces partially covered with acrylic resin to simulate gingiva, leaving a 2-mm area apical to the cemento-enamel junction exposed to toothbrushing. Specimens were brushed with the test slurries for 35,000 and 65,000 double strokes. Impressions taken at baseline and after both brushing periods were scanned by a 3D optical profilometer. Dentin volume loss (mm3) was calculated by image subtraction. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests.

RESULTS:

All toothbrushes caused higher volume loss when associated to higher abrasive slurry, compared to medium- and lower-abrasive slurries. Medium caused more volume loss than lower-abrasive slurry, which led to more volume loss than DI. Hard and medium toothbrushes were not different when used with medium- or higher-abrasive slurries. There were no differences among toothbrushes when used with DI and lower-abrasive slurry. Overall, 35,000 brushing strokes resulted in significantly less volume loss than 65,000.

CONCLUSIONS:

Toothbrush stiffness was an important factor on NCCL development, especially when brushing with medium- and higher-abrasive slurries. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Medium and hard toothbrushes associated with medium- and high-abrasive toothpastes can yield more severe NCCLs.