Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 13 de 13
Filtrar
Mais filtros










Filtros aplicados

Base de dados
Tipo de estudo
Intervalo de ano de publicação
1.
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd ; 144(2): 83-5, Jan. 8, 2000.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-764

RESUMO

In a general practice in Amsterdam SouthEast in 1998 a delayed first attack of Plasmodium ovale infection was diagnosed in a 13-year-old-girl from Ghana, malaria tropica with a low parasitaemia index in a 43-year-old Ghanaian man and a 8-year-old Ghanaian girl, and a Plasmodium vivax infection in a 44-year-old Surinam woman. The Ghanaian patients had visited their native country, the Surinam woman had contracted the infection during a visit to India. All patients responded well to antimalaria medication. These patients were among a total of 6 patients of non-Dutch origin diagnosed with malaria in 1998 in this general practice. Four patients had not taken any prophylactic drug and two had not used the drugs properly. A relative increase of malaria in immigrants has been seen in the Netherlands and elsewhere in Europe in recent years. Underestimation of the risks and lack of knowledge of malaria and of the changing epidemiology make people of ethnic minorities travel without taking appropriate precautions. New, creative ways of communication and information will have to be explored to reach these migrant communities. (AU)


Assuntos
Adulto , Relatos de Casos , Criança , Masculino , Humanos , Feminino , Adolescente , Malária/diagnóstico , Malária/etnologia , Migrantes , Viagem , Gana/etnologia , Malária/prevenção & controle , Malária/parasitologia , Malária Falciparum/diagnóstico , Malária Falciparum/etnologia , Malária Vivax/diagnóstico , Malária Vivax/etnologia , Países Baixos/epidemiologia , Suriname/etnologia
2.
Diabetes Care ; 22(3): 434-40, Mar. 1999.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-1393

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of glucose intolerance in genetically similar African-origin populations within Cameroon and from Jamaica and Britain. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Subjects studied were from rural and urban Cameroon or from Jamaica, or were Caribbean migrants, mainly Jamaican, living in Manchester, England. Sampling bases included a local census of adults aged 25-74 years in Cameroon, districts statistically representative in Jamaica, and population registers in Manchester. African-Caribbean ethnicity required three grandparents of this ethnicity. Diabetes was defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) 1985 criteria using a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (2-h > or = 11.1 mmol/l or hypoglycemic treatment) and by the new American Diabetes Association criteria (fasting glucose > or = 7.0 mmol/l or hypoglycemic treatment). RESULTS: For men, mean BMIs were greatest in urban Cameroon and Manchester (25-27 kg/m2); in women, these were similarly high in urban Cameroon and Jamaica and highest in Manchester (27-28 kg/m2). The age-standardized diabetes prevalence using WHO criteria was 0.8 percent in rural Cameroon, 2.0 percent in urban Cameroon, 8.5 percent in Jamaica, and 14.6 percent in Manchester, with no difference between sexes (men: 1.1 percent, 1.0 percent, 6.5 percent, 15.3 percent, women: 0.5 percent, 2.8 percent, 10.6 percent, 14.0 percent), all tests for trend P < 0.001. Impaired glucose tolerance was more frequent in Jamaica. CONCLUSIONS: The transition in glucose intolerance from Cameroon to Jamaica and Britain suggests that environment determines diabetes prevalence in these populations of similar genetic origin.(Au)


Assuntos
Adulto , Estudo Comparativo , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Intolerância à Glucose/etnologia , Intolerância à Glucose/epidemiologia , Saúde da População Rural , Migrantes , Saúde da População Urbana , África Ocidental/etnologia , Camarões/etnologia , Região do Caribe/etnologia , Inglaterra/epidemiologia , Jamaica/etnologia , Prevalência
3.
In. United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy's & St. Thomas' Hospitals; King's College School of Medicine & Dentistry of King's College, London; University of the West Indies. Center for Caribbean Medicine. Research day and poster display. s.l, s.n, Jun. 30, 1997. p.1.
Não convencional em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-823

RESUMO

In attempting to identify factors responsible for the onset, course and prognosis of an illness, it is necessary to identify differences between generations in order to separate the effects of heritability and environment. Ethnicity and culture can also be examined in this way so that changes in culture occasioned by changes in environment can be assessed in terms of their impact on illness. In our work on the family history of psychoses among the African-Caribbean population in Britain we have found that for schrizophrenia, the relatives of first generation (those born in the Caribbean) and white psychotic patients share similiar risks while the risk is markedly increase in the relatives, particularly siblings of the second generation (those born in Britain to Caribbean parents) psychotic patients. For affective psychoses, we have found that the risk in the relatives of the first generation patients is significantly less than for both the white and the second generation relatives. These differences would have been much less noticeable if the separation between first and second generation patients had not been undertaken and would have been more difficult to interpret. Our findings do suggest that there are factors acting on the second generation making them more susceptible than their first generation counterparts to psychotic illness. This therefore diminishes the likelihood that the increased risk of illness in the second generation is due to a genetic effect and is much more likely to be mediated by some selective environmental effects acting either specifically on those families already afflicted by the disease or more generally on the entire second generation population.(AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Transtornos Psicóticos Afetivos , Transtornos Psicóticos , Reino Unido , Afro-Americanos , Migrantes , Relação entre Gerações
4.
In. United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy's & St. Thomas' Hospitals; King's College School of Medicine & Dentistry of King's College, London; University of the West Indies. Center for Caribbean Medicine. Research day and poster display. s.l, s.n, Jun. 30, 1997. p.1.
Não convencional em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-824

RESUMO

High rates of schizophrenia have been repeatedly reported among the African-Caribbean population in Britain. There has been no satisfactory explanation for these increased rates and while migrants in general are thought to be at increased risk, the incidence of schizophrenia is especially raised among African-Caribbean population that was born in Britain (second generation). Preliminary data from the Caribbean also suggest that there is a specific pathological process occuring in Britain. The available evidence in Britain also suggest that there are environmental factors which are selectively affecting the African-Caribbean population in Britain that are making them more vulnerable to schizophrenia. The study of high risk groups can be very instrumental in the elucidation of the aetiology of disease and therefore the study of this population may shed light on the aetiology of schizophrenia as a whole. In addition, this increased incidence of schizopherenia places a heavy demand both on the families of an already disadvantaged group as well as on the psychiatric services, particularly in the inner cities where the majority of African Caribbean people live in Britain. An understanding of the determinants of this increased risk of schizophrenia would lead to appropriate intervention strategies especially in the areas of prevention and provision of effective care. The study will be a population based case control study of the first contact schizophrenia in African-Caribbeans and the remaining population in three British centres. The research hypotheses are that the African-Caribbeans psychotic patients will show more evidence of risk increasing social factors, in particular adverse life events and a marked discrepancy between expectations and achievement. Their siblings will also show a high risk for psychosis suggesting that certain families are more susceptible to the social adversity associated with migration. The study will combine two strategies; the first to determine the absolute risk of the disorder, and the other to identify the risk factors which mediate the onset and course of the illness. We will also carry out a one year outcome study to examine the needs for mental health care in the African-Caribbean population and the extent to which treatment is appropriate.(AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Esquizofrenia/diagnóstico , Transtornos Psicóticos , Reino Unido , Afro-Americanos , Jamaica , Migrantes
5.
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv ; 30(3): 27-32, Mar. 1992.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-15748

RESUMO

This article described a method of patient and family intervention designed for psychotic patients who are prone to relapse. Issues addressed in a monthly group meeting were designed to clarify, inform, and support families on the facts of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This format succeeded in improving the rate of recidivism in the population of Caribbean patients because it clarified distortions of the nature of the illnesses and made obvious that medication compliance was separate and did not intrude on the culture and belief systems. Family dynamics were not a focus in this psychoeducation program, but alliances, boundaries, and process did change over the course of the 6 months of the program. Family members were engaged relatively easily and responded when it was clear there was no intention to intrude on culture or personal beliefs. Many expressed anger and fustrations that such a program had not been offered before, especially those families whose relatives had experienced multiple readmissions. The questionnaires clearly illustrated an increase in knowledge and understanding about the illness, and this correlated with reduced recidivism. A major effort is made to maintain contact with patients and their families following discharge from the day hospital for up to 3 years to ensure their follow- through. Follow-up phone calls ensure 100 percent follow-up for the past few years, we have found that on going contact is also useful on a reduced frequency to reinforce the concepts communicated initially.(AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Pré-Escolar , Criança , Adolescente , Adulto , Masculino , Feminino , Terapia Familiar , Educação em Saúde , Transtornos Psicóticos/terapia , Migrantes/psicologia , Doença Crônica , Hospitalização , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Transtornos Psicóticos/tratamento farmacológico , Recidiva
6.
Int J Soc Psychiatry ; 37(2): 80-9, 1991 Summer.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-9851

RESUMO

The psychopathology of 126 black Jamaican migrants who had spent an average of 12 years in North America and the United Kingdom and had subsequently returned to Jamaica, was established and compared to that of a matched control group of Jamaicans who had never migrated. There was a statistically significant difference in the pattern of diagnosis between the two groups (p less than 0.0001), and although the existence of a past history of mental illness between the groups was not statistically higher frequency of mental hospitalization (p less than 0.0001) than the controls, with 94 percent of the previous hospitalisations of the returned migrants being of schizophrenic illnesses. Case studies are presented to illustrate the social stresses experienced by the returned migrant group in the countries to which they migrated and on the return to their home country, and thus to underscore the double jeopardy faced by these patients experiencing return migration. (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Adulto , Masculino , Feminino , Transtornos Mentais/diagnóstico , Migrantes/psicologia , Adaptação Psicológica , Reino Unido , Hospitalização , Jamaica/etnologia , Transtornos Mentais/psicologia , América do Norte , Esquizofrenia/diagnóstico , Classe Social , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia
7.
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol ; 2(2): 161-84, Apr. 1988.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-12480

RESUMO

The literature on the incidence in the UK of congenital and constitutional anomalies in populations deriving from Africa, the Caribbean, the Far East, the Indian subcontinent and the Mediterranean is reviewed. These groups represent an increasing proportion of the whole child population. Comparison with the white population and between groups reveals that the burden of impairment varies with country of origin. Some of the reasons implicated include different gene frequencies and mating patterns, age/parity distribution and uptake of preventive services. Comparisons with prevalence at birth in the countries of origin are made where possible. In general, populations with high rates in their country of origin retain their high rates (e.g. central nervous system anomalies among births to parents deriving from the Indian subcontinent). There is a general lack of data on the prevalence of handicapping conditions such as cerebral palsy, as well as the associated health needs and service utilisation amongst ethnic minorities. (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Anormalidades Congênitas/etnologia , Anormalidades Congênitas/epidemiologia , Anormalidades Congênitas/genética , África/etnologia , Extremo Oriente/etnologia , Reino Unido , Necessidades e Demandas de Serviços de Saúde , Índia/etnologia , Itália/etnologia , Migrantes , Índias Ocidentais/etnologia
8.
Ann Trop Med Parasitol ; 72(2): 101-9, Apr. 1978.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-12662

RESUMO

This review examines the possible association in undeveloped and developing communities between 'development' and blood pressure, coronary heart disease and rheumatic heart disease. Previous studies have shown that hypertension is rare and coronary heart disease almost unknown in many of the more isolated and less developed communities, whilst rheumatic heart disease is relatively common. Consideration is given to the possibility that development in such communities may lead to a higher incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease and to a reduction in the amount of rheumatic heart disease. Epidemiological methods for separating environmental and genetic causes are discussed. Some more recent studies in genetically different 'primitive' groups are reviewed, and then methods are discussed for the control of the genetic component, based on the examination of one genetic group living at different levels of development, either at the same time or at different times. The advantages of using migrant studies are outlined and some examples are given. The evidence appears to favour the hypothesis that development is associated with a greater incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease, but there is little to suggest that the incidence of rheumatic heart disease is decreasing with development (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Doença das Coronárias/epidemiologia , Hipertensão/epidemiologia , Cardiopatia Reumática/epidemiologia , Doenças Cardiovasculares/etiologia , Doenças Cardiovasculares/genética , Países em Desenvolvimento , Meio Ambiente , Métodos Epidemiológicos , Migrantes , Índios Norte-Americanos , Jamaica/epidemiologia , Tanzânia
11.
West Indian med. j ; 18(3): 182, Sept. 1969.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-6409

RESUMO

Of a total 393 applicants for the seasonal farmwork programme 32.3 percent were suffering from worm infestation. The numbers of Indians and Negroes affected were approximately equal and Necator americanus was the worm present in 95.3 percent of all those affected. Infested candidates were treated. Those with Necator americanus received tetrachlorethylene, those with Ascaris lumbricoides recieved alcopar and results were good in these groups. There was a poor response to the treatment of Trichiuris trichiura with both tetrachlorethylene and alcopar (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Helmintíase , Migrantes , Tetracloroetileno , Canadá
12.
Trop Geogr Med ; 21(2): 177-85, June 1969.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-12463

RESUMO

This report has attempted to relate settlement typology to infant malnutrition in Jamaica. During the summer of 1967, field work was undertaken in two western parishes of the island. Numerous clinics of the Ministry of Health were visited and interviews conducted with clinic staffs and local residents. With a geographer's eye, the landscape was examined in relation to population distribution and movement, land-use, topography, child care practices and general life style. The mapping of deaths attributed to PCM and related causes in the age group 1-4 years shows striking correlation with specific population agglomerations. The probability factors associated with PCM occurs in four distinct patterns associated with urben, plantation, remote village and town-small holding settlements. There seems to be a greater similarity in behaviour, and hence greater similarity in disease pattern, between certain of these settlements. Urban and plantation areas are more alike, as are remote village and town-small holdings. As an area begins exhibiting behaviour similar to urban-plantation settlements, there is a probability of PCM increase. There seems to be some predictive capability of showing PMC incidence by examining probability factors. (AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Lactente , Pré-Escolar , Masculino , Feminino , Cultura , Kwashiorkor/epidemiologia , Características de Residência , Fatores Etários , Escolaridade , Jamaica , Classe Social , Isolamento Social , Migrantes , Desemprego
13.
J Child Psychol Psychiatry ; 8(2): 105-16, 1967.
Artigo em Inglês | MedCarib | ID: med-7215

RESUMO

The clinical characteristics of fifty-five children, born of West Indian parents, who had been referred to a Child Guidance Clinic over a period of three years, are described. The children are compared with fifty-five other children matched for age and sex. Roughly equal numbers of West Indian boys and girls were referred, although there is a considerable preponderance of boys in the rest of the clinic population. The two groups did not differ in social class or family size, nor was there a high rate of current separation amongst the parents of West Indian children. However, the West Indian children had suffered more separations from parent figures in their early years. West Indian boys showed less neurotic disorder and West Indian girls more antisocial disorder than the controls. All groups showed a severe degree of reading retardation. Caution is expressed about generalizing these findings to the population from which the children are drawn, but there is felt to be a clear cause for concern in the frequent and sometimes traumatic separations that the current migration imposes on West Indian family life (Summary)


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Criança , Transtornos do Comportamento Infantil/epidemiologia , Migrantes , Logro , Adaptação Psicológica , Fatores Etários , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Cultura , Defecação , Depressão/epidemiologia , Enurese/sangue , Enurese/epidemiologia , Características da Família , Medo , Inteligência , Relações Interpessoais , Delinquência Juvenil , Privação Materna , Ocupações , Transtornos Fóbicos/epidemiologia , Preconceito , Leitura , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Fatores Sexuais , Classe Social , Índias Ocidentais
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA