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1.
Health Informatics J ; 27(4): 14604582211043158, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34609237

ABSTRACT

Studies on vitamin D receptor (VDR) and its association with multiple disorders are expanding. This bibliometric study aims to find and summarize VDR-related publications, and compare them across various countries, organizations, and journals to demonstrate trends in VDR research. VOSviewer and Excel 2019 were used to classify and summarize Web of Science articles from 1900 to mid-2021. Total records of 8762 articles were analyzed, and maps of co-citations bibliometric keywords co-occurrence were designed. In conclusion, relative research interest and published papers related to VDR were growing in the past 30 years. The United States of America dominates the research regarding VDR. The highest quality of VDR research was achieved by the University of California System, University of Wisconsin System, and Harvard University. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol, PLoS One, and J Biol Chem are the leading three productive journals on VDR. Various aspects of vitamin D deficiency associated disorders and genetic studies regarding VDR, including single nucleotide polymorphism, gene variants, epigenome, long non-coding ribonucleic acid (lncRNA), and small nucleolar RNA host gene 6 are potentially the recent research hotspot in this field. Moreover, coronavirus disease, polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, gut microbiota, gestational diabetes, systemic sclerosis, and chemoresistance are the trending medical conditions associated with VDR.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , Receptors, Calcitriol , Humans , Receptors, Calcitriol/genetics
2.
Rev Fac Cien Med Univ Nac Cordoba ; 78(3): 221-227, 2021 08 23.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34617711

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 outbreak has caused a major threat to the international community and raised significant public health concerns. The objective of this work was to describe the scientific communication patterns of Argentina on COVID-19 in the Scopus database. Method: A bibliometric study was carried out. Articles were retrieved according to subject matter using the title, abstract and keywords fields in the Scopus database. Results: 229 documents were retrieved, where 69.9% were citable documents (51.5% originals), 76.4% in English. The scientific leadership of Argentina in the published documents was 44.1%. National collaboration was found in 38% of the documents, in 16.6% collaboration between institutions from different jurisdictions, and 59.8% international collaboration. Conclusions: The productivity and internationalization indicators found in this study represent the response of the Argentine scientific community in the initial phase from the sphere of knowledge production. The results obtained could be interpreted as an effective response to the unprecedented health and social crisis imposed by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Argentina , Bibliometrics , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Front Public Health ; 9: 713487, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34497794

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak, which began in December 2019, has not been completely controlled; therefore, COVID-19 has received much attention from countries around the world. Many related clinical studies, such as clinical trials, have been published, but to the knowledge of the authors, there has been no bibliometric analysis of these publications focusing on clinical research studies on COVID-19. Methods: Global publications on COVID-19 from January 2020 to December 2020 were extracted from the Web of Science (WOS) collection database. The VOSviewer software and CiteSpace were employed to perform a bibliometric study. In addition, we obtained information on relevant clinical trials from the website http://clinicaltrials.gov. Results: China published most of the articles in this field and had the highest number of citations and H-index. The Journal of Medical Virology published most of the articles related to COVID-19. In terms of institutions, Huazhong University of Science and Technology had the most publications, and Wang, JW received the highest number of citations. Conclusion: The diagnosis, prevention, and prognosis of COVID-19 are still the focus of attention at present. The overall analysis of the disease were identified as the emerging topics from the perspectives of epidemiology and statistics. However, finding an effective treatment remains the focus of clinical trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Bibliometrics , Databases, Factual , Humans , Publications , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Front Public Health ; 9: 720787, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34527652

ABSTRACT

Background: Disaster epidemiology has not attracted enough attention in the past few decades and still faces significant challenges. This study aimed to systematically analyze the evolving trends and research hotspots in disaster epidemiology and provide insights into disaster epidemiology. Methods: We searched the Scopus and Web of Science Core Collection (WoSCC) databases between 1985 and 2020 to identify relevant literature on disaster epidemiology. The retrieval strategies were TITLE-ABS-KEY (disaster epidemiology) and TS = (disaster AND epidemiology). Bibliometrix, VOSviewer 1.6.6 and SigmaPlot 12.5 were used to analyze the key bibliometric indicators, including trends and annual publications, the contributions of countries, institutions, journals and authors, and research hotspots. Results: A total of 1,975 publications were included. There was an increasing trend in publications over the past 35 years. The USA was the most productive country. The most frequent institutions and journals were Fukushima Medical University and Prehospital and Disaster Medicine. Galea S made significant contributions to this field. "Epidemiology" was the highest-frequency keyword. COVID-19 was highly cited after 2019. Three research hotspots were identified: (i) the short- and long-term adverse health effects of disasters on the population; (ii) COVID-19 pandemic and emergency preparedness; and (iii) disaster management. Conclusions: In recent decades, the USA was a global leader in disaster epidemiology. Disaster management, the short- and long-term health effects of disasters, and the COVID-19 pandemic reflected the research focuses. Our results suggest that these directions will remain research hotspots in the future. International collaboration is also expected to widen and deepen in the field of disaster epidemiology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disasters , Bibliometrics , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0258064, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34591941

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has triggered an avalanche of research publications, the various aspects of which need to be assessed. The objective of this study is to determine the scientific community's response patterns to COVID-19 through a bibliometric analysis of the time-trends, global contribution, international collaboration, open-access provision, science domains of focus, and the behavior of journals. METHODS: The bibliographic records on COVID-19 literature were retrieved from both PubMed and Scopus. The period for searching was set from November 1, 2019, to April 15, 2021. The bibliographic data were coupled with COVID-19 incidence to explore possible association, as well as World Bank indicators and classification of economies. RESULTS: A total of 159132 records were included in the study. Following the escalation of incidences of COVID-19 in late 2020 and early 2021, the monthly publication count made a new peak in March 2021 at 20505. Overall, 125155 (78.6%) were national, 22548 (14.2%) were bi-national, and 11429 (7.2%) were multi-national. Low-income countries with 928 (66.8%) international publications had the highest percentage of international. The open-access provision decreased from 85.5% in February 2020 to 62.0% in April 2021. As many as 82841 (70.8%) publications were related to health sciences, followed by life sciences 27031 (23.1%), social sciences 20291 (17.3%), and physical sciences 15141 (12.9%). The top three medical subjects in publications were general internal medicine, public health, and infectious diseases with 28.9%, 18.3%, and 12.6% of medical publications, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The association between the incidence and publication count indicated the scientific community's interest in the ongoing situation and timely response to it. Only one-fifth of publications resulted from international collaboration, which might lead to redundancy without adding significant value. Our study underscores the necessity of policies for attraction of international collaboration and direction of vital funds toward domains of higher priority.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , COVID-19 , Biomedical Research , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Pandemics , PubMed , Public Health , Publishing/statistics & numerical data , Publishing/trends , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
6.
Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica ; 38(2): 224-231, 2021.
Article in Spanish, English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34468568

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the Peruvian scientific output on COVID-19 up to January 31, 2021. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We carried out a bibliometric study using two databases (MEDLINE and SciELO). We included original or short original articles with at least one author with Peruvian institutional affiliation. Scientific output was described according to: institution, approval by a Research Ethics Committee, registration in the platforms established by regulations, scientific journals in which they were published, research funding, and Peruvian collaboration networks. RESULTS: A total of 106 articles were analyzed, only three (2.8%) were clinical trials. Of the top 10 institutions with the highest scientific output, only two did not belong to the education sector. A total of 53 (50.0%) articles had no information regarding ethical aspects or it was not explicitly stated whether or not it was approved by a Research Ethics Committee. Only 8 (7.7%) of 104 articles were registered in PRISA; 12 (11.3%) articles were published in Peruvian journals. Regarding funding, 71 (67.0%) investigations did not specify the source or they were self-financed. We found international collaboration in 70 publications (66.0%). CONCLUSIONS: The most productive Peruvian institutions are found in Lima. Half of the articles did not state ethical aspects in any part of the document. Almost all of the studies were not registered on the platforms established by regulations. In more than half of the articles the source of funding is not stated or they were self-financed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Bibliometrics , Humans , Peru , Publications , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(9): e30692, 2021 09 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34346891

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 is one of the most threatening pandemics in human history. As of the date of this analysis, it had claimed about 2 million lives worldwide, and the number is rising sharply. Governments, societies, and scientists are equally challenged under this burden. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to map global coronavirus research in 2020 according to various influencing factors to highlight incentives or necessities for further research. METHODS: The application of established and advanced bibliometric methods combined with the visualization technique of density-equalizing mapping provided a global picture of incentives and efforts on coronavirus research in 2020. Countries' funding patterns and their epidemiological and socioeconomic characteristics as well as their publication performance data were included. RESULTS: Research output exploded in 2020 with momentum, including citation and networking parameters. China and the United States were the countries with the highest publication performance. Globally, however, publication output correlated significantly with COVID-19 cases. Research funding has also increased immensely. CONCLUSIONS: Nonetheless, the abrupt decline in publication efforts following previous coronavirus epidemics should demonstrate to global researchers that they should not lose interest even after containment, as the next epidemiological challenge is certain to come. Validated reporting worldwide and the inclusion of low-income countries are additionally important for a successful future research strategy.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Bibliometrics , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
8.
PLoS One ; 16(8): e0254988, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34370749

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During uncertainties associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, effectively improving people's health literacy is more important than ever. Drawing knowledge maps of health literacy research through data mining and visualized measurement technology helps systematically present the research status and development trends in global academic circles. METHODS: This paper uses CiteSpace to carry out a metric analysis of 9,492 health literacy papers included in Web of Science through mapping knowledge domains. First, based on the production theory of scientific knowledge and the data mining of citations, the main bodies (country, institution and author) that produce health literacy knowledge as well as their mutual cooperation (collaboration network) are both clarified. Additionally, based on the quantitative framework of cocitation analysis, this paper introduces the interdisciplinary features, development trends and hot topics of the field. Finally, by using burst detection technology in the literature, it further reveals the research frontiers of health literacy. RESULTS: The results of the BC measures of the global health literacy research collaboration network show that the United States, Australia and the United Kingdom are the major forces in the current international collaboration network on health literacy. There are still relatively very few transnational collaborations between Eastern and Western research institutions. Collaborations in public environmental occupational health, health care science services, nursing and health policy services have been active in the past five years. Research topics in health literacy research evolve over time, mental health has been the most active research field in recent years. CONCLUSIONS: A systematic approach is needed to address the challenges of health literacy, and the network framework of cooperation on health literacy at regional, national and global levels should be strengthened to further promote the application of health literacy research. In the future, we anticipate that this research field will expand in two directions, namely, mental health literacy and eHealth literacy, both of which are closely linked to social development and issues. The results of this study provide references for future applied research in health literacy.


Subject(s)
Data Mining , Global Health , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Literacy , Bibliometrics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Public Health
9.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34299724

ABSTRACT

Scientometrics enables scholars to assess and visualize emerging research trends and hot-spots in the scientific literature from a quantitative standpoint. In the last decades, Africa has nearly doubled its absolute count of scholarly output, even though its share in global knowledge production has dramatically decreased. The still-ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly impacted the way scholarly research is conducted, published, and disseminated. However, the COVID-19-related research focus, the scientific productivity, and the research collaborative network of African researchers during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to clarify the COVID-19 research patterns among African researchers and estimate the strength of collaborations and partnerships between African researchers and scholars from the rest of the world during the COVID-19 pandemic, collecting data from electronic scholarly databases such as Web of Science (WoS), PubMed/MEDLINE and African Journals OnLine (AJOL), the largest and prominent platform of African-published scholarly journals. We found that COVID-19-related collaboration patterns varied among African regions. For instance, most of the scholarly partnerships occurred with formerly colonial countries (such as European or North-American countries). In other cases, scholarly ties of North African countries were above all with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In terms of number of publications, South Africa and Egypt were among the most productive countries. Bibliometrics and, in particular, scientometrics can help scholars identify research areas of particular interest, as well as emerging topics, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. With a specific focus on the still-ongoing viral outbreak, they can assist decision- and policy-makers in allocating funding and economic-financial, logistic, organizational, and human resources, based on the specific gaps and needs of a given country or research area.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Africa, Northern , Bibliometrics , Egypt , Humans , Leadership , North America , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia , South Africa
10.
Front Immunol ; 12: 669539, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34093568

ABSTRACT

Acute lung injury (ALI) is an intractable disorder associated with macrophages. This bibliometric analysis was applied to identify the characteristics of global scientific output, the hotspots, and frontiers about macrophages in ALI over the past 10 years. We retrieved publications published from 2011 to 2020 and their recorded information from Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-expanded) of Web of Science Core Collection (WoSCC). Bibliometrix package was used to analyze bibliometric indicators, and the VOSviewer was used to visualize the trend and hotspots of researches on macrophages in ALI. Altogether, 2,632 original articles were reviewed, and the results showed that the annual number of publications (Np) concerning the role of macrophages in ALI kept increasing over the past 10 years. China produced the most papers, the number of citations (Nc) and H-index of the USA ranked first. Shanghai Jiaotong University and INT IMMUNOPHARMACOL were the most prolific affiliation and journal, respectively. Papers published by Matute-Bello G in 2011 had the highest local citation score (LCS). Recently, the keywords "NLRP3" and "extracellular vesicles" appeared most frequently. Besides, researches on COVID-19-induced ALI related to macrophages seemed to be the hotspot recently. This bibliometric study revealed that publications related to macrophages in ALI tend to increase continuously. China was a big producer and the USA was an influential country in this field. Most studies were mainly centered on basic researches in the past decade, and pathways associated with the regulatory role of macrophages in inhibiting and attenuating ALI have become the focus of attention in more recent studies. What is more, our bibliometric analysis showed that macrophages play an important role in COVID-19-induced ALI and may be a target for the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/immunology , Bibliometrics , Macrophages/immunology , Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Asia , Brazil , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Europe , Humans , North America , Publishing/trends , SARS-CoV-2
11.
BMJ Glob Health ; 6(5)2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33972261

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to an unprecedented global research effort to build a body of knowledge that can inform mitigation strategies. We carried out a bibliometric analysis to describe the COVID-19 research output in Africa in terms of setting, study design, research themes and author affiliation. METHODS: We searched for articles published between 1 December 2019 and 3 January 2021 from various databases including PubMed, African Journals Online, medRxiv, Collabovid, the WHO global research database and Google. All article types and study design were included. RESULTS: A total of 1296 articles were retrieved. 46.6% were primary research articles, 48.6% were editorial-type articles while 4.6% were secondary research articles. 20.3% articles used the entire continent of Africa as their study setting while South Africa (15.4%) was the most common country-focused setting. The most common research topics include 'country preparedness and response' (24.9%) and 'the direct and indirect health impacts of the pandemic' (21.6%). However, only 1.0% of articles focus on therapeutics and vaccines. 90.3% of the articles had at least one African researcher as author, 78.5% had an African researcher as first author, while 63.5% had an African researcher as last author. The University of Cape Town leads with the greatest number of first and last authors. 13% of the articles were published in medRxiv and of the studies that declared funding, the Wellcome Trust was the top funding body. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights Africa's COVID-19 research and the continent's existing capacity to carry out research that addresses local problems. However, more studies focused on vaccines and therapeutics are needed to inform local development. In addition, the uneven distribution of research productivity among African countries emphasises the need for increased investment where needed.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Africa/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans
12.
Rev Esp Salud Publica ; 952021 May 27.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34042088

ABSTRACT

The impact and the universality of the pandemic by SARS-CoV-2 has caused the need to have information quickly and accessible for the benefit of decision-making among healthcare professionals. In 10 months the scientific production on this new coronavirus has exceeded the number of 66 thousand articles, according to the LitCovid database, created by the National Library of Medicine, doubling and tripling every few weeks. This same urgency has characterized some of the main features of this voluminous production, in addition to its continuous and exponential growth, such as greater dissemination in open access and preprint repositories, a certain acceleration in the manuscript review process by editorials and an abundance of opinion articles, recommendations or comments compared to a smaller number of original articles with clinical data from large groups of patients.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19 , Publishing/trends , Access to Information , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Decision-Making , Databases, Factual , Evidence-Based Medicine , Global Health , Humans , Pandemics
14.
Yearb Med Inform ; 30(1): 245-256, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33882597

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The study aims at understanding the structural characteristics and content features of COVID-19 literature and public health data from the perspective of the 'Language and Meaning in Biomedicine' Working Group (LaMB WG) of IMIA. The LaMB WG has interest in conceptual characteristics, transparency, comparability, and reusability of medical information, both in science and practice. METHODS: A set of methods were used (i) investigating the overall speed and dynamics of COVID-19 publications; (ii) characterizing the concepts of COVID-19 (text mining, visualizing a semantic map of related concepts); (iii) assessing (re)usability and combinability of data sets and paper collections (as textual data sets), and checking if information is Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable (FAIR). A further method tested practical usability of FAIR requirements by setting up a common data space of epidemiological, virus genetics and governmental public health measures' stringency data of various origin, where complex data points were visualized as scatter plots. RESULTS: Never before were that many papers and data sources dedicated to one pandemic. Worldwide research shows a plateau at ∼ 2,200 papers per week - the dynamics of areas of studies being slightly different. Ratio of epidemic modelling is rather low (∼1%). A few 'language and meaning' methods, such as using integrated terminologies, applying data and metadata standards for processing epidemiological and case-related clinical information and in general, principles of FAIR data handling could contribute to better results, such as improved interoperability and meaningful knowledge sharing in a virtuous cycle of continuous improvements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Publications/statistics & numerical data , Bibliometrics , Biomedical Research , Humans , Information Storage and Retrieval
16.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(8): 2367-2372, 2021 08 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33687303

ABSTRACT

Background: In the last two decades the world has experienced many outbreaks of infectious diseases including the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. COVID-19 was first reported in China and spread to more than 200 countries and territories. At present, there are no available treatment and vaccines for COVID-19. This study aimed to evaluate the global research trends in COVID-19 vaccine.Methods: On January 12, 2020, a comprehensive search of documents on COVID-19 was conducted in the Web of Science Core Collection database. HistCiteTM and VOSviewer softwares are used for citations and visualization mapping.Results: A total of 916 documents authored by 4,392 authors and published in 376 journals were included in the final analysis. Majority of the retrieved documents consisted of articles (n = 372, 40.6%). The most prolific authors were Dhama K (n = 10, 1.1%) and Hotez PJ (n = 10, 1.1%). The most active institution was the University of Oxford (n = 24, 2.6%). The leading journal in COVID-19 vaccine was Human Vaccine & Immunotherapeutics (n = 43, 4.7%). The most frequently used keywords were COVID (n = 597, 65.2%), and vaccine (n = 521, 56.9%). Furthermore, visualization mapping shows that COVID-19 was the most co-occurrence author keyword. The United States of America (USA) was the most productive country, 352 (38.4%).Conclusions: This is the first bibliometric study that provides detailed information about published literature on the COVID-19 vaccine. Majority of the publications were published in developed countries. The findings may useful for researchers and policymakers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Bibliometrics , Humans , Publications , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
17.
Biosci Trends ; 15(2): 64-73, 2021 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33746182

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has affected tens of millions of people globally since it was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) on March 11, 2020. There is an urgent need for safe and effective preventive vaccines to curb this pandemic. A growing amount of related research has been published. This study aimed to provide the current status of COVID-19 vaccine using bibliometric analysis. We searched Embase.com and MEDLINE comprehensively and included articles, articles in press, reviews, short surveys, conference abstracts and conference papers about COVID-19 vaccine. VOSviewer1.6.11 (Leiden University, Leiden, Netherlands) was applied to perform the bibliometric analysis of these papers. A total of 1,312 papers were finally included. The BMJ has been the most popular journal in this field. The United States maintained a top position worldwide and has provided a pivotal influence, followed by China, India and United Kingdom. Among all the institutions, Harvard University was regarded as a leader for research collaboration. We analyzed the keywords and identified seven COVID-19 vaccine research hotspot clusters. COVID-19 vaccine research hotspots focus on clinical trials on vaccine safety and efficacy, research on vaccine immunology and immunoinformatics, and vaccine hesitancy. Our analysis results demonstrated that cooperation between countries, institutions, and authors were insufficient. The results suggested that clinical trials on vaccine safety, efficacy, immunology, immunoinformatics, production and delivery are research hotspots. Furthermore, we can predict that there will be a lot of research focusing on vaccine adverse reactions.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacology , Databases, Bibliographic , Humans , MEDLINE , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Safety
18.
Mycopathologia ; 186(2): 155-162, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33704625

ABSTRACT

The 2020 COVID-19 pandemic had a profound impact on the publishing landscape. The 'pre-peer-review' publication model is likely to become common as a lag in publishing is not acceptable in a pandemic or other time! Mycopathologia is well placed to adopt such changes with its improved editorial processes, article formats, author engagements, and published articles' access and citation. Mycopathologia had an improved journal impact factor and article downloads in 2018-2019. A limited sampling suggested a slight decrease in the total submissions in 2019 (352 articles) compared to 2018 (371 articles). However, the acceptance rate improved to 30% in 2019 from 19% in 2018. Nearly half of all submissions in 2019 were rejected before peer-review or transferred to other Springer Nature journals. The published articles were contributed from 34 different countries, with authors from China, the USA, and Brazil among the top three contributors. An enhanced editorial oversight allowed peer-reviewers to focus on fewer articles that were well-matched to their expertise, which led to lower rejection rates post-peer-review. The introduction of MycopathologiaGENOME and MycopathologiaIMAGE article types received a good reception with notable downloads and citations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mycology , Pathology , Peer Review, Research/standards , Periodicals as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Periodicals as Topic/standards , Research Report/standards , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Journal Impact Factor , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Radiology ; 300(1): E301-E307, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33724061

ABSTRACT

Background Early reports show the unequal effect the COVID-19 pandemic might have on men versus women engaged in medical research. Purpose To investigate whether the COVID-19 pandemic has had an impact on scientific publishing by female physicians in medical imaging. Materials and Methods The authors conducted a descriptive bibliometric analysis of the gender of the first and last authors of manuscripts submitted to the top 50 medical imaging journals from March to May 2020 (n = 2480) compared with the same period of the year in 2018 (n = 2238) and 2019 (n = 2355). Manuscript title, date of submission, first and last names of the first and last authors, journal impact factor, and author country of provenance were recorded. The Gender-API software was used to determine author gender. Statistical analysis comprised χ2 tests and multivariable logistic regression. Results Percentages of women listed as first and last authors were 31.6% (1172 of 3711 articles) and 19.3% (717 of 3711 articles), respectively, in 2018-2019 versus 32.3% (725 of 2248 articles) and 20.7% (465 of 2248 articles) in 2020 (P = .61 and P = .21, respectively). For COVID-19-related articles, 35.2% (89 of 253 articles) of first authors and 20.6% (52 of 253 articles) of last authors were women. No associations were found between first- and last-author gender, year of publication, and region of provenance. First and last authorship of high-ranking articles was not in favor of North American women whatever the year (odds ratio [OR], 0.79 [P = .05] and 0.72 [P = .02], respectively). Higher rates of female last authorship of high-ranking articles were observed in Europe (P = .003) and of female first authorship of low-ranking publications in Asia in 2020 (OR, 1.38; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.92; P = .06). Female first and last authorship of COVID-19-related articles was overrepresented for lowest-rank publications (P = .02 and P = .01, respectively). Conclusion One in three first authors and one in five last authors were women in 2018-2019 and 2020, respectively. Although the first 2020 lockdown did not diminish the quantity of women-authored publications, the impact on the quality was variable. ©RSNA, 2021 See also the editorial by Robbins and Khosa in this issue.


Subject(s)
Authorship , Bibliometrics , Biomedical Research/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Periodicals as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Sexism/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Global Health ; 17(1): 31, 2021 03 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33766073

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: At the global level and in the Arab world, particularly in low-income countries, COVID-19 remains a major public health issue. As demonstrated by an incredible number of COVID-19-related publications, the research science community responded rapidly. Therefore, this study was intended to assess the growing contribution of the Arab world to global research on COVID-19. METHODS: For the period between December 2019 and March 2021, the search for publications was conducted via the Scopus database using terms linked to COVID-19. VOSviewer 1.6.16 software was applied to generate a network map to assess hot topics in this area and determine the collaboration patterns between different countries. Furthermore, the research output of Arab countries was adjusted in relation to population size and gross domestic product (GDP). RESULTS: A total of 143,975 publications reflecting the global overall COVID-19 research output were retrieved. By restricting analysis to the publications published by the Arab countries, the research production was 6131 documents, representing 4.26% of the global research output regarding COVID-19. Of all these publications, 3990 (65.08%) were original journal articles, 980 (15.98%) were review articles, 514 (8.38%) were letters and 647 (10.55%) were others, such as editorials or notes. The highest number of COVID-19 publications was published by Saudi Arabia (n = 2186, 35.65%), followed by Egypt (n = 1281, 20.78%) and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), (n = 719, 11.73%). After standardization by population size and GDP, Saudi Arabia, UAE and Lebanon had the highest publication productivity. The collaborations were mostly with researchers from the United States (n = 968), followed by the United Kingdom (n = 661). The main research lines identified in COVID-19 from the Arab world are related to: public health and epidemiology; immunological and pharmaceutical research; signs, symptoms and clinical diagnosis; and virus detection. CONCLUSIONS: A novel analysis of the latest Arab COVID-19-related studies is discussed in the current study and how these findings are connected to global production. Continuing and improving future collaboration between developing and developed countries will also help to facilitate the sharing of responsibilities for COVID-19 in research results and the implementation of policies for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Developing Countries , SARS-CoV-2 , Arabs , COVID-19/virology , Databases, Factual , Egypt , Humans , International Cooperation , Lebanon , Publishing , Saudi Arabia , United Kingdom , United States
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