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1.
U: the Caribbean health digest ; (13): 20-23, Apr. 2011. ilus
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-17536

RESUMO

From the bark, to the leaves, to the fruit and its seeds, the jamoon tree is another of nature's wonderful gifts. Jamoon is not just for enjoyment; it's good for your health. It's a very good source of Vitamin C, and the skin has antioxidant properties. Antioxidants help fight certain diseases and protect our bodies. Societies that practice herbal, traditional, or alternative medicine use the leaves and the seeds of the jamoon fruit because theses traditions believe that these assist in the control of some illnesses - for example, diabetes, digestive problems and high blood pressure, though there is no formal scientific confirmation of this.


Assuntos
Humanos , Antioxidantes , Frutas , Barbados , Trinidad e Tobago , Região do Caribe
2.
International journal of epidemiology ; 32(4): 516-517, Aug. 2003. graf
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-17615

RESUMO

Gulliford and colleagues report in this issue of the International Journal of Epidemiology on a study in Trinidad and Tobago that investigated whether household food insecurity was associated with obesity in this middle-income country. They found that food insecurity was associated with underweight but not with obesity. Food insecurity was also associated with decreased consumption of fruits and vegetables, a result previously reported in several studies, and with physical limitations, a result previously reported for elders in the US.


Assuntos
Adolescente , Adulto , Humanos , Feminino , Comportamento de Escolha , Dieta , Alimentos , Privação de Alimentos , Abastecimento de Alimentos , Frutas , Trinidad e Tobago , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Verduras
3.
West Indian med. j ; 49(1): 32-3, Mar. 2000. tab
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-1134

RESUMO

The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of the use of the fruit (papaya) or Carica papaya as topical ulcer dressings by registered nurses in the Spanish Town Hospital (STH), Kingston Public Hospital (KPH) and the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI), Jamaica. A ten-item pre-tested self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 285 randomly selected registered nurses at the UHWI, KPH and STH. There was a 72 percent response rate. The prevalence of topical papaya use among the respondents was 75 percent. Comments from the users of papaya suggested that topical application of the unripe fruit promoted desloughing, granulation and healing and reduced odour in chronic skin ulcers. It was cost effective. Papaya was considered to be more effective than other topical applications in the treatment of chronic ulcers. There was some difficulty in preparation of the fruit and occasionally a standardised procedure but there were no reports of wound infection from its use. Papaya is widely used by nurses as a form of dressing for chronic ulcers and there is need for standardisation of its preparation and application.(Au)


Assuntos
Humanos , Úlcera Cutânea/terapia , Frutas/uso terapêutico , Jamaica , Inquéritos e Questionários , Administração Tópica , Pesquisas sobre Serviços de Saúde , Distribuição Aleatória , Úlcera Cutânea/classificação
4.
West Indian med. j ; 49(1): 27-31, Mar. 2000. ilus, gra
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-1135

RESUMO

The experiments reported in this study constitute a preliminary investigation into the possible hypotensive effect of the Jamaican Cho-Cho (Sechium edule). Experiments were conducted in a random and blind fashion on two sub species of Sechium edule. Both the pulp and the peel were examined for hypotensive activity. Water-soluble extracts were prepared from these components of the fruit and injected into anaesthetised rats. Various cardiovascular parameters were measured including heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and several ECG intervals. We report that all extracts tested produced a fall in blood pressure with little change in ECG intervals. Extract B produced the least change in heart rate with a fall in MAP of approximately 23 mmHg. Changes in heart rate with all extracts appeared to be minimal as an ED25 value could only be determined for extract A, and ED10 values could not be evaluated for extracts C and D. The mechanism(s) by which these extracts produce their hypotensive effects could not be determined in these preliminary experiments. However, it appears not to involve direct effects on cardiac tissue. This conclusion is based on the finding that it took a minimum of 10 to 15 seconds for the hypotensive action to manifest post bolus. Future experiments will be aimed at delineating the mechanism(s) involved in decreasing MAP.(Au)


Assuntos
Ratos , 21003 , Anti-Hipertensivos/uso terapêutico , Hipertensão/dietoterapia , Frutas/uso terapêutico , /uso terapêutico , Algoritmos , Pressão Arterial/efeitos dos fármacos , Método Duplo-Cego , Frequência Cardíaca/efeitos dos fármacos
6.
West Indian med. j ; 46(1(Suppl.1)): 31, Feb. - Mar. 1997.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-2401

RESUMO

Few studies have investigated the role of fruit and vegetable consumption in the aetiology of NIDDM. This study was underaken to investigate the association between salad and fruit consumption and glucose intolerance. 1122 subjects aged 40-60 years in a population-based cross-sectional study underwent an oral glucose tolerance test between 1990 amd 1992. Diet was assesses using the "Health and Lifestyle Survey" food frequency questionnaire. The crude prevalence of underdiagnosed diabetes mellitus was 4.5 percent and IGT 16.8 percent. Abnormal glucose tolerance was positively associated with age, obesity, family history of diabetes, and socioeconomic groups. High consumption of salads in winter (OR = 0.29, 95 percent CI=0.09-0.95) and summer (OR=0.40, 95 percent CI=0.22-0.74) was inversely associated with the risk of having NIDDM. This association was maintained after adjustment for age, sex and family history. A non-significant inverse association between high comsumption of fruit and NIDDM (summer OR=0.55, 95 percent CI=0.29-1.06); winter OR=0.56 95 percent CI=0.31-1.01) was observed. Whether the association between high frequency of consumption of salads ad NIDDM represents a causal relationship or if salad comsumption is a marker of a "health lifestyle" remains to be elucidated. (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Diabetes Mellitus , Plantas , Frutas
7.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 89(9): 1577-8, Sept. 1994.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-7958

RESUMO

A 27 year old Jamaican male presented with a 2 month history of jaundice, pruritus, intermittent diarrhea, and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Over the next month, his abdominal pain and diarrhea improved, but his jaundice and pruritus worsened. He was afebrile and profound jaundice, with a benign abdominal examination. Medical workup included a normal abdominal ultrasound, iron studies, ceruloplasm, and serum electrophoresis. Negative viral (Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, mononucleosis, hepatitis A, B, C) studies, ANA, AMA, ASMA, RPR, were noted. He denied any alcohol, drug, or toxin exposure. Liver tests revealed total bilirubin of 25.6 mg/dl, direct bilirubin of 13.9 mg/dl, alkaline phosphate 278 IU/L, AST 45 IU/L, and ALT 71 IU/L. Liver biopsy demonstrated centrilobular zonal necrosis and cholestasis most consistent with a toxic reaction. The patient was again interviewed regarding potential toxins, and he admitted to the ingestion of ackee fruit, a native Jamaican fruit that is illegal in the United States. Shortly after he had ceased intake of the fruit, his symptoms resolved and his liver function tests returned to normal. We present a case of chronic ackee fruit ingestion that led to cholestatic jaundice, vomiting, and abdominal pain (AU)


Assuntos
Adulto , Humanos , Masculino , Frutas/envenenamento , Intoxicação por Plantas/complicações , Colestase/etiologia , Dor Abdominal/etiologia , Jamaica/etnologia , Vômito/etiologia , Intoxicação por Plantas/diagnóstico , Intoxicação por Plantas/epidemiologia
9.
Cajanus ; 26(3): 146-75, 1993. tab
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-8232
11.
Anon.
MMWR ; 41(4): 53-5, Jan. 31, 1991.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-15941

RESUMO

In January and February 1991, the health officer in the parish of St. Ann, Jamaica, received reports of eight persons with toxic hypoglycemic syndrome (THS), an illness associated with consumption of unripe ackee fruit and, possibly, renta yam; two cases were fatal. On July 25, the Jamaican Ministry of Health (JMH) contacted CDC for assistance in investigating the continued occurrence of THS: the collaborative JMH and CDC epidemiologic investigation focused on characterizing the epidemiology of THS in Jamaica and assessing the role of ackee fruit, renta yams, and other factors. (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Adolescente , Frutas/envenenamento , Hipoglicemia/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Alimentos/epidemiologia , Jamaica/epidemiologia , Síndrome
12.
West Indian med. j ; 37(1): 6-8, Mar. 1988.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-11731

RESUMO

The hypoglycemia seen in ackee poisoning almost certainly results from the presence of hypoglycin A in the aril. However, the mechanism underlying the vomiting and neurologic disorders have not been properly established. We have, in this review, re-established the latter and proposed that the vomiting and neurological features of ackee poisoning probably result from the excitotoxic properties of glutamic and aspartic acids derived directly and indirectly from ackee intake (AU)


Assuntos
21003 , Humanos , /envenenamento , Frutas/envenenamento , Hipoglicinas/envenenamento , Intoxicação por Plantas/etiologia , Vômito/envenenamento , Glutamatos/fisiologia
14.
West Indian med. j ; 29(2): 117-22, June 1980.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-11299

RESUMO

Bananas are known to have a high K+ content. The bioavailability of the K+ in bananas was compared with that in Slow-K tablets in 5 normal subjects. 24-hr urinary K+ excretion was assumed to be an index of K+ absorbed from the gatro-intestinal tract. The results indicate that the K+ in bananasis available, since 24-hr K+ excretion rose significantly during the period of banana consumption. The rise in K+ excretion while taking Slow-K was however, greater, the difference between the two being highly significant (p<0.01). The possible reasons for this difference are discussed. It is suggested that bananas may be a useful and safer alternative to Slow-K for K+ supplementation in patients in whom the extra calories are not contraindicated (AU)


Assuntos
Adulto , Humanos , Masculino , Frutas , Potássio/urina , Disponibilidade Biológica , Creatinina/urina , Preparações de Ação Retardada , Diuréticos/efeitos adversos , Deficiência de Potássio/induzido quimicamente , Deficiência de Potássio/terapia , Potássio/administração & dosagem , Potássio/metabolismo , Sódio/urina
15.
Kingston; ; 1980. xiii,99p. p. tab.
Tese em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-13798

RESUMO

The nutritional values of a traditional banana porridge and a new commercially produced porridge, Cerex, were compared in a feeding trial. The banana porridge contained banana flour, wheat flour, condensed milk and water. Cerex porridge was made from cerex (corn, rice, soya and fortified skimmed milk powders) made isocaloric to the banana porridge (100 Kcal/100g) with the addition of oil, sugar and water. The porridges were fed at libitum as the only source of nutrients to 8 children recovering from malnutrition for 10 days on each porridge in a cross over design. There were 5 girls and 3 boys, aged 6-16 months, all of whom were about 80 percent weight for height at the start of the study. Anthropometric measurements and the intakes of porridges were recorded. The protein and energy content of the porridges as fed were measured. The children gained weight at the same rate on both porridges: a rate comparable to that achieved on "high calorie milk" used as a routine for treating malnutrition in TMRU. The mean rate of weight gained on cerex porridge was 13.1 ñ 6.3 (SD) g/kg/d, for banana porridge 12.5 ñ 5.2 (SD) g/kg/d. This is 3 times as fast as a normal child of the same average weight and 13 times as fast as a normal child of the same average age. The mean food intakes of cerex (147 ñ 19 (SD) g/kg/d) and banana (156 ñ 16 (SD) g/kg/d) porridges were not significantly different nor was there a statistical difference in the mean energy intakes between cerex (159 Kcal/kg/d) and banana (161 Kcal/kg/d) porridges. Although cerex porridge provided more protein (5.39 > 3.73g/kg/d.p < 0.05), the protein in green banana porridge was more efficiently utilized for balanced weight gain as the energy cost of weight gain was the same on both porridges. At the projected retail price for cerex, that porridge provides more energy/dollar than green banana flour porridge based on the actual retail price of banana flour. However, the difference is outweighed by the advantage of utilizing a locally produced food, if the total cost from production at the farm, through cost to national budget, to cost to consumer is considered. The advantage of being able to grow the food in a backyard or small farm is considered for the rural population. We conclude that the traditional banana porridge should be acceptable and economically the use of indigenous foodstuff is desirable (Summary)


Assuntos
Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Feminino , Alimentos Infantis , Valor Nutritivo , Grão Comestível/análise , Nutrição do Lactente , Desmame , Frutas/análise , Desnutrição Proteico-Calórica/dietoterapia , Análise Custo-Benefício , Jamaica
19.
Kingston; s.n; Apr. 1976. iv,72 p. ills, tab.
Tese em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-13623

RESUMO

This study was undertaken with a view to providing an inexpensive, low-protein diet for dietary therapy in chronic renal failure, based on ingredients which are easily available in the West Indies. The menu included modifications of traditional and other recipes. Chemical analyses were conducted on the raw and cooked ingredients. The initial diet provided 24.4-26.7 g protein and 2691-2879 Keals/day and the final diet incorporating patients' suggestions provided 29.3-37.5 g protein and 2559-3135 Keals/day. Patient trials using 3 volunteer out-patients from the Renal Clinic of the University Hospital of the West Indies were conducted to assess the degree of adherence to the diet and its effectiveness. These patients were diagnosed as suffering from chronic renal failure. Adherence was assessed by using the 24-hour dietary recall method and by comparison of the volunteer's blood urea: creatinine ratios with reference ratios for uraemic patients established on low protein diets and on normal diets. Assessment of effectiveness was based on changes in their subjective symptoms and blood chemistry. Over the period studied, two of the patients adhered to the diet and showed improvement in uraemic symptomatology and blood chemistry. The third did not adhere closely to the diet and therefore her improvement could not be assessed. The very low protein diet achieved by omitting eggs and milk from Menu I was used in a study of the kinetics of urea metabolism and recycling. Five investigations have been carried out to date and these results will be reported elsewhere (Summary)


Assuntos
Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Idoso , Masculino , Feminino , Insuficiência Renal Crônica/dietoterapia , Jamaica , Proteínas na Dieta , Manihot , Plantago , Frutas , Planejamento de Cardápio , Ureia/sangue , Creatinina/sangue , Aceitação pelo Paciente de Cuidados de Saúde , Uremia
20.
Anon.
Cajanus ; 8(2): 102-3, Apr. 1975.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-11910

Assuntos
Humanos , Frutas , Plantas , China
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