Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 382
Filtrar
1.
N Z Med J ; 133(1516): 7-9, 2020 06 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32525857
2.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 108(6): 1927, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31761267
3.
BMJ Health Care Inform ; 26(1)2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31676495

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Intensification of diabetes therapy with insulin is often delayed for people with suboptimal glycaemic control. This paper reports on the feasibility of using an innovative mobile health (mHealth) programme to assist a diabetes insulin dose adjustment (IDA) service. METHODS: Twenty adults with diabetes referred to a tertiary hospital IDA service were recruited. They were provided with a cloud-based mobile remote monitoring system-the mobile diabetes management system (MDMS). The credentialled diabetes educator (CDE) recorded the time taken to perform IDA utilising the MDMS versus the conventional method-which is a weekly adjustment of insulin doses by a CDE through telephone contact based on three or more daily blood glucose readings. Participants and staff completed a feedback questionnaire. RESULTS: The CDE spent 55% less time performing IDA using MDMS than using the conventional method. The participants were satisfied with MDMS use and the CDEs reported improved efficiency. CONCLUSION: Incorporating a mHealth programme for an IDA service has the potential to improve service delivery efficiencies while simultaneously improving the patient experience.


Assuntos
Automonitorização da Glicemia/métodos , Diabetes Mellitus/tratamento farmacológico , Hipoglicemiantes/administração & dosagem , Insulina/administração & dosagem , Smartphone , Telemedicina/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Educadores em Saúde/organização & administração , Educadores em Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Hipoglicemiantes/uso terapêutico , Insulina/uso terapêutico , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Satisfação do Paciente , Autocuidado , Centros de Atenção Terciária , Adulto Jovem
4.
Can J Diabetes ; 43(8): 613-620, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31669188

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Our aim in this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a home-based diabetes prevention program, delivered by interdisciplinary certified diabetes educators (CDEs), and customized for postpartum women with recent gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). METHODS: This pilot randomized trial recruited women with GDM from 24 to 40 weeks gestation from 4 centres, and trained 10 CDEs in behaviour coaching, physical activity (PA) and low glycemic index education. Women were randomized after 3 months postpartum to standard care (1 visit) or 1 of 3 24-week coaching interventions (1 visit and 12 telephone calls): i) PA and diet, ii) PA only or iii) diet only. Feasibility outcomes included recruitment, retention, adherence and satisfaction. RESULTS: Of 1,342 eligible patients, 392 were actively invited (29.3%) and 227 (16.9%) consented. Of these, 149 (65.6%) were randomized postpartum, of whom 131 (87.9%) started the program and 105 (70.5%) attended the final assessment. Intervention arm participants completed a median 75% (interquartile range, 50% to 92%) of telephone calls. Visit and call duration were a mean 71.4 (standard deviation, 13.8) and 18.1 (standard deviation, 6.5) minutes, respectively. Participants reported excellent/very good satisfaction 73% of the time, and 87% would recommend the program to others. CONCLUSIONS: A home-based diabetes prevention program customized for postpartum women with GDM can be feasibly delivered by CDEs, and it is associated with >70% retention, adherence and satisfaction.


Assuntos
Diabetes Gestacional/reabilitação , Exercício Físico , Educação em Saúde , Educadores em Saúde , Prevenção Secundária , Adulto , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Educadores em Saúde/educação , Implementação de Plano de Saúde , Humanos , Satisfação do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Projetos Piloto , Gravidez
5.
Diabetes Educ ; 45(6): 569-579, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31617467

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Increasing attention is being given to the challenges and emotional toll of managing diabetes. This Perspectives in Practice details the specialty's guiding documents for initial and ongoing support. It also defines various types of social support, including peer support, for optimal diabetes care. Focusing on peer support, this paper provides a review of the body of evidence demonstrating the value of peer support to improve clinical and behavioral outcomes. To achieve positive outcomes, it is optimal for people with diabetes to have access to ongoing support from their health care provider, including diabetes care and education specialists. They should also be made aware of, and given referral to options and opportunities for peer support. This Perspectives in Practice concludes with a call to action for diabetes care and education specialists to deliver to integrate and promote the value of peer support in the care they provide. CONCLUSION: Managing diabetes during the stages and ages of life is chronically challenging and complex. Various types of support offered by health care providers, including diabetes care and education specialists and others in the person's social support milieu, can positively affect emotional well-being. Health care providers should routinely assess their client's social supports and refer the person with diabetes and/or their caregivers to evidence-based types of peer support mutually determined to be of most value. Diabetes care and education specialists should increase their awareness of opportunities to integrate the value of and referral to peer support in their counseling and to gain greater insight into the diabetes-lived experience.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus/psicologia , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Grupo Associado , Autocuidado/psicologia , Apoio Social , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Educadores em Saúde/psicologia , Humanos , Papel Profissional/psicologia
6.
Health Promot Pract ; 20(6): 801-804, 2019 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31559887

RESUMO

This article is the author's first-person perspective of completing an Applied Practice Experience (APE) at an accredited public health program. Graduate-level public health students in the United States are mandated by the Council on Education for Public Health to complete this supervised field experience to apply knowledge and concepts to real-world public health practice. For his APE, the author worked with a faculty advisor and two community groups to facilitate and submit a community-based participatory research grant proposal. This article discusses the author's experiences before, during, and after the APE. The author outlines challenges and success of working on this applied project. The article concludes with implications for public health education specialists regarding experiential learning and applied practice experiences for graduate students.


Assuntos
Pessoal Técnico de Saúde/educação , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas/métodos , Saúde Pública/educação , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Educação de Pós-Graduação/métodos , Educadores em Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Faculdades de Saúde Pública/organização & administração , Percepção Social , Estudantes/psicologia , Estados Unidos
7.
J Relig Health ; 58(5): 1687-1697, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31414337

RESUMO

This study focused on a partnership with a mosque in Baltimore, MD, and its impact on the local Syrian refugee population through a peer-to-peer healthcare training program. We implemented the Lay Health Educator Program over a 6-week period in an effort to teach members of the mosque about healthcare-related topics that they could then disseminate to the Syrian refugee population that attends the mosque. Physicians and nurses instructed community members on health, healthcare resources, and healthcare information during 2-h long sessions once a week. A total of 18 community members took part in the program, and their participation highlighted that the most significant health issues for the Syrian refugees are "access to healthcare," "mental health," and insight into certain noncommunicable disease. Finally, the community program graduates implemented several health-related campaigns over 2 years in an effort to disseminate information taught to them. In doing so, they significantly impacted the ability of the refugees to assimilate to the US healthcare system.


Assuntos
Educação em Saúde/organização & administração , Educadores em Saúde , Promoção da Saúde/organização & administração , Grupo Associado , Refugiados , Adulto , Baltimore/epidemiologia , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Síria/etnologia
8.
Health Promot Pract ; 20(6): 818-823, 2019 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31465239

RESUMO

The interdependent relationship between health and education has long been documented by leading health and education scholars. Children who are not physically, mentally, socially, or emotionally healthy will not be ready to learn and thus hampered to achieve their full potential as productive members of society. Despite this evidence, the United States has yet to bridge the divide between the health and education systems. This perspective introduces three manuscripts in this Special School Health Education Collection on the future of school health education in the United States, and provides a context for the challenges and recommendations each article outlines to improve the quantity and quality of school health education for preK-12 youth. Although some of the challenges and recommendations are not novel, what is exciting is the opportunity to move the agenda forward given the Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child model and the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015. Aligning the forces of public health and school health educators is essential to make school health education a societal imperative.


Assuntos
Educação em Saúde/organização & administração , Educadores em Saúde/organização & administração , Promoção da Saúde/organização & administração , Serviços de Saúde Escolar/organização & administração , Adolescente , Criança , Bem-Estar da Criança/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Saúde Pública , Estados Unidos
9.
Diabetes Educ ; 45(5): 498-506, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31375055

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the effectiveness of Glucose to Goal (G2G), a diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) model for primary care (PC). METHODS: PC providers and staff were recruited from 5 PC practices participating in the 18-month intervention to participate in focus groups and interviews, which were used to gain insights about their perspectives on DSMES and how G2G was implemented across the intervention. Data were collected by qualitative researchers at baseline, midpoint, and study completion. RESULTS: At baseline, PC participants held a favorable view of DSMES and welcomed having a diabetes educator (DE) in their practice. Most participants suggested DEs would be helpful in meeting patients' nutrition needs but should give therapeutic advice only with a doctor's oversight. Participants anticipated that having a DE onsite would mitigate transportation, scheduling, communication, and cost barriers. Participant viewpoints about G2G remained unchanged from midpoint to study end, while barriers regarding location and transportation were perceived as being reduced by having a DE in the practice. Despite referral rates remaining low in some practices, many concerns stated at earlier timepoints appeared to have been attenuated by G2G components (eg, bringing the DE onsite, preidentifying patients, and DE ability to communicate and make diabetes management recommendations). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that G2G, providing DSMES in PC, appeared to be a welcome service where acceptance of and enthusiasm for the model grew over the course of the intervention.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus , Pessoal de Saúde/educação , Modelos Educacionais , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Atenção Primária à Saúde/métodos , Adulto , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Educadores em Saúde/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pesquisa Qualitativa
10.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 13(4): 2671-2682, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31405693

RESUMO

AIMS: Diabetes educators (DEs) play a major role in diabetes education and management. The aims of this scoping review were to compile the currently identified core competencies for DEs and, to review the currently used criteria to assess DEs' core competencies. METHODS: A scoping review was conducted using the methodology of the Joanna Briggs Institute. Five databases (Ovid, CINAHL, Scopus, Web of Science and PubMed) were searched. Keywords as well as inclusion and exclusion criteria were identified as search strategies and study selection for this review. RESULTS: A total of (n = 22) publications comprising sixteen peer-reviewed studies and six professional-organisations (grey literature) were selected for review, as they listed the core competencies of DEs. The most common core competencies were related to knowledge and skills in diabetes self-management education, knowledge of pathophysiology and epidemiology, teaching skills, clinical skills and cultural competency. Evidently, an appropriate tool for assessing DEs' competencies is currently unavailable. CONCLUSIONS: Given the importance of diabetes education in the care of people living with diabetes, it is imperative that DEs possess competencies in diabetes education and management. The review also identified the need to develop a globally applicable core competency assessment tool for DEs.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Educadores em Saúde/normas , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/organização & administração , Competência Profissional/normas , Autogestão/educação , Gerenciamento Clínico , Humanos
11.
BMC Cancer ; 19(1): 673, 2019 Jul 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31286871

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite numerous guidelines, nearly one of two patients with cancer pain remains undertreated, thereby affecting their quality of life. Active patient involvement through Therapeutic Patient Education (TPE) is considered as a relevant strategy to overcoming hurdles in pain management. The aim of the EFFADOL study is to assess the effectiveness of a TPE program in improving cancer pain management. METHODS/DESIGN: The EFFADOL study is a stepped-wedge randomised controlled trial. A total of 260 cancer patients with unbalanced background pain will be randomised over the institutional level, i.e. stepped-wedge cluster design. Six clusters will be formed, one at the regional level of "Basse-Normandie" for patients receiving the educational approach by health providers already trained to TPE. Then, five additional centers will be gradually included at the national level, making it possible to compare the "conventional" management of pain (before medical staff training to TPE) with the educational approach (after being trained). The main study parameter is pain interference on daily life assessed with the self-administrated and validated Brief Pain Inventory questionnaire. Secondary objectives comprised the evaluation of patients' adherence to pain education program, the description of pain intensity, pain relief, analgesic adherence and pain emotional impact. Educational dimension of the program will be evaluated through the patients' acquisition of knowledge and skills about their pain and treatment as well as their self-efficacy to participate actively in pain management. The patient's feeling of pain changes will be measured. Finally, the satisfaction of participants and educators will be reported. We hypothetise active involvement of patients in TPE will lead to an improved pain management compared to standard care. DISCUSSION: Analyzing the impact of a TPE program in cancer pain patients will improve their pain management and quality of life. We expect that the dissemination of our project educational approach through the French territory will be accompanied by long term change in clinical practices with mutual benefit to patients and caregiver-educators. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT03297723 , registered: 09/28/2017. Protocol version: Version n°1.1 dated from 2016/09/08.


Assuntos
Dor do Câncer/terapia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Manejo da Dor , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Participação do Paciente , Educadores em Saúde , Humanos , Satisfação do Paciente , Qualidade de Vida , Inquéritos e Questionários
12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31343131

RESUMO

Education dedicated to the health needs of pupils disabled because of chronic diseases in Poland remains an empty term, a chair without a backrest. In this article, suggestions of changes in the educational system are presented. These suggestions, thanks to support from interested therapeutic teams, have a chance to fulfil the educational gap in the area of chronic diseases and proceeding with disabled pu-pils at universal teaching institutions in Poland due to the introduction of health educators. A health educator is a person suffering from type 1 diabetes, educated during specialised postgraduate studies conducted at the Medical University of Lodz. The aim of this article is to show the importance of the health educator's role in the education process of children and youths disabled because of chronic diseases, at educational institutions of the Polish system of universal education.


Assuntos
Educadores em Saúde , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1 , Pessoas com Deficiência , Humanos , Polônia
13.
PLoS One ; 14(7): e0219746, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31306443

RESUMO

Intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD) are a safe and cost-effective contraceptive method for medically eligible women. Despite this, the utilisation rate for IUCDs is relatively low in many high-income countries, including Australia. Provision of education and training regarding IUCDs to healthcare providers, including nurses and midwives, is one approach to overcome some of the barriers that may prevent wider uptake of IUCDs. This study aims to explore the types and impact of IUCD insertion training for healthcare providers. A systematic review was undertaken in January 2017 to determine the effectiveness of IUCD training for healthcare providers in relation to provision of IUCDs to women. The databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, COCHRANE and SCOPUS were searched to identify studies from high-income countries relating to IUCD training for healthcare providers and relevant outcomes. A total of 30 studies were included in the review. IUCD training for healthcare providers contributed to increased knowledge and improved positive attitudes towards IUCDs, high rates of successful insertions, low complication rates, and increased provision of IUCDs. Successful insertions and low complication rates were similar across different healthcare provider types. No notable differences between provider types in terms of knowledge increase or insertion outcomes were observed. Different training programs for healthcare providers were found to be effective in improving knowledge and successful provision of IUCDs. Increasing the number of healthcare providers skilled in IUCD insertions in high-income countries, including nurses and midwives, will enhance access to this method of contraception and allow women greater contraceptive choice.


Assuntos
Anticoncepção/métodos , Anticoncepção/estatística & dados numéricos , Ginecologia/educação , Pessoal de Saúde/educação , Dispositivos Intrauterinos/efeitos adversos , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Competência Clínica , Anticoncepção/efeitos adversos , Países Desenvolvidos , Educação Médica Continuada/métodos , Educação Continuada em Enfermagem/métodos , Feminino , Educadores em Saúde/educação , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Internato e Residência
14.
PLoS One ; 14(6): e0218774, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31247036

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: People living with HIV (PLHIV) often face barriers in accessing quality and comprehensive HIV care, including stigma and discrimination, which results in poor retention and viral non-suppression. Peer-led interventions can help address these barriers. In Kenya, peer educators (PEs) are PLHIV who support other PLHIV to adhere to clinic schedules and antiretroviral medication uptake. In spite of their status as role models and their key role in supporting clients receiving HIV care and treatment, little is known about the characteristics and treatment outcomes of PEs themselves, specifically viral suppression. METHODS: This is a retrospective descriptive analysis of program data on treatment outcomes of PEs engaged in active patient support activities between October 2010 and January 2017. All eligible PEs from 140 health facilities located in 23 counties of Kenya were included in the study. Data from 230 PEs were abstracted from the electronic medical records, patient files, and registers between June and August 2017. Study variables included key sociodemographic characteristics (sex, marital status, and age), duration on antiretroviral therapy (ART), WHO clinical staging, baseline CD4 count, current antiretroviral regimen and uptake of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT). The outcome variable was viral suppression, defined as a viral load <1000 copies/ml. RESULTS: Overall, 173/230 (75%) of the PEs were female, 144/230 (63%) were married, and median age (LQ, UQ) was 38.5 (33.0, 42.0) years. The PEs had been on ART for a median (LQ, UQ) duration of 76.0 (37.0, 105.0) months. Six months IPT completion was high at 97%. Of the 222 (97%) PEs with an up-to-date viral load taken within the last one year, 211 (95%) were virally suppressed. CONCLUSION: Our study showed that peer educators actively engaged in patient support activities have achieved high viral suppression rates.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Educadores em Saúde , Grupo Associado , Adulto , Fármacos Anti-HIV/uso terapêutico , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/virologia , Educadores em Saúde/psicologia , Humanos , Quênia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Sistemas de Apoio Psicossocial , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estigma Social , Resultado do Tratamento
15.
Diabetes Educ ; 45(4): 333-348, 2019 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31232222

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The US health care system's focus on high-quality, efficient, and cost-effective care has led payers and provider groups to identify new models with a shift toward value-based care. This perspective on clinical practice describes the population health movement and the opportunities for diabetes educators beyond diabetes self-management education, as well as steps to engage in and drive new care models to demonstrate individual, organizational, and payer value. CONCLUSION: Diabetes educators have an opportunity to position themselves as diabetes specialists for diabetes management, education, and population health care delivery. With expertise that extends beyond diabetes self-management education and with a wide variety of skills, diabetes educators recognize that there is a range of personal, social, economic, and environmental factors that influence diabetes health outcomes. Diabetes educators should align with organizational strategic plans and support the population-level performance measures and quality initiatives, thus enhancing the value that diabetes educators bring to health care organizations.


Assuntos
Assistência à Saúde/tendências , Diabetes Mellitus , Educadores em Saúde , Saúde da População , Papel Profissional , Humanos
17.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 19(1): 357, 2019 Jun 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31170973

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Lifestyle interventions regularly rely on study staff to implement the intervention and collect outcomes data directly from study participants. This study describes the experiences of project staff in two randomized controlled trials of a postpartum lifestyle intervention to reduce risk factors for type 2 diabetes in Latinas. Latinas are the fastest growing minority group in the U.S. and have the highest rates of type 2 diabetes after a diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus. The challenges of implementing lifestyle interventions for postpartum women have been poorly documented. METHODS: A qualitative focus group was conducted with eight staff members (five health educators and three health interviewers) involved in Proyecto Mamá and Estudio Parto. The discussion was audio recorded, transcribed, and coded in NVivo. Focus group topics included: 1) participant recruitment, 2) participant retention, 3) implementation of the lifestyle intervention, 4) assessment of behavior change, 5) overall challenges and rewarding aspects of the trial, and 6) recommended changes for future trials. RESULTS: Key themes emerged regarding enabling factors and barriers to implementing a lifestyle intervention in postpartum Latinas. Enabling factors included: a) the staff's belief in the importance of the intervention, b) opportunities associated with the longitudinal nature of the trial, c) belief that the staff could empower participants to make behavior change, d) benefits of flexible intervention sessions, and e) connection with participants due to shared cultural backgrounds. Barriers included: a) participant stressors: home, food, and financial insecurity, b) low health literacy, c) issues related to recent immigration to the continental U.S., d) handling participant resistance to behavior change, e) involvement of family members in assessment visits, f) limitations of the assessment tools, and g) time limitations. CONCLUSIONS: Findings highlight the challenging contexts that many study participants face, and shed light on the potentially influential role of health educators and interviewers in intervention implementation and data collection. Specific recommendations are made for strategies to improve adherence to diabetes prevention programs in postpartum underserved and minority populations in this challenging, transitional period of life. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT01679210 . Registered 5 September 2012; NCT01868230 . Registered 4 June 2013.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/prevenção & controle , Diabetes Gestacional/epidemiologia , Hispano-Americanos , Cuidado Pós-Natal , Adulto , Estudos de Avaliação como Assunto , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Educadores em Saúde , Humanos , Cuidado Pós-Natal/métodos , Gravidez , Comportamento de Redução do Risco , Adulto Jovem
19.
South Med J ; 112(4): 205-209, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30943537

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary diabetes team model of care in assisting patients to achieve improved glucose control in a primary care rural setting. METHODS: A family medicine clinic at a rural university medical center developed an interdisciplinary diabetes team clinic composed of a certified diabetes educator/dietitian, a case manager, a pharmacist, nursing staff, a family medicine resident, a psychologist, and a board-certified family medicine attending physician. Patients were referred if their hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was ≥9% (75 mmol/mol); patients were seen for an initial consultation and for additional visits as needed. RESULTS: A total of 94 patients attended an initial visit and at least 1 follow-up within 6 months. Mean age was 57 ± 13 years, and 54% were female. Median time from the initial intensive diabetes clinic visit to a follow-up visit was 2.8 months. There was a significant reduction in median HbA1c percentage from 10.25% (88.5 mmol/mol) ± 1.4% (range 73-104 mmol/mol) at the initial intensive diabetes clinic visit to 8.7% (72 mmol/mol) ± 1.8% (range 52-92 mmol/mol) at a 1- to 6-month follow-up (z = -7.161, P < 0.001) and a significant difference between baseline HbA1c (10.25% [88.5 mmol/mol] ± 1.4% [range 73-104 mmol/mol]) and latest HBA1c (1-18 months later) 8.4% (68 mmol/mol) ± 2.2% (range 44-92 mmol/mol; z = -7.022, P < 0.001). Overall, 86% of patients had a lower HbA1c at follow-up, and 33% had an HbA1c <8% (64 mmol/mol). There were no differences in patients' blood pressure, immunization rates, or lipid values between baseline and follow-up visits (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: An interdisciplinary team approach to glycemic control can achieve significant reductions in HbA1c in the rural primary care setting.


Assuntos
Assistência à Saúde/métodos , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/terapia , Hemoglobina A Glicada/metabolismo , Hipoglicemiantes/uso terapêutico , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Adulto , Idoso , Automonitorização da Glicemia , Gerentes de Casos , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/metabolismo , Gerenciamento Clínico , Medicina de Família e Comunidade , Feminino , Educadores em Saúde , Humanos , Internato e Residência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Recursos Humanos de Enfermagem , Nutricionistas , Farmacêuticos , População Rural , Autogestão , Resultado do Tratamento
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA