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1.
[Georgetown]; Guyana. Ministry of Public Health; Feb. 2, 2018. xi, 51 p. ilus, maps, tab.
Não convencional em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: biblio-906525

RESUMO

Malaria is a major health problem in Guyana and this report charts the path for malaria control, prevention and elimination over the period 2015-2020. The National Malaria Strategic Plan 2015-2020 is committed to reducing the overall burden of malaria in Guyana by 50% in the affected areas. To achieve this goal, the document addresses the development of the national strategy; the role of stakeholders; a situational analysis; the response to malaria and related gaps and challenges; the guiding principles and strategic framework; monitoring and evaluation; the financial investments and gap analysis; and the implementation and management of the programme.


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Arbovirus/imunologia , Malária/prevenção & controle , Planejamento Estratégico , Guiana/epidemiologia
2.
Paramaribo; Suriname. Ministry of Health; 2018. 35 p. graf, tab, maps, ilus.
Não convencional em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: biblio-906622

RESUMO

Suriname was responsible for the highest concentration of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Americas prior to 2006. Since 2006 the country experienced a significant decrease in malaria incidence, reaching near elimination levels by 2009. The country is currently listed by the World Health Organization (WHO) among the countries with the potential to eliminate malaria by 2020. The 2017 Annual Report of the Ministry of Health Malaria Program of Suriname outlines the ongoing, nationally adopted strategies aimed at achieving the elimination of Malaria by the target date, especially in light of diminishing funding from international aid organizations


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Planos e Programas de Saúde/organização & administração , Malária , Controle de Vetores , Saúde Pública/estatística & dados numéricos
3.
[Belmopan]; Belize. Ministry of Health; [2018]. 4 p. tab.
Não convencional em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: biblio-909488

RESUMO

Operational plan of Belize's 2018-2019 National Vector Control Program. This shows the strategies used for improved health services and their outcomes in reducing vector borne diseases (Malaria, Dengue, Zika and Chikungunya).


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Vírus Chikungunya , Dengue/epidemiologia , Atenção à Saúde , Malária/epidemiologia , Zika virus , Belize/epidemiologia
4.
West Indian med. j ; 65(Supp. 3): [43], 2016.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-18124

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To analyse meteorological data (temperature, rainfall and relative humidity) and vector-borne diseases (malaria, dengue and leptospirosis) to determine trends that may exist between and among variables within the Georgetown area. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This study took on a retrospective approach which used data from the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Agriculture, Hydro-meteorological Department, to assess the true nature of the relationship between climate and vector-borne diseases (malaria, dengue and leptospirosis) within the Georgetown area. Correlation and regression analysis was done using SPSS version 13. RESULTS: The results yielded weak positive correlation between climate variables and vector-borne disease withstrongest correlation between P falciparum and Pmalariae. Leptospirosis showed positive correlation withhumidity and dengue showed positive correlation with all three climate variables measured. Projections showed that with a 1 increase in temperature, 1% increase in relative humidity and 50 mm increase in rainfall, there would be significant increases in malaria and leptospirosis. CONCLUSIONS: There have been theories that suggest a connection between climate variables and vector-borne disease but conclusive evidence does not exist. In this present study, the need for research that yields more unwavering results is highlighted. There is no doubt that climate variables influence vector-borne diseases. Therefore, it is recommended that an interdisciplinary approach be taken to ensure reliability and foster a better understanding between climate variables and vector-borne diseases.


Assuntos
Humanos , Malária/transmissão , Dengue/transmissão , Leptospirose/transmissão , Clima , Guiana
5.
In. Ministry of Public Health, Guyana; PAHO/WHO. Health @ 50 in Guyana: Progress health report 1966-2016. [Georgetown], Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization, 2016. p.39-43, ilus.
Não convencional em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: biblio-906584

RESUMO

The report traces the efforts of the National Malaria Eradication Programme to eliminate the disease from as early as 1959 and up to 2015. Statistics to support the reduction of malaria in the coastal and other regions include the cases of malaria in Guyana between 1991-2013; the correlation between malaria cases and the price of gold; and cases of malaria by age and ethnicity in 2014.


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Malária/prevenção & controle , Malária/transmissão , Guiana/epidemiologia
6.
Georgetown; Guyana. Ministry of Public Health;PAHO; June 2015. 55 p. ilus, tab.
Não convencional em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: biblio-906529

RESUMO

In response to the malaria challenge in Guyana, the Ministry of Public Health of Guyana outlines the best standardized treatment of malaria for the public and private sector by promoting the development of one strategy for early diagnosis and treatment for malaria patients. This is a review of the first version developed in 2004 which now includes updated content on further complicated treatment guidelines and malaria in pregnancy. The manual includes the epidemiological situation of malaria in Guyana up to 2014; the antimalarial treatment policy; and the timely diagnosis and adequate doses of the treatment for complicated and uncomplicated malaria cases


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Gravidez , Antimaláricos/administração & dosagem , Malária/prevenção & controle , Antimaláricos/normas , Guiana/epidemiologia , Gestantes
7.
Malar J ; 14(184): [1-11], 2015. maps, ilus, tab, graf
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: biblio-910961

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Campaigns for the continued reduction and eventual elimination of malaria may benefit from new and innovative vector control tools. One novel approach being considered uses a push-pull strategy, whereby spatial repellents are used in combination with outdoor baited traps. The desired effect is the behavioural manipulation of mosquito populations to elicit movement of vectors away from people and into traps. METHODS: Here, a prototype push-pull intervention was evaluated using an experimental hut methodology to test proof-of-principle for the strategy against two natural vector populations, Anopheles albimanus and Anopheles vestitipennis in Belize, Central America. A Latin square study design was used to compare mosquito entry into experimental huts and outdoor traps across four different experimental conditions: 1) control, with no interventions; 2) pull, utilizing only outdoor traps; 3) push, utilizing only an indoor spatial repellent; and 4) push-pull, utilizing both interventions simultaneously. RESULTS: For An. vestitipennis, the combined use of an indoor repellent and outdoor baited traps reduced average nightly mosquito hut entry by 39% (95% CI: [0.37 ­ 0.41]) as compared to control and simultaneously increased the nightly average densities of An. vestitipennis captured in outdoor baited traps by 48% (95% CI: [0.22 ­ 0.74]), compared to when no repellent was used. Against An. albimanus, the combined push-pull treatment similarly reduced hut entry, by 54% (95% CI: [0.40 ­ 0.68]) as compared to control; however, the presence of a repellent indoors did not affect overall outdoor trap catch densities for this species. Against both anopheline species, the combined intervention did not further reduce mosquito hut entry compared to the use of repellent alone. CONCLUSIONS: The prototype intervention evaluated here clearly demonstrated that push-pull strategies have potential to reduce human-vector interactions inside homes by reducing mosquito entry, and highlighted the possibility for the strategy to simultaneously decrease human-vector interactions outside of homes by increasing baited trap collections. However, the variation in effect on different vectors demonstrates the need to characterize the underlying behavioral ecology of target mosquitoes in order to drive local optimization of the intervention…(AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Experimentação Animal/estatística & dados numéricos , Malária/prevenção & controle , Controle de Mosquitos/métodos , Controle de Vetores , Belize/epidemiologia
8.
[Belmopan]; [Pan American Health Organization]; [2014]. 1-37 p. ilus, tab, chart, graf.
Não convencional em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: biblio-908822

RESUMO

The objectives of the presentation are to enable participants to identify: the vectors of malaria, dengue, chikungunya and chagas diseases; the signs and symptoms for malaria, dengue, chagas and chikungunya diseases; and the transmission cycle for malaria, dengue, chikungunya and chagas diseases.


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Culicidae , Meio Ambiente e Saúde Pública , Saúde Pública/educação , Controle de Vetores , Belize/epidemiologia , Doença de Chagas , Vírus Chikungunya , Dengue , Manual de Referência , Malária , Zika virus
9.
[Georgetown]; Guyana. Ministry of Health; [2013?]. 79 p. tab, ilus.
Não convencional em Inglês | LILACS, MedCarib | ID: biblio-906458

RESUMO

Use of malaria medicines is essential and critical in our response to the malaria situation in Guyana. It is part of the final link between patients and health services. Availability of malaria medicines and diagnostic supplies can only be realized by improving the opportunity to manage these commodities in an efficient manner. For these reasons, this manual will address all aspects of the pharmaceutical management cycle. The manual provides basic information for the successful operation of the supply chain for Malaria Medicines and Supplies. The intention is to use this manual for training and orientation of health workers in best practices of the drug management cycle, in pursuit of securing performance improvements to the malaria program.


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Lactente , Pré-Escolar , Criança , Adolescente , Adulto , Adulto Jovem , Antimaláricos/provisão & distribução , Instalações de Saúde/normas , Reagentes de Laboratório/provisão & distribução , Malária/prevenção & controle , Administração Farmacêutica/normas , Malária/diagnóstico , Malária/terapia , Controle de Vetores
10.
Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association ; 29(4): [175-183], 2013. ilus, graf, tab
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: biblio-910888

RESUMO

To achieve maximum success from any vector control intervention, it is critical to identify the most efficacious tools available. The principal aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of 2 commercially available adult mosquito traps for capturing Anopheles albimanus and An. vestitipennis, 2 important malaria vectors in northern Belize, Central America. Additionally, the impact of outdoor baited traps on mosquito entry into experimental huts was assessed. When operated outside of human-occupied experimental huts, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) miniature light trap, baited with human foot odors, captured significantly greater numbers of female An. albimanus per night (5.1 6 1.9) than the Biogents SentinelTM trap baited with BG-LureTM (1.0 6 0.2). The 2 trap types captured equivalent numbers of female An. vestitipennis per night, 134.3 6 45.6 in the CDC trap and 129.6 6 25.4 in the Sentinel trap. When compared to a matched control hut using no intervention, the use of baited CDC light traps outside an experimental hut did not impact the entry of An. vestitipennis into window interception traps, 17.1 6 1.3 females per hour in experimental huts vs. 17.2 6 1.4 females per hour in control huts. However, the use of outdoor baited CDC traps did significantly decrease the entry of An. albimanus into window interception traps from 3.5 6 0.5 females per hour to 1.9 6 0.2 females per hour. These results support existing knowledge that the underlying ecological and behavioral tendencies of different Anopheles species can influence trap efficacy. Furthermore, these findings will be used to guide trap selection for future push­ pull experiments to be conducted at the study site...(AU)


Assuntos
Animais , Malária/epidemiologia , Controle de Mosquitos/instrumentação , Belize/epidemiologia
11.
Georgetown; Guyana. Ministry of Health; 2008. 1-90 p. ilus, maps, tab.
Não convencional em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: biblio-906459

RESUMO

The Basic Malaria Microscopy Manuals, Manual of Standard Operating Procedures for Malaria Microscopic Diagnosis and Training Manual Tutor's Guide, for conducting microscopic diagnosis of malaria in Guyana was developed jointly by the Ministry of Health and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) through the RAVREDA-AMI Project. These Manuals are necessary to ensure all partners involved in the multitask holder approach to the control of malaria in Guyana follow the principles of best practices globally tailored to suit the local epidemiologic, social and clinical aspects of malaria control in the country.


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Controle/métodos , Diagnóstico , Malária , Manuais como Assunto/normas , Guiana/epidemiologia
12.
Tropical medicine & international health ; 8(2): 140-3, Feb.2003. tab
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-16853

RESUMO

Lymphatic filariasis and malaria are endemic in Guyana, South America. To determine the prevalence of concomitant infections, we conducted a 1-year survey of febrile patients attending the malaria (day) and filariasis (night) clinics in Georgetown. In all, 1278 thick blood smears were collected; 769 for filariasis, of which 103 were positive for Wucheria bancrofti, and three for both W. bancrofti and malaria parasites; and 509 for malaria, 21 of which tested positive for malaria and 17 for both malaria and filariasis. The age groups and sex of the infected persons with malaria and W. bancrofti are descibed. These results suggest that the incidence of concomitant infections in Guyana may be quite low but efforts should be made to reduce the disease burden in Georgetown, Guyana (AU)


Assuntos
Gatos , Cães , Humanos , Malária/prevenção & controle , Malária/epidemiologia , Malária/parasitologia , Plasmodium malariae/parasitologia , Malária Vivax/parasitologia , Malária Falciparum/parasitologia , Guiana , Sintomas Concomitantes , Infecções , Prevalência , Filariose/parasitologia , Filariose/transmissão , Filariose/diagnóstico
13.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 65(4): 318-24, Oct. 2001. maps, tab
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-50

RESUMO

Hepaptits is common in the Stann Creek District of Southern Belize to determine the etiologies, incidence and potential risk factors for acute jaundice, we conducted active surveillance for cases. Cases of jaundice diagnosed by a physician within the previous 6 weeks were enrolled. Evaluation included a questionnaire and laboratory tests for Hepatitis A, B. C, D, and E, a blood film for malaria, and a serologic test for syphilis. Etiologies of jaundice among 62 evaluable patients included acute hepatitis A, 6 (9.7 percent), acute hepatitis B, 49 (79.0 percent) hepatitis non-A-E, 2 (3.2 percent), and malaria, 5 (8.1 percent). There were no cases of acute hepatitis E. One patient each with antibody to hepatitis C and D were detected. The annualized incidence of hepatitis A was 0.26 per 1000. All cases of hepatitis A were in children 4-16 years of age. The annualized incidence of hepatitis B, 2.17 per 1000, was highest in adults aged 15-44 years (4.4 per 1000) and was higher in men (36 cases; 3.09 per 1000) than women (13 cases; 1.19 per 1000). Four (31 percent) of the women with hepatitis B were pregnant. The annualized incidence was significantly higher in Mestizo (6.18 per 10000 and Maya (6.79 per 1000) than Garifuna (0.38 per 1000) or Creole (0.36 per 1000). Persons with Hepatitis B were significantly more likely to be born outside of Belize (82 percent), had been in Belize < 5 years (73 percent), and lived and worked in rural areas (96 percent) than was the general population. Of those o 14 years of age with Hepatitis B, only 36 percent were married. Few persons admitted to transfusions, tattoos, IV drug use, multiple sexual partners, visiting prostitutes, or sexually transmitted diseases. Only 1 of 49 had a reactive test for syphilis. Six patients were hospitalized (including 3 with acute hepatitis B and one with Hepatitis A), and none to our knowledge died. Acute hepatitis B is the most common cause of viral hepatitis in the Stann Creek District, but the modes of transmission remain obscure. Infants, women attending prenatal clinics, and new workers are potential targets for immunization with Hepatitis B vaccine. (AU)


Assuntos
Adulto , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Gravidez , Adolescente , Hepatite/epidemiologia , Icterícia/diagnóstico , Belize/epidemiologia , Hepatite/etiologia , Hepatite/imunologia , Hepatite B/epidemiologia , Hepatite B/imunologia , Hepatite B/prevenção & controle , Vacinas contra Hepatite B , Icterícia/etiologia , Malária/complicações , Malária/epidemiologia , Doença Aguda , Vigilância da População , Testes Sorológicos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Transmissão de Doença Infecciosa/prevenção & controle
15.
The New England journal of medicine ; 342(25): 1924-1924, June 2000.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-17384

RESUMO

Malaria often presents as an acute febrile illness with fever, headache, rigors, anemia, and splenomegaly. The only malaria parasite associated with cerebral complications, Plasmodium falciparum usually blocks cerebral capillaries because of its endothelial adhesiveness. Infections with P. marlariae can persist for decades and are associated with splenomegaly and the nephrotic syndrome but not with cerebral complications. We describe P. malariae infection that was reactivated after neurosurgery after decades of latency. Infections with P. malariae may be asymptomatic and can be reactivated decades after the initial infection. The epidemiologic significance of asymptomatic cases of P. malariae infection has been well documented during outbreaks in Trinidad and Tobago and Grenada. Most of the symptomatic cases were detected by microscopial analysis, whereas the asymptomatic cases were diagnosed with the use of immunofluorescence antibody assays. Subclinical infections in humans may serve as the source of the protozoa in mosquitoes. Consequently, it is recommended that a sensitive technique that is based on the polymerase chain reaction be used to screen persons for persistent malaria infections, especially those who live in regions where the disease was once common but has since been eradicated


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Malária/diagnóstico , Malária/cirurgia , Região do Caribe , Trinidad e Tobago
16.
Caribbean Health ; 3(1): 22-25, April 2000. maps, tab, gra
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-17343

RESUMO

Despite the successful elimination of malaria from the Caribbean islands (except Hispaniola) by 1958-61, vector- borne diseases (VBDs) continue to challenge the health and wellbeing of Caribbean people. In addition during the last few years, we have witnessed the emergence or re-emergence of certain VBDs, which have a lasting impact on our health and also on our economies given the tourism-dependent nature of the Caribbean. Virtually all Caribbean countries have been affected by one or more of these emergent diseases in the past year, be it dengue/dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), malaria, Chagas' disease, cutaneous leishmaniasis, lymphatic filariasis, Venezuelan and Eastern equine encephalitis (VEE & EEE), the threat of yellow fever, or infection by other viruses (such as Mayaro) which may go undiagnosed. Dengue and malaria are of particular concern (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Vetores de Doenças , Dengue , Aedes , Malária , Gerenciamento Clínico , Região do Caribe
17.
18.
West Indian med. j ; 49(Supp 2): 31, Apr. 2000.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-967

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of concomitant malaria and bancroftian filariasis among febrile patients in Georgetown, Guyana, South America. METHODOLOGY: From January to December 1997, all patients visiting the Georgetown Malaria and Filariasis Clinics were enrolled in the study. At the Filariasis Clinic, nocturnal thick blood smears prepared from blood taken between 8:00 pm and 12:00 midnight were dried and stored overnight. At the Malaria Clinic, thick blood smears were taken during the period 8:30 am to 4:00 pm, representing the diurnal study. All slides were stained using the standard Giemsa protocol and microscopically examined for the presence of filariasis and malaria. RESULTS: Of 1,267 persons, 83 percent were of African descent, 10 percent were of East Indian descent, and 7 percent were mixed or of other ethnic origins. Sixty-one per cent (769/1267) of smears were prepared from nocturnal blood samples whereas 509/1267 (40 percent) were diurnal samples from the Malaria Clinic. One hundred and three of 769 nocturnal blood smears were positive for only W bancrofti and 3 smears contained mixed infections, W bancrofti and malaria parasites. Only 21/509 diurnal blood smears had malaria parasites while 17 persons had both malaria and microfilaria parasites. CONCLUSION: The 20 cases of concomitant infection of malaria and bancroftian filariasis in this study may represent the first report of the occurrence of this phenomenon in Guyana.(AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Malária/epidemiologia , Filariose/epidemiologia , Febre/sangue , Ritmo Circadiano , Guiana/epidemiologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles
19.
West Indian med. j ; 49(Supp 2): 31, Apr. 2000.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-968

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the completeness of reporting malaria cases by the Insect Vector Control Division (IVCD), hospitals and commercial laboratories (HCL) in Trinidad during 1989-1998. METHOD: Cases of malaria identified by HCLs were compared with those identified through the IVCD laboratory-based active case detection surveillance system. Since IVCD is the reference laboratory for malaria diagnosis, the data were analyzed for north and south Trinidad. The completeness of reporting malaria cases was calculated using the Lincoln-Peterson capture-recapture technique. RESULTS: Of the 118 cases of malaria identified through the IVCD and HCLs in Trinidad, 23 (67 percent) came from north Trinidad and 24 (100 percent) from south Trinidad. IVCD identified 117 cases (>99 percent). Completeness of reporting, calculating using the Lincoln-Peterson capture-recapture technique was 99.2 percent for IVCD laboratory-based case detection programme. CONCLUSION: The high percentage of cases identified by IVCD suggests that the Malaria Surveillance programme provides trends that accurately reflect the epidemiology of malaria in Trinidad and Tobago. Cases identified may be improved by promoting confirmatory testing for all laboratories, clinicians' updates and incorporating laboratory-based reporting into the wider surveillance system.(AU)


Assuntos
Malária/epidemiologia , Monitoramento Epidemiológico , Trinidad e Tobago/epidemiologia , Coleta de Dados
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