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1.
Dermatol Online J ; 26(3)2020 Mar 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32609440

RESUMO

Efforts to increase patient comfort by minimizing pain and anxiety have been shown to improve clinical outcomes, reduce pain thresholds, decrease analgesic requirements and complication risk, strengthen the physician-patient relationship, and increase overall patient satisfaction. Patients also have a strong preference for patient-centered communication and educational discussion with physicians. In recent years, the increasing emphasis on patient experience scores as a metric for quality care has had significant implications for physician practice and has reinforced attempts to provide more patient-centered care. Though different pharmacologic agents and techniques have been extensively reviewed in the dermatologic literature, there have been few studies of non-pharmacologic strategies for improving patient-centered care. This evidence-based review describes alternative techniques that have been suggested for use in dermatologic surgery. Mechanoanesthesia, cold therapy, verbal and audiovisual distraction, music, optimal needle insertion methods, hypnosis and guided-imagery, perioperative communication, and educational strategies have been reported to improve the patient experience in dermatologic surgery. These interventions are often cost-effective and easy to implement, avoid medication side effects, and serve as adjunct approaches to enhance patient comfort. This review examines the corresponding evidence for these nonpharmacologic strategies to provide a clinical resource for the dermatologic surgeon seeking to optimize the patient experience.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/prevenção & controle , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Dermatológicos/psicologia , Humanos , Hipnose , Imagens, Psicoterapia , Terapias Mente-Corpo , Filmes Cinematográficos , Música , Dor/prevenção & controle , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto , Satisfação do Paciente
2.
J Music Ther ; 57(3): 251-281, 2020 Jul 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32602546

RESUMO

While literature exists supporting the use of music for health promotion, scholars have also noted the potential for music-induced harm and other maladaptive effects of music. Harm is a multifaceted construct that can include affective, behavioral, cognitive, identity, interpersonal, physical, and spiritual aspects. As music also represents a multifaceted experience, the relationship between music and harm is complex and can include numerous contextual-, deliverer-, music-, and recipient-based factors. Music-induced harm (MIH) also needs to be clearly defined to understand and protect against it. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to explore the numerous factors influencing how music can result in harm and develop a theoretical model that could be used to inform safe music practices. Drawing from existing models of emotional responses to music, music intervention reporting guidelines, therapeutic functions of music, and holistic wellness, we explored how the interplay between the deliverer, music, and recipient can result in various types of MIH in diverse contexts. We then developed the MIH model to integrate these factors and connect the model with the existing literature. The MIH model highlights the relevance of academic and clinical training, credentialing, occupational regulation, continuing education, and professional organizations that provide accredited curricular oversight to protect people from MIH. Implications for clinical application, limitations, and suggestions for future research are provided.


Assuntos
Musicoterapia/educação , Musicoterapia/métodos , Música , Credenciamento , Humanos , Modelos Teóricos
3.
Behav Brain Sci ; 43: e143, 2020 06 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32624050

RESUMO

Hierarchical structures are rapidly and flexibly built up in the domains of human language and music. These domains require a tree-building capacity - "dendrophilia" - to dynamically infer hierarchical structures from sensory input (or to hierarchically structure output), based on subunits stored in a lexicon. This dynamic process involves a crucial class of abstracta overlooked in the target article.


Assuntos
Música , Encéfalo , Cognição , Humanos , Idioma
4.
Acta Med Hist Adriat ; 18(1): 9-14, 2020 06.
Artigo em Servo-Croata (Latino) | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32638596

RESUMO

Searching for an answer whether medicine is a science or an art, especially in today's time when the emphasis is on the biotechnological aspects of treatment, the intention of this paper is to reflect on the outcomes of the encounter of medicine and art. Those that are recognised at least in the complementarity of the methodology, creating additional life values. By presenting authentic actions, this is a call for additional health improvement interventions, without allowing the biopsychosocial approach to human integrity to be forgotten. The inspiration for this view was the prestigious title of the European Capital of Culture that the Town of Rijeka was awarded for the year 2020. This city is also a kind of capital of health culture in many ways.


Assuntos
Distinções e Prêmios , Cultura , Medicina nas Artes , Croácia , História do Século XXI , Música
5.
J Orofac Orthop ; 81(4): 267-285, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32556368

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To systematically search the scientific literature concerning the influence of playing a wind instrument on tooth position and/or facial morphology. METHODS: The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched up to September 2019. Orthodontic journals were hand searched and grey literature was sought via Google Scholar. Observational studies and (randomized) controlled clinical trials that assessed tooth position and/or facial morphology by profile cephalograms, dental casts or clinical examination were included. The potential risk of bias was assessed. Data from wind instrument players and controls were extracted. Descriptive analysis and meta-analysis were performed. RESULTS: In total, 10 eligible studies with a cross-sectional (n = 7) or longitudinal design (n = 3) and an estimated low to serious risk of bias were included. Sample sizes ranged from 36 to 170 participants, varying from children to professional musicians. Descriptive analysis indicated that adults playing a single-reed instrument may have a larger overjet than controls. Playing a brass instrument might be associated with an increase in maxillary and mandibular intermolar width among children. Longitudinal data showed less increase in anterior facial height among brass and single-reed players between the age of 6 and 15. Children playing a wind instrument showed thicker lips than controls. Meta-analysis revealed that after a follow-up of 6 months to 3 years, children playing brass instruments had a significant reduction in overjet as compared to controls. The magnitude of the effect was of questionable clinical relevance and the generalizability was limited. CONCLUSIONS: Playing a wind instrument can influence tooth position and facial morphology in both children and adults. Aspects that stand out are overjet, arch width, facial divergence/convergence and lip thickness. However, evidence was sparse and the strength of the premise emerging from this review was graded to be "very low".


Assuntos
Música , Sobremordida , Dente , Adulto , Criança , Estudos Transversais , Face , Humanos
6.
PLoS One ; 15(5): e0232514, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32384088

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To investigate if, regardless of language background (tonal or non-tonal), musicians may show stronger CP than non-musicians; To examine if native speakers of English (English or non-tonal musicians henceforth) or Mandarin Chinese (Mandarin or tonal musicians henceforth) can better accommodate multiple functions of the same acoustic cue and if musicians' sensitivity to pitch of lexical tones comes at the cost of slower processing. METHOD: English and Mandarin Musicians and non-musicians performed a categorical identification and a discrimination task on rising and falling continua of fundamental frequency on two vowels with 9 duration values. RESULTS: Non-tonal musicians exhibited significantly stronger categorical perception of pitch contour than non-tonal non-musicians. However, tonal musicians did not consistently perceive the two types of pitch directions more categorically than tonal non-musicians. Both tonal and non-tonal musicians also benefited more from increasing stimulus duration in processing pitch changes than non-musicians and they generally require less time for pitch processing. Musicians were also more sensitive to intrinsic F0 in pitch perception and differences of pitch types. CONCLUSION: The effect of musical training strengthens categorical perception more consistently in non-tonal speakers than tonal speakers. Overall, musicians benefit more from increased stimulus duration, due perhaps to their greater sensitivity to temporal information, thus allowing them to be better at forming a more robust auditory representation and matching sounds to internalized memory templates. Musicians also attended more to acoustic details such as intrinsic F0 and pitch types in pitch processing, and yet, overall, their categorization of pitch was not compromised by traces of these acoustic details from their auditory short-term working memory. These findings may lead to a better understanding of pitch perception deficits in special populations, particularly among individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).


Assuntos
Idioma , Música/psicologia , Nível de Percepção Sonora/fisiologia , Estimulação Acústica , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Hong Kong , Humanos , Masculino , Nível de Discriminação Sonora/fisiologia , Acústica da Fala , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
7.
PLoS One ; 15(5): e0232711, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32365101

RESUMO

In music education, women are present in great numbers. In professional settings, however, women musicians are not as predominant. With some exceptions, such as Scandinavian countries, women still pursue gender equality in professional music practice. To inquire about the causes of this, we considered if gender-differences in amotivation in conservatoire instrument practice could be associated with aspects of learning environment. Self-determination theory (SDT) posits that learning environments may influence motivation, by satisfying or thwarting students' psychological needs and by selectively endorsing specific extrinsic goals. Thus, we analysed if-women and men-amotivation variations could be explained by differences in behavioural regulations and satisfaction of their psychological needs for competence and autonomy. Participants (67 women and 74 men, 18-47 years old) completed validated scales for amotivation, behavioural regulations, and needs satisfaction. Students exhibited high intrinsic and introjected regulations, and high autonomy and competence needs satisfaction. Students' identified regulation levels were modest, and external regulation and amotivation levels were low. Women students' perceived competence was lower, and their amotivation was higher than men's. Amotivation variations were explained positively by identified regulation and negatively by context-derived satisfaction of the psychological needs for competence (and autonomy, only among women). Results suggest that internalization of extrinsic goals can pose difficulties and that psychological needs satisfaction may counteract amotivation (autonomy being potentially more important for women musicians).


Assuntos
Objetivos , Motivação , Música/psicologia , Satisfação Pessoal , Caracteres Sexuais , Adolescente , Adulto , Comportamento , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Análise de Regressão , Fatores Sexuais , Estudantes/psicologia , Adulto Jovem
8.
J Appl Oral Sci ; 28: e20190601, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32401941

RESUMO

Objective The aim of this study was to compare the effects of music at 432 Hz, 440 Hz, and no music on the clinical perception of anxiety and salivary cortisol levels in patients undergoing tooth extraction. Methodology A parallel-group randomized clinical trial was conducted. Forty-two patients (average age: 23.8±7.8 years, 27 women) with a moderate level of anxiety were distributed in three groups: use of music for 15 minutes at a frequency of 432 Hz (n=15), at 440 Hz (n=15) and a control group without music (n=12). The CORAH Dental Anxiety Scale and salivary cortisol levels, estimated by the solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), were measured and compared before and after the music intervention between groups (two-way ANOVA-Tukey p<0.05, RStudio). Results Significantly lower anxiety level values were observed at 432 Hz (8.7±2.67) and 440 Hz (8.4±2.84) compared to the control group (17.2±4.60; p<0.05). The salivary cortisol level at 432 Hz (0.49±0.37 µg/dL) was significantly lower than 440 Hz (1.35±0.69 µg/dL) and the control group (1.59±0.7 µg/dL; p<0.05). Conclusion The use of music significantly decreased clinical anxiety levels, and the frequency of 432 Hz was effective in decreasing salivary cortisol levels before tooth extraction.


Assuntos
Ansiedade ao Tratamento Odontológico/terapia , Hidrocortisona/análise , Musicoterapia/métodos , Música/psicologia , Saliva/química , Extração Dentária/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Análise de Variância , Ansiedade ao Tratamento Odontológico/psicologia , Ensaio de Imunoadsorção Enzimática , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Estatísticas não Paramétricas , Estresse Psicológico , Inquéritos e Questionários , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
9.
PLoS One ; 15(4): e0231549, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32294119

RESUMO

Our study is the first to objectively assess sleep and sleep-related respiration in orchestra musicians. We hypothesized low sleep quality due to high work demands and irregular work-sleep schedules, and a better respiration for wind instrument (WI) players than string instrument (SI) players due to habitual upper airway muscles training. We recorded overnight polysomnography with 29 professional orchestra musicians (21 men, 14 WI/ 15 SI). The musicians presented a sleep efficiency of 88% (IQR 82-92%) with WI having a significant higher sleep efficiency than SI (89%, 85-93% vs. 85%, 74-89%; p = 0.029). The group had a total sleep time around 6 hours (377min, 340-421min) with signs of increased NREM 1 (light sleep) and decreased REM (dream sleep). The musicians displayed an apnea-hypopnea-index of 2.1events/hour (0.7-5.5) and an oxygen saturation of 98% (97-100%). While SI player exhibited declining sleep-related respiration with age (breathing events: r = 0.774, p = 0.001, oxygen: r = -0.647, p = 0.009), WI player showed improved respiration with age (breathing events: r = -0.548, p = 0.043; oxygen: r = 0.610, p = 0.020). Our study is the first objective investigation of sleep pattern and respiration during sleep with overnight polysomnography in professional orchestra musicians. While sleep and respiration were unexpectedly good, our results revealed possible signs of sleep deprivation and an interesting age-related pattern on respiration depending on instrument. While sample size was small and results modest, these findings present first objective evidence towards the assumption that habitual playing of a WI-and training of the upper airway muscles-may have a protective effect on respiration.


Assuntos
Música , Ocupações , Respiração , Sono , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Apneia/epidemiologia , Apneia/fisiopatologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polissonografia , Músculos Respiratórios , Sono/fisiologia
10.
J Music Ther ; 57(2): 127-167, 2020 May 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32249313

RESUMO

Music interventions have been introduced in a range of pain management contexts, yet considerable inconsistencies have been identified across evaluation studies. These inconsistencies have been attributed to a lack of clarity around the prospective cognitive mechanisms of action underlying such interventions. The current systematic scoping review was conducted to examine the theoretical rationales provided in the literature for introducing music listening interventions (MLIs) in pain contexts. 3 search terms (music, listening, and pain) were used in four electronic databases, and 75 articles were included for analysis. Content analysis was used to identify that more intensive listening schedules were associated with chronic and cancer pain compared with procedural pain. The degree to which patients had a choice over the music selection could be categorized into 1 of 5 levels. Thematic synthesis was then applied to develop 5 themes that describe the cognitive mechanisms involved in MLIs for pain. These mechanisms were brought together to build the Cognitive Vitality Model, which emphasizes the role of individual agency in mediating the beneficial effects of music listening through the processes of Meaning-Making, Enjoyment, and Musical Integration. Finally, content analysis was used to demonstrate that only a small proportion of studies were explicitly designed to examine the cognitive mechanisms underlying MLIs and we have suggested ways to improve future practice and empirical research. We call on researchers to design and evaluate MLIs in line with the Cognitive Vitality Model of music listening interventions for pain.


Assuntos
Cognição/fisiologia , Musicoterapia , Música/psicologia , Manejo da Dor/métodos , Percepção Auditiva , Emoções , Humanos , Dor
11.
J Music Ther ; 57(3): 282-314, 2020 Jul 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32227084

RESUMO

Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music emerged following discontinuation of psychedelic therapy research in the early 1970s, but psychedelic therapy research has since revived. Music remains a vital component. This study examined participants' experiences of music in psychedelic therapy research. A rapid review of qualitative and quantitative journal articles in four major databases was conducted in February to April, 2019, using the terms hallucinogens, psychedelic, "lysergic acid diethylamide," psilocybin, ayahuasca, music, and/or "music therapy." Of 406 articles retrieved, 10 were included (n = 180; 18-69 years old). Participants had varied backgrounds. Music was widely considered integral for meaningful emotional and imagery experiences and self-exploration during psychedelic therapy. Music transformed through its elicitation of anthropomorphic, transportive, synesthetic, and material sensations. Music could convey love, carry listeners to other realms, be something to "hold," inspire, and elicit a deep sense of embodied transformation. Therapeutic influence was especially evident in music's dichotomous elicitations: Music could simultaneously anchor and propel. Participant openness to music and provision of participant-centered music were associated with optimal immediate and longer-term outcomes. Many studies reported scarce details about the music used and incidental findings of music experienced. Further understanding of participants' idiosyncratic and shared responses to music during drug therapy phases will inform optimal development of flexible music protocols which enhance psychedelic therapy. Music therapists could be involved in the psychedelic therapy research renaissance through assisting with research to optimize music-based protocols used. If psychedelics become approved medicines, music therapists may be involved in offering psychedelic therapy as part of therapeutic teams.


Assuntos
Alucinógenos/administração & dosagem , Musicoterapia/métodos , Música/psicologia , Psilocibina/administração & dosagem , Psicoterapia/métodos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Percepção Auditiva/efeitos dos fármacos , Percepção Auditiva/fisiologia , Emoções/efeitos dos fármacos , Feminino , Humanos , Imagens, Psicoterapia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
12.
J Music Ther ; 57(3): 315-352, 2020 Jul 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32227108

RESUMO

Music therapy clinicians bring an important perspective to the design and conduct of clinically meaningful studies. Unfortunately, there continue to be roadblocks that hinder clinician involvement in research and the development of successful partnerships between academic researchers and practicing clinicians. To help grow clinician involvement, it is important that research teams share their experiences. As such, the purpose of this qualitative study was to share music therapists' perspectives about their experience of working as a research clinician on a large multisite randomized controlled trial. 10 board-certified music therapists provided written responses to 6 data-generating questions about: (a) reasons for participating, (b) perceived challenges and benefits, (c) experiences of quality assurance monitoring, (d) professional growth, (e) value of research, and (f) advice for clinicians considering research involvement. Using thematic content analysis, we identified primary themes and subthemes for each question (20 themes; 30 subthemes). Qualitative analysis revealed not only common challenges, such as reconciling clinical and research responsibilities, but also benefits, including continued professional growth, greater understanding of research processes, and research participation as a way to advocate and advance the profession. Finally, for clinicians interested in becoming involved in research, therapists noted the importance of having workplace support from a mentor, supervisor, and/or administrator; seeking out available resources; and knowing roles and responsibilities before initiating research involvement. Findings offer important insight and recommendations to support the involvement of clinicians in research and support further exploration of clinician involvement in dissemination efforts to improve translation and uptake of research into practice.


Assuntos
Musicoterapia , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Pesquisadores , Certificação , Feminino , Humanos , Mentores , Música , Pesquisa Qualitativa
15.
PLoS One ; 15(4): e0231054, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32240253

RESUMO

Flow is a positive and optimal state of mind, during which people are highly motivated and absorbed in the activity they are doing. It is an experience that can occur in any area of life. One of the measurement instruments which is most commonly used to evaluate this construct is the Flow State Scale-2 (FSS-2). This instrument has been used in different languages, mainly in the field of sport. In this research work, the FSS-2 has been translated into Spanish and administered to 486 musicians from different regions of Spain in order to examine the psychometric properties. A version which uses six dimensions from the original questionnaire has been used-those that constitute the experience of flow-and four alternative models have been analysed (Six related factors model, two second order factor models and a bifactor model).The results revealed that the dimension time could be controversial and more research could be needed. In general terms, the six-factor model (RMSEA = .04; GFI = .99; AGFI = .99) and a second-factor one (RMSEA = .033; GFI = .99; AGFI = .99) are solutions consistent with previous studies and show that the questionnaire can be considered a reliable (Alphas of the dimensions range from .81 to .94; Omegas from .86 to .97; and mean discrimination of the dimensions from .64 to .88) and useful tool, both in clinical and educational contexts, as well as an instrument for the evaluation of this construct in future research. However, the results of this study also suggest that flow can be explored in greater depth in musicians, taking into account that the writing of the original items was based on the experience of athletes and that the role of time in flow needs to be investigated.


Assuntos
Música , Psicometria , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto , Análise Fatorial , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Modelos Teóricos , Padrões de Referência , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Espanha
16.
PLoS One ; 15(3): e0229109, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32130244

RESUMO

Music and language have long been considered two distinct cognitive faculties governed by domain-specific cognitive and neural mechanisms. Recent work into the domain-specificity of pitch processing in both domains appears to suggest pitch processing to be governed by shared neural mechanisms. The current study aimed to explore the domain-specificity of pitch processing by simultaneously presenting pitch contours in speech and music to speakers of a tonal language, and measuring behavioral response and event-related potentials (ERPs). Native speakers of Mandarin were exposed to concurrent pitch contours in melody and speech. Contours in melody emulated those in speech were either congruent or incongruent with the pitch contour of the lexical tone (i.e., rising or falling). Component magnitudes of the N2b and N400 were used as indices of lexical processing. We found that the N2b was modulated by melodic pitch; incongruent item evoked significantly stronger amplitude. There was a trend of N400 to be modulated in the same way. Interestingly, these effects were present only on rising tones. Amplitude and time-course of the N2b and N400 may suggest an interference of melodic pitch contours with both early and late stages of phonological and semantic processing.


Assuntos
Idioma , Música/psicologia , Nível de Percepção Sonora/fisiologia , Semântica , Percepção da Fala/fisiologia , Fala/fisiologia , Estimulação Acústica , Adulto , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/psicologia , Percepção Auditiva/fisiologia , Eletroencefalografia , Potenciais Evocados , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Vias Neurais/fisiologia , Tempo de Reação , Adulto Jovem
17.
Brain Nerve ; 72(3): 227-238, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Japonês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32152256

RESUMO

Mokichi Saito (1882-1953) was born in Yagamata in 1882. After he graduated from junior high school, he was adopted by the Saito family. He started writing songs from the time he was in school. He eventually became a doctor, and soon after that, he published his first work, "Red Light." While studying in Europe, he wrote "The Brain Map in Progressive Dementia." After returning to Japan, he composed several songs. She was a best mother for her children. I have written his story because he had a peculiar character, even according to his wife.


Assuntos
Demência , Médicos , Europa (Continente) , História do Século XIX , História do Século XX , Humanos , Japão , Música , Redação
18.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 301(3): 693-698, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32125522

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Women's experience of pain during labor varies greatly, and pain control is a major concern for obstetricians. Several methods have been studied for pain management for women in labor, including drug and non-drug interventions. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that in nulliparous women with singleton pregnancies at term, listening to music would reduce the pain level during labor. METHODS: Parallel group non-blinded randomized clinical trial conducted at a single center in Italy. Nulliparous women in spontaneous labor with singleton pregnancies and vertex presentation admitted in labor and delivery room between 37 0/7 and 42 0/7 weeks of gestation for active phase of labor were eligible, and were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive music during labor or no music during labor. Music in labor was defined listening to music from the randomization until the delivery of the baby. The primary endpoint was the pain level during the active phase of labor, recorded using the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, ranging from 0 (no pain) to 10 (unbearable pain). The effect of music use during labor on each outcome was quantified as the mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS: During the study period, 30 women agree to take part in the study, underwent randomization, and were enrolled and followed up. 15 women were randomized in the music group, and 15 in the control group. No patients were lost to follow up for the primary outcome. Pain level during the active phase of labor was scored 8.8 ± 0.9 in the music group, and 9.8 ± 0.3 in the control group (MD - 1.00 point, 95% CI - 1.48 to - 0.52; P < 0.01). Music during labor and delivery was also associated with a decreased pain at 1 h postpartum (MD - 2.40 points, 95% CI - 4.30 to - 0.50), and decreased anxiety level during active phase of labor (MD - 19.90 points, 95% CI - 38.72 to - 1.08), second stage of labor (MD - 49.40 points, 95% CI - 69.44 to - 29.36), and at 1 h postpartum (MD - 27.00 points, 95% CI - 47.37 to - 6.63). CONCLUSION: In nulliparous women with singleton pregnancies at term, listening to music reduces the pain level, and the anxiety level during labor. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT03779386.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/terapia , Dor do Parto/terapia , Trabalho de Parto , Musicoterapia , Música , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Itália , Trabalho de Parto/psicologia , Manejo da Dor/métodos , Paridade , Período Pós-Parto , Gravidez , Resultado da Gravidez , Resultado do Tratamento , Escala Visual Analógica , Saúde da Mulher
19.
MMW Fortschr Med ; 162(Suppl 4): 3-8, 2020 03.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32189317

RESUMO

What is music and how does it affect the human body? Historically, music is considered something divine because it has a huge impact on human emotions. This effect also has a psychosomatic effect and can influence and control the thoughts and actions of the listener. For example, purchasing behavior can be severely manipulated by musical accompaniment alone. Even the motivation can be either increased or reduced with the appropriate setting. In today's civilization, music accompanies people every day and is used for many different purposes. Thus, the musical stimulation is to be evaluated as a kind of psychotherapy, which is often used purposefully, but subconsciously takes place in the influenced. Of course, as there are still unanswered questions about the exact effect of music on the brain, many studies are currently being conducted in the field of neuroscience to fully understand this phenomenon.


Assuntos
Emoções , Música , Encéfalo/fisiologia , Humanos
20.
J Music Ther ; 57(2): 193-218, 2020 May 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32201892

RESUMO

A variety of factors affect the success of music therapy students in practica. Many music therapy students may have invisible illnesses or invisible disabilities (II/ID) that affect their work. II/ID have physical or psychological effects but are not apparent to an observer. Such illnesses may include chronic illnesses, mental illnesses, and developmental disabilities. Although researchers have studied the success of post-secondary students with II/ID and the success of music therapy students without II/ID, there is a lack of research on music therapy students who identify with having II/ID. This researcher used an exploratory online survey to investigate the prevalence of II/ID among music therapy students and how it may affect their success in music therapy practica. Quantitative responses were compiled and analyzed into frequencies and percentages, and open-ended responses were coded and analyzed for patterns and themes. Results indicated that music therapy students with II/ID have various reasons for disclosure or nondisclosure. Some music therapy students with II/ID required accommodations, while many did not. Additionally, the effects of II/ID on music therapy practica students included physical, psychosocial, and cognitive symptoms, which led to various choices for disclosure/nondisclosure and the request/use of individualized accommodations. Music therapy students with II/ID self-reported that making decisions regarding appropriate disclosure and determining their need for accommodations or not allowed them to be more successful in practica.


Assuntos
Pessoas com Deficiência , Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Musicoterapia/educação , Musicoterapia/métodos , Estudantes/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Música , Inquéritos e Questionários
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