Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 18 de 18
Filter
1.
Psychiatry Res ; 307: 114279, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34861423

ABSTRACT

Previous studies have suggested that subjects participating in schizophrenia research are not representative of the demographics of the global population of people with schizophrenia, particularly in terms of gender and geographical location. We here explored if this has evolved throughout the decades, examining changes in geographical location, gender and age of participants in studies of schizophrenia published in the last 50 years. We examined this using a meta-analytical approach on an existing database including over 3,000 studies collated for another project. We found that the proportion of studies and participants from low-and-middle income countries has significantly increased over time, with considerable input from studies from China. However, it is still low when compared to the global population they represent. Women have been historically under-represented in studies, and still are in high-income countries. However, a significantly higher proportion of female participants have been included in studies over time. The age of participants included has not changed significantly over time. Overall, there have been improvements in the geographical and gender representation of people with schizophrenia. However, there is still a long way to go so research can be representative of the global population of people with schizophrenia, particularly in geographical terms.


Subject(s)
Schizophrenia , China/epidemiology , Female , Geography , Humans , Income , Middle Aged , Schizophrenia/epidemiology
2.
Psychol Med ; 52(5): 914-923, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32758314

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests the incidence of non-affective psychotic disorders (NAPDs) varies across persons and places, but data from the Global South is scarce. We aimed to estimate the treated incidence of NAPD in Chile, and variance by person, place and time. METHODS: We used national register data from Chile including all people, 10-65 years, with the first episode of NAPD (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision: F20-F29) between 1 January 2005 and 29 August 2018. Denominators were estimated from Chilean National Census data. Our main outcome was treated incidence of NAPD and age group, sex, calendar year and regional-level population density, multidimensional poverty and latitude were exposures of interest. RESULTS: We identified 32 358 NAPD cases [12 136 (39.5%) women; median age-at-first-contact: 24 years (interquartile range 18-39 years)] during 171.1 million person-years [crude incidence: 18.9 per 100 000 person-years; 95% confidence interval (CI) 18.7-19.1]. Multilevel Poisson regression identified a strong age-sex interaction in incidence, with rates peaking in men (57.6 per 100 000 person-years; 95% CI 56.0-59.2) and women (29.5 per 100 000 person-years; 95% CI 28.4-30.7) between 15 and 19 years old. Rates also decreased (non-linearly) over time for women, but not men. We observed a non-linear association with multidimensional poverty and latitude, with the highest rates in the poorest regions and those immediately south of Santiago; no association with regional population density was observed. CONCLUSION: Our findings inform the aetiology of NAPDs, replicating typical associations with age, sex and multidimensional poverty in a Global South context. The absence of association with population density suggests this risk may be context-dependent.


Subject(s)
Psychotic Disorders , Adolescent , Adult , Affective Disorders, Psychotic , Chile/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Poverty , Psychotic Disorders/psychology , Young Adult
3.
Int J Health Serv ; 52(1): 99-114, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34672829

ABSTRACT

The objective of this research was to systematically review and synthesize quantitative studies that assessed the association between socioeconomic inequalities and primary health care (PHC) utilization among older people living in low- and middle- income countries (LMICs). Six databases were searched, including Embase, Medline, Psych Info, Global Health, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, CNKI, to identify eligible studies. A narrative synthesis approach was used for evidence synthesis. A total of 20 eligible cross-sectional studies were included in this systematic review. The indicators of socioeconomic status (SES) identified included income level, education, employment/occupation, and health insurance. Most studies reported that higher income, higher educational levels and enrollment in health insurance plans were associated with increased PHC utilization. Several studies suggested that people who were unemployed and economically inactive in older age or who had worked in formal sectors were more likely to use PHC. Our findings suggest a pro-rich phenomenon of PHC utilization in older people living in LMICs, with results varying by indicators of SES and study settings.


Subject(s)
Developing Countries , Social Class , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Income , Patient Acceptance of Health Care
4.
Ann Surg ; 274(6): e489-e506, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34784666

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to review and appraise how quality improvement (QI) skills are taught to surgeons and surgical residents. BACKGROUND: There is a global drive to deliver capacity in undertaking QI within surgical services. However, there are currently no specifications regarding optimal QI content or delivery. METHODS: We reviewed QI educational intervention studies targeting surgeons or surgical trainees/residents published until 2017. Primary outcomes included teaching methods and training materials. Secondary outcomes were implementation frameworks and strategies used to deliver QI training successfully. RESULTS: There were 20,590 hits across 10 databases, of which 11,563 were screened following de-duplication. Seventeen studies were included in the final synthesis. Variable QI techniques (eg, combined QI models, process mapping, and "lean" principles) and assessment methods were found. Delivery was more consistent, typically combining didactic teaching blended with QI project delivery. Implementation of QI training was poorly reported and appears supported by collaborative approaches (including building learning collaboratives, and coalitions). Study designs were typically pre-/post-training without controls. Studies generally lacked clarity on the underpinning framework (59%), setting description (59%), content (47%), and conclusions (47%), whereas 88% scored low on psychometrics reporting. CONCLUSIONS: The evidence suggests that surgical QI training can focus on any well-established QI technique, provided it is done through a combination of didactic teaching and practical application. True effectiveness and extent of impact of QI training remain unclear, due to methodological weaknesses and inconsistent reporting. Conduct of larger-scale educational QI studies across multiple institutions can advance the field.


Subject(s)
General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency/standards , Quality Improvement , Curriculum , General Surgery/standards , Humans , United States
5.
Pharmacoeconomics ; 39(7): 757-770, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34013440

ABSTRACT

The availability and use of tools to guide the choice of modelling technique are not well understood. Our study aims to review existing tools and explore the use of those tools in health economic models. Two reviews and one case study were conducted. Review 1 aimed to identify tools based on expert opinion and citation searching and explore the value of the tools for health economic models. Review 2, based on citation searching, aimed to describe how those tools have been used in health economic models. Both reviews were conducted using Web of Science and Scopus. Two independent reviewers selected studies for inclusion. A case study, focused on economic evaluations of antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia, was conducted to compare the modelling techniques used by existing models with modelling techniques recommended by identified tools. Seven tools were identified, of which the revised Brennan's toolkit, was assessed to be the most appropriate for health economic models. The seven tools were cited 126 times in publications reporting health economic models. Only 17 of these (13.5%) reported that they used the tool(s) to guide the choice of modelling technique. Application of these tools suggested discrete event simulation is most appropriate for modelling antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia, but discrete event simulation was only used by 17% of existing models. There is considerable inconsistency between the modelling techniques used by existing models and modelling techniques recommended by tools. It is recommended that for future modelling studies the choice of modelling technique should be justified, this can be achieved by the application of model selection tools, such as the revised Brennan's toolkit. Future research is required to explore the barriers to using model selection tools in health economic models and to update existing tools and make them easier to use.


Subject(s)
Antipsychotic Agents , Schizophrenia , Antipsychotic Agents/therapeutic use , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Economics, Medical , Humans , Models, Economic , Schizophrenia/drug therapy
6.
Value Health ; 24(4): 603, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33840440
7.
Early Interv Psychiatry ; 15(5): 1104-1114, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33047889

ABSTRACT

AIM: The evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of early intervention for psychosis (EIP) services has motivated their implementation worldwide. However, complex interventions of such EIP services require local adaptations to successfully match population needs and cultural differences. Latin America is a heterogenous region where EIP services are progressively being adopted. Our aim is to map such initiatives in the region with a focus on implementation outcomes. METHODS: A scoping review following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis extension for Scoping Reviews guidelines was conducted. International and regional databases were searched for publications describing EIP programmes in the region. Besides mapping the services, we described implementation outcomes based on the Standards for Reporting Implementation Studies Checklist. RESULTS: Ten articles describing seven EIP initiatives from the region were found. Four countries were represented: Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico. The implementation outcomes reporting was heterogenous, although it was possible to ascertain EIP services are feasible and adequate for the region's context. Also, there is some evidence of effectiveness in terms of reducing hospitalizations and improving symptoms. Information about fidelity measures was scarce and there was no information about costs or cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS: Only a small proportion of Latin American countries have adopted EIP services. Although these programmes seem to be feasible and effective, data on other implementation outcomes, such as fidelity, cultural appropriateness, cost-effectiveness and affordability are not available. This might in part explain why this effective approach has not been yet scaled-up at nationwide levels.


Subject(s)
Psychotic Disorders , Chile , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Humans , Latin America , Psychotic Disorders/diagnosis , Psychotic Disorders/therapy
8.
BJPsych Open ; 7(1): e15, 2020 Dec 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33298229

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Substantial evidence has highlighted the importance of considering the mental health of healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, and several organisations have issued guidelines with recommendations. However, the definition of well-being and the evidence base behind such guidelines remain unclear. AIMS: The aims of the study are to assess the applicability of well-being guidelines in practice, identify unaddressed healthcare workers' needs and provide recommendations for supporting front-line staff during the current and future pandemics. METHOD: This paper discusses the findings of a qualitative study based on interviews with front-line healthcare workers in the UK (n = 33), and examines them in relation to a rapid review of well-being guidelines developed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic (n = 14). RESULTS: The guidelines placed greater emphasis on individual mental health and psychological support, whereas healthcare workers placed greater emphasis on structural conditions at work, responsibilities outside the hospital and the invaluable support of the community. The well-being support interventions proposed in the guidelines did not always respond to the lived experiences of staff, as some reported not being able to participate in these interventions because of understaffing, exhaustion or clashing schedules. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare workers expressed well-being needs that aligned with socio-ecological conceptualisations of well-being related to quality of life. This approach to well-being has been highlighted in literature on support of healthcare workers in previous health emergencies, but it has not been monitored during this pandemic. Well-being guidelines should explore the needs of healthcare workers, and contextual characteristics affecting the implementation of recommendations.

9.
Value Health ; 23(9): 1256-1267, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32940244

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Patient preferences are increasingly important in informing clinical and policy decisions. Health-state utility values (HSUVs) are quantitative measures of people's preferences over different health states. In schizophrenia, there is no clarity about HSUVs across the symptoms' severity spectrum. This meta-analysis aims to synthesize the literature on HSUVs in people with schizophrenia. METHODS: We searched Medline, PsycInfo, Embase, EconLit, The Cochrane Library, and specialized databases. The studies reporting HSUVs in people with schizophrenia were selected and pooled in a random-effects meta-analysis. The primary outcome was the mean HSUV obtained from participants. RESULTS: A total of 54 studies involving 87 335 participants were included. The pooled estimate using direct elicitation was a mean HSUV of 0.79 (95% CI: 0.70-0.88) for mild symptomatic states, 0.69 (95% CI: 0.54-0.85) in moderate states, and 0.34 (95% CI: 0.13-0.56) in severe states. Studies using indirect techniques resulted in a pooled mean HSUV of 0.73 (95% CI: 0.67-0.78) applying the EuroQol 5-dimension, 0.66 (95% CI: 0.62-0.71) in the Short-Form 6-dimension, and 0.59 (95% CI: 0.57-0.61) using the Quality of Well-Being scale. All the estimates resulted in considerable heterogeneity, partially reduced by meta-regression. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the severity of psychotic symptoms has an important effect on HSUVs in schizophrenia, with values mirroring patients with disabling physical conditions such as cancer and stroke. Decision makers should be aware of these results when including people's preferences in trials, models, and policy decisions.


Subject(s)
Health Status Indicators , Patient Preference , Quality of Life , Schizophrenia , Humans , Quality-Adjusted Life Years
10.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0234996, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32649663

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Numerous economic models have assessed the cost-effectiveness of antipsychotic medications in schizophrenia. It is important to understand what key impacts of antipsychotic medications were considered in the existing models and limitations of existing models in order to inform the development of future models. OBJECTIVES: This systematic review aims to identify which clinical benefits, clinical harms, costs and cost savings of antipsychotic medication have been considered by existing models, to assess quality of existing models and to suggest good practice recommendations for future economic models of antipsychotic medications. METHODS: An electronic search was performed on multiple databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo, Cochrane database of systematic reviews, The NHS Economic Evaluation Database and Health Technology Assessment database) to identify economic models of schizophrenia published between 2005-2020. Two independent reviewers selected studies for inclusion. Study quality was assessed using the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) checklist and the Cooper hierarchy. Key impacts of antipsychotic medications considered by exiting models were descriptively summarised. RESULTS: Sixty models were included. Existing models varied greatly in key impacts of antipsychotic medication included in the model, especially in clinical outcomes used for assessing reduction in psychotic symptoms and types of adverse events considered in the model. Quality of existing models was generally low due to failure to capture the health and cost impact of adverse events of antipsychotic medications and input data not obtained from best available source. Good practices for modelling antipsychotic medications are suggested. DISCUSSIONS: This review highlights inconsistency in key impacts considered by different models, and limitations of the existing models. Recommendations on future research are provided.


Subject(s)
Antipsychotic Agents/economics , Models, Economic , Schizophrenia/drug therapy , Antipsychotic Agents/therapeutic use , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Economics, Medical/standards , Humans
11.
Pharmacoeconomics ; 38(6): 537-555, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32144726

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is associated with a high economic burden. Economic models can help to inform resource allocation decisions to maximise benefits to patients. OBJECTIVES: This systematic review aims to assess the availability, quality and consistency of conclusions of health economic models evaluating the cost effectiveness of interventions for schizophrenia. METHODS: An electronic search was performed on multiple databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane database of systematic reviews, NHS Economic Evaluation Database and Health Technology Assessment database) to identify economic models of interventions for schizophrenia published between 2005 and 2020. Two independent reviewers selected studies for inclusion. Study quality was assessed using the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) checklist and the Cooper hierarchy. Model characteristics and conclusions were descriptively summarised. RESULTS: Seventy-three models met inclusion criteria. Seventy-eight percent of existing models assessed antipsychotics; however, due to inconsistent conclusions reported by different studies, no antipsychotic can be considered clearly cost effective compared with the others. A very limited number of models suggest that the following non-pharmacological interventions might be cost effective: psychosocial interventions, stratified tests, employment intervention and intensive intervention to improve liaison between primary and secondary care. The quality of included models is generally low due to use of a short time horizon, omission of adverse events of interventions, poor data quality and potential conflicts of interest. CONCLUSIONS: This review highlights a lack of models for non-pharmacological interventions, and limitations of the existing models, including low quality and inconsistency in conclusions. Recommendations on future modelling approaches for schizophrenia are provided.


Subject(s)
Antipsychotic Agents/therapeutic use , Models, Economic , Schizophrenia/drug therapy , Antipsychotic Agents/economics , Cost of Illness , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Humans , Schizophrenia/economics
12.
Br J Psychiatry ; 215(6): 744-745, 2019 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31742501
13.
Evid Based Ment Health ; 22(4): 142-144, 2019 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31126911

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Cost-effectiveness analyses that use quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) allow comparing the value for money of interventions across different health problems. Health state utility values (HSUVs) are crucial to calculate QALYs. These are weights attached to a given health state reflecting preferences in health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In schizophrenia, there is extensive evidence about the consequences of this condition on HRQoL. Besides, several interventions have claimed to be cost-effective in terms of QALYs gained. Despite this evidence, a systematic review of HSUVs has not been conducted. Therefore, we aim to synthesise the evidence about HSUVs in schizophrenia. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will conduct a systematic review of the literature about HSUVs in people with schizophrenia following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic review and Meta-Analysis and the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research task force recommendations. The submissions records of eight electronic peer-reviewed databases and three health technology assessment (HTA) agencies will be searched. Quantitative synthesis will be carried out in comparable studies, using random-effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity will be explored using meta-regression if more than 10 studies per covariate are found. A narrative synthesis and methodological quality of included studies will be also reported. DISCUSSION: This review will provide a synthesis of the HSUVs estimated for different states experienced by people with schizophrenia. This will inform analysts when calculating QALYs, using values in a more transparent and accountable manner. Finally, it will shed light on evidence gaps and limitations about this measure in mental health. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42019123582.


Subject(s)
Cost-Benefit Analysis , Health Status Indicators , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Quality of Life , Quality-Adjusted Life Years , Schizophrenia , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Clinical Protocols , Humans , Schizophrenia/diagnosis , Schizophrenia/epidemiology , Schizophrenia/therapy
14.
Br J Psychiatry ; 215(1): 388-394, 2019 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30696495

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early intervention in psychosis (EIP) has been developed as an approach to improve the prognosis of people with psychotic disorders and it has been claimed to be a more efficient model of care. However, the evidence is not definitive and doubts have spread regard to the economic outcomes of EIP services amid the usually restricted mental health budget.AimsWe aimed to review the cost-effectiveness evidence of EIP services worldwide. METHOD: We systematically reviewed the economic literature about EIP following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement guidelines. Studies were selected according to previously stated criteria and analysed with standardised critical appraisal tools for trial-based economic evaluations and modelling studies. RESULTS: A total of 16 studies were selected after applying the eligibility criteria. Most of them were economic evaluations alongside clinical trials. The overall evidence was consistent in the cost-effectiveness of EIP compared with standard care for first episode of psychosis and the Clinical High Risk for Psychosis paradigm. Such evidence was replicated among different health systems, but mainly in high-income countries. The methodological quality of such evidence, however, was moderate and heterogeneity was significant across the studies. CONCLUSIONS: There is consistent evidence that the implementation of EIP services might be a cost-effective alternative across different health systems. Such evidence, nevertheless, derives from heterogeneous and sometimes methodologically flawed studies, reducing the certainty of such statement. More efforts must be done to rigorously assess the value of this intervention, before expanding it among systems where mental health budgets are more constrained.Declaration of interestNone.


Subject(s)
Cost-Benefit Analysis , Early Medical Intervention , Psychotic Disorders/therapy , Humans
15.
Medwave ; 17(Suppl1): e6845, 2017 Jan 19.
Article in Spanish, English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28112711

ABSTRACT

Art therapy is used as a complementary treatment to antipsychotics in schizophrenia. However, its effectiveness is not clear. To answer this question, we searched in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases. We identified five systematic reviews including 20 studies overall, of which four were randomized trials. We extracted data and prepared summary of findings tables using the GRADE method. We concluded it is not clear whether art therapy leads to clinical improvement in schizophrenia because the certainty of the evidence is very low.


La arteterapia se utiliza como tratamiento complementario a los antipsicóticos en la esquizofrenia, sin embargo, no está clara su efectividad. Para responder esta pregunta, se utilizó la base de datos Epistemonikos, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en múltiples bases de datos. Identificamos cinco revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incluyen 20 estudios, de los cuales cuatro corresponden a estudios aleatorizados. Extrajimos los datos y preparamos tablas de resumen de los resultados utilizando el método GRADE. Concluimos que no está claro si la arteterapia produce mejoría en la esquizofrenia porque la certeza de la evidencia existente es muy baja.


Subject(s)
Antipsychotic Agents/therapeutic use , Art Therapy/methods , Schizophrenia/therapy , Combined Modality Therapy , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Schizophrenia/physiopathology , Treatment Outcome
16.
Medwave ; 16(Suppl5): e6614, 2016 Dec 02.
Article in Spanish, English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27922589

ABSTRACT

Clozapine constitutes the treatment of choice in patients with schizophrenia with persisting symptoms despite antipsychotics at adequate dose and treatment duration. However, an important proportion does not respond to optimal doses of clozapine, so the addition of a second antipsychotic might increase clinical response. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases, we identified 17 systematic reviews comprising 62 studies addressing the question of this article, including 26 randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded adding a second antipsychotic to clozapine in patients with refractory schizophrenia probably leads to little or no difference in clinical response, and increases adverse effects.


Subject(s)
Antipsychotic Agents/administration & dosage , Clozapine/administration & dosage , Schizophrenia/drug therapy , Antipsychotic Agents/adverse effects , Antipsychotic Agents/therapeutic use , Clozapine/adverse effects , Clozapine/therapeutic use , Drug Resistance , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Schizophrenia/physiopathology , Treatment Outcome
17.
Medwave ; 16(Suppl5): e6577, 2016 Oct 14.
Article in Spanish, English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27813505

ABSTRACT

Clozapine is considered to be the most effective antipsychotic drug for patients with treatment resistant schizophrenia, but up to a third of the patients do not respond to this treatment. Various strategies have been tried to augment the effect of clozapine in non-responders, one of these strategies being electroconvulsive therapy. However, its efficacy and safety are not yet clear. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 55 studies, among them six randomized controlled trials addressing clozapine-resistant schizophrenia. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded electroconvulsive therapy probably augments response to clozapine in patients with treatment resistant schizophrenia, but it is not possible to determine if it leads to cognitive adverse effects because the certainty of the evidence is very low.


Subject(s)
Clozapine/therapeutic use , Electroconvulsive Therapy/methods , Schizophrenia/therapy , Antipsychotic Agents/therapeutic use , Combined Modality Therapy , Drug Resistance , Electroconvulsive Therapy/adverse effects , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Schizophrenia/physiopathology , Treatment Outcome
18.
Medwave ; 16 Suppl 2: e6447, 2016 May 23.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27218484

ABSTRACT

Depot antipsychotics have been generally used in patients with chronic schizophrenia with adherence problems to oral therapy. However, it has been suggested they can be a good alternative in earlier stages too. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified three systematic reviews including two pertinent randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded it is not clear whether there are differences between depot and oral antipsychotics in first-episode psychosis because the certainty of the available evidence is very low.


Los antipsicóticos de depósito han sido utilizados generalmente en pacientes que padecen esquizofrenia crónica con problemas de adherencia a antipsicóticos orales. Sin embargo, se ha planteado que en etapas psicóticas precoces el uso de antipsicóticos de depósito podría ser más efectivo, aunque esto es materia de debate. Utilizando la base de datos Epistemonikos, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en 30 bases de datos, identificamos tres revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incluyen dos estudios aleatorizados. Realizamos un metanálisis y tablas de resumen de los resultados utilizando el método GRADE. Concluimos que no está claro si los antipsicóticos de depósito son superiores o inferiores a los orales en un primer episodio psicótico porque la certeza de la evidencia disponible es muy baja.


Subject(s)
Antipsychotic Agents/administration & dosage , Psychotic Disorders/drug therapy , Schizophrenia/drug therapy , Administration, Oral , Delayed-Action Preparations , Humans , Medication Adherence , Psychotic Disorders/physiopathology , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Schizophrenia/physiopathology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...