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1.
Genet Mol Biol ; 41(3): 545-554, 2018.
Article En | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30043834

Our aim was to develop and apply a comprehensive noninvasive prenatal test (NIPT) by using high-coverage targeted next-generation sequencing to estimate fetal fraction, determine fetal sex, and detect trisomy and monogenic disease without parental genotype information. We analyzed 45 pregnancies, 40 mock samples, and eight mother-child pairs to generate 35 simulated datasets. Fetal fraction (FF) was estimated based on analysis of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele fraction distribution. A Z-score was calculated for trisomy of chromosome 21 (T21), and fetal sex detection. Monogenic disease detection was performed through variant analysis. Model validation was performed using the simulated datasets. The novel model to estimate FF was robust and accurate (r2= 0.994, p-value < 2.2e-16). For samples with FF > 0.04, T21 detection had 100% sensitivity (95% CI: 63.06 to 100%) and 98.53% specificity (95% CI: 92.08 to 99.96%). Fetal sex was determined with 100% accuracy. We later performed a proof of concept for monogenic disease diagnosis of 5/7 skeletal dysplasia cases. In conclusion, it is feasible to perform a comprehensive NIPT by using only data from high coverage targeted sequencing, which, in addition to detecting trisomies, also make it possible to identify pathogenic variants of the candidate genes for monogenic diseases.

2.
Am J Med Genet A ; 173(4): 938-945, 2017 Apr.
Article En | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28328130

Auriculocondylar syndrome, mainly characterized by micrognathia, small mandibular condyle, and question mark ears, is a rare disease segregating in an autosomal dominant pattern in the majority of the families reported in the literature. So far, pathogenic variants in PLCB4, GNAI3, and EDN1 have been associated with this syndrome. It is caused by a developmental abnormality of the first and second pharyngeal arches and it is associated with great inter- and intra-familial clinical variability, with some patients not presenting the typical phenotype of the syndrome. Moreover, only a few patients of each molecular subtype of Auriculocondylar syndrome have been reported and sequenced. Therefore, the spectrum of clinical and genetic variability is still not defined. In order to address these questions, we searched for alterations in PLCB4, GNAI3, and EDN1 in patients with typical Auriculocondylar syndrome (n = 3), Pierre Robin sequence-plus (n = 3), micrognathia with additional craniofacial malformations (n = 4), or non-specific auricular dysplasia (n = 1), which could represent subtypes of Auriculocondylar syndrome. We found novel pathogenic variants in PLCB4 only in two of three index patients with typical Auriculocondylar syndrome. We also performed a detailed comparative analysis of the patients presented in this study with those previously published, which showed that the pattern of auricular abnormality and full cheeks were associated with molecularly characterized individuals with Auriculocondylar syndrome. Finally, our data contribute to a better definition of a set of parameters for clinical classification that may be used as a guidance for geneticists ordering molecular testing for Auriculocondylar syndrome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Ear Diseases/diagnosis , Ear/abnormalities , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Micrognathism/diagnosis , Mutation , Phospholipase C beta/genetics , Pierre Robin Syndrome/diagnosis , Adult , Child , Ear/pathology , Ear Diseases/classification , Ear Diseases/genetics , Ear Diseases/pathology , Endothelin-1/genetics , Female , GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gi-Go/genetics , Gene Expression , Genes, Dominant , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Male , Micrognathism/classification , Micrognathism/genetics , Micrognathism/pathology , Pedigree , Phenotype , Pierre Robin Syndrome/classification , Pierre Robin Syndrome/genetics , Pierre Robin Syndrome/pathology , Terminology as Topic
3.
Hum Mutat ; 38(7): 751-763, 2017 07.
Article En | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28332257

Brazilians are highly admixed with ancestry from Europe, Africa, America, and Asia and yet still underrepresented in genomic databanks. We hereby present a collection of exomic variants from 609 elderly Brazilians in a census-based cohort (SABE609) with comprehensive phenotyping. Variants were deposited in ABraOM (Online Archive of Brazilian Mutations), a Web-based public database. Population representative phenotype and genotype repositories are essential for variant interpretation through allele frequency filtering; since elderly individuals are less likely to harbor pathogenic mutations for early- and adult-onset diseases, such variant databases are of great interest. Among the over 2.3 million variants from the present cohort, 1,282,008 were high-confidence calls. Importantly, 207,621 variants were absent from major public databases. We found 9,791 potential loss-of-function variants with about 300 mutations per individual. Pathogenic variants on clinically relevant genes (ACMG) were observed in 1.15% of the individuals and were correlated with clinical phenotype. We conducted incidence estimation for prevalent recessive disorders based upon heterozygous frequency and concluded that it relies on appropriate pathogenicity assertion. These observations illustrate the relevance of collecting demographic data from diverse, poorly characterized populations. Census-based datasets of aged individuals with comprehensive phenotyping are an invaluable resource toward the improved understanding of variant pathogenicity.


Exome , Genetics, Population , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Aging , Alleles , Brazil , Cohort Studies , Computational Biology , Databases, Genetic , Ethnic Groups , Female , Gene Frequency , Genetic Variation , Genotype , Heterozygote , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Mutation , Phenotype
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