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Rapid and parallel formation of Fe3+ multimers, including a trimer, during H-type subunit ferritin mineralization.

Pereira, A S; Tavares, P; Lloyd, S G; Danger, D; Edmondson, D E; Theil, E C; Huynh, B H.
Biochemistry; 36(25): 7917-27, 1997 Jun 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-9201937
Conversion of Fe ions in solution to the solid phase in ferritin concentrates iron required for cell function. The rate of the Fe phase transition in ferritin is tissue specific and reflects the differential expression of two classes of ferritin subunits (H and L). Early stages of mineralization were probed by rapid freeze-quench Mossbauer, at strong fields (up to 8 T), and EPR spectroscopy in an H-type subunit, recombinant frog ferritin; small numbers of Fe (36 moles/mol of protein) were used to increase Fe3+ in mineral precursor forms. At 25 ms, four Fe3+-oxy species (three Fe dimers and one Fe trimer) were identified. These Fe3+-oxy species were found to form at similar rates and decay subsequently to a distinctive superparamagentic species designated the "young core." The rate of oxidation of Fe2+ (1026 s(-1)) corresponded well to the formation constant for the Fe3+-tyrosinate complex (920 s(-1)) observed previously [Waldo, G. S., & Theil, E. C. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 13261] and, coupled with EPR data, indicates that several or possibly all of the Fe3+-oxy species involve tyrosine. The results, combined with previous Mossbauer studies of Y30F human H-type ferritin which showed decreases in several Fe3+ intermediates and stabilization of Fe2+ [Bauminger, E. R., et al. (1993) Biochem. J. 296, 709], emphasize the involvement of tyrosyl residues in the mineralization of H-type ferritins. The subsequent decay of these multiple Fe3+-oxy species to the superparamagnetic mineral suggests that Fe3+ species in different environments may be translocated as intact units from the protein shell into the ferritin cavity where the conversion to a solid mineral occurs.