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1.
J Zoo Wildl Med ; 50(2): 405-413, 2019 Jun 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31260207

RESUMO

Snake fungal disease (SFD) is an emerging mycotic disease caused by Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola, and has been demonstrated to impact snake populations of conservation concern in the United States negatively. Although Ophidiomyces has been shown to affect diverse taxa and to have a broad distribution, host factors associated with infected individuals and optimal testing protocols are not yet well characterized. The purpose of this study was to evaluate host factors and agreement across testing modalities associated with Ophidiomyces infection in a free-ranging snake population in southeast Ohio. Wild-caught snakes were swabbed and biopsied to test for Ophidiomyces via quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), culture, and histopathology. The host parameters assessed were species, sex, snout-vent length, body weight, month captured, and presence of gross skin lesions. A total of 8/30 individuals across three species-Black Racers (Coluber constrictor), Grey Ratsnakes (Pantherophis spiloides), and Eastern Gartersnakes (Thamnophis sirtalis sirtalis)-tested positive via at least one testing modality for Ophidiomyces infection. There were no associations between sex, snout-vent length, or weight and Ophidiomyces infection status. A higher proportion of individuals with gross lesions tested positive for Ophidiomyces than those without gross lesions, and most individuals that tested positive were caught in April or May. A low level of agreement was observed across testing modalities. Swab qPCR identified the most Ophidiomyces-positive individuals, and fungal culture identified the fewest at 0 individuals. Although there are limitations associated with a sample size of 30, these findings support the potential of this pathogen to infect individuals broadly across species and size, highlighting the relevance of this disease for snake conservation efforts. They also suggest that although little agreement was observed across test modalities, the concurrent use of multiple modalities is a more sensitive method for characterizing prevalence and distribution of Ophidiomyces.


Assuntos
Dermatomicoses/veterinária , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , Serpentes , Animais , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/microbiologia , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/veterinária , Dermatomicoses/epidemiologia , Dermatomicoses/microbiologia , Ohio/epidemiologia , Pele/microbiologia
2.
J Zoo Wildl Med ; 50(1): 225-230, 2019 03 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31120682

RESUMO

Nannizziopsis crocodili, a contagious, keratinophilic fungus, was identified from biopsied tissue in a captive juvenile freshwater crocodile during an outbreak of severe multifocal dermatitis affecting four of five crocodiles. Lesions progressed from superficial, well-demarcated ulceration of scales, to black pigmentation, localized edema, erythema, and flattening of the scales. Treatment with topical enilconazole provided clinical improvement in three of four crocodiles but all developed terminal gout. One crocodile did not develop clinical disease despite long-term exposure. This is the first report of N. crocodili in freshwater crocodiles and in a location remote to the index Australian case.


Assuntos
Jacarés e Crocodilos , Dermatite/veterinária , Fungicidas Industriais/uso terapêutico , Imidazóis/uso terapêutico , Micoses/veterinária , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , Animais , Animais de Zoológico , Dermatite/diagnóstico , Dermatite/tratamento farmacológico , Dermatite/microbiologia , Micoses/diagnóstico , Micoses/tratamento farmacológico , Micoses/microbiologia
3.
J Wildl Dis ; 55(4): 961-964, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30896366

RESUMO

Snake fungal disease (ophidiomycosis) is an emerging infection of snakes caused by Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola. Little is known about mechanisms of this pathogen's transmission and its implications for conservation of wild snake populations. We report four cases with evidence of vertical transmission of O. ophiodiicola from dam to offspring.


Assuntos
Dermatomicoses/veterinária , Transmissão Vertical de Doença Infecciosa/veterinária , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , Serpentes/microbiologia , Animais , Animais Selvagens , Dermatomicoses/microbiologia , Dermatomicoses/transmissão , Ovoviviparidade
4.
J Wildl Dis ; 55(3): 658-662, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30605391

RESUMO

Snake fungal disease (SFD), caused by the fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola, is an emerging threat to wild snake populations in the US. Data regarding its distribution, prevalence, and population-level impacts are sparse, and more information is needed to better manage SFD in the wild. In this study, we captured 38 wild snakes of five species in Connecticut in the summers of 2015 and 2017. Skin lesions were biopsied and evaluated histologically for fungal dermatitis. At least one individual from each species was positive for SFD, and 48% of snakes sampled in 2015 and 39% of snakes sampled in 2017 were positive for SFD. A Dekay's brownsnake (Storeria dekayi dekayi) with SFD lesions, captured in the summer of 2017, extended the host range of the disease. Thus, SFD was present in wild Connecticut snakes in 2015 and 2017, which demonstrated a wide-spread distribution throughout the state.


Assuntos
Colubridae/microbiologia , Dermatomicoses/veterinária , Onygenales , Animais , Connecticut/epidemiologia , Dermatomicoses/epidemiologia , Dermatomicoses/microbiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos
5.
J Clin Microbiol ; 57(2)2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30487306

RESUMO

The fungal order Onygenales includes many pathogens of humans and animals, and recent studies have shown some onygenalean fungi to be significant emerging pathogens of reptiles. Although many of these fungi have similar morphological features in histologic tissue sections, recent molecular analyses have revealed a genetically complex and diverse group of reptile pathogens comprising several genera, most notably Nannizziopsis, Ophidiomyces, and Paranannizziopsis Infections by members of these genera have been previously reported in a variety of reptile species, including crocodilians, lizards, snakes, and tuataras, with negative impacts on conservation efforts for some reptiles. Despite the well-documented pathogenicity of these fungi in all other extant reptile lineages, infection has not yet been reported in aquatic turtles. In this study, we report the isolation of an onygenalean fungus associated with shell lesions in freshwater aquatic turtles. The morphologic and genetic characteristics of multiple isolates (n = 21) are described and illustrated. Based on these features and results of a multigene phylogenetic analysis, a new genus and species, Emydomyces testavorans, are proposed for these fungi isolated from turtle shell lesions.


Assuntos
Exoesqueleto/microbiologia , Micoses/veterinária , Onygenales/classificação , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , Filogenia , Tartarugas/microbiologia , Actinas/genética , Animais , Antifúngicos/farmacologia , Análise por Conglomerados , DNA Fúngico/química , DNA Fúngico/genética , DNA Ribossômico/química , DNA Ribossômico/genética , DNA Espaçador Ribossômico/química , DNA Espaçador Ribossômico/genética , Água Doce , Genes de RNAr , Histocitoquímica , Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana , Técnicas Microbiológicas , Microscopia , Micoses/microbiologia , Onygenales/citologia , Onygenales/genética , RNA Fúngico/genética , RNA Ribossômico 18S/genética , RNA Ribossômico 28S/genética , Análise de Sequência de DNA
6.
Ecohealth ; 16(1): 141-150, 2019 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30349999

RESUMO

Snake fungal disease (SFD) is an emerging disease caused by the fungal pathogen, Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola. Clinical signs of SFD include dermal lesions, including regional and local edema, crusts, and ulcers. Snake fungal disease is widespread in the Eastern United States, yet there are limited data on how clinical signs of SFD compare with laboratory diagnostics. We compared two sampling methods for O. ophiodiicola, scale clip collection and swabbing, to evaluate whether collection method impacted the results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In addition, we evaluated the use of clinical signs to predict the presence of O. ophiodiicola across seasons, snake habitat affiliation (aquatic or terrestrial) and study sites. We found no significant difference in PCR results between sampling methods. Clinical signs were a strong predictor of O. ophiodiicola presence in spring and summer seasons. Snakes occupying terrestrial environments had a lower overall probability of testing positive for O. ophiodiicola compared to snakes occupying aquatic environments. Although our study indicates that both clinical signs of SFD and prevalence of O. ophiodiicola vary seasonally and based on habitat preferences of the host, our analysis suggests that clinical signs can serve as a reliable indicator of O. ophiodiicola presence, especially during spring and summer.


Assuntos
Dermatomicoses/veterinária , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , Serpentes/microbiologia , Animais , Kentucky/epidemiologia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase
7.
Med Mycol ; 57(7): 825-832, 2019 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30520962

RESUMO

We report several cases of fungal infections in snakes associated with a new species within the genus Paranannizziopsis. Three juvenile Wagler's vipers (Tropidolaemus wagleri) presented with skin abnormalities or ulcerative dermatitis, and two snakes died. Histologic examination of skin from the living viper revealed hyperplastic, hyperkeratotic, and crusting epidermitis with intralesional fungal elements. The terrestrial Wagler's vipers were housed in a room with fully aquatic tentacled snakes (Erpeton tentaculatum), among which there had been a history of intermittent skin lesions. Approximately 2 months after the biopsy of the viper, a skin sample was collected from one tentacled snake (TS1) with skin abnormalities and revealed a fungal infection with a similar histologic appearance. Fungal isolates were obtained via culture from the Wagler's viper and TS1 and revealed a novel species, Paranannizziopsis tardicrescens, based on phenotypic characterization and molecular analysis. P. tardicrescens was cultured and identified by DNA sequence analysis 8 months later from a dead tentacled snake in an exhibit in an adjacent hallway and 13 months later from a living rhinoceros snake (Rhynchophis boulengeri) with two focal skin lesions. Antifungal susceptibility testing on three of four cultured isolates demonstrated potent in vitro activity for terbinafine and voriconazole.


Assuntos
Micoses/veterinária , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , Pele/microbiologia , Serpentes/microbiologia , Animais , Biópsia , Feminino , Masculino , Micoses/mortalidade , Onygenales/classificação , Pele/patologia
8.
Mycologia ; 110(2): 325-338, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29852093

RESUMO

Ascosphaera apis is an intestinally infective, spore-forming, filamentous fungus that infects honeybees and causes deadly chalkbrood disease. Although A. apis has been known for 60 y, little is known about the ultrastructure of the spores. In this study, the fine morphology and ultrastructure of an isolate, A. apis CQ1 from southwest China, was comprehensively identified by transmission electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. The high sequence similarity and phylogenetic data based on nuc rDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 (ITS) supported the hypothesis that the CQ1 strain is a new member of the A. apis species. Morphological observation indicated that the mature spores are long ovals with an average size of 2 × 1.2 µm and are tightly packed inside spherical spore balls. More than 10 spore balls that were 8-16 µm in diameter were wrapped and formed a spherical, nearly hyaline spore cyst of 50-60 µm in diameter. Ultrastructural analysis showed that mature spores have two nuclei with distinctly different sizes. A large nucleus with double nuclear membranes was found in the center of the spore, whereas the small nucleus was only one-fifth of the large nucleus volume and was located near the end of the spore. Numerous ribosomes filled the cytoplasm, and many mitochondria with well-defined structures were arranged along the inner spore wall. The spore wall consists of an electron-dense outer surface layer, an electron-lucent layer, and an inner plasma membrane. Chitin is the major component of the spore wall. The germinated spore was observed as an empty spore coat, whereas the protoplasts, including the nuclei, mitochondria, and ribosomes, had been discharged. In addition to these typical fungal spore organelles, an unknown electron-dense regular structure might be the growing mycelium, which was arranged close to the inner spore wall and almost covered the entire wall area.


Assuntos
Abelhas/microbiologia , Onygenales/citologia , Onygenales/ultraestrutura , Esporos Fúngicos/citologia , Esporos Fúngicos/ultraestrutura , Animais , Parede Celular/química , China , Quitina/análise , Análise por Conglomerados , DNA Fúngico/química , DNA Fúngico/genética , DNA Espaçador Ribossômico/química , DNA Espaçador Ribossômico/genética , Microscopia , Microscopia Confocal , Microscopia Eletrônica de Transmissão , Onygenales/classificação , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , Organelas/ultraestrutura , Filogenia , RNA Ribossômico 5,8S , Análise de Sequência de DNA
10.
Med Mycol ; 56(5): 610-620, 2018 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29420823

RESUMO

Fungal infections in captive as well as in free-living reptiles caused by emerging obligate pathogenic fungi appear with increasing frequency and give occasion to establish new and fast methods for routine diagnostics. The so-called yellow fungus disease is one of the most important and common fungal dermatomycoses in central bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps) and green iguanas (Iguana iguana) and is caused by Nannizziopsis guarroi. The aim of this study was to prove reliability in identification of N. guarroi with Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in comparison to molecular biological analysis of ribosomal DNA genes. In seven lizards from three different species, including central bearded dragons, green iguanas, and a European green lizard (Lacerta viridis), dermatomycoses caused by N. guarroi were diagnosed by isolation of the fungal pathogen as well as histopathological confirmation of the granulomatous inflammatory reaction in deep skin biopsies. With this survey, we proved that MALDI-TOF MS is a diagnostic tool for accurate identification of N. guarroi. Besides small subunit 18S rDNA (SSU) and internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1-5.8S rDNA, a large fragment of the large subunit of the 28S rDNA (LSU), including the domain (D)1 and D2 have been sequenced, for phylogenetical analysis. Large fragment of the LSU from N. guarroi has been sequenced for the first time. Yellow fungus disease in a European lizard species is described for the first time to our knowledge as well, which could be of importance for free-ranging populations of European lizards.


Assuntos
Dermatomicoses/veterinária , Genômica , Lagartos/microbiologia , Onygenales/genética , Proteômica , Animais , DNA Ribossômico/genética , Dermatomicoses/microbiologia , Dermatomicoses/patologia , Proteínas Fúngicas/metabolismo , Genoma Fúngico/genética , Técnicas de Tipagem Micológica , Onygenales/classificação , Onygenales/metabolismo , Filogenia , Análise de Componente Principal , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Espectrometria de Massas por Ionização e Dessorção a Laser Assistida por Matriz/veterinária
11.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 12(1): e0006174, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29357352

RESUMO

Emergomyces africanus is a thermally dimorphic fungus that causes a systemic mycosis in immunocompromised persons in South Africa. Infection is presumed to follow inhalation of airborne propagules. We developed a quantitative PCR protocol able to detect as few as 5 Es. africanus propagules per day. Samples were collected in Cape Town, South Africa over 50 weeks by a Burkard spore trap with an alternate orifice. We detected Es. africanus in air samples from 34 days (10%) distributed over 11 weeks. These results suggest environmental exposure to airborne Es. africanus propagules occurs more commonly in endemic areas than previously appreciated.


Assuntos
Microbiologia do Ar , Técnicas Microbiológicas/métodos , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase em Tempo Real/métodos , Onygenales/genética , África do Sul
12.
Med Mycol ; 56(4): 510-513, 2018 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28992307

RESUMO

The ecological niche of Emergomyces africanus (formerly Emmonsia species), a dimorphic fungus that causes an AIDS-related mycosis in South Africa, is unknown. We hypothesized that natural infection with E. africanus occurs in wild small mammals. Using molecular detection with primers specific for E. africanus, we examined 1402 DNA samples from 26 species of mole-rats, rodents, and insectivores trapped in South Africa that included 1324 lung, 37 kidney, and 41 liver specimens. DNA of E. africanus was not detected in any animals. We conclude that natural infection of wild small mammals in South Africa with E. africanus has not been proven.


Assuntos
Micoses/microbiologia , Onygenales/genética , Animais , DNA Espaçador Ribossômico/genética , Humanos , Mamíferos/microbiologia , Técnicas Microbiológicas , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , África do Sul
13.
Mycopathologia ; 182(11-12): 967-978, 2017 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28894998

RESUMO

The new species Spiromastigoides albida (Onygenales, Eurotiomycetes, Ascomycota), from a lung biopsy in USA, is proposed and described based on morphological data and the analysis of rRNA, and fragments of actin and ß-tubulin gene sequences. This species is characterized by white colonies and a malbranchea-like asexual morph with profusely branching curved conidiophores forming sporodochia-like structures. Moreover, new combinations for Gymnoascus alatosporus, and for some new species recently described under the generic name Spiromastix, are provided.


Assuntos
Pulmão/microbiologia , Micoses/microbiologia , Onygenales , Biópsia , DNA Fúngico/genética , Humanos , Micoses/diagnóstico , Onygenales/classificação , Onygenales/genética , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , Filogenia , RNA Ribossômico/genética , Esporos Fúngicos/classificação
14.
Mycoses ; 60(7): 469-476, 2017 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28321920

RESUMO

From stratum corneum samples of a palmar eczema, a fungus was isolated that developed white colonies with a yellowish dark reverse, suggestive of dermatophytes. The isolate produced numerous chlamydospores and sparse aleuroconidia, was resistant to cycloheximide, grew well on human stratum corneum samples and was positive in tests for urease production and hair perforation, but no dermatophyte could be identified. After several weeks, cleistothecia with delicate asci and disc-shaped ascospores were formed, suggesting Arachnomyces spp. The analyses of the ribosomal ITS and LSU (D1/D2 domains) nucleotide sequences proved a good match with the ex-type strain of Xanthothecium peruvianum (family Onygenaceae, order Onygenales), and LSU sequence showed 99% similarity with Arachnomyces glareosus. This is the first report of X. peruvianum isolated from human skin. The description of our isolate provides new information about this species and proposes its transfer to the genus Arachnomyces with the subsequent emendation of the description of Arachnomyces peruvianus. Morphologically and physiologically it mimics dermatophytes and other species of the genus Arachnomyces. Although the clinical situation did not suggest any relevance for A. peruvianus as a primary pathogen, this fungus may act as a secondary pathogen under suitable conditions due to its keratinolytic capacity.


Assuntos
Epiderme/microbiologia , Onygenales/classificação , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , Adulto , Análise por Conglomerados , DNA Fúngico/química , DNA Fúngico/genética , DNA Ribossômico/química , DNA Ribossômico/genética , DNA Espaçador Ribossômico/química , DNA Espaçador Ribossômico/genética , Eczema/microbiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Técnicas Microbiológicas , Onygenales/genética , Onygenales/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Filogenia , RNA Ribossômico/genética , Análise de Sequência de DNA
15.
Mycoses ; 60(5): 296-309, 2017 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28176377

RESUMO

Recent discoveries of novel systemic fungal pathogens with thermally dimorphic yeast-like phases have challenged the current taxonomy of the Ajellomycetaceae, a family currently comprising the genera Blastomyces, Emmonsia, Emmonsiellopsis, Helicocarpus, Histoplasma, Lacazia and Paracoccidioides. Our morphological, phylogenetic and phylogenomic analyses demonstrated species relationships and their specific phenotypes, clarified generic boundaries and provided the first annotated genome assemblies to support the description of two new species. A new genus, Emergomyces, accommodates Emmonsia pasteuriana as type species, and the new species Emergomyces africanus, the aetiological agent of case series of disseminated infections in South Africa. Both species produce small yeast cells that bud at a narrow base at 37°C and lack adiaspores, classically associated with the genus Emmonsia. Another novel dimorphic pathogen, producing broad-based budding cells at 37°C and occurring outside North America, proved to belong to the genus Blastomyces, and is described as Blastomyces percursus.


Assuntos
Micoses/microbiologia , Onygenales/classificação , Onygenales/genética , Blastomyces/genética , Chrysosporium/genética , Genoma Fúngico , Histoplasma/genética , Humanos , Microscopia , Micélio/ultraestrutura , Micoses/epidemiologia , América do Norte/epidemiologia , Onygenales/patogenicidade , Onygenales/ultraestrutura , Fenótipo , Filogenia , Análise de Sequência de DNA , África do Sul/epidemiologia , Esporos Fúngicos/ultraestrutura
16.
Mycoses ; 60(5): 310-319, 2017 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28240390

RESUMO

A novel dimorphic fungus, Emergomyces orientalis sp. nov. a close relative of systemic pathogens in the family Ajellomycetaceae (Blastomyces, Histoplasma). The fungus is reported in a 64-year-old male from Shanxi, China. The patient developed disseminated skin lesions, productive cough with fever and showed nodular opacities in his left lung on chest radiography. The patient had no identified cause of immunodeficiency apart from type-2 diabetes mellitus. Clinical, histopathological and mycological characteristics of the agent are given, and its phylogenetic position is determined with multilocus sequence data.


Assuntos
Infecções Fúngicas Invasivas/diagnóstico , Infecções Fúngicas Invasivas/microbiologia , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , Onygenales/patogenicidade , Filogenia , Blastomyces/genética , China , DNA Ribossômico , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/complicações , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/microbiologia , Febre/etiologia , Febre/microbiologia , Histoplasma/genética , Humanos , Pulmão/diagnóstico por imagem , Pulmão/microbiologia , Pulmão/patologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Tipagem de Sequências Multilocus , Onygenales/classificação , Onygenales/genética , Análise de Sequência de DNA , Pele/microbiologia , Pele/patologia , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X
17.
N Z Vet J ; 64(5): 298-300, 2016 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27079795

RESUMO

AIMS: To describe the methods used at the Animal Health Laboratory (AHL, Ministry for Primary Industries) to identify Paranannizziopsis australasiensis. METHODS: Skin biopsy samples from two adult male tuatara were submitted to the AHL in March 2014. Approximately half of each sample was processed for fungal culture and incubated on mycobiotic agar containing cycloheximide at 30°C. Following morphological examination of the culture products, DNA was extracted from suspect colonies. PCR was used to amplify the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of fungal rRNA using primers ITS1 and ITS4. Positive amplicons were subjected to DNA sequencing and the results were compared to published sequences. In addition, DNA was extracted from the remaining skin samples and the same PCR was carried out to compare the results. RESULTS: After 7 days of incubation, colonies morphologically resembling P. australasiensis were observed. DNA extracted from these isolates tested positive for P. australasiensis by PCR and DNA sequencing. Samples of DNA extracted directly from the infected skin samples tested negative for P. australasiensis using the generic fungal PCR. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Isolation and identification of P. australasiensis was carried out using a combination of fungal culture and molecular testing available at AHL. Results were available in significantly less time than in the past, when isolates had to be sent overseas. PCR and sequencing of fungal isolates is a valuable tool for identification of species that have few, if any, unique macroscopic or microscopic features to aid identification. Further sampling from captive and wild New Zealand reptiles will provide important information on the epidemiology of P. australasiensis, and the conservation and management implications for tuatara and other native reptile species.


Assuntos
Dermatomicoses/veterinária , Onygenales/genética , Répteis/microbiologia , Animais , Sequência de Bases , DNA Fúngico/genética , Dermatomicoses/microbiologia , Masculino , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase/veterinária , Pele/microbiologia
18.
N Z Vet J ; 64(5): 301-7, 2016 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27074995

RESUMO

CASE HISTORY: Health monitoring of tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus) at Auckland Zoo between 2001 and 2009 showed that 58/93 tuatara had been affected by dermatitis of unknown origin. From 2011 onwards, cases of suspected fungal dermatitis underwent extensive diagnostic investigations. CLINCAL FINDINGS: Six cases of dermatomycosis were attributed to Paranannizziopsis australasiensis, five in tuatara and one in a coastal bearded dragon (Pogona barbata). Cases presented typically as raised, yellow to brown encrustations on the skin. Severe cases progressed to necrotising ulcerative dermatitis, and in the bearded dragon to fatal systemic mycosis. Following topical and systemic treatments, lesions resolved in all five tuatara. LABORATORY FINDINGS: Histopathological examination of skin biopsy samples revealed dermatitis with intralesional septate branching hyphae. Fungal culture yielded isolates morphologically resembling Chrysosporium species, and isolates were submitted for molecular confirmation and sequencing of DNA. DIAGNOSIS: All six cases were confirmed as dermatitis due to infection with P. australasiensis, on the basis of fungal culture and DNA sequencing of isolates. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: These are the first reported cases of dermatomycosis associated with P. australasiensis infection in tuatara, and the first cases in which systemic therapeutic agents have been used in the treatment of such disease. Tuatara at the Auckland Zoo are now routinely examined every 3 months and tissue samples from any lesions sent for histopathology and fungal culture. Further work to elucidate the epidemiology and significance of P. australasiensis infections in reptiles in New Zealand is important for both welfare and conservation purposes.


Assuntos
Dermatomicoses/veterinária , Lagartos/microbiologia , Onygenales , Répteis/microbiologia , Animais , Animais de Zoológico/microbiologia , Dermatomicoses/microbiologia , Feminino , Masculino , Nova Zelândia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase/veterinária , Pele/microbiologia
19.
Hautarzt ; 67(9): 739-49, 2016 Sep.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26758910

RESUMO

Moulds or non-dermatophyte moulds (NDM) are being increasingly isolated as causative agent of onychomycoses. Known causes of a NDM-OM are Scopulariopsis brevicaulis, Fusarium, Aspergillus, Acremonium, Neoscytalidium dimidiatum, Arthrographis kalrae, and Chaetomium. In this article, 5 patients with suspected nail infection due to Onychocola canadensis are reported for the first time in Germany. Systemic antifungal agents are not considered to be effective in NDM onychomycosis. In individual cases, however, terbinafine seems to be effective in Onychocola canadensis infection of the nails. Treatment of choice represents, however, nontraumatic nail avulsion using 40 % urea ointment followed by antifungal nail lacquer with ciclopirox olamine or amorolfine.


Assuntos
Naftalenos/uso terapêutico , Onicomicose/diagnóstico , Onicomicose/tratamento farmacológico , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , Idoso , Antifúngicos/uso terapêutico , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/diagnóstico , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/tratamento farmacológico , Doenças Transmissíveis Emergentes/microbiologia , Feminino , Alemanha , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Onicomicose/microbiologia , Terbinafina , Resultado do Tratamento
20.
J Wildl Dis ; 52(1): 143-9, 2016 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26745835

RESUMO

Snake fungal disease (SFD) is an emerging disease of wildlife believed to be caused by Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola. Although geographic and host ranges have yet to be determined, this disease is characterized by crusty scales, superficial pustules, and subcutaneous nodules, with subsequent morbidity and mortality in some snake species. To confirm the presence of SFD and O. ophiodiicola in snakes of eastern Virginia, US, we clinically examined 30 free-ranging snakes on public lands from April to October 2014. Skin biopsy samples were collected from nine snakes that had gross lesions suggestive of SFD; seven of these biopsies were suitable for histologic interpretation, and eight were suitable for culture and PCR detection of O. ophiodiicola. Seven snakes had histologic features consistent with SFD and eight were positive for O. ophiodiicola by PCR or fungal culture.


Assuntos
Micoses/veterinária , Onygenales/isolamento & purificação , Serpentes , Animais , Feminino , Masculino , Micoses/microbiologia , Micoses/patologia , Onygenales/genética , Onygenales/patogenicidade , Pele/microbiologia , Pele/patologia , Virginia
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