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1.
J Midlife Health ; 15(1): 29-31, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38764921

ABSTRACT

This case report describes a rare example of a solitary abdominal wall metastasis in a middle-aged endometrial cancer (EC) survivor 3 years following disease-free status. Following induction chemotherapy, she had a margin-negative surgical excision of the abdominal tumor. Surprisingly, the patient has been disease-free for more than 3 years after the operation. This emphasizes the necessity of addressing single metastasis amenable to surgical resection, as well as the need for diligent monitoring to discover recurrences sooner. Understanding rare locations of recurrence, such as the abdominal wall, is critical for optimum EC therapy and care. The data given in this article adds to the existing body of information on atypical presentations and recurrent EC therapy. Additional research is required to develop evidence-based guidance.

2.
J Surg Case Rep ; 2024(5): rjae295, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38721261

ABSTRACT

Abdominal wall endometrioma (AWE) results from endometrial-like tissue implants in the abdominal wall after uterine surgery. While the diagnosis can be challenging, an abdominal mass at the site of a previous incision accompanied by cyclical pain and enlargement correlating with menstruation is highly suspicious. Excision is indicated for symptomatic relief as well as the probability of malignant transformation. Because signs and symptoms are similar to other soft tissue lesions, general surgeons are sought out for excision and thus encounter the majority of AWE cases. Here, we present two patients of similar age who both presented to our hospital within one month, each found to have an endometrioma at the site of a Pfannenstiel scar after Cesarean section, and were managed operatively.

3.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38709799

ABSTRACT

Background: Tsukamurella species were first isolated in 1941. Since then, 48 cases of Tsukamurella bacteremia have been reported, a majority of which were immunosuppressed patients with central venous catheters.A case is described and previous cases of Tsukamurella bacteremia are reviewed. Patients and Methods: A 70-year-old total parenteral nutrition (TPN)-dependent female with recurrent enterocutaneous fistula (ECF), developed leukocytosis one week after a challenging ECF takedown. After starting broad-spectrum antibiotic agents, undergoing percutaneous drainage of intra-abdominal abscess, and subsequent repositioning of the drain, her leukocytosis resolved. Blood and peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) cultures grew Tsukamurella spp. The patient was discharged to home with 14 days of daily 2 g ceftriaxone, with resolution of bacteremia. Conclusions: Tsukamurella spp. are a rare opportunistic pathogen predominantly affecting immunocompromised patients, with central venous catheters present in most cases. However, there have been few reported cases in immunocompetent individuals with predisposing conditions such as end-stage renal disease and uncontrolled diabetes mellitus.

4.
Surg Endosc ; 2024 May 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38719985

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Transversus abdominis release (TAR) is an effective technique for treating large midline and off-midline hernias. Recent studies have demonstrated that robotic TAR (rTAR) is technically feasible and associated with improved outcomes compared to open surgery. There is no published experience to date describing abdominal wall reconstruction using the novel robotic platform HUGO RAS System (Medtronic®). METHODS: All consecutive patients who underwent a rTAR in our institution were included. Three of the four arm carts of the HUGO RAS System were used at any given time. Each arm configuration was defined by our team in conjunction with Medtronic® personnel. rTAR was performed as previously described. Upon completion of the TAR on one side, a redocking process with different, mirrored arms angles was performed to continue with the contralateral TAR. Operative variables and early morbidity were recorded. RESULTS: Ten patients were included in this study. The median BMI was 31 (21-40.6) kg/m2. The median height was 1.6 m (1.5-1.89 m). A trend of decreased operative time, console time, and redocking time was seen in these consecutive cases. No intraoperative events nor postoperative morbidity was reported. The median length of stay was 3 (1-6) days. CONCLUSION: Robotic TAR utilizing the HUGO RAS system is a feasible and safe procedure. The adoption of this procedure on this novel platform for the treatment of complex abdominal wall hernias has been successful for our team.

5.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 93: 281-289, 2024 Apr 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38728901

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This work aimed to investigate the validity of wearable activity monitors (WAMs) as an objective tool to measure the return toward normal functional mobility following abdominal wall surgery. This was achieved by quantifying and comparing pre- and postoperative physical activity (PA). METHODS: A multicenter, prospective, observational cohort study was designed. Patients undergoing abdominal wall surgery were assessed for eligibility and consent for study participation was obtained. Participants were asked to wear a WAM (AX3, Axivity) on the wrist of their dominant hand at least 48 hours pre-operatively, for up to 2 weeks postop, and again after 6 months postop for 48 hours. RESULTS: A cohort of 20 patients were recruited in this validation study with a mean age of 47.3 ± 13.0 years. Postoperation, the percentage median PA (±IQR) dropped to 32.6% (20.1), whereas on day 14, PA had reached 64.6% (22.7) of the preoperative value providing construct validity. Activity levels at >6 months postop increased by 16.4% on an average when compared to baseline preoperative PA (p = 0.046). CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that WAMs are valid markers of postoperative recovery following abdominal wall surgery. This was achieved by quantifying the reduction in PA postoperation, which has not been previously shown. In addition, this study suggests that abdominal wall surgery may improve the patient's quality of life via increased functional mobility at 6 months postop. In the future, this technology could be used to identify the patient and surgical factors that are predictors of outcome following abdominal wall surgery.

6.
J Abdom Wall Surg ; 3: 12945, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38711962

ABSTRACT

Background: Abdominal wall surgery (AWS) is characterised by the increasing caseload and the complexity of the surgical procedures. The introduction of a tailored approach to AWS utilising laparoendoscopic, robotic and/or open techniques requires the surgeon to master several surgical techniques. All of which have an associated learning curve, and the necessary knowledge/experience to know which operation is the right one for the individual patient. However, the reality in general surgery training shows that training in just a limited number of procedures is not enough. By the end of general surgery training, many chief residents do not feel they are yet ready to carry out surgery independently. Therefore, hernia surgery experts and societies have called for the introduction of a Fellowship in Abdominal Wall Surgery. Methods: The UEMS (Union Européenne des Médecins Spécialistes, European Union of Medical Specialists) in collaboration with the European Hernia Society (EHS) introduced a fellowship by examination in 2019. As a prerequisite, candidates must complete further training of at least 2 years with a special focus on abdominal wall surgery after having completed their training in general surgery. To be eligible for the examination, candidates must provide evidence of having performed 300 hernia procedures. In addition, candidates must have accrued sufficient "knowledge points" by attending abdominal wall surgery congresses, courses and clinical visitations, and engaged in scientific activities. On meeting the requirements, a candidate may be admitted to the written and oral examination. Results: To date, three examinations have been held on the occasion of the Annual Congress of the European Hernia Society in Copenhagen (2021), Manchester (2022) and Barcelona (2023). Having met the requirements, 48 surgeons passed the written and oral examination and were awarded the Fellow European Board of Surgery-Abdominal Wall Surgery certificate. During this time period, a further 25 surgeons applied to sit the examination but did not fulfil all the criteria to be eligible for the examination. Fifty experienced abdominal wall surgeons applied to become an Honorary Fellow European Board of Surgery-Abdominal Wall Surgery. Fourty eight were successful in their application. Conclusion: The Fellowship of the European Board of Surgery - Abdominal Wall Surgery by examination has been successfully introduced at European level by the joint work of the UEMS and the EHS. The examination is also open to surgeons who work outside the European area, if they can fulfil the eligibility criteria.

7.
J Pain Res ; 17: 1563-1570, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38699067

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to explore the distribution of nerve fibers in abdominal wall endometriosis (AWE) and discern their association with pain. Methods: A retrospective case-control study was conducted. The cases comprised 30 patients diagnosed with AWE, while the control group consisted of 17 patients who had undergone laparotomy without any history of endometriosis. We analyzed clinical characteristics and examined the innervation patterns in samples using stains for S-100, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5), neurofilament (NF), and substance P (SP) antibodies. Results: There was a notable increase in the density of S-100, NSE and PGP9.5 immunoreactive nerve fibers and a higher proportion of SP positivity in AWE lesions compared to standard abdominal wall scars (p < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences in the density or proportion of NF-immunoreactive nerve fibers between the cases and the controls. Moreover, no statistically significant correlation was observed between the density of S-100, NSE, PGP9.5, NF, or SP-positive nerve fibers and pain scores. Conclusion: This study demonstrated an increased immunoreactive nerve fiber density located in AWE lesions compared to normal abdominal wall scars. Further high-quality studies are needed to investigate the mechanisms responsible for pain in women with endometriosis.

8.
Am Surg ; 90(6): 1161-1166, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38751046

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Blunt traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWHs) are rare but require a variety of operative techniques to repair including bone anchor fixation (BAF) when tissue tears off bony structures. This study aimed to provide a descriptive analysis of BAF technique for blunt TAWH repair. Bone anchor fixation and no BAF repairs were compared, hypothesizing increased hernia recurrence with BAF repair. METHODS: A secondary analysis of the WTA blunt TAWH multicenter study was performed including all patients who underwent repair of their TAWH. Patients with BAF were compared to those with no BAF with bivariate analyses. RESULTS: 176 patients underwent repair of their TAWH with 41 (23.3%) undergoing BAF. 26 (63.4%) patients had tissue fixed to bone, with 7 of those reinforced with mesh. The remaining 15 (36.6%) patients had bridging mesh anchored to bone. The BAF group had a similar age, sex, body mass index, and injury severity score compared to the no BAF group. The time to repair (1 vs 1 days, P = .158), rate of hernia recurrence (9.8% vs 12.7%, P = .786), and surgical site infection (SSI) (12.5% vs 15.6%, P = .823) were all similar between cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: This largest series to date found nearly one-quarter of TAWH repairs required BAF. Bone anchor fixation repairs had a similar rate of hernia recurrence and SSI compared to no BAF repairs, suggesting this is a reasonable option for repair of TAWH. However, future prospective studies are needed to compare specific BAF techniques and evaluate long-term outcomes including patient-centered outcomes such as pain and quality of life.


Subject(s)
Herniorrhaphy , Surgical Mesh , Wounds, Nonpenetrating , Humans , Male , Female , Wounds, Nonpenetrating/surgery , Herniorrhaphy/methods , Adult , Middle Aged , Abdominal Injuries/surgery , Suture Anchors , Recurrence , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Hernia, Ventral/surgery , Hernia, Abdominal/surgery , Hernia, Abdominal/etiology , Injury Severity Score , Surgical Wound Infection/etiology , Surgical Wound Infection/epidemiology
9.
Trials ; 25(1): 327, 2024 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38760769

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The recent guidelines from the European and American Hernia Societies recommend a continuous small-bite suturing technique with slowly absorbable sutures for fascial closure of midline abdominal wall incisions to reduce the incidence of wound complications, especially for incisional hernia. However, this is based on low-certainty evidence. We could not find any recommendations for skin closure. The wound closure technique is an important determinant of the risk of wound complications, and a comprehensive approach to prevent wound complications should be developed. METHODS: We propose a single-institute, prospective, randomized, blinded-endpoint trial to assess the superiority of the combination of continuous suturing of the fascia without peritoneal closure and continuous suturing of the subcuticular tissue (study group) over that of interrupted suturing of the fascia together with the peritoneum and interrupted suturing of the subcuticular tissue (control group) for reducing the incidence of midline abdominal wall incision wound complications after elective gastroenterological surgery with a clean-contaminated wound. Permuted-block randomization with an allocation ratio of 1:1 and blocking will be used. We hypothesize that the study group will show a 50% reduction in the incidence of wound complications. The target number of cases is set at 284. The primary outcome is the incidence of wound complications, including incisional surgical site infection, hemorrhage, seroma, wound dehiscence within 30 days after surgery, and incisional hernia at approximately 1 year after surgery. DISCUSSION: This trial will provide initial evidence on the ideal combination of fascial and skin closure for midline abdominal wall incision to reduce the incidence of overall postoperative wound complications after gastroenterological surgery with a clean-contaminated wound. This trial is expected to generate high-quality evidence that supports the current guidelines for the closure of abdominal wall incisions from the European and American Hernia Societies and to contribute to their next updates. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN-CTR UMIN000048442. Registered on 1 August 2022. https://center6.umin.ac.jp/cgi-open-bin/ctr_e/ctr_view.cgi?recptno=R000055205.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Wall , Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques , Digestive System Surgical Procedures , Elective Surgical Procedures , Incisional Hernia , Surgical Wound Infection , Suture Techniques , Humans , Prospective Studies , Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques/adverse effects , Abdominal Wall/surgery , Suture Techniques/adverse effects , Surgical Wound Infection/prevention & control , Surgical Wound Infection/etiology , Surgical Wound Infection/epidemiology , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Digestive System Surgical Procedures/methods , Incisional Hernia/prevention & control , Incisional Hernia/etiology , Incisional Hernia/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Elective Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome , Incidence , Wound Healing , Equivalence Trials as Topic , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Time Factors
10.
Case Rep Womens Health ; 42: e00616, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38779129

ABSTRACT

Objective: This report summarizes the characteristics of a series of 8 recent (2020-2022) patients with abdominal wall endometriosis (AWE) who underwent laparoscopic surgery. The feasibility and advantages of laparoscopy in the treatment of AWE are set out. Methods: The clinical data of the 8 AWE patients were retrospectively analysed. Basic clinical characteristics, operation details and postoperative details were collected and analysed. Results: Laparoscopic treatment was successful in all 8 cases. The mean operation time was 212.13 ± 48.16 min, the mean estimated blood loss was 25.00 ± 11.18 ml, and the mean postoperative hospital stay was 5.25 ± 1.39 days. 7 of the patients were found to have concomitant pelvic endometriosis, and 1 patient was found to have concealed inguinal hernias during surgery. Concomitant laparoscopic surgery for pelvic lesions was performed, including electrocautery or lesion resection of the pelvic endometriosis lesions in 7 patients, uterine fibroidectomy in 2 patients, high ligation of the hernia sac in 1 patient and endometrial biopsy under hysteroscopy in 1 patient. Endometrial-like tissue was confirmed by postoperative pathological examination of resected AWE lesions in all patients. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The mean follow-up time was 18.75 ± 3.96 months, and no recurrence of AWE was found. Conclusion: Laparoscopic surgery is a safe, effective and feasible treatment option for AWE patients and has the advantages of simultaneous diagnosis and treatment of other pelvic lesions.

11.
Radiol Case Rep ; 19(8): 3176-3179, 2024 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38779193

ABSTRACT

Congenital infantile fibrosarcoma is a rare malignant soft tissue tumor, accounting for less than 1%-2% of childhood cancers. Although it can arise from any body part, an abdominal wall origin is exceptionally rare. This case report presents a case of congenital infantile fibrosarcoma originating from the abdominal wall. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of abdominal wall congenital infantile fibrosarcoma. Unlike adult fibrosarcoma, infantile fibrosarcoma has a good prognosis with less metastasis. Early diagnosis and management are critical for improving outcomes in such rare cases.

12.
J Mech Behav Biomed Mater ; 156: 106578, 2024 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38781775

ABSTRACT

The study refers to the application of a type of artificial neural network called the Self-Organising Map (SOM) for the identification of areas of the human abdominal wall that behave in a similar mechanical way. The research is based on data acquired during in vivo tests using the digital image correlation technique (DIC). The mechanical behaviour of the human abdominal wall is analysed during changing intra-abdominal pressure. SOM allow to study simultaneously three variables in four time/load steps. The variables refer to the principal strains and their directions. SOM classifies all the abdominal surface data points into clusters that behave similarly in accordance with the 12 variables. The analysis of the clusters provides a better insight into abdominal wall deformation and its evolution under pressure than when observing a single mechanical variable. The presented results may provide a better understanding of the mechanics of the living human abdominal wall. It might be particularly useful when selecting proper implants as well as for the design of surgical meshes for the treatment of abdominal hernias, which would be mechanically compatible with identified regions of the human anterior abdominal wall, and possibly open the way for patient-specific solutions.

13.
Hernia ; 2024 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38767716

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Literature reviews outline minimally invasive approaches for abdominal diastasis in patients without skin excess. However, few surgeons are trained in endoscopic rectus sheath plication, and no simulated training programs exist for this method. This study aimed to develop and validate a synthetic simulation model for the training of skills in this approach under the Messick validity framework. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out to assess the participants' previous level of laparoscopic/endoscopic skills by a questionnaire. Participants performed an endoscopic plication on the model and their performance was evaluated by one blinded observer using the global rating scale OSATS and a procedure specific checklist (PSC) scale. A 5-level Likert survey was applied to 5 experts and 4 plastic surgeons to assess Face and Content validity. RESULTS: Fifteen non-experts and 5 experts in abdominal wall endoscopic surgery were recruited. A median OSATS score [25 (range 24-25) vs 14 (range 5-22); p < 0.05 of maximum 25 points] and a median PSC score [11 (range 10-11) vs 8 (range 3-10); p < 0.05 of maximum 11 points] was significantly higher for experts compared with nonexperts. All experts agreed or strongly agreed that the model simulates a real scenario of endoscopic plication of the rectus sheath. CONCLUSION: Our simulation model met all validation criteria outlined in the Messick framework, demonstrating its ability to differentiate between experts and non-experts based on their baseline endoscopic surgical skills. This model stands as a valuable tool for evaluating skills in endoscopic rectus sheath plication.

14.
Hernia ; 2024 May 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38761301

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We studied the effectiveness of biomechanically calculated abdominal wall reconstructions for incisional hernias of varying complexity in an open, prospective observational registry trial. METHODS: From July 1st, 2017 to December 31st, 2020, four hospitals affiliated with the University of Heidelberg recruited 198 patients with complex incisional hernias. Hernias were repaired using biomechanically calculated reconstructions and materials classified on their gripping force towards cyclic load. This approach determines the required strength preoperatively based on the hernia size, using the Critical Resistance to Impacts related to Pressure. The surgeon is supported in reliably determining the Gained Resistance, which is based on the mesh-defect-area-ratio, as well as other mesh and suture factors, and the tissue stability. Tissue stability is defined as a maximum distension of 1.5 cm upon a Valsalva maneuver. In complex cases, a CT scan of the abdomen can be used to assess unstable tissue areas both at rest and during Valsalva's maneuver. RESULTS: Larger and stronger gripping meshes were required for more complex cases to achieve a durable repair, especially for larger hernia sizes. To achieve durable repairs, the number of fixation points increased while the mesh-defect area ratio decreased. Performing these repairs required more operating room time. The complication rate remained low. Less than 1% of recurrences and low pain levels were observed after 3 years. CONCLUSIONS: Biomechanical stability, defined as the resistance to cyclic load, is crucial in preventing postoperative complications, including recurrences and chronic pain.

15.
Updates Surg ; 2024 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38733484

ABSTRACT

Treatment of incisional hernia is a rapidly evolving field of surgery, with actual trends being oriented toward retromuscular/preperitoneal mesh placement. The diffusion of robotic surgery is constantly growing in different surgical specialties and is gaining widespread acceptance for abdominal wall reconstruction. Recently, novel robotic platforms have entered into the market. In this study, we present the first transabdominal retromuscular incisional hernia repair performed with the new Hugo RAS™ system (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA). The surgical team had previous robotic experience and completed an official 2-day session running incisional hernia repair on human cadaver lab. Operating room setting and trocar layout were planned. The patient presented a 4 × 4 cm midline incisional hernia and was scheduled for transabdominal retromuscular incisional hernia repair at our Institution. A description of the operative room setup, robotic arm configuration and docking/tilt angles is provided. Docking time, operative time, and console time were 15, 95, and 75 min, respectively. All the surgical steps were completed without critical surgical errors or high-priority alarms. Neither intraoperative complications nor conversion to open surgery was recorded. Postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. The safety and the feasibility of these procedures will require further analysis and larger patients' sample sizes for procedural standardization and potential integration into minimally invasive abdominal wall reconstruction programs.

16.
Gastroenterol Clin North Am ; 53(2): 265-279, 2024 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38719377

ABSTRACT

Failure to close the abdomen after intestinal or multivisceral transplantation (Tx) remains a frequently occurring problem. Two attractive reconstruction methods, especially in large abdominal wall defects, are full-thickness abdominal wall vascularized composite allograft (AW-VCA) and nonvascularized rectus fascia (NVRF) Tx. This review compares surgical technique, immunology, integration, clinical experience, and indications of both techniques. In AW-VCA Tx, vascular anastomosis is required and the graft undergoes hypotrophy post-Tx. Furthermore, it has immunologic benefits and good clinical outcome. NVRF Tx is an easy technique without the need for vascular anastomosis. Moreover, a rapid integration and neovascularization occurs with excellent clinical outcome.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Wall , Intestines , Humans , Abdominal Wall/surgery , Abdominal Wall/blood supply , Intestines/transplantation , Intestines/blood supply , Fascia/transplantation , Fascia/blood supply , Organ Transplantation/methods , Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques , Viscera/transplantation , Viscera/blood supply
17.
JSLS ; 28(1)2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38562947

ABSTRACT

Background and Objective: We operated on a series of mostly obese patients with diastasis recti abdominis using the "Slim-Mesh" technique to repair/reinforce the diastasis and linea alba/recti muscles without plicating and traumatizing them. Additional objectives were to decrease operation time and intra- and postoperative complications. Methods: We considered T1 cases diastasis after pregnancy and T2 cases obesity (BMI ≥ 30 mg/kg2); D1, D2, and D3 when the diastasis measured 2-3, 3-5, and ≥ 5 cm, respectively; H0 and H1 without and concomitant umbilical and/or epigastric hernia, respectively. At our Department, between May 2010 and November 2022, 47 patients with diastasis recti were operated on with the "Slim-Mesh" technique to reinforce/repair the traumatized linea alba/recti muscles, without plicating them. This was a prospective (83%)-retrospective study. Results: We studied 23 males and 24 females. Mean age and BMI was 58 years and 29 kg/m2, respectively. Groups D1, D2, and D3 comprised 6, 23 and 18 patients, respectively; groups T1, T2, H0 and H1 comprised 22, 25, 13 and 34 patients, respectively. Mean operation time for all cases was 100 minutes. Mean length of hospital stay was 2.3 days and follow-up time was 5 years. We had 6 late postoperative complications: 3 hernia recurrences and 3 trocar site hernias. Conclusion: Considering the lack of agreement on the best surgery for diastasis recti abdominis repair, in our experience the "Slim-Mesh" technique is a valid, safe and easy-to-reproduce way to save, repair and reinforce linea alba/recti muscles in diastasis recti patients, including the obese population (53%).


Subject(s)
Hernia, Abdominal , Rectus Abdominis , Male , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Rectus Abdominis/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Surgical Mesh , Prospective Studies , Hernia, Abdominal/surgery , Obesity/complications , Herniorrhaphy/methods
18.
Br J Radiol ; 2024 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38588564

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the safety and efficacy of percutaneous cryoablation (CA) of soft-tissue tumors (desmoid tumors (DT), vascular malformations (VM), and abdominal wall endometriosis (AWE)). METHODS: This systematic review of studies published before January 2024 encompassed a detailed analysis of CA techniques and technical aspects for the treatment of soft-tissue tumors. Data concerning CA efficacy, complication rates, and other relevant metrics was extracted and included for analysis. RESULTS: The analysis included 27 studies totaling 554 CA procedures. For DT (13 studies, 393 sessions), CA showed an average pain reduction of 79 ± 17% (range: 57-100) and a lesion volume decrease of 71.5 ± 9.8% (range: 44-97). VM (4 studies, 58 sessions) had a 100% technical success rate and an average pain reduction of 72 ± 25% (range: 63-85). The average pain reduction for AWE (6 studies, 103 sessions) was 82 ± 13% (range: 62-100). Overall, the complication rate for CA was low, with minor adverse events (AE) in about 20% of patients and major events in less than 5% of patients. CONCLUSION: Showing substantial efficacy in pain reduction and lesion volume decrease, as well as low incidence of severe AE, CA presents as a highly effective and safe alternative for the treatment of soft-tissue tumors. ADVANCES IN KNOWLEDGE: CA is effective and safe in treating soft-tissue tumors, particularly DT, VM, and AWE.

19.
World J Clin Cases ; 12(8): 1467-1473, 2024 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38576801

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Malignant triton tumors (MTTs) comprise a subgroup of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) that exhibits rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation and follow an aggressive course. MTTs are primarily located along peripheral nerves. Cases of MTTs in the abdominal wall have not been reported. MTT has a poorer prognosis than classic MPNSTs, and accurate diagnosis necessitates a keen understanding of the clinical history and knowledge of its differential diagnosis intricacies. Treatment for MTTs mirrors that for MPNSTs and is predominantly surgical. CASE SUMMARY: A 49-year-old woman presented with a subcutaneous mass in her lower abdominal wall and a pre-existing surgical scar that had grown slowly over 3-4 months before the consultation. She had previously undergone radical hysterectomy and concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for cervical cancer approximately 5 years prior to the consultation. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed a 1.3 cm midline mass in the lower abdomen with infiltration into the rectus abdominis muscle. There was no sign of metastasis (T1N0M0). An incisional biopsy identified sporadic MTT of the lower abdomen. A comprehensive surgical excision with a 3 cm margin inclusive of the peritoneum was executed. Subsequently, the general surgeon utilized an approach akin to the open peritoneal onlay mesh technique. The patient underwent additional treatment with an excision shaped as a mini-abdominoplasty for the skin defect. No complications arose, and annual follow-up CTs did not show signs of recurrence or metastasis. CONCLUSION: An abdominal MTT was efficaciously treated with extensive excision and abdominal wall reconstruction, eliminating the need for postoperative radiotherapy.

20.
Ann Med Surg (Lond) ; 86(4): 2208-2213, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38576955

ABSTRACT

Introduction and importance: The incidence of congenital abdominal wall defects is increasing, but few cases have been reported in the African population. Case presentation: The authors report a case of gastroschisis in a term neonate who was delivered through spontaneous vaginal delivery (SVD) in a remote health facility before transfer to a tertiary hospital in Uganda. Although there was no environmental exposure to teratogens, the major risk factor of Gastroschisis, the neonate was low birth weight, HIV-exposed, and the mother had not received folic acid supplementation during the first trimester, known risk factors of gastroschisis. Physical examination revealed intrauterine growth restriction in addition to the findings of the abdominal wall defect. Clinical discussion: There were many missed opportunities in the management of this case which was marred by delayed essential care of the newborn, delayed surgical repair, and transfer to the tertiary surgical centre. At the tertiary surgical centre, a modified silo technique with delayed secondary closure was used to repair the defect, but the neonate still met its death before completing day 7 of life. Conclusion: This case of gastroschisis shows how the diagnosis and management of neonates born with major congenital structural abnormalities in resource-limited settings is still desirable due to lack of sophisticated medical care services to assist in early detection during pregnancy and early surgical intervention at birth to prevent associated mortality. The authors discuss the lessons learnt and provide recommendations for improvement in the care of neonates born with abdominal wall defects and other congenital birth defects.

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