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1.
Bol. latinoam. Caribe plantas med. aromát ; 20(1): 90-100, 2021. ilus, tab
Article in Spanish | LILACS, MOSAICO - Integrative health | ID: biblio-1145972

ABSTRACT

Cataia es una Myrtaceae de gran potencial aromático y medicinal. En la costa de Paraná hay registro de uso comercial creciente de sus hojas en la aromatización de aguardiente. Buscando comprender mejor la explotación de cataia desde una perspectiva histórica, así como elucidar el conocimiento ecológico de los moradores acerca del manejo, se presentan los resultados de una investigación etnobotánica realizada en Barra do Ararapira (PR/Brasil). La recolección de datos ha incluido entrevistas semiestructuradas y acompañamiento a campo de los extractivistas. Se ha revelado potencial de sostenibilidad, denotado por el apoyo institucional, en lo que se refiere a conferir legalidad a la actividad. La baja demanda actual se presenta como punto positivo, con la necesidad de monitoreo continuo de posibles daños, frente al posible aumento de la demanda. Sobre la cadena de valor, la inexistencia de intermediarios y la venta regular a comerciantes, caracterizan un componente de comercialización favorable.


Cataia is a Myrtaceae of great aromatic and medicinal potential. On the coast of Paraná there is a record of increasing commercial use of its leaves in the aromatization of brandy. In order to better understand the exploitation of cataia from a historical perspective, as well as elucidate the ecological knowledge of the inhabitants about the management, the results of an ethnobotanical investigation carried out in Barra do Ararapira are presented. Data collect has involved individual and group interviews and monitoring of all extractor's activities. It was elucidated a sustainability potential, denoted at first instance by institutional support to confer legality to the activity and for their implementation, and the community organizational capacity. As regards to the ecological question, the low demand now existent was considerate a positive aspect, but is highlight the importance of a continuous monitoring of possible damage. Regarding the value chain was evidenced the absence of intermediaries and the regular sale to traders of the region, featuring a favorable marketing component.


Subject(s)
Ethnobotany , Polygonum/classification , Plants, Medicinal , Brazil , Medicine, Traditional
2.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 264: 113254, 2021 Jan 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32798616

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Research on the folk categorization of nature in preliterate societies in Europe is complicated due to the fragmentation of the information available and is rarely undertaken. Yet the data is valuable and may provide, in certain circumstances, important insights, if not into novel medicines, then into the historical logic of selection and memorisation of plants useful from a medicinal perspective. AIMS OF THE STUDY: We aim to understand the ethnobotany of a preliterate society by analysing the emic (derived from people) perspective on nature-related culture of one of Europe's smaller nations, whose written language and culture was shaped in the 18th-19th centuries by other, larger nations of Europe, and thus from the etic (academic) perspective. We attempt to identify how folk categorization is reflected in the relationships between plant names and uses and to map the structure of those relationships. DATA AND METHODS: We base our analysis on one of the oldest ethnobotanical manuscripts and herbaria of the Baltic governorates, compiled in 1831 by an amateur botanist, Baltic German Pastor Johann Heinrich Rosenplänter (1782-1846), which was derived from conversations with his parishioners from the tiny Pärnu parish. The historical dataset was critically analysed from an ethnobotanical perspective in light of recent identifications of the herbarium specimens. RESULTS: Although the Rosenplänter collection is fragmentary, the logic of plant categorization by non-literate peasants at that time is clearly seen in the data. Plants preserved in the herbarium were predominantly used for ethno-medicinal, food or ethno-veterinary purposes, such as treating chronic skin and joint diseases as well as severe acute diseases in humans and animals. Among 129 folk taxa analysed, more than one third had apparent purpose-related plant names providing clear links to their use, whereas a few multifunctional plants had several names reflecting diverse uses. For example, Hypericum spp., which was used in three different ways, had three semantically distinct names. However, among the plants that Rosenplänter collected, there were also some that were simply named and described by people but lacked any usability data (e.g., Trollius europaeus), meaning that use as such was not the primary criterion for recognising a plant. The web-like structure of preliterate thinking in plant-related knowledge reveals a deep relationship with the environment and the interpretation of new elements through familiar natural objects. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate that historical ethnobotanical data, if thoughtfully analysed, can be used not only for comparative purposes, but also for understanding the logic of preliterate thinking. We encourage future in-depth studies of historical ethnobotanical data in Europe in order to understand the relationship between nature and culture of native European populations.


Subject(s)
Ethnobotany/history , Ethnopharmacology/history , Manuscripts, Medical as Topic/history , Medicine, Traditional/history , Plants, Medicinal , Baltic States/ethnology , History, 18th Century , History, 19th Century , Humans
3.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 264: 113262, 2021 Jan 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32818574

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: In the Peruvian Amazon as in the tropical countries of South America, the use of medicinal Piper species (cordoncillos) is common practice, particularly against symptoms of infection by protozoal parasites. However, there is few documented information about the practical aspects of their use and few scientific validation. The starting point of this work was a set of interviews of people living in six rural communities from the Peruvian Amazon (Alto Amazonas Province) about their uses of plants from Piper genus: one community of Amerindian native people (Shawi community) and five communities of mestizos. Infections caused by parasitic protozoa take a huge toll on public health in the Amazonian communities, who partly fight it using traditional remedies. Validation of these traditional practices contributes to public health care efficiency and may help to identify new antiprotozoal compounds. AIMS OF STUDY: To record and validate the use of medicinal Piper species by rural people of Alto Amazonas Province (Peru) and annotate active compounds using a correlation study and a data mining approach. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rural communities were interviewed about traditional medication against parasite infections with medicinal Piper species. Ethnopharmacological surveys were undertaken in five mestizo villages, namely: Nueva Arica, Shucushuyacu, Parinari, Lagunas and Esperanza, and one Shawi community (Balsapuerto village). All communities belong to the Alto Amazonas Province (Loreto region, Peru). Seventeen Piper species were collected according to their traditional use for the treatment of parasitic diseases, 35 extracts (leaves or leaves and stems) were tested in vitro on P. falciparum (3D7 chloroquine-sensitive strain and W2 chloroquine-resistant strain), Leishmania donovani LV9 strain and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. Assessments were performed on HUVEC cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages. The annotation of active compounds was realized by metabolomic analysis and molecular networking approach. RESULTS: Nine extracts were active (IC50 ≤ 10 µg/mL) on 3D7 P. falciparum and only one on W2 P. falciparum, six on L. donovani (axenic and intramacrophagic amastigotes) and seven on Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. Only one extract was active on all three parasites (P. lineatum). After metabolomic analyses and annotation of compounds active on Leishmania, P. strigosum and P. pseudoarboreum were considered as potential sources of leishmanicidal compounds. CONCLUSIONS: This ethnopharmacological study and the associated in vitro bioassays corroborated the relevance of use of Piper species in the Amazonian traditional medicine, especially in Peru. A series of Piper species with few previously available phytochemical data have good antiprotozoal activity and could be a starting point for subsequent promising work. Metabolomic approach appears to be a smart, quick but still limited methodology to identify compounds with high probability of biological activity.


Subject(s)
Antiprotozoal Agents/metabolism , Ethnopharmacology/methods , Medicine, Traditional/methods , Metabolomics/methods , Piper/metabolism , Plant Extracts/metabolism , Animals , Antimalarials/isolation & purification , Antimalarials/metabolism , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Antiprotozoal Agents/isolation & purification , Antiprotozoal Agents/therapeutic use , Female , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Humans , Leishmania donovani/drug effects , Leishmania donovani/metabolism , Mesocricetus , Mice , Peru/ethnology , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Plasmodium falciparum/drug effects , Plasmodium falciparum/metabolism , RAW 264.7 Cells , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 264: 113339, 2021 Jan 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32898627

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Cereus hildmannianus (K.) Schum. (syn. C. peruvianus) is a native medicinal plant in the Neotropical region. C. hildmannianus cladodes extracts are used in folk medicine for weight loss, reducing cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels, as diuretic and cardiotonic, and to treat various diseases, including pulmonary disorders, rheumatism, and in topical treatment for wounds and lithiasis. Fruits and flowers of C. hildmmanianus have high nutritional value. AIM OF THE REVIEW: In this review, previous reports on C. hildmannianus (syn. C. peruvianus) concerning its botanical description, geographical distribution, ethnomedicinal use, phytochemistry, in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties, food benefits and plant biotechnology were summarized. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Scientific search engines, including ScienceDirect, Capes Journals Portal, Google Scholar, PubMed, Scielo, and Scifinder, were consulted to gather data on C. hildmannianus. The present review is an up-to-date and comprehensive analysis of phytochemical compounds, ethnomedicinal uses, phytopharmacological activities, and food value of cladodes, flowers, fruits, seeds, and tissue culture from C. hildmannianus. RESULTS: In traditional medicine, C.hildmannianus is used to treat various diseases, including pulmonary disorders, rheumatism, and in topical treatment for wounds and lithiasis. The extracts from the cladodes of C. hildmannianus exhibited numerous in vitro and in vivo pharmacological activities such as gastroprotective, antioxidant, antifungal, ovicidal, hemagglutinating and slimming, and anticancer activity. These extracts' substances belong to different classes of chemical compounds such as fatty acids, polysaccharides, terpenes, alkaloids, phenolic acids, and flavonoids CONCLUSIONS: Ethnomedicinal surveys have indicated the use of C. hildmannianus, an important medicinal plant in South America, for the treatment of various diseases. The ethnobotanical, phytochemical, pharmacological, and ethnomedicinal properties from various morphological parts of the plant of C. hildmannianus were highlighted in this review, which provides information for future studies, commercial exploration and reveals that this plant has a huge potential for pharmaceutical and nutraceutical applications.


Subject(s)
Cactaceae , Ethnopharmacology/methods , Medicine, Traditional/methods , Phytochemicals/therapeutic use , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Plants, Medicinal , Animals , Antifungal Agents/isolation & purification , Antifungal Agents/pharmacology , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , Antioxidants/isolation & purification , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Ethnopharmacology/trends , Humans , Medicine, Traditional/trends , Phytochemicals/isolation & purification , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , South America/ethnology
5.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 264: 113378, 2021 Jan 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32918995

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Ocotea odorifera (Vell.) Rohwer has been used in traditional medicine in the south of Brazil for the treatment of inflammatory-related conditions, such as rheumatism. However, there is not any scientific evidence for popular use. AIMS OF THE STUDY: To investigate the O. odorifera anti-inflammatory potential and identification of the main active compounds through metabolomic approaches. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In order to in vivo evaluate the inhibition of the main inflammatory pathways, the leaf decoction, leaf extract, its fractions and the essential oils from leaves and branches were submitted to the ear oedema and the neutrophils recruitment assays. The samples were chemically investigated by UHPLC-HRMS or GC-MS. The multivariate statistical analysis (PLS-DA) was used to determine the substances correlated with the anti-inflammatory properties. RESULTS: The in vivo studies indicated a promissory anti-inflammatory effect on both oedema and neutrophil recruitment for some samples including the decoction; hydroethanolic, ethyl acetate, and chloroform fractions; and the essential oils. According to the PLS-DA, the S-(+)-reticuline was evidenced as one of the three compounds of the plant most correlated with both anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, S-(+)-reticuline was isolated and the anti-inflammatory activity was confirmed. Moreover, for the first time, the dual inhibition of oedema and neutrophil recruitment was uncovered and reported. Another compound positively correlated with the anti-inflammatory activity is likely to be a new compound since zero hit on the comprehensive mass database were encountered. The compounds found in the essential oils also showed significant anti-inflammatory activity, and thus indeed the plant has different classes of active substances. CONCLUSIONS: The decoction of O. odorifera and different fractions from its ethanolic extract demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity through dual inhibition of oedema and neutrophil recruitment. Thus, corroborating the popular medicinal use of the decoction of leaves from O. odorifera as an anti-inflammatory medicine. Besides, reticuline, one of the main active compounds, was isolated and proved to display the dual mechanism of action, indicating the O. odorifera as a promising source of active compounds for the treatment of inflammatory conditions.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Ethnopharmacology/methods , Ocotea , Oils, Volatile/therapeutic use , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use , Plant Oils/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/isolation & purification , Brazil/ethnology , Edema/drug therapy , Edema/pathology , Mice , Oils, Volatile/isolation & purification , Plant Extracts/isolation & purification , Plant Leaves , Plant Oils/isolation & purification
6.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 264: 112915, 2021 Jan 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32360044

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The genus Stellera Linn. consists of species of perennial herbs and shrubs, and is mainly distributed in the temperate regions of east Asia to west Asia. There are 10∼12 species in the world, two species in China: Stellera chamaejasme Linn. and Stellera formosana Hayata ex Li. As recorded, the roots of Stellera species are used to dissipate phlegm and relieve pain. The roots and the barks can be used for papermaking. AIM OF THIS REVIEW: This review aims to summarize the ethnopharmacological uses, chemical constituents, pharmacological activities, clinical applications and toxicology of the genus Stellera to better understand their therapeutic potential in the future. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The relevant information of the genus Stellera was collected from scientific databases (Pubmed, ACS website, SciFinder Scholar, Elsevier, Google Scholar, Web of Science and CNKI). Information was also gathered from 'Flora Republicae Popularis Sinicae (〈〈〉〉)', folk records, conference papers on ethnopharmacology, Ph.D. and Masters' Dissertation. RESULTS: Stellera plants have been studied as traditional folk medicines all around the world. The chemical constituents of Stellera species mainly comprise terpenoids, flavonoids, coumarins, lignans, and so on. Extracts and compounds of Stellera species exhibit extensive pharmacological activities, such as anti-tumor, anti-viral, anti-convulsive, anti-epileptic, anti-bacterial and anti-insect activities, etc. Clinical applications have suggested that the genus Stellera has the effects in treating several skin diseases and cancers, however, the results should be further verification. The genus Stellera plants are toxic and should be used reasonable. CONCLUSION: This paper reviewed the ethnopharmacological uses, chemical constituents, pharmacology, clinical applications and toxicology of the genus Stellera. The genus Stellera has broad application prospects. However, further in-depth studies are needed to determine the medical uses of the genus and its chemical constituents, pharmacological activities, clinical applications and toxicology.


Subject(s)
Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Ethnopharmacology/methods , Medicine, Traditional/methods , Phytochemicals/therapeutic use , Thymelaeaceae , Toxicity Tests/methods , Animals , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/isolation & purification , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology , Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/isolation & purification , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/isolation & purification , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Ethnopharmacology/trends , Humans , Medicine, Traditional/trends , Phytochemicals/isolation & purification , Phytochemicals/pharmacology
7.
Int J Equity Health ; 19(1): 101, 2020 06 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32571404

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDS: An intercultural society facilitates equitable and respectful interrelations. Knowing and understanding each other's sociocultural and linguitic contexts is a prerequisite for an intercultural society. This study explores the concepts of health and illness among healers of indigenous ethnicities in Southern Ecuador. METHODS: A qualitative observational study with eleven focus groups was conducted in three locations in Southern Ecuador; a total of 110 participants the Shuar, Kichwa and Mestizo ethnic groups were included. A phenomenological and hermeneutic analysis was conducted. RESULTS: Fourteen main subtopics around of two predefined themes, i.e., "Health" and "Illness" were identified: 1) four bodies, 2) religiosity, 3) health as a good diet, 4) health as god's blessing or a gift, 5) health as balance/ harmony, 6) health as community and social welfare, 7) health as potentiality or a skill, 8) health as peacefulness, 9) heath as individual will, 10) illness as an imbalance, 11) illness as bad energy, 12) illness as a bad diet, 13) illness as suffering or worry, and 14) illness from God, Nature and People illness. By analysing all the topics' and subtopics' narratives, a health and illness definition was developed. The principal evidence for this new framework is the presence of interculturality as a horizontal axis in health. The indigenous perspective of health and illness focus on a balance between 4 bodies: the physical, spiritual, social and mental bodies. Additionally, "good health" is obtained through of the good diet and balanced/harmony. CONCLUSION: Indigenous healers in Southern Ecuador have views on health and illness that differ from the Western biomedical model of care. These different views must be recognized and valued in order to build an intercultural (health) system that empowers both ancestral and modern medical knowledge and healing.


Subject(s)
Attitude to Health , Chronic Disease/classification , Ethnic Groups/psychology , Healthy Lifestyle/classification , Indigenous Peoples/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ecuador , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research
8.
PLoS One ; 15(5): e0232288, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32379779

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Ethnobotanical studies that include participatory methods aim to engage residents in different steps to promote the strengthening and perpetuation of local culture, and empowerment in making decisions about the use of available environmental resources. Thus, the aim of this project was to perform an ethnobotanical survey based on traditional knowledge of medicinal plants with the active participation of residents living in Bairro do Cambury, Ubatuba, São Paulo State, Brazil. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During meetings held between the researchers and community members, locally used plants were regarded as an important means for preserving local knowledge for future generations. Some residents showed interest in participating as local partners, and training courses for collecting ethnobotanical data were offered. Local partners and researchers from São Paulo Federal University (Universidade Federal de São Paulo) utilized ethnobotanical methods to select and interview the specialists in medicinal plants for 80 days between 2016 and 2018. Data on plant use were recorded, and plants were collected and deposited in two herbaria. Furthermore, participant observation and fieldwork diaries were used by the researchers, aiding the data analysis. RESULTS: Three local partners participated in objective definitions, data collection, analysis and publication. Nine local specialists were interviewed by the local partners and indicated the use of 82 plant species in 90 recipes for 55 therapeutic uses. These uses were grouped into 12 categories. In addition, a video and booklet were created. CONCLUSIONS: Data obtained during participatory research show that training local communities in the registration of their own knowledge is feasible and necessary since they register knowledge based on local perceptions, as well as valuing knowledge and approaching the current discussion about intellectual property is a global concern.


Subject(s)
Ethnobotany/methods , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology , Medicine, Traditional/methods , Brazil/ethnology , Expert Testimony/methods , Female , Humans , Knowledge , Male , Middle Aged , Plants, Medicinal , Records , Stakeholder Participation/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi ; 45(3): 689-696, 2020 Feb.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32237530

ABSTRACT

Indigenous knowledge and traditional culture for sustainable use of native plants in Juenang cultural region of Rangtang county, Aba Zang and Qiang Prefecture of Sichuan province, have been characterized in this paper followed the principles and methods of ethnobotany. The results indicate that 38 species from 27 families(including 6 species of fungi) are ethnobotanically used commonly in this area. Of 38 species of the native plants, 13 species from 12 families are collected for eatables and vegetables, 12 families and 16 species of indigenous plants for medicinal and edible use, 4 species from 4 families for decoration, 4 species from 4 families used for building materials or firewood, and 1 species from 1 families used for religious folklore. Under the influence of Juenang culture and Tibetan culture, indigenous knowledge such as instinctive reverence and gratitude for nature, protection ecological environment and habitats, and moderate use of natural resources(especially wild bioresource), have been gotten passed on from generation to generation in Juenang culture region of Rangtang county, which is of great significance to the protection of local bioresources and environment, including ethnic medicinal plants, and also to provide practical guidance for biodiversity conservation and ecological restoration in those alpine ecological vulnerable areas.


Subject(s)
Ethnobotany , Fungi/classification , Plants, Medicinal/classification , Biodiversity , China , Conservation of Natural Resources , Humans , Knowledge , Phytotherapy
10.
Bol. latinoam. Caribe plantas med. aromát ; 19(2): 149-160, mar. 2020. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS | ID: biblio-1104061

ABSTRACT

Clinopodium mexicanum (Benth.) Govaerts (Lamiaceae) is a native plant of Mexico. This plant is used in traditional Mexican medicine for the treatment of cultural specific syndromes such as "susto", "nervios" or "espanto", conditions related to anxiety and depression. In addition, it has a high biocultural value for its medicinal and culinary use and for its exchange value in various indigenous areas of México. This review aims to compile updated information about the ethnobotanical, phytochemistry and commercialization aspects of Clinopodium mexicanum, and it focuses on the potential use of this species as a raw material in the phytopharmaceutical industry for the treatment of anxiety and pain. Moreover, it would be a viable productive alternative for many rural communities, which could not only produce the raw material but who could also add value to the sale of the plant.


Clinopodium mexicanum (Benth.) Govaerts, es una planta nativa de México. Es usada en la medicina tradicional mexicana para tratar síndromes de filiación cultural como "susto", "nervios" o "espanto", los cuales están asociados a la ansiedad y depresión. Además, la planta presenta un alto valor biocultural por sus usos: medicinal, culinario y por el valor de cambio que tiene en áreas indígenas de México. La revisión presentada tiene como objetivo compilar información actualizada sobre aspectos etnobotánicos, fitoquímicos y comercialización de Clinopodium mexicanum. Igualmente señalar el potencial uso de esta especie como materia prima para la elaboración de productos para la ansiedad y el dolor por parte de la industria fitofarmacéutica. Además de ser una alternativa productiva para muchas comunidades rurales, las cuales pueden venderla como materia prima o como producto derivado.


Subject(s)
Plants, Medicinal , Ethnobotany , Lamiaceae/chemistry , Medicine, Traditional , Commerce , Phytochemicals/analysis , Indigenous Peoples , Mexico
11.
BMC Complement Med Ther ; 20(1): 60, 2020 Feb 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32070348

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Traditional medicine serves as a form of primary health care for more than 80% of African populations. Currently, there is no research documenting if and how African migrant communities engage with their traditional health practices and beliefs after they resettle in Western countries. The aim of this study was to examine African migrant women's experiences and perspectives about traditional and complementary medicine use in relation to their maternal health and wellbeing in Australia. METHODS: We conducted a mixed method study between December 2016 and October 2017. Questionnaires were completed by 319 women and 15 in-depth interviews were conducted among African migrant women residing across the Sydney metropolitan area, Australia. Survey data were analysed using SPSS (version 23) and logistic regression model was used to test associations. Qualitative data were analysed thematically using NVivo 11 software to identify themes and conceptual categories in the participants' responses. The study was informed by Andersen's Socio-behavioural model of health service utilisation. RESULTS: The findings indicated that use of traditional and complementary medicine was high and continued to be well used following African women's resettlement in Australia. The survey found that 232 (72.7%) women use some form of traditional and complementary medicine for maternal health and wellbeing purposes. Most women (179, 77.2%) reported that maintaining their maternal health and wellbeing was the most common reason for use. The interview findings indicated that access to traditional medicine included making requests from relatives and friends who travelled to Africa looking for a similar medicinal plant in Australia and preparing home remedies with advice from family members and healers back in Africa. Age ≥ 35 years (OR, 16.5; 95%CI, 6.58-41.5; p < 0.001), lower education (OR, 24; 95%CI, 8.18-71.1; p < 0.001), parity (OR, 7.3; 95%CI, 1.22-42.81; p = 0.029), and lower income (OR, 2.7; 95%CI, 1.23-5.83; p = 0.013) were strong predictors of traditional medicine use. CONCLUSION: Use of traditional and complementary medicine among African migrant women in Sydney remained high following resettlement in Australia. As noted in Andersen's sociobehavioural model of health service utilisation, specific predisposing and enabling factors including age, education and income were associated with use of traditional and complementary medicine.


Subject(s)
African Continental Ancestry Group/ethnology , Attitude to Health/ethnology , Complementary Therapies/statistics & numerical data , Maternal Health/statistics & numerical data , Transients and Migrants , Adolescent , Adult , Africa/ethnology , Australia , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
12.
PLoS One ; 15(2): e0228529, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32027688

ABSTRACT

Postpartum care is a critical element for ensuring survival and health of mothers and newborns but is often inadequate in low- and middle-income countries due to barriers to access and resource constraints. Newly delivered mothers and their families often rely on traditional forms of postnatal care rooted in social and cultural customs or may blend modern and traditional forms of care. This ethnographic study sought to explore use of biomedical and traditional forms of postnatal care. Data were collected through unstructured observation and in-depth interviews with 15 mothers. Participants reported embracing traditional understandings of health and illness in the post-partum period centered on heating the body through diet, steaming, and other applications of heat, yet also seeking injections from private health care providers. Thematic analysis explored concepts related to transitioning forms of postnatal care, valuing of care through different lenses, and diverse sources of advice on postnatal care. Mothers also described concurrent use of both traditional medicine and biomedical postnatal care, and the importance of adhering to cultural traditions of postnatal care for future health. Maternal and newborn health are closely associated with postnatal care, so ensuring culturally appropriate and high-quality care must be an important priority for stakeholders including understand health practices that are evolving to include injections.


Subject(s)
Anthropology, Cultural , Body Temperature/physiology , Hot Temperature/therapeutic use , Injections , Medicine, Traditional/methods , Postnatal Care/methods , Adult , Cambodia/epidemiology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Hyperthermia, Induced/methods , Hyperthermia, Induced/psychology , Hyperthermia, Induced/statistics & numerical data , Infant Health , Infant, Newborn , Injections/psychology , Injections/statistics & numerical data , Male , Medicine, Traditional/statistics & numerical data , Mothers , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Postnatal Care/statistics & numerical data , Postpartum Period , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(3)2020 Feb 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32028721

ABSTRACT

Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson (CMC) is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine that has been widely grown and used in Asia. It is also known as "She chuang zi" in China (Chinese: ), "Jashoshi" in Japan, "Sasangia" in Korea, and "Xa sang tu" in Vietnam. This study aimed to provide an up-to-date review of its phytochemistry, ethnopharmacology, pharmacokinetics, and toxicology. All available information on CMC was collected from the Encyclopedia of Traditional Chinese Medicines, PubMed, EMBASE, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Web of Science, and China Network Knowledge Infrastructure. The updated chemical structures of the compounds are those ones without chemical ID numbers or references from the previous review. A total of 429 chemical constituents have been elucidated and 56 chemical structures have been firstly identified in CMC with traceable evidence. They can be categorized as coumarins, volatile constituents, liposoluble compounds, chromones, monoterpenoid glucosides, terpenoids, glycosides, glucides, and other compounds. CMC has demonstrated impressive potential for the management of various diseases in extensive preclinical research. Since most of the studies are overly concentrated on osthole, more research is needed to investigate other chemical constituents.


Subject(s)
Cnidium/chemistry , Ethnopharmacology , Phytotherapy , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Plant Extracts/pharmacokinetics , Toxicology , Animals , Humans , Tissue Distribution
14.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 249: 112430, 2020 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31783134

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The Lhoba people are a small, ancient, tribal ethnic group from the Himalayas and are located in the Tibet Autonomous Region of China. Medog County is rich in biocultural diversity. For a long time, Medog has been almost isolated from the outside world. The Lhoba people, who live in Medog, have maintained a relatively unique lifestyle and have accumulated rich traditional knowledge (TK), especially about medicinal and edible plants. Currently, there is very little documentation of the plants traditionally used by the local Lhoba communities. AIM OF THE STUDY: Our investigation aimed to (i) document the species of medicinal and food plants used by the Lhoba people in Medog County, Tibet, China; (ii) screen the most important plant taxa for specific medicines, and identify the aliments treated to further contribute to drug and food supplement research; and (iii) examine whether the ethnobotanical knowledge of the Lhoba is similar among different tribes and discuss traditional uses in the health practices and livelihoods of the local communities. METHODS: Ethnobotanical data were recorded through semi-structured interviews, guided field trips, and quantitative analysis. The informant consensus factor (FIC) was used as a quantitative index. RESULTS: Ninety-one informants (61 men and 30 women) were interviewed. A total of 75 species, including 37 medicinal plants for 14 categories of diseases and 57 edible plants from six types of food, were recorded. Among the usage types of medicinal plants, the highest FIC values were recorded for antidotes (FIC = 0.98), anthelmintics (FIC = 0.98), and treatments of gastrointestinal problems (FIC = 0.93). The FIC values for different types of edible plants were very similar. The most frequently used medicinal and food plants in the studied communities are Zanthoxylum motuoense, Crassocephalum crepidioides, and Swertia nervosa. According to the comparative study, few differences in the use of wild plants were found. There appeared to be more overlapping species between two Lhoba tribes in Medog, named Mixingba and Miguba, with 46 (61%) common species, compared with the Bo'gaer tribe in Milin, which had only two (2.7%) overlapping species. This might be due to the different geographical environments, vegetation types, and different influences of other ethnic cultures. CONCLUSIONS: The Lhoba people in Medog County, Tibet, China, have rich TK about the uses of wild plants. However, the TK is seriously threatened due to environmental degradation and acculturation, and it showed signs of being forgotten and abandoned by the younger generation. Therefore, measures are urgently needed to document and protect the TK of the uses of the wild plant resources; and (i) the most frequently used medicinal and/or edible plants; (ii) the plants used to treat the most commonly mentioned diseases; and (iii) the endemic species that are widely used in Medog, which should be assessed for their potential future as food supplements and therapeutic products.


Subject(s)
Ethnobotany/methods , Medicine, Tibetan Traditional/methods , Plants, Edible , Plants, Medicinal , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Ethnic Groups/statistics & numerical data , Ethnobotany/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Medicine, Tibetan Traditional/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Tibet , Young Adult
15.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 249: 112386, 2020 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31730891

ABSTRACT

AIM OF THE STUDY: The indigenous people of Sikkim Himalaya possess indispensable traditional knowledge including the use of flora and fauna due to their close association with nature. The present study aims to explore the rich and undocumented ethnozoological practices of different indigenous communities of the Sikkim Himalaya. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data was collected using semi-structured questionnaire interviews among the traditional healers and indigenous communities of Sikkim. A total of 91 respondents covering all four districts of Sikkim were interviewed from September 2017-April 2018. RESULTS: This study recorded a total of 59 species belonging to nine taxonomic groups used for traditional ethnozoological practices by the indigenous communities of Sikkim. Mammals represented 58% of the total animals followed by birds (22%). Among the total, 71% of animal species were used for zootherapy whereas 29% were used for religious customs or shamanistic practices. Almost 64% species were used for treatment of more than one disease and the chief mode of preparation was by boiling the body parts. Among different parts used in traditional medicine, meat was most preferred while horns and hairs were mostly used for religious purposes. CONCLUSION: Present findings suggest that traditional medicine including zootherapy still serves as a source of primary healthcare in rural areas of Sikkim and provides an identity to the culture of a region. We recommend documentation of more such traditional medicinal systems along with scientific validation of traditional practices with modern tools. Biodiversity Management Committees (BMCs), the legally formed bodies at local level, may be entrusted in documentation of such practices which might contribute significantly in the conservation of traditional practices and also preserves the associated traditional knowledge as per the provision of Biological Diversity Act of India.


Subject(s)
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Medicine, Traditional/methods , Organotherapy/methods , Adult , Aged , Animals , Ethnopharmacology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Population Groups , Sikkim , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
16.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 250: 112414, 2020 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31751650

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The research into bioactive natural products originating from medicinal plants, fungi and other organisms has a long history, accumulating abundant and diverse publications. However no quantitative literature analysis has been conducted so far. AIM OF THE STUDY: Here we analyze the bibliometric data of ethnopharmacology literature and relate the semantic content to the publication and citation data so that the major research themes, contributors, and journals of different time periods could be identified and evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Web of Science (WoS) was searched to identify relevant publications. The Analyze function of WoS and bibliometric software (VOSviewer) were utilized to perform the analyses. RESULTS: Until the end of November 2018, 59,576 publications -linked to 'ethnopharmacology' indexed by WoS, published since 1958 in more than 5600 journals, and contributed by over 20,600 institutions located in more than 200 countries/regions, were identified. The papers were published under four dominating WoS categories, namely pharmacology/pharmacy (34.4%), plant sciences (28.6%), medicinal chemistry (25.3%), and integrative complementary medicine (20.6%). India (14.6%) and China (13.2%) were dominating the publication space. The United States and Brazil also had more than 8.0% contribution each. The rest of the top ten countries/regions were mainly from Asia. There were around ten-fold more original articles (84.6%) than reviews (8.4%). CONCLUSIONS: Ethnopharmacological research has a consistent focus on food and plant sciences, (bio)chemistry, complementary medicine and pharmacology, with a more limited scientific acceptance in the socio-cultural sciences. Dynamic global contributions have been shifting from developed countries to economically and scientifically emerging countries in Asia, South America and the Middle East. Research on recording medicinal plant species used by traditional medicine continues, but the evaluation of specific properties or treatment effects of extracts and compounds has increased enormously. Moreover increasing attention is paid to some widely distributed natural products, such as curcumin, quercetin, and rutin.


Subject(s)
Ethnopharmacology , Animals , Bibliometrics , Humans , Periodicals as Topic/trends
17.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 247: 112258, 2020 Jan 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31574342

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: In northwestern Argentina inhabit several ancient indigenous communities with diverse cultural and historical background. Geographical isolation has contributed to the prevalence of a native plant-based folk medicine; "jarilla" species are medicinal plants widely used in local communities for the treatment of mycosis, respiratory, gastrointestinal and rheumatic disorders. THE AIM OF THE STUDY: To assemble the traditional knowledge acquired through years with scientific data concerning to phytochemistry, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of three "jarillas" species. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ethnobotanical data of three "jarillas", Zuccagnia punctata (Zp), Larrea cuneifolia (Lc), and Larrea divaricata (Ld), were explored by interviewing native people from Indigenous Community of Amaicha del Valle, Tucumán. Phenolic profiles from each infusion were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Antioxidant activity was determined by superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide scavenging capacity, lipoperoxidation inhibition, and ferrous iron chelating activity. It was also assessed their ability to inhibit pro-inflammatory enzymes, such as xanthine oxidase, lipoxygenase, and hyaluronidase. RESULTS: Ethnobotanical interviews showed that local people use "jarillas" mainly as infusions and baths. It was reported different categories of uses, such as medicinal (10 curative applications), to religious purposes, tinctorial, as construction material and as fuel. From infusions prepared, the MS and MS/MS data allowed the identification of 27 compounds from Z. punctata, and 11 from both Larrea sp. The infusions showed an important antioxidant activity through different mechanisms, highlighting Zp and Lc in free radical scavenging capacity and Ld on lipid peroxidation inhibition and iron binding. They were also capable of inhibit xanthine oxidase and lipoxygenase enzymes, being Lc the most active one. CONCLUSIONS: This research work provides novel information concerning to several categories of traditional uses of "jarilla" species in a Diaguita-Calchaquí community and focus attention to infusions from a phytochemical and biological approach.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Ethnobotany , Magnoliopsida/chemistry , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Argentina , Baths , Ethnopharmacology , Humans , Indigenous Peoples , Medicine, Traditional/methods , Plant Extracts/therapeutic use
18.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 248: 112309, 2020 Feb 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31654798

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Majority of people living in Ghana and many other developing countries rely on traditional medicinal plants for their primary healthcare. These plants are used either alone or in combination to manage a wide range of ailments. However, most of these plants have not been investigated for their mutagenic effects. AIM OF THE STUDY: This study, therefore aimed at evaluating the mutagenic activity of the most frequently used medicinal plants amongst Ghanaians living within the Accra metropolis, Ghana. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Validated questionnaires were administered to 53 herbalists and herbal medicines dealers in the Makola, Madina and Nima communities. Plants that were identified as being frequently used were investigated for their mutagenicity using the Ames test. RESULTS: A total of 110 medicinal plants belonging to 53 families were identified as most frequently used plants in the study sites. These are used to treat various ailments including gastric ulcer, fever, malaria, male impotence, diabetes, typhoid, high blood pressure and candidiasis. Thirteen samples (52%) showed moderate to high mutagenicity in the TA 100 bacterial strain before and after metabolism with rat liver enzyme. CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that over half of the frequently used medicinal plants showed moderate to high mutagenicity before and after metabolism at the concentration of a 100 µg/mL. This may have implications for the safety of those who use them to manage diseases. These findings will suggest the need for an in-depth study of the mutagenic potentials of plants commonly used by indigenous people and more especially for those exhibiting high mutagenicity in this study.


Subject(s)
Ethnopharmacology , Medicine, African Traditional/adverse effects , Mutagenesis , Plant Extracts/adverse effects , Plants, Medicinal/adverse effects , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Consumer Product Safety , Female , Ghana , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mutagenicity Tests , Risk Assessment , Salmonella/drug effects , Salmonella/genetics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
19.
J Ethnopharmacol ; 246: 112217, 2020 Jan 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31520672

ABSTRACT

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Mauritania is a country in which few ethnobotanical studies have been conducted and consequently the ethnomedical data is scarce. Since the geographical region reflects the transition between tropical and Northern Africa, influenced by the Mediterranean floristic region, the traditional knowledge was influenced by several cultures from tropical Africa as well as Arab, Berber and Islamic societies. AIM OF THE STUDY: This paper aims to explore and compile the diversity of ethnomedical knowledge in one of the regions of Mauritania and to compare the data with similar studies from surrounding territories. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Surveys and interviews were carried out in 11 villages of Adrar province in northern Mauritania. Data were collected through open, semi-structured interviews (with individuals and focus groups). A sample of 120 people aged between 20 and 70 years, including 24 herbalists and 28 traditional healers was included. RESULTS: Ethnomedical data for 68 plant species belonging to 27 families were obtained. They are used to treat 50 health conditions grouped in 14 pathological groups. Remedies for digestive system disorders, skin problems and respiratory ailments were among the most frequent indications. Leaves were the most frequently used plant part and remedies generally used as a powder for the various applications and a total of 2'317 use reports were gathered. About 55% of the reported species were not cited previously in the literature focusing on Mauritania and neighbouring countries. Moreover, only 6 species are also cited by Ibn al-Baytar (13th century CE). CONCLUSIONS: This work shows a promising perspective for future studies, shedding light on the richness and the risk for conservation of traditional knowledge of herbal medicine in Mauritania.


Subject(s)
Ethnobotany , Plants, Medicinal , Adult , Aged , Data Collection , Ethnopharmacology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Mauritania , Middle Aged , Phytotherapy , Plant Preparations/therapeutic use , Young Adult
20.
Bol. latinoam. Caribe plantas med. aromát ; 19(6): 601-613, 2020. tab, graf, ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS, MOSAICO - Integrative health | ID: biblio-1145976

ABSTRACT

La presente investigación se avocó a determinar el valor de uso etnomedicinal dado a la flora del Cerro "La Botica", por la Comunidad Andina de Cachicadán, Santiago de Chuco, Perú. Se aplicaron 96 entrevistas semiestructuradas, siguiendo la técnica "bola de nieve". Se realizaron colectas mediante exploraciones botánicas. Para cada una de las especies se detallaron los datos de familia, nombre científico y común, parte utilizada, enfermedad o dolencia tratada, ubicación en UTM e índice de valor de uso (IVU). Se reportan 48 especies empleadas etnomedicinalmente por la Comunidad Andina de Cachicadán, distribuidas en 46 géneros y 26 familias, de las que destacan por su número de especies: Asteraceae (10), Rosaceae (5) y Lamiaceae (3). De estas, el 72 % (35 especies) resultan muy importantes para la cura o tratamiento de sus enfermedades, según su valor de uso (IVU). Además los pobladores de la Comunidad Andina de Cachicadán, refieren padecer de 38 enfermedades o dolencias; agrupadas en 10 categorías, donde prevalecen, las de los sistemas: respiratorio (FCI=0.88), digestivo y gastrointestinal (FCI=0.85), reproductivo (FCI=0.84), urinario (FCI= 0.84), nervioso (FCI=0.83), Músculo-esquelético (FCI=0.82), cardiovascular (FCI=0.82) y rituales (FCI=0.81).


The present investigation was aimed at determining the value of ethnomedicinal use that is given to the flora of the Hill "La Botica", by the Andean Community of Cachicadán, Santiago de Chuco, Perú. 96 semi-structured interviews were applied, following the "snowball" technique. Collections were made by botanical explorations.For each of the species, family data, scientific and common name, part used, disease or disease treated, location in UTM and use value index (IVU) were detailed. 48 species of flora are used ethnobotanically by the Andean Community of Cachicadán, distributed in 46 genera and 26 families, of which they stand out for their number of species: Asteraceae (10), Rosaceae (5) and Lamiaceae (3). Of these, 72% (35 species) are very important for the cure or treatment of their diseases, according to their use value (IVU). In addition the inhabitants of the Andean Community of Cachicadán, report suffering from 38 diseases or ailments; grouped into 10 categories, where they prevail, those of the systems: respiratory (FCI = 0.88), digestive and gastrointestinal (FCI = 0.85), reproductive (FCI = 0.84), urinary (FCI = 0.84), nervous (FCI = 0.83), Musculoskeletal (FCI = 0.82), cardiovascular (FCI = 0.82) and rituals (FCI = 0.81).


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Ethnobotany/classification , Asteraceae , Lamiaceae , Rosaceae , Peru , Rural Population , Medicine, Traditional
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