Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 24
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Filtros aplicados
Base de dados
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
In. The University of the West Indies, Faculty of Medical Sciences. Faculty of Medical Sciences, Research Day. St. Augustine, Caribbean Medical Journal, March 21, 2019. .
Não convencional em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: biblio-1023383

RESUMO

Objective: To investigate the accuracy of Immersion A-Scan Biometry by comparing the relationship between the predicted refractive status from the biometric data with the achieved refractive status determined from objective/subjective refraction. Design and Methodology: Sixty patients were recruited from the Trinidad Eye Hospital (TEH) who was scheduled to undergo cataract surgery. The method of ocular biometry measurement used in this study was Immersion A-scan Biometry using the Aviso: The Ultrasound Platform. The biometric data was then recorded along with the expected refractive status based on the SRK-T formula used to calculate the power of the intra-occular lens (IOL) to be implanted. Results: Out of the 60 patients used, phacoemulsification surgery was performed on 33 right eyes and 27 left eyes. The goal of emmetropia after surgery was achieved in 32 patients among the 60 patients. The 28 patients that were unable to achieve emmetropia brought awareness to the assumptions of errors within the biometric data. The visual acuity was improved significantly in all patients after the phacoemulsification surgery. Conclusion: The study confirmed that there is no significant difference between the refractive status predicted from Immersion A-scan biometry with the refractive status achieved post cataract surgery.


Assuntos
Humanos , Biometria , Trinidad e Tobago , Catarata
2.
In. The University of the West Indies, Faculty of Medical Sciences. Faculty of Medical Sciences, Research Day. St. Augustine, Caribbean Medical Journal, March 21, 2019. .
Não convencional em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: biblio-1023497

RESUMO

Objective: To study the trends in the burden of cataract in SIDS in the Caribbean using disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). Design and Methodology: National and regional age and sex specific cataract DALY numbers, crude DALY rates, and agestandardised DALY rates from 1990 to 2016 for the SIDS in the Caribbean, were extracted from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016. The human development index, healthcare access and quality (HAQ) index, and the World Bank's classification of economies were used as indicators of socioeconomic status. The Gini coefficient, Atkinson, Theil and concentration indices were used to measure health inequality. Paired Wilcoxon signed rank test, Pearson correlation, and linear regression analyses were performed to evaluate the sociodemographic and socioeconomic factors associated with differences in cataract burden. Results: Men had higher age-standardised DALY rates than women (P < 0.001) with median rates of 90.72 (Interquartile range [IQR], 87.8-94.2) and 83.94 (IQR, 80.9-86.5), respectively. The burden of cataract increased with age. Upper-middle income countries had higher age-standardised DALY rates than high income countries (P < 0.001), with median rates of 90.1 (IQR, 86.8 ­ 93.4) and 79.8 (IQR, 77.5 ­ 81.8), respectively. Age-standardised DALY rates were inversely correlated with both HDI (r = -0.61, ) and HAQ ( ). Between-country inequality was negligible and the burden of cataract is greater among the poor. Conclusions: This study confirmed the trends seen at the global level, except for the finding of men having a higher cataract burden than women in SIDS in the Caribbean. This is an area for further research.


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Catarata/economia , Região do Caribe
3.
In. The University of the West Indies, Faculty of Medical Sciences. Faculty of Medical Sciences, Research Day. St. Augustine, Caribbean Medical Journal, March 21, 2019. .
Não convencional em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: biblio-1023809

RESUMO

Objective: To evaluate optical vs immersion ultrasound biometry to measure ocular axial length (the distance between the anterior surface of the cornea and the fovea). Design and Methodology: The axial length of the eye is usually measured by A-scan ultrasonography or optical coherence biometry. Optical biometry is the gold standard, but cannot be used for patients with dense cataracts, when immersion ultrasound biometry is utilized. Both optical and immersion ultrasound biometry were performed on patients scheduled to undergo cataract surgery between November 2017 and November 2018. Statistical difference was determined using a two tailed t-test. Results: There was no statistical difference between mean axial length measured using optical biometry (23.83 mm ± 1.34) vs immersion ultrasound biometry (23.80 mm ± 1.30); t(46)= -0.05, p=0.96. Conclusion: Accurate axial length measurement is essential for reliable intraocular lens power calculation, minimizing refractive error following cataract surgery. The cost of optical coherence biometry equipment is prohibitive and this technology is not readily available in the public hospital eye clinics. There was no statistical difference in axial length measured using optical biometry and immersion ultrasound. This suggests that in low resource settings, immersion biometry can be utilized without compromising surgical outcome.


Assuntos
Humanos , Catarata , Trinidad e Tobago , Comprimento Axial do Olho , Imagem Óptica
4.
West Indian med. j ; 49(suppl. 3): 14, July 2000.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-688

RESUMO

Cataract surgery, especially by phacoemulsification, can be very difficult if the cataract has weak zonular attachments as seen in patients following trauma in Marfan's, Ehlers-Danlos and Weill-Marchesani syndromes. Failure to recognise this weakness in the zonules can lead to the disastrous drop nucleus which may ultimately lead to aggressive vitreous reaction and eventual blindness. The placement of a capsular tension ring in such patients will allow for better stability of the cataract during surgery, hence minimizing intraoperative complications and ease in intraocular lens insertion. The technique for placement and complications will be discussed.(AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Catarata , Facoemulsificação
5.
West Indian med. j ; 49(Suppl 2): 45, Apr. 2000.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-936

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Age related cataract is the major cause of visual impairment globally, and is more prevalent in black than white populations. Several studies have shown associations between cataract and mortality, and this report aimed to examine whether lens opacities were associated with mortality in an Afro-Caribbean population. DESIGN AND METHODS: The Barbados Incidence Study of Eye Disease (BISED) re-examined the Barbados Eye Study (BES) cohort, which was based on a simple random sample of Barbadian-born citizens, age 40 to 84 years. Eighty-five percent of those eligible (3,427 participants) has a 4-year follow-up visit. Both visits included an interview, anthropometric measurements, and a detailed ophthalmologic examination, including lens grading with the LOCS II method. Mortality was verified from records held at the Ministry of Health. RESULTS: Cardiovascular disease was the principal cause of death (3.7 percent), followed by malignant neoplasms (1.4 percent). Cumulative 4-year mortality increased from 3.1 percent among those without cataract to 6.0 percent, 8.9 percent and 19.6 percent for cortical-only, nuclear-only and mixed cataract, respectively. An independent association was demonstrated between mixed opacities and 4-year mortality (death rate ratio: 1.6). Co-existing diabetes acted as an effect modifier, increasing mortality in those with mixed lens opacities. The presence of any nuclear cataract (death rate ratio 1.5) was also associated with an increase risk of death. CONCLUSION: This study is the first to confirm an association between cataract and mortality in a population of African descent.(AU)


Assuntos
Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Idoso , Humanos , Adulto , Catarata/mortalidade , Pessoas com Deficiência Visual , /genética , Barbados , Amostragem Aleatória e Sistemática , Doenças Cardiovasculares/mortalidade
6.
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci ; 40(10): 2179-84, Sept. 1999.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-1357

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To describe the prevalence of refractive errors in a black adult population. METHODS: The Barbados Eye Study, a population-based study, included 4709 Barbados-born citizens, or 84 percent of a random sample, 40 to 84 years of age. Myopia and Hyperopia were defined as a spherical equivalent <-0.5 diopters and >+0.5 diopters, respectively, based on automated refraction. Analyses included 4036 black participants without history of cataract surgery. Associations with myopia and hyperopia were evaluated in logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: The prevalence of myopia was 21.9 percent and was higher in men (25.0 percent) than in women (19.5 percent). The prevalence of hyperopia was 46.9 percent and was higher in women (51.8 percent) than in men (40.5 percent). The prevalence of myopia decreased from 17 percent in persons 40 to 49 years of age to 11 percent in those 50 to 59 years of age, but increased after 60 years of age. The prevalence of hyperopia increased from 29 percent at 40 to 49 years of age to 65 percent at 50 to 59 years of age, and tended to decline thereafter. A higher prevalence of myopia was positively associated (P < 0.05) with lifetime occupations requiring nearwork, nuclear opacities, posterior subcapsular opacities, glaucoma, and ocular hypertension. Factors associated with hyperopia were the same as for myopia, except for occupation, and in the opposite direction. CONCLUSION: High prevalences of myopia and hyperopia were found in this large black adult population. The prevalence of myopia (hyperopia) increased (decreased) after 60 years of age, which is inconsistent with data from other studies. The high prevalence of age-related cataract, glaucoma, and other eye conditions in the Barbados Eye Study population may contribute to the findings.(AU)


Assuntos
Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Hiperopia/etnologia , Miopia/etnologia , Distribuição por Idade , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Barbados/epidemiologia , Catarata/epidemiologia , Glaucoma/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Distribuição Aleatória , Fatores de Risco , Distribuição por Sexo
7.
West Indian med. j ; 48(2): 73-80, Jun. 1999. tab
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-1517

RESUMO

The health status and the prevalence of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, glaucoma and visual disorders of 123 elderly people (56 men, 67 women) in the Marigot Health District, Dominica, were assessed by means of four questionnaires: collection of data from their medical records; physical examination, measurement of blood pressure, visual acuity and intra-ocular pressure (IOP); and testing for glucosuria. The overall health status was good, but 20 percent were dependent on care. 74 percent were independent in the activities in daily life, with only moderate limitations in activities. The health status decreased considerably in those over 75 years of age. There were slight perceived differences in health status between men and women. About 40 percent of the study population were known to be hypertensive, and another 13 percent had an elevated blood pressure on examination. Diabetes mellitus was present in 15 percent. 20 percent had a visual acuity of 0.1 or below, and 10 percent had an elevated IOP. During the study, a considerable number of new cases of hypertension, diabetes mellitus and elevated IOP were diagnosed. 50 percent of the study population who were on medication used this more than as prescribed. This study indicates a high prevalence of the secondary complications of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cataract, glaucoma and osteo-arthritis that cause disability and dependency in the elderly population. Education, diagnosis at an early stage and appropriate treatment of these disorders may prevent or delay their development. We suggest the development of a programme oriented approach of primary health care for the elderly to support this.(AU)


Assuntos
Idoso , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , Nível de Saúde , Fatores Etários , Atividades Cotidianas , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Pressão Arterial , Catarata/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia , Dominica/epidemiologia , Glaucoma/epidemiologia , Glicosúria/epidemiologia , Hipertensão/epidemiologia , Pressão Intraocular , Registros Médicos , Osteoartrite/epidemiologia , Exame Físico , Prevalência , Inquéritos e Questionários , Fatores Sexuais , Transtornos da Visão , Acuidade Visual
8.
Ophthalmology ; 106(1): 35-41, Jan. 1999.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-1302

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The increased cataract prevalence of black populations, especially of cortical cataract, remains unexplained. The authors evaluate the relationships of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity patterns to lens opacities, by age, among 4314 black participants in the Barbados Eye Study. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: Prevalence study of a random sample of the Barbados population, ages 40 to 84 years (84 percent participation). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Associations with age-related lens changes (grade > or = 2 in the Lens Opacities Classification System II at the slit lamp) were evaluated in logistic regression analyses by age (persons < 60 years and > or = 60 years). Results are presented as odds ratios (OR) with 95 percent confidence intervals. RESULTS: Of the 1800 participants with lens changes, most had cortical opacities. Diabetes history (18 percent prevalence) was related to all lens changes, especially at younger ages (age < 60 years: OR = 2.23 [1.63, 3.04]; age > or = 60 years: OR = 1.63 [1.22, 2.17]). Diabetes also increased the risk of cortical opacities (age < 60 years: OR = 2.30 [1.63, 3.24]; age > or = 60 years: OR = 1.42 [1.03, 1.96]); additional risk factors were high diastolic blood pressure (age < 60 years: OR = 1.49 [1.00, 2.23] and higher waist/hip ratio (all ages: OR = 1.49 [1.00, 1.84]). Diabetes was also related to posterior subcapsular opacities. Glycated hemoglobin levels were positively associated with cortical and posterior subcapsular opacities. Overall, 14 percent of the prevalence of lens changes could be attributed to diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence of cortical opacities was related to diabetes, hypertension, and abdominal obesity, which also are common in this and other black populations. Interventions to modify these risk factors, especially in populations which they are highly prevalent, may have implications to control visual loss from cataract, which is the first cause of blindness worldwide.(Au)


Assuntos
Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Catarata/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus/etnologia , Hipertensão/etnologia , Obesidade/etnologia , Distribuição por Idade , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Barbados/epidemiologia , Pressão Arterial , Catarata/patologia , Cristalino/patologia , Razão de Chances , Prevalência , Distribuição Aleatória , Fatores de Risco
9.
Postgrad Doc - Caribbean ; 14(2): 46-51, Mar./Apr. 1998.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-1590

RESUMO

Childhood blindness results in a lifetime of morbidity for the child and family involved, requiring special schooling with limited employment opportunities. The identification of the causes of blindness in children and their prevention, where possible, is of vital importance. We look at the causes of blindness in Jamaica. The leading preventable cause was congenital rubella syndrome, which often results in multiple handicap. This condition should be avoidable with a suitable immunisation programme. The leading treatable causes were congenital cataract and glucoma. These conditions may both be treatable if surgery is performed at an early age and specialist care is maintained.(AU)


Assuntos
Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Cegueira , Síndrome da Rubéola Congênita/complicações , Catarata/complicações , Glaucoma/congênito , Cegueira/prevenção & controle , Jamaica
10.
Arch Opthalmol ; 115(1): 105-11, Jan. 1997.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-2099

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To present population-based data on type and extent of age-related lens opacities in the predominantly black population of the Barbados Eye Study. DESIGN: Prevalence study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The Barbados Eye Study included 4709 participants (84 percent of those eligible), who were identified from a random sample of Barbadian-born citizens aged 40 to 84 years. DATA COLLECTION: Lens gradings at the slit lamp, obtained with the use of the Lens Opacities Classification System II. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Prevalence of posterior subcapsular, nuclear, and cortical opacities (defined as a grade > or = 2 in either eye), as well as prevalence of any lens changes (including history of previous cataract surgery and/or cataract too advanced to grade). RESULTS: Overall, 41 percent of the Barbados Eye Study population had any lens change, including 3 percent with aphakia or an intraocular lens. Among the population of African descent, cortical opacities (34 percent) were most prevalent, followed by nuclear (19 percent) and posterior subcapsular (4 percent) opacities. Prevalence of all opacity types increased with age (P < .001). Cortical and nuclear opacities were more frequent in women than men. When prevalence of a single kind of opacity was considered, 21 percent of participants had cortical only, 6 percent had nuclear only, and 0.4 percent and posterior subcapsular only; 13 percent had mixed opacities. Visual acuity loss to worse than 20/40 in the more affected eye was present in 48 percent, 26 percent, and 18 percent of nuclear only, posterior subcapsular only, and cortical only types, respectively, and in 53 percent of mixed opacities. CONCLUSIONS: The Barbados Eye Study provides the first prevalence data on different types of lens opacities in a large, predominantly black population. Whereas nuclear opacities are most common in white populations, cortical opacities were the most frequent type in the Barbados Eye Study, a finding of possible etiologic relevance. Other results highlight a higher frequency of opacities in women than men and a high prevalence of visual acuity loss in affected eyes.(AU)


Assuntos
Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Catarata/epidemiologia , Barbados/epidemiologia , Afro-Americanos , Catarata/patologia , Cristalino/patologia , Prevalência , Distribuição Aleatória , Distribuição por Sexo , Acuidade Visual , Distribuição por Idade
11.
Postgrad Doc - Caribbean ; 11(6): 268-77, Dec. 1995.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-5032

RESUMO

Skin manifestations are a common feature of HTLV-1 associated disorders and of HTLV-1 infection itself. These include the lymphomatous skin infiltrates in adult T-cell lymphoma/leukaemia, most commonly manifesting as persistent, generalised papules, nodules and plaques with later ulceration, acquired ichthyosis and xeroderma in HAM/TSP, infective dermatitis of children, dermatomyositis, crusted (Norwegian) scabies, psoriasiform rashes which may precede one of the more serious disease associations, and possibly also seborrhoeic dermatitis. Disorders typically associated with immunosuppression such as disseminated herpes zoster, and ulcerative non-healing herpes simplex may also be seen occasionally both in ATK as well as in other wise asymptomatic HTLV-1 infection (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Criança , Adulto , Vírus Linfotrópico T Tipo 1 Humano , Linfoma Cutâneo de Células T , Dermatite , Dermatomiosite , Escabiose , Psoríase , Herpes Zoster , Herpes Simples , Leucemia-Linfoma de Células T do Adulto , Paraparesia Espástica Tropical , Uveíte , Hipercalcemia , Anemia , Complexo Relacionado com a AIDS , Hanseníase , Sarcoidose , Dermatite Esfoliativa , Escleroderma Sistêmico , Dermatopatias Vesiculobolhosas , Eczema , Ictiose , Imunoglobulina G , Anticorpos Anti-HTLV-I , Staphylococcus , Streptococcus , Bronquiectasia , Catarata , Polimiosite , Eritema , Edema , Sarcoptes scabiei , Dermatite Seborreica , Tinha do Couro Cabeludo , Região do Caribe , Estados Unidos , Haiti , Japão , América do Sul , África
12.
West Indian med. j ; 44(Suppl. 3): 12-3, Nov. 1995.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-5082

RESUMO

The outcomes of the first 28 phacoemulsification (PE) cataract procedures done by one of the authors (DS) were compared with those achieved in 100 extracapsular cataract extractions (ECCE). A greater complication rate was encountered during PE, 28.5 percent vitreous loss, compared to ECCE with 1 percent vitreous loss. The visual outcome was however comparable with 96 percent of the PE group achieving 20/40 or better and 86 percent of the ECCE group achieving the same. Prompt handling of complications is essential. A cost analysis for PE was also done indicating that PE cost at least US$50 more per eye than ECCE. The investment in training, equipment and disposables as well as a low cataract surgery rate may mitigate against the provision of the new technology in the smaller territories. For those planning to embark on phaco surgery, a comprehensive training programme is recommended culminating with supervised hands-on experience. Time outside the routine operating schedule should be devoted to training as operating time is long during the learning curve. A phaco machine inthe hands of an itinerant Ophthalmology Resident is certainly not the answer to the prayer of the Caribbean cataract patient (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Catarata/terapia , Extração de Catarata
13.
West Indian med. j ; 44(Suppl. 2): 24, Apr. 1995.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-5785

RESUMO

Cataract surgery is the commonest surgical procedure performed by opthalmologists. Most anaesthetic techniques involve the use of needle injections which cause some pain and varying degrees of discomfort. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of a new technique of local anaesthetic for cataract surgery in which no needle injections are used. Anaesthesia was achieved in 33 consecutive cataract surgery patients using a new technique which involved topical anaesthesia, using 0.75 percent bupivacaine drops and, for anaesthetising the globe, a subtenon infusion of 1.25 - 1.5 cc of 2 percent xylocaine without adrenaline. Only one patient complained, on the day after surgery, that her operation was painful. The method is faster for the surgeon working alone and allows for maximum use of operating time. The attendance of an anaesthetist has not been found necessary. Three complications were encountered: 2 subconjunctival haemorrhages, which did not interfere with surgery; and one mild post-op. ptosis. No pharmacologic agent was used for pre-medication, and the patient's regime of systemic medication and dietary arrangements were unaltered - a desirable situation for the 28 - 30 percent diabetics among our cataract surgery patients. Conclusion: the regime described above provides anaesthesia that is effective, and reduces the risk of complications by avoiding the use of sharp needles. It also saves operating time where the surgeon is working alone. The non-use of sharp needle injections makes the method patient friendly. It is suitable for most adult opthalmic operations, especially in diabetic patients (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Anestesia Local/métodos , Catarata/terapia , Trinidad e Tobago , Catarata , Administração Tópica
14.
Arch ophthalmol ; 107(11): 1604-8, Nov. 1989.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-10009

RESUMO

Surgical treatment in a West Indian black population with primary open angle glaucoma was randomized to full-thickness posterior lip sclerectomies or partial thickness trabeculectomies. Forty-five posterior lip sclerectomies and 35 trabeculectomies were performed. With a mean follow-up period of 28.3 months, the eyes with posterior lip sclerectomies had lower intraocular pressures, reduced glaucoma medication requirements, and less failures. Decline of visual acuity did not differ significantly between the two groups, but early visual acuity loss due to accelerated cataract formation was noted more frequently with posterior lip sclerectomies. The incidence of flat anterior chambers also did not differ significantly, but shallow anterior chambers were more frequent and persisted for a longer time with posterior lip sclerectomies. Other complications were more frequent with posterior lip sclerectomies. (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Adulto , Glaucoma de Ângulo Aberto/cirurgia , Esclera/cirurgia , Trabeculectomia , Catarata/etiologia , Ensaios Clínicos como Assunto , Seguimentos , Glaucoma de Ângulo Aberto/etnologia , Glaucoma de Ângulo Aberto/fisiopatologia , Pressão Intraocular , Complicações Pós-Operatórias , Estudos Prospectivos , Distribuição Aleatória , Reoperação , Acuidade Visual , Índias Ocidentais
15.
Br J Ophthalmol ; 73(5): 365-9, May 1989.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-10014

RESUMO

The prevalence of open-angle glaucoma is believed to be very high among West Indian blacks. To begin investigating the prevalence and risk factors for glaucoma and other eye diseases in Barbados, WI, a pilot study was conducted. The pilot project identified a stratified, random national sample of 300 persons over 35 years of age who were invited to participate in an ophthalmic examination and an interview. Of those contacted 89 percent were eligible and 95 percent of these agreed to participate. The overall glaucoma prevalence in the participants was 6 percent; it was 13 percent among black and mixed persons over 54 years. Age related cataract, hypertension, and diabetes were frequent findings. Although the sample size of the pilot project is small, the results suggest a high prevalence of glaucoma in Barbados, a finding that merits further study. (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Idoso , Masculino , Feminino , Glaucoma/epidemiologia , Barbados , Afro-Americanos , Catarata/complicações , Catarata/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus/complicações , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia , Estudos de Viabilidade , Glaucoma/etnologia , Glaucoma de Ângulo Aberto/epidemiologia , Glaucoma de Ângulo Aberto/etnologia , Hipertensão/complicações , Hipertensão/epidemiologia , Projetos Piloto , Risco
16.
Br J Ophthalmol ; 72(1): 65-7, Jan. 1988.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-12473

RESUMO

Examinations were performed on the 108 blind Jamaican children (VA less than 6/60 in the better eye) in residential care. The congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) was the leading preventable cause of childhood blindness, accounting for 22 percent of children examined. Improvement of the surgical procedures constitute recent attempts to combat childhood blindness. (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Pré-Escolar , Criança , Adolescente , Masculino , Feminino , Cegueira/epidemiologia , Cegueira/etiologia , Cegueira/prevenção & controle , Catarata/congênito , Glaucoma/congênito , Imunização , Jamaica , Atrofia Óptica/congênito , Rubéola (Sarampo Alemão)/prevenção & controle , Síndrome da Rubéola Congênita/complicações
17.
West Indian med. j ; 36(2): 114-6, June 1987.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-11643

RESUMO

A 24 year-old male Jamaican building worker developed cataracts four months after electrical injury from a high tension cable. His visual acuity fell to perception of hand movements at 1 metre. Extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation restored his visual acuity to 20/25 (6/7.5). Mechanisms for this unusual complication of electrical injury are discussed (AU)


Assuntos
Adulto , Humanos , Masculino , Catarata/etiologia , Traumatismos por Eletricidade/complicações , Jamaica
18.
Int ophthal ; 4(3): 159-62, 1981. tab
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-2257

RESUMO

Unilateral, mostly traumatic cataract in children and adults is considered a good indication for lens implant surgery in developing countries. In Suriname fourteen patients with unilateral, non-senile cataract underwent pseudophakos surgery from 1975 to 1980. No major complications occurred. In ten of the fourteen patients good binocular vision was achieved. Two patients had good visual acuity with poor fusion. One patient had persistent deprivation amblyoplia. Six patients were ultimately lost to follow-up.(AU)


Assuntos
Resumo em Inglês , Humanos , Oftalmopatias/cirurgia , Catarata/terapia , Lentes Intraoculares , Suriname
19.
Barbados Nurs J ; 1(2): 5-6, Sept.-Oct. 1967.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-8684
20.
Jamaican Nurse ; 6(3): 16-7, Dec. 1966.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-13428
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA