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1.
West Indian med. j ; 40(1): 7-10, Mar. 1991.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-10387

RESUMO

M.R.C.P. (UK) and D.M. (Internal Medicine), University of the West Indies, are postgraduate qualifications that did, or now do, evaluate and set the quality of specialist Internal Physician training. Since the inception of the degree, graduates of D.M. (Internal Medicine), University of the West Indies, have developed sub-speciality interests and have been recognized as being of consultant status throughout the region and the world. D.M. is of a higher standard as it is an exit examination whereas the MRCP (U.K.) diploma is an entrance examination. Acquisition of the MRCP (U.K.) is expensive; travel to the U.K. is mandatory. Possession of MRCP (UK) is considered by most graduates of D.M. (Internal Medicine), University of the West Indies, to be unnecessary; it has not advanced their career in any discernible way. It should no longer be encouraged in any way at the University of the West Indies (AU)


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Medicina Interna/educação , Índias Ocidentais
2.
Med Educ ; 23(4): 399-402, July 1989.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-10004

RESUMO

The outcome is described of 48 entrants to a postgraduate degree course (DM) in Internal Medicine established at the University of the West Indies in 1974. Contact by postal questionnaire was established in 96 percent of 26 graduates and 82 percent of 22 non-graduates. 22 of 25 DM graduate responders have remained in the Caribbean, working in six Caribbean territories. All graduate responders developed a subspeciality interest. The graduates' primary employers are the University (9) and the Government (12). However, failure to graduate did not necessarily preclude qualification as consultant physician (7 of 18 responders). Major difficulties with the DM programme included: (1) in practice, lack of recognition by contributing territories of individual DM (Internal Medicine) graduates; (2) incomplete regional coverage; (3) lack of adequate funding for the programme; (4) an inadequate research training input; and (5) difficulties with seniority for staff who trained in Jamaica to go to work in another territory. All these problems have solutions. Overall, the international recognition of the new degree programme has been satisfactory and the graduates' own assessment of the training was complimentary. At last a system has been devised that enables postgraduates to train as internal medicine specialists in the Caribbean to practise effectively within the Caribbean health system. (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Adulto , Masculino , Feminino , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Medicina Interna/educação , Jamaica
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