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1.
Journal of ethnobiology and ethnomedicine ; 3(13): [1-12], March 2007. tab
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-17430

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Throughout history women have tried to control or enhance their fertility using herbal remedies, with various levels of societal support. Caribbean folk medicine has been influenced by European folk medicine, either through the early Spanish and French settlers or through the continuous immigration of Spanish-speaking peoples from Venezuela.Some folk uses are ancient and were documented by Galen and Pliny the Elder. METHODS: Thirty respondents, ten of whom were male were interviewed from September 1996 to September 2000.The respondents were obtained by snowball sampling, and were found in thirteen different sites, 12 in Trinidad (Paramin,Talparo, Sangre Grande, Mayaro, Carapichaima, Kernahan, Newlands, Todd's Road, Arima, Guayaguayare, Santa Cruz,Port of Spain and Siparia) and one in Tobago (Mason Hall). Snowball sampling was used because there was no other means of identifying respondents and to cover the entire islands. The validation of the remedies was conducted with a non-experimental method. RESULTS: Plants are used for specific problems of both genders. Clusea rosea, Urena sinuata and Catharanthus roseus areused for unspecified male problems. Richeria grandis and Parinari campestris are used for erectile dysfunction. Ageratum conyzoides, Scoparia dulcis, Cucurbita pepo, Cucurbita maxima, Gomphrena globosa and Justicia pectoralis are usedfor prostate problems. The following plants are used for childbirth and infertility: Mimosa pudica, Ruta graveolens, Abelmoschus moschatus, Chamaesyce hirta, Cola nitida, Ambrosia cumanenesis, Pilea microphylla, Eryngium foetidum, Aristolochiarugosa, Aristolochia trilobata, Coleus aromaticus, Laportea aestuans and Vetiveria zizanioides.


The following plants are used for menstrual pain and unspecified female complaints: Achyranthes indica, Artemisia absinthium, Brownea latifolia, Eleutherine bulbosa, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Eupatorium macrophyllum,Justicia secunda, Parthenium hysterophorus, Wedelia trilobata, Abelmoschus moschatus, Capraria biflora, Cordia curassavica,Croton gossypifolius, Entada polystachya, Leonotis nepetaefolia, Eryngium foetidum, Aristolochia rugosa, Aristolochia trilobata and Ambrosia cumanenesis. CONCLUSION: Native Caribbean plants have been less studied that those from Africa, India and Europe. Chamaesyce hirtahas scientific support but as a diuretic. Other plants with level 3 validity for reproductive issues are: Achyranthes indica,Coleus aromaticus, Hibiscus rosa-sinesis, Parthenium hysterophorus and Ruta graveolens. The non-experimental validation method can be used to advise the public on which plants are safe, effective and useful, and which are not; pending clinicaltrials. This is especially important since so few clinical trials are conducted on Caribbean plants.


Assuntos
Humanos , Interações Ervas-Drogas , Medicina Reprodutiva , Trinidad e Tobago , Terapias Complementares/estatística & dados numéricos
2.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-16860

RESUMO

Hot aqueous extract of bark of Anacardium occidentale (Cashew), commonly used in Trinidadian folk medicine for the treatment of diarrhoea was evaluated for antidiarrhoeal activity. The extract inhibited castor oil-induced diarrhoea in rats as judged by a decrease in the number of wet faeces in the extract-treated rats. The extract was also inhibited the propulsive movement of intestinal contents in mice. The extract showed no direct effect on the isolated guinea-pig ileum, however, it inhibited in a dose-related manner the contractile effects of acetylcholine, histamine, and 5-hydroxytryptamine. The inhibitary effects on these agonists were non competitive in nature. Phytochemical tests revealed the main constituents as tannin, steroids, triterpenoid and carbohydrates. The results indicates that action of A. occidentale bark extract could be through a combination of inhibition of elevated transmitter released and reduced propulsive movement of the small intestine. There is merit in the folk medicinal use of the extract (AU)


Assuntos
Ratos , Anacardium/farmacologia , Trinidad e Tobago , Terapias Complementares , Diarreia/tratamento farmacológico , Antidiarreicos/farmacologia
5.
Hastings Cent Rep ; 29(4): 23-7, July-Aug. 1999.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-1312

RESUMO

In the Caribbean as as in many other areas costly biomedical resources and personnel are limited, and more and more people are turning to alternative medicine and folk practitioners for health care. To meet the goal of providing health care for all, research on nonbiomedical therapies is needed, along with legal recognition of folk practitioners to establish standards of practice.(Au)


Assuntos
Humanos , Terapias Complementares , Prioridades em Saúde , Medicina , Medicina Tradicional , Terapias Complementares/legislação & jurisprudência , Terapias Complementares/normas , Orçamentos , Região do Caribe , Custos e Análise de Custo , Países em Desenvolvimento , Ética Médica , Previsões , Mão de Obra em Saúde , Prioridades em Saúde/economia , Prioridades em Saúde/tendências , Recursos em Saúde/economia , Recursos em Saúde , Medicina Herbária
6.
Caribbean health ; 2(2): 9-10, July 1999. ilus
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-17329

RESUMO

The dawn of the 21st century will see a 51 percent increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the Caribbean. In 1994 there were 105,000 cases of Type 1 diabetes (IDDM), and 913,000 cases of Type 2 (NIDDM). By the year 2010, it is estimated there will be 184,000 and 1,597,000 cases respectively. These trends are thought to be a result of rapid cultural change with a consequent impact on diet and lifestyle, which is further compounded by an ageing population. The role of diabetes education is well recognised and healthcare workers are helped by influential community members who are empowered as 'lay diabetes facilitators' and who will help to manage the condition in the community. More epidemiological studies are being made as these small island nations undertake an assessment of the burden diabetes places on their society and economy (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/tratamento farmacológico , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/dietoterapia , Farmacologia Clínica/educação , Organizações , Terapias Complementares , Região do Caribe
7.
West Indian med. j ; 47(4): 165-68, Dec. 1998.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-1276
10.
West Indian med. j ; 47(Suppl. 4): 34-6, Dec. 1998.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-1289

RESUMO

The use of complementary or alternative medicine has greatly increased in developed countries during th last few years. In such countries, laws have been passed and regulations made to protect both the public and practitioners. There are a growing number of research units in universities, journals, and associations of practitioners of complementary medicine. In Jamaica, too, there is increasing recognition, if not acceptance, of the popular interest in complementary medicine. In preparation for the next century we will need to address some of the legal, educational and scientific issues raised.(AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Terapias Complementares , Jamaica , Terapias Complementares/educação , Terapias Complementares/tendências , Terapias Complementares/educação , Terapias Complementares/normas , Previsões , Saúde Pública , Pesquisa , Terminologia
11.
West Indian med. j ; 47(suppl. 3): 42, July 1998.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-1688

RESUMO

Pain medicine is a relatively new speciality in clinical medicine. While it is widely accepted and recognized, there are some areas of controversy which makes this speciality interesting and open to diverse kinds of research opportunities and clinical innovations. In this presentation, several controversial areas have been selected for discussion because of their scientific merit, clinical applicability, and evolving status in the physician's armamentarium. EPIDURAL STEROIDS FOR LOW PAIN: Epidural steroid injections remain one of many modalities for managing chronic low back pain. The frequency, dose, kind of steroids used and management of complications are still open to discussion. Meta-analysis of the applicability of epidural steroids for low back pain leaves a lot to be desired. More importantly, the criteria for epidural steroid injection have not yet been clearly delineated. REFLEX SYMPATHETIC DYSTROPHY (RSD) AND NEUROPATHIC PAIN: Most clinicians propose that RSD has become a "legal phenomenon" rather than a medical one. This observation indicates the adversarial focus that the injured patient possesses as far as his recovery and rehabilitation are concerned. The different diagnosis techniques and the corresponding diverse therapeutic modalities available for treating RSD are still controversial. CANCER PAIN MANAGEMENT: Cancer pain management is very important in the overall management of the cancer patient, especially when dying and death appear inevitable. A proposed fourth step of the World Health Organization three-step ladder for pain management and its implication will be discussed. MORPHINE AS ANTI-ANALGESIC AGENT: Review of the pharmacological activity of morphine metabolities will be undertaken. A re-evaluation of morphine-3-glucuronide and its analgesic activity may help to explain some interesting physiological phenomena observed during morphine administration. PAIN EDUCATION AND PAIN CERTIFICATION: In the United States of America the education of medical and nursing students regarding pain therapy has been largely ignored. The situation is unfortunate since most young health care professionals have to deal with chronic pain problems as soon as they commence their practices. As pain medicine develops, it is important to have adequate credentialing.(AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Dor , Doença Crônica , Analgesia Epidural/estatística & dados numéricos , Dor Lombar/terapia , Distrofia Simpática Reflexa/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias , Morfina/uso terapêutico , Terapias Complementares/estatística & dados numéricos , Medição da Dor
12.
West Indian med. j ; 47(Suppl. 3): 33-4, July 1998.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-1708

RESUMO

A quiet revolution is taking place in the field of health. More and more people are seeking alternative healing methods. They are tired of invasive, costly, potentially harmful treatments, yet they are dubious of alternative therapies that involve other specialists, strange belief systems, and which can make the doctor's visit seem cheap. They seek a wholistic approach to heatlh. Hospital are realizing the importance of Arts in Medicine and are including them in their programmes. Music as a healing tool is being used in many area of Medicine as it was used in ancient times. Many ancient healers used sound, chants and music in their healing. Psychoneuroimmunology now explains how "Body, Mind and Spirit" have to be dealt with for real treatment to occur and "Right Attitude" is now accepted as the key in the business of curing illnesses. Patients need to be participants in their health care and realize that negative thoughts and attitudes are contributing to their health status and that music can assist them in changing this. Music has the ability to change our moods, beliefs and attitudes and is now playing a major role in relief of stress, one of the major causes of illness. This study shows how music can effect the body, what extensive research has uncovered scientifically, and how music can be used in different areas of medicine. It reveals how important it is for physicians and other health care workers to cognisant of and to include music in their approach to healing.(AU)


Assuntos
Musicoterapia/tendências , Terapias Complementares/estatística & dados numéricos , Cura Mental , Estresse Psicológico/terapia
13.
West Indian med. j ; 47(Suppl. 3): 33, July 1998.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-1709

RESUMO

Epidemiological studies show a growing dissatisfaction with conventional Western Medicine and its handling of chronic debilitating illnesses. The argument is that conventional medicine, which is excellent for treating acute illness, has extraplated that paradigm to deal with chronic illnesses, resulting in the introduction of more powerful medications, increased side effects and reduced success. In realizing this, many medical schools have accepted and incorporated changes in the medical curriculum. Despite this, there is great resistance, particularly in North America, to accept other paradigms that show validity. This refusal to adapt and be flexible affords the opportunity for the creation of other health providers to supply a demand previously dominated by physicians. This is causing a more constricted medical practice in these countries. Based on medical physiology, there is a scientific way to measure health. This evaluation compares the patient's current biological terrain or physiological state to an ideal one. As a result, patients can be monitored as their terrain begins to "drift away" from a ideal healthy state and interventions can be made and evaluated before symptomatology appears. Further data are confirming that specific chronic illnesses exist in particular physiological milieus or "biological terrains". Changing the terrains to what is the ideal state produces remissions which are cost effective, less invasive and accomplishes this with fewer side effects. The author will present these concepts and data to show improvement in chronic illnesses treated at the Research Center for Alternative Medicine.(AU)


Assuntos
Terapias Complementares/tendências , Terapias Complementares/educação , Doença Crônica/economia , Doença Crônica/terapia
14.
West Indian med. j ; 47(suppl. 2): 45, Apr. 1998.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-1845

RESUMO

Alternative, complementary, unconventional, non-allopathic, non-Western medical therapies, to list some of the many synonyms in current use, have become increasingly popular in all Western countries, including Europe, North America and the Caribbean. They include an extremely large number of practices, from those of long standing European origin (eg homeopathy and hypnosis) to many Eastern practices (eg acupunture), from those of long tradition in every culture (herbal medicine) to the exotic, "new age" therapies; from those based on single theories with little or no scientific rationale to those with increasing evidence of some efficacy (acupunture and chiropractic); from those very much on the fringe to those incorporating valid nutritional, physiological or psychological principles. Much of the popularity of complementary or alternative medicine (CAM) stems from increasing dissatisfaction with modern, scientific, conventional, allopathic or Western medicine. Reasons for this include increasingly high costs of medical technology, a worldwide interest in "natural" remedies and the intensive hype and advertising in the media.(AU)


Assuntos
Terapias Complementares
15.
West Indian med. j ; 46(1 (suppl.1)): 24, Feb.- Mar. 1997.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-2413

RESUMO

Nutrition is an area of medicine that is conducive to home remedies and folk medicine which are often supported by users'testimonies. Although it is important to keep and "open mind" about the possibilities of alternative therapies, very little research has been done documenting effectiveness of many of the benefits that are touted. The following questions can be used to evaluate how helpful or harmful alternative therapies may be: Are exaggerated claims being made without substantiated research? Is it recommended that individuals talk to their doctor or dietitian about the product or claim. Is the claim supported only by personal testimonies? Are scientific terms used without adequate explanations? Are recommendations made only to eat few foods or eliminate entire groups? Are moderation and variety in eating of foods and regular physical activity mentioned? Is there any evidence that the product or claim can be harmful? Can putting one's faith in the curative powers of some "magic" food formula, or product lead to neglect of a real disorder? What is the cost to the purchases and what does the seller gain financially. (Au)


Assuntos
Humanos , Terapias Complementares
17.
West Indian med. j ; 45(3): 78-81, Sept. 1996.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-3503

RESUMO

Do persons who utilize the services of the alternative therapist demonstrate a greater self-care response to illness? This cross-sectional study was done to compare the health perceptions and self-care response to minor illness among users of conventional medical care and alternative therapy. Data were collected with a pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire to 99 patients of medical practitioner and 74 of alternative therapists. Results indicated statistically significant differences in some health perceptions such as ways to improve general health and responsibility for personal health. For both groups there were similarities in socio-demographic characteristics and self-care responses to minor illness, such as headaches, constipation, diarrhoea, sinus congestion and colds or flu. Also, results reflected a common practice of self-management of minor illness and an overlap in attendance by patients to both groups of practitioners. Recommendations are made for the public to be guided in its practice of self-management of minor illness and that a regulatory body be set up to govern the practice of alternative therapy in Jamaica. (AU)


Assuntos
Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Atitude Frente a Saúde , Autocuidado , Terapias Complementares , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Papel do Doente , Nível de Saúde , Jamaica
18.
West Indian med. j ; 44(suppl.3): 8-9, Nov. 1995.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-5449

RESUMO

Epidemiological studies show that there is an increasing number of the North American population using alternative medicine. The highest is in the 25 to 49 year age group, who are relatively more educated with higher incomes (Eisenberg et al). Since political factors have major impact on health, the consumerization of health will set future trends. Patients are becoming increasingly assertive mwith regard to exercising choices. They are becoming more litigious towards doctors and are demanding greater participation in the shape of the health care system and allocation of resources (Coulter). Current concepts in quantum physics give very strong credence to the alternative paradigm. Governments in Europe now recognize these medicines as being very cost effective, pro active and efficient. Western medicine is based on an illness module, alternative on a wellness one. Of 21 major causes of illness and death today in the U.S. population, 19 are entirely lifestyle related (U.S. Surgeon General). This focuses the attention to the wellness model which places responsibility on the patients to review their lifestyles. Capra notes, "General Practioners administering this type of primary care need not be medical doctors, nor experts in any of the scientific disciplines concerned." In the new evolving model, interventions will take place earlier and the patient moved through a highly organized, stematized delivery system. When trauma or the disease process is advanced, the patient is then moved on to the medical practitioner, who now brings up the rear rather than leads the van (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Terapias Complementares
19.
BAMP Bulletin ; (134): 22, 1994.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-4869
20.
Kingston; [Unpublished; 1994. 74 p. graph, tab.
Tese em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-7706

RESUMO

Consultation with alternative therapists appears to be common place. This cross- sectional survey explored the health perceptions and self-care responses to illness among users of alternative therapy and conventional medical services. Data were collected by a self administered questionnaire to 74 users of alternative therapy and 99 from general practitioners. These indicated that users of alternative care were more likely to have the felt-need to improve their health by dietary changes (p<0.0002), and to report improvement in their dietary habits in response to chronic illness (p<0.02). Further, users of conventional medicine were more likely to mention their "family" as being resposible for their personal health (p<0.03). There was no statistically significant differences between respondents from alternative care and conventional medical care with respect to age, sex


Assuntos
Adolescente , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Humanos , Feminino , Masculino , Autocuidado , Terapias Complementares , Jamaica , Inquéritos e Questionários , Assistência à Saúde , Atitude Frente a Saúde
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