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1.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 12(10)2024 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38786426

ABSTRACT

Family caregivers take on a variety of tasks when caring for relatives in need of care. Depending on the situation and the intensity of care, they may experience multidimensional burdens, such as physical, psychological, social, or financial stress. The aim of the present study was to identify and appraise self-assessment instruments (SAIs) that capture the dimensions of family caregivers' burdens and that support family caregivers in easily identifying their caregiving role, activities, burden, and needs. We performed an integrative review with a broad-based strategy. A literature search was conducted on PubMed, Google Scholar, Google, and mobile app stores in March 2020. After screening the records based on the eligibility criteria, we appraised the tools we found for their usefulness for family care and nursing practice. From a total of 2654 hits, 45 suitable SAIs from 274 records were identified and analyzed in this way. Finally, nine SAIs were identified and analyzed in detail based on further criteria such as their psychometric properties, advantages, and disadvantages. They are presented in multi-page vignettes with additional information for healthcare professionals. These SAIs have proven useful in assessing the dimensions of caregiver burden and can be recommended for application in family care and nursing practice.

2.
Health Soc Care Deliv Res ; 12(13): 1-181, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38767587

ABSTRACT

Background: The mental health of children/young people is a growing concern internationally. Numerous reports and reviews have consistently described United Kingdom children's mental health services as fragmented, variable, inaccessible and lacking an evidence base. Little is known about the effectiveness of, and implementation complexities associated with, service models for children/young people experiencing 'common' mental health problems like anxiety, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and self-harm. Aim: To develop a model for high-quality service design for children/young people experiencing common mental health problems by identifying available services, barriers and enablers to access, and the effectiveness, cost effectiveness and acceptability of such services. Design: Evidence syntheses with primary research, using a sequential, mixed-methods design. Inter-related scoping and integrative reviews were conducted alongside a map of relevant services across England and Wales, followed by a collective case study of English and Welsh services. Setting: Global (systematic reviews); England and Wales (service map; case study). Data sources: Literature reviews: relevant bibliographic databases and grey literature. Service map: online survey and offline desk research. Case study: 108 participants (41 children/young people, 26 parents, 41 staff) across nine case study sites. Methods: A single literature search informed both reviews. The service map was obtained from an online survey and internet searches. Case study sites were sampled from the service map; because of coronavirus disease 2019, case study data were collected remotely. 'Young co-researchers' assisted with case study data collection. The integrative review and case study data were synthesised using the 'weaving' approach of 'integration through narrative'. Results: A service model typology was derived from the scoping review. The integrative review found effectiveness evidence for collaborative care, outreach approaches, brief intervention services and the 'availability, responsiveness and continuity' framework. There was cost-effectiveness evidence only for collaborative care. No service model appeared to be more acceptable than others. The service map identified 154 English and Welsh services. Three themes emerged from the case study data: 'pathways to support'; 'service engagement'; and 'learning and understanding'. The integrative review and case study data were synthesised into a coproduced model of high-quality service provision for children/young people experiencing common mental health problems. Limitations: Defining 'service model' was a challenge. Some service initiatives were too new to have filtered through into the literature or service map. Coronavirus disease 2019 brought about a surge in remote/digital services which were under-represented in the literature. A dearth of relevant studies meant few cost-effectiveness conclusions could be drawn. Conclusions: There was no strong evidence to suggest any existing service model was better than another. Instead, we developed a coproduced, evidence-based model that incorporates the fundamental components necessary for high-quality children's mental health services and which has utility for policy, practice and research. Future work: Future work should focus on: the potential of our model to assist in designing, delivering and auditing children's mental health services; reasons for non-engagement in services; the cost effectiveness of different approaches in children's mental health; the advantages/disadvantages of digital/remote platforms in delivering services; understanding how and what the statutory sector might learn from the non-statutory sector regarding choice, personalisation and flexibility. Study registration: This study is registered as PROSPERO CRD42018106219. Funding: This award was funded by the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) Health and Social Care Delivery Research programme (NIHR award ref: 17/09/08) and is published in full in Health and Social Care Delivery Research; Vol. 12, No. 13. See the NIHR Funding and Awards website for further award information.


In this research study, we explored services for children and young people with 'common' mental health problems like depression, anxiety and self-harm. We aimed to find out what services exist, how children/young people and families find out about and access these services, what the services actually do, whether they are helpful and whether they offer value for money. We looked at the international literature (reports and research papers) to identify different approaches to providing support, and to find out whether certain approaches worked better than others and whether children/young people and families preferred some approaches over others. The literature provided very little information about the value for money of services. We also carried out a survey and used the internet to identify 154 relevant services in England and Wales. To explore services in more detail, and hear directly from those using them, we planned to visit 9 of the 154 services to interview children/young people, parents and staff. Unfortunately, coronavirus disease 2019 stopped us directly visiting the nine services and so we conducted phone and video interviews instead. We still managed to speak to, and hear the experiences of, more than 100 people (including children/young people and parents). We combined information from the literature with information from the interviews to create an evidence-based 'model' of what services should look like. This model considers some basic things like how quickly children/young people could access a service, what information was available, the importance of confidentiality and whether staff make the service fit with the child/young person's needs and interests. It also considers whether the service helps children/young people learn skills to manage their mental health and whether staff at a service work well together. We hope our model will help existing and new services improve what they offer to children/young people and families.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Mental Health Services , Humans , Child , Adolescent , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Mental Disorders/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , England , Wales , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Male , Female , Child Health Services/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1292692, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38784580

ABSTRACT

Background: Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) has become an area of increasing concern for organizations and institutions. As it evolves, it has gradually posed ongoing challenges, becoming more complex, for organizations. Consequently, more comprehensive studies are required to advance academic and institutional research. From this perspective, this study aims to gather research contributions on the effectiveness of existing interventions for OSH improvement and identify areas for further exploration. Methods: According to the nature of scientific literature, the overall process of a literature review was investigated following an integrative approach, which involved searching for, selecting, and analyzing various literature in a creative and integrated manner, without a predefined structure. Results: The analysis suggests that there is room for improvement in understanding the effectiveness of OSH interventions and more concrete guidance is still desirable. Based on the literature, some research areas for future developments in OSH interventions are identified. One potential area to explore further is fostering human-centered technological development and a more conscious network of stakeholders, with higher coordination, shared knowledge, and open communication. Implications: Focusing on the proposed directions will support scholars and practitioners in pursuing continuous OSH improvement through more effective and well-grounded workplace interventions and encourage organizations to be proactive in daily OSH management.


Subject(s)
Occupational Health , Humans , Workplace
4.
Birth ; 2024 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38798177

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the United States, 35% of all pregnancy-related deaths occur between 24 h and 6 weeks after delivery, yet the first outpatient visit is not typically scheduled until 6 weeks postpartum. Thus, the ability to independently navigate this period is critical to maternal well-being and safety. However, previous research suggests that many women feel unprepared to manage the challenges they encounter during this time, and there is a current need to synthesize the existing evidence. Therefore, the purpose of this integrative review is to describe parent-identified gaps in preparation for the postpartum period in the United States. METHODS: Using the Integrative Review framework by Whittemore and Knafl, a systematic search of Medline, CINAHL, PsychInfo, Web of Science, and a hand-search was conducted for peer-reviewed articles published in English between 1995 and 2023. Results were reported according to PRISMA 2020 guidelines. Studies that met eligibility criteria were synthesized in a literature matrix. RESULTS: Twenty-two studies met inclusion criteria. Four themes were identified: Mental Health Concerns, Physical Concerns, Infant Feeding and Care Concerns, and General Concerns and Recommendations. Many women, regardless of parity, reported feeling unprepared for numerous postpartum experiences, including depression, anxiety, physical recovery, breastfeeding, and infant care. Parents reported difficulty differentiating normal postpartum symptoms from complications. Hospital discharge teaching was viewed as simultaneously overwhelming and inadequate. Parent recommendations included the need for earlier and more comprehensive postpartum preparation during pregnancy, delivered in multiple formats and settings. Parents also reported the need for earlier postpartum visits and improved outpatient support. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that many parents in the United States feel unprepared to navigate a wide variety of emotional, physical, breastfeeding, and infant-care experiences. Future research should explore innovative educational approaches to postpartum preparation during pregnancy as well as outpatient programs to bridge the current gaps in postpartum care.

5.
J Pediatr Nurs ; 2024 May 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38777676

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: Pediatric specialty services are often geographically concentrated in urban areas, leaving up to 1 in 5 rural-dwelling children in the United States without access to advanced care. The purpose of this review was to identify and review extant literature related to barriers and facilitators to accessing specialty care for rural-dwelling children with complex chronic conditions. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA: The Whittemore and Knafl (2005) integrative review method guided the review which included a critical appraisal and analysis of relevant articles published between 2012 and 2023. SAMPLE: Twenty-three studies were identified for inclusion in the integrative review. RESULTS: Using the domains of the Levesque et al. (2013) conceptual framework, findings were categorized according to the access to care continuum. Barriers included broadband access, transportation, and inadequate care coordination. Facilitators included telehealth, social support, and outreach clinics. CONCLUSIONS: To improve access to pediatric specialty care for rural-dwelling children, nurses, physicians, and policymakers will need to consider how the social determinants of health impact the healthcare access continuum from diagnosis to continuing healthcare. IMPLICATIONS: The findings of this integrative review will aid researchers in developing interventions to improve access to pediatric specialty care for rural-dwelling children.

6.
J Adv Nurs ; 2024 May 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38771082

ABSTRACT

AIM: To identify the risk and protective factors affecting thirst symptoms in patients with heart failure (HF) and intervention strategies to alleviate thirst symptoms. DESIGN: An integrative review. METHODS: A total of 61 articles were retrieved. Screening yielded a total of 21 articles which were appraised for quality. The quality of studies was assessed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. DATA SOURCES: Ten electronic databases were searched in October 2023, including Embase, Pubmed, CINAHL, Cochrane, Web of Science, Wiley, CNKI, VIP, CBM and WanFang. In addition, we searched grey databases and manually searched reference lists of included and relevant reviews. RESULTS: In total, 1644 articles were retrieved, of which 21 were included. Eight studies addressed the factors. Six themes emerged as risk factors, including demographics, severity of disease, psycho-environmental, medication, fluid restriction and homeostasis. Conversely, an increase in fluid intake, a high score of sodium restriction diet attitude and using ARB were identified as protective factors. Thirteen studies focus on intervention strategies. Five unique intervention strategies were identified, including Traditional Chinese Medicine, mint-related interventions, sour-flavour interventions, improved water restriction and cluster nursing strategy. CONCLUSION: This finding identified the factors associated with thirst symptoms in patients with HF, especially concerning the elaboration of risk factors, which suggests that healthcare professionals should focus on the risk factors for thirst in patients with HF and consciously avoid the occurrence of these risk factors. Additionally, there are considerable cultural differences in interventions, therefore, to increase adherence during symptom management, careful selection of appropriate intervention strategies based on the requirements and preferences of patients is required. While there are some therapies, there aren't enough high-quality empirical investigations. Thus, multi-centre, large-sample studies are also required in subsequent research to demonstrate the interventions' effectiveness. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PROFESSION: The nurse must notice the symptoms of thirst in HF to slow down the disease's progression and improve the patient's physical and emotional well-being. REPORTING METHOD: The review complies with the PRISMA guidelines for reporting systematic reviews. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: No patient or public contribution.

7.
J Adv Nurs ; 2024 May 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38738535

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore what Internet-based breastfeeding peer support offers to breastfeeding parents. DESIGN: Integrative review. DATA SOURCES AND REVIEW METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted in March 2024 using the following electronic databases: CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, PubMed/MEDLINE and PsycINFO. Database searches yielded 717 results. Two researchers removed the duplicates (n = 256) and screened the remaining titles (n = 461), abstracts (n = 197) and full texts (n = 60) independently. Eventually, 19 studies were included in the review. The chosen studies had qualitative (n = 11), quantitative (n = 6), or mixed methods designs (n = 2) and were published between 2015 and 2024. Qualitative content analysis was conducted. RESULTS: The main categories were supplying support that is responsive to the needs of parents and belonging to a breastfeeding community. The parents looked for and received breastfeeding support, advice, information, emotional support, reassurance and access to shared experiences from various online breastfeeding peer support groups. The support groups helped them in their breastfeeding decisions, thus making a difference in their breastfeeding experience. The support groups created breastfeeding communities for these parents and they were able to bond with others, feel like they belonged and share experiences. Additionally, these breastfeeding communities helped to normalize various breastfeeding practices. CONCLUSION: Breastfeeding peer support groups can offer parents the support and guidance they seek and a sense that they are part of a breastfeeding community. However, it is vital these groups are efficiently moderated to ensure the advice parents receive is evidence-based and the support is encouraging. IMPACT: These findings show that well-moderated online breastfeeding peer support can offer parents high-quality support. It is essential for health care professionals to be aware of the various options available in order to recommend high-quality support groups for breastfeeding parents. REPORTING METHOD: PRISMA. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: This was an integrative review therefore no patient or public contribution was necessary.

8.
Heliyon ; 10(7): e29047, 2024 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38623201

ABSTRACT

Access to sociodigital experiences is constantly expanding, driven by the development of immersive technologies that capture the public's interest. These technological advances present a hypnotic nature, sparking curiosity, creating new experiences, and providing opportunities for expanding access and inclusion. This article aims to highlight the characteristics and requirements necessary for the development of creativity in new virtual environments, with a focus on the metaverse, a three-dimensional and interactive virtual space that offers users the sensation of existence within this environment. The study centers on the following question: what are the essential characteristics for an immersive environment to promote the development of creativity in its users? Understanding how technologies influence creativity is crucial to driving innovation, the progress of contemporary sciences, and education. This research analyzed various approaches and strategies for the use of the metaverse and immersive virtual environments to promote user creativity. Through an integrative literature review, practical characteristics that contribute to creativity in previous studies were identified. The results highlight the presence of common characteristics, organized into a model of articulation of the sociodigital analysis categories for creativity with potential for application.

9.
Nurs Rep ; 14(2): 753-766, 2024 Mar 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38651470

ABSTRACT

Background: The concept of unfinished nursing care (UNC) describes nursing interventions required by patients and families that nurses postpone or omit. UNC reasons have been documented; however, no studies have summarised the underlying factors triggering the UNC during the pandemic. Therefore, the aim was to synthesise the available studies exploring factors affecting UNC during a pandemic. Methods: We conducted an integrative review following Whittemore and Knafl's framework according to the Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. PubMed, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and the Scopus databases were searched for primary studies that collected data from 1 January 2020 to 1 May 2023. Both qualitative and quantitative studies assessing the reasons for UNC were eligible and evaluated in their quality using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme and the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Results: Four studies were included-three qualitative and one cross-sectional. The reasons for UNC have been documented at the following levels: (a) system (e.g., new healthcare system priorities); (b) unit (e.g., ineffective work processes); (c) nurse management (e.g., inadequate nurse manager's leadership); (d) nurse (e.g., nurses' attitudes, competences, performances); and (e) patient (increased demand for care). Conclusion: The reasons for UNC during the COVID-19 pandemic are different to those documented in the pre-pandemic times and reflect a pre-existing frailty of the National Health Service towards nursing care.

10.
Nurse Educ Today ; 139: 106217, 2024 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38676961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While the number of reviews of nursing education research has increased over the years, bibliometric studies about these reviews are limited. OBJECTIVES: The purposes were to: (1) examine the number of reviews of nursing education research published from 2018 through 2022, (2) identify journals publishing these reviews, (3) identify the types and topics of reviews in nursing education, and (4) analyze how these reviews are labeled (standard versus nonstandard). DESIGN: This was a bibliometric study of reviews in nursing education. METHODS: The search for reviews in nursing education was done using CINAHL Complete via the EBSCO host platform and was limited to articles published in peer reviewed journals. The results were imported into EndNote, and the title or abstract was used to identify the review type. The categorized reviews were then exported into Microsoft Excel. The titles and abstracts were searched to identify reviews in nursing education, resulting in 600 articles analyzed in this study. The topics of the reviews were identified via natural language processing techniques based on the Medical Subject Headings biomedical vocabulary in the manual tags with each article. RESULTS: The number of reviews has steadily increased over the years. The top journal in which reviews were published was Nurse Education Today (n = 197). Nearly a quarter (n = 149, 24.8 %) of the reviews were integrative, followed by systematic (n = 117, 19.5 %), scoping (n = 117, 19.5 %), and literature (n = 85, 14.2 %). There were 12 main topics: most reviews were on simulation, followed by critical thinking methods and the academic achievement of nursing students. CONCLUSION: This study documented an increase in the number of reviews of nursing education research over the last five years. The most common type was an integrative review, followed by systematic, scoping, and literature. Reviews on simulation were most common.

11.
J Pediatr Nurs ; 77: 212-235, 2024 Apr 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38598994

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore children and young people's (CYP) (5-24 years of age) self-reported experiences of asthma self-management strategies (ASMS) with nursing involvement across various settings. BACKGROUND: Childhood asthma is an increasingly significant health issue, highlighting the importance of acquiring self-management skills to optimise future health outcomes. Registered nurses play a pivotal role in delivering appropriate, personalized self-management support. METHODS: This integrative review searched four electronic databases: Cumulated Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature via Elton B. Stephens Company, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Object, View and Interactive Design (OVID), and PubMed, that followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis flowchart. Included studies were critically appraised using the Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal tools. Braun and Clarks thematic analysis was used to generate themes, and sub-themes. FINDINGS: Fifteen studies were included for review. Thematic analysis generated three themes being healthy literacy; health and wellbeing; and tools and working together. CONCLUSIONS: Asthma continues to have negative physical, psychological, and social implications among CYP. CYP are both willing and capable of engaging in ASMS and learning self-management skills, however, continue to have unmet self-management needs. IMPLICATIONS TO PRACTICE: Strategies must bolster health literacy, improve physical and psychological health, and harness interactive, youth-centric, and informative tools to facilitate communication and decrease the burden of self-management. Applications pose a promising avenue for self-management support. This age group remains under-explored and future research should enable meaningful engagement with CYP to better understand their perspectives and improve strategy success.

12.
Nurse Educ Today ; 136: 106148, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38442641

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this integrative review is to identify, describe, and synthesise evidence regarding students' perceptions of online degree programmes in nurse education, their academic performance, and the factors associated with their academic performance. DESIGN: Integrative review. DATA SOURCES: Four databases, CINAHL, ERIC (Ebsco), PubMed/MEDLINE, and Web of Science were searched. The reference lists of included studies were reviewed to identify other relevant studies. REVIEW METHODS: Whittemore and Knafl's method was used as a guideline for the integrative review. Peer-reviewed studies describing students' perceptions of-or academic performance in-online degree programmes in nurse education were included in the review without time limitations. The quality of the selected article was assessed using the Mixed Method Appraisal Tool. RESULTS: Nursing students' perceptions of online degree programmes were categorised into enabling career development, content delivered online, and community belonging. Factors related to student's academic performance were associated with individual students and the characteristics of online learning environments. Factors associated with students' academic performance were individual self-direction, formal communication skills, and working and educational backgrounds. Factors associated with academic performance in an online learning environment were categorised into regular feedback and methods for learning. CONCLUSIONS: Online degree programmes in nurse education contribute to developing pedagogy through a satisfactory work-life balance, students' experiences of community and support, pleasant digital content, and various teaching methods by faculties. The study findings of this review have implications for educators to develop and adopt strategies for advancing digital environments with the pedagogy that supports community building to meet the needs of individual students.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Nursing , Students, Nursing , Humans , Learning , Students , Educational Status , Education, Nursing/methods
13.
Sociol Health Illn ; 2024 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38517474

ABSTRACT

Health and illness identities have been presented as important for the experience of health and illness, and they are a widespread research interest. However, these identities are conceptualised in many different ways. This conceptual diversity calls for us to take stock of existing understandings of health and illness identities to provide conceptual clarity and reliability. The study performs an integrative review of these understandings in scientific articles identified through the databases PsychInfo, Pubmed and Scopus. The final sample consists of 64 articles, on which a thematic analysis has been performed. Health and illness identities are regarded as constructed and can be understood in terms of being, acting and judging, answering the questions 'Who are you, with regard to health/illness?', 'How do you deal with health/illness?' and 'How are people judged by their health/illness?', respectively. The terms health identity and illness identity are understood in varied, not necessarily compatible ways, and need to be applied carefully. Health identity concepts appear to be less well established and based upon a more varied theoretical background, while illness identity concepts appear to be more well established and usually relate to a (bio-)medical context. A potential understanding of health identity for medical sociology is suggested.

14.
Nurs Ethics ; : 9697330241235305, 2024 Mar 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38504620

ABSTRACT

Ethics is a foundational competency in healthcare inherent in everyday nursing practice. Therefore, the promotion of qualified nurses' and nursing students' moral competence is essential to ensure ethically high-quality and sustainable healthcare. The aim of this integrative literature review is to identify the factors contributing to the promotion of qualified nurses' and nursing students' moral competence. The review has been registered in PROSPERO (CRD42023386947) and reported according to the PRISMA guideline. Focusing on qualified nurses' and nursing students' moral competence, a literature search was undertaken in January 2023 in six scientific databases: CINAHL, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, PubMed Medline, Scopus and Web of Science. Empirical studies written in English without time limitation were eligible for inclusion. A total of 29 full texts were retrieved and included out of 5233 citations. Quality appraisal was employed using Joanna Briggs Institute checklists and the Mixed Method Appraisal Tool. Data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Research about the factors contributing to the promotion of qualified nurses' and nursing students' moral competence is limited and mainly explored using descriptive research designs. The contributing factors were identified as comprising two main categories: (1) human factors, consisting of four categories: individual, social, managerial and professional factors, and ten sub-categories; and (2) structural factors, consisting of four categories: educational, environmental, organisational and societal factors, and eight sub-categories. This review provides knowledge about the factors contributing to the promotion of qualified nurses' and nursing students' moral competence for the use of researchers, nurse educators, managers, organisations and policymakers. More research about the contributing factors is needed using complex intervention, implementation and multiple methods designs to ensure ethically sustainable healthcare.

15.
J Clin Nurs ; 33(4): 1362-1375, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38317507

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore the role of family meetings for individuals living with dementia and their family caregivers. DESIGN: Integrative review. METHODS: We conducted searches in the Cochrane Library, PubMed, CINAHL, and Embase databases (up to December 2022). Additionally, an ancestry search strategy was employed to supplement the retrieval of published literature related to family meetings or family conferences for people with dementia and their family caregivers. RESULTS: The review integrated 11 articles, comprising seven quantitative studies, two qualitative studies, and two case reports. The findings did not indicate a significant improvement in end-of-life quality for individuals with dementia in the family meetings group compared to those receiving usual care. Limited evidence suggested some improvement in mental health outcomes for family caregivers. Both intervention and control groups incurred high care costs. However, family meetings appeared to delay nursing home placements for individuals with dementia. Two qualitative studies provided insights into the experiences of families and healthcare professionals participating in family meetings, highlighting opportunities and challenges in implementing such meetings. Additionally, two case reports offered specific and illustrative accounts of typical family meetings. CONCLUSION: Family meetings can delay nursing home placements for elderly individuals with dementia. Families dealing with dementia perceive family meetings as an opportunity to collaborate with professionals in providing comprehensive care. Further research is needed to explore the effectiveness of family meetings in decision-making for families affected by dementia. Additionally, addressing timing and process coordination issues in family meetings is crucial for optimising their practices among families dealing with dementia. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: In order to make family meetings more accessible to families of individuals with dementia, we offer the following recommendations for future research and practice: Rather than a blanket rejection, the decision regarding the participation of individuals with dementia in family meetings should be based on their specific condition and the needs of their family. Coordination and harmonisation of opinions and perceptions among family members of individuals with dementia can sometimes be complex for healthcare professionals. The involvement of family coordinators may simplify this process. To determine the optimal timing for holding family meetings that can better assist families dealing with dementia, we propose that the right to initiate a meeting be granted to the family. This allows them to convene with healthcare professionals and address their concerns at their convenience.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Dementia , Family , Aged , Humans , Caregivers/psychology , Health Personnel , Nursing Homes
16.
Nurs Rep ; 14(1): 362-375, 2024 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38391073

ABSTRACT

Prelicensure nursing students face significant stress from their education and clinical placements, highlighting the crucial need for the development of effective coping mechanisms with which to manage both academic and clinical responsibilities, ultimately enhancing the wellbeing and academic performance of these students. This umbrella review aims to evaluate and synthesize existing review articles that examine stress levels and coping mechanisms among student nurses during their education and training. Five databases (PsycINFO, PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus and Web of Science) were searched for review articles published from 2010 onwards. This review includes twelve articles, encompassing 189 studies. The review findings demonstrate that student nurses experience moderate-to-high levels of stress during their nurse education. Major sources of stress include academic demands, patient care responsibilities, and interactions with nursing staff and faculty. Commonly utilized coping skills involve problem-solving behaviors, transference, and maintaining an optimistic outlook. Given the adverse consequences of stress, nurse educators play a critical role in the development of strategies with which to reduce stress and enhance coping skills among student nurses. This study was not registered.

17.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 12: e48526, 2024 Feb 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38335026

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Smart home technology (SHT) can be useful for aging in place or health-related purposes. However, surveillance studies have highlighted ethical issues with SHTs, including user privacy, security, and autonomy. OBJECTIVE: As digital technology is most often designed for younger adults, this review summarizes perceptions of SHTs among users aged 50 years and older to explore their understanding of privacy, the purpose of data collection, risks and benefits, and safety. METHODS: Through an integrative review, we explored community-dwelling adults' (aged 50 years and older) perceptions of SHTs based on research questions under 4 nonmutually exclusive themes: privacy, the purpose of data collection, risk and benefits, and safety. We searched 1860 titles and abstracts from Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Scopus, Web of Science Core Collection, and IEEE Xplore or IET Electronic Library, resulting in 15 included studies. RESULTS: The 15 studies explored user perception of smart speakers, motion sensors, or home monitoring systems. A total of 13 (87%) studies discussed user privacy concerns regarding data collection and access. A total of 4 (27%) studies explored user knowledge of data collection purposes, 7 (47%) studies featured risk-related concerns such as data breaches and third-party misuse alongside benefits such as convenience, and 9 (60%) studies reported user enthusiasm about the potential for home safety. CONCLUSIONS: Due to the growing size of aging populations and advances in technological capabilities, regulators and designers should focus on user concerns by supporting higher levels of agency regarding data collection, use, and disclosure and by bolstering organizational accountability. This way, relevant privacy regulation and SHT design can better support user safety while diminishing potential risks to privacy, security, autonomy, or discriminatory outcomes.


Subject(s)
Independent Living , Privacy , Aged , Humans , Middle Aged , Perception , Technology
18.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 75: 103908, 2024 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38335697

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this integtrative review is to examine the literature on nursing students preparedness for the digitalised clinical setting. BACKGROUND: Digital literacy skills ensure nursing students can provide quality and safe care to patients in a digitalised clinical setting. DESIGN: Integrative review of the literature. METHODS: The integrative review of the literature incorporated Whittemore and Knafl's (2005) framework and reported in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) 2021 statement. A review of the literature comprised of a search of the following databases: ERIC, Scopus, CINAHL, Medline, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar from 2010-2022. Data were critically appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP), the Mixed Method Tool (MMAT) and Joanna Biggs Institute (JBI). RESULTS: The literature reported on nine studies from 2010 to 2022. The four themes identified using Braun and Clarke's thematic analysis were curriculum design, education and training, digital literacy level and professional digital literacy competency standard framework. Major findings include the need for the development and integration of a professional digital literacy competency standard framework embedded into nursing curricula to equip nursing students with appropriate digital literacy skills to navigate digitalised healthcare settings. CONCLUSION: Current registered nurses and preregistration nurses are required to be upskilled with the understanding and knowledge of health informatics and its role in the clinical setting. This will enable future registered nurses to keep up with the rapidly evolving technological clinical environment.


Subject(s)
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Humans , Curriculum , Literacy , Australia
19.
J Adv Nurs ; 2024 Feb 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38318982

ABSTRACT

AIM: To develop a framework to guide the successful integration of nurse practitioners (NPs) into practice settings and, working from a social justice lens, deliver comprehensive primary healthcare which advances health equity. DESIGN: Integrative review. METHODS: The integrative review was informed by the Whittemore and Knafl's framework and followed the Preferred Reporting for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Quality was assessed using the Johns Hopkins Research Evidence Appraisal Tool. Findings were extracted and thematically analysed using NVivo. A social justice lens informed all phases. DATA SOURCES: Databases, including CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science, were searched for peer-reviewed literature published in English between 2005 and April 2022. RESULTS: Twenty-eight articles were included. Six themes were identified at the individual (micro), local health provider (meso), and national systems and structures (macro) levels of the health sector: (1) autonomy and agency; (2) awareness and visibility; (3) shared vision; (4) leadership; (5) funding and infrastructure; and (6) intentional support and self-care. The evidence-based framework is explicitly focused on the components required to successfully integrate NPs into primary healthcare to advance health equity. CONCLUSION: Integrating NPs into primary healthcare is complex and requires a multilevel approach at macro, meso and micro levels. NPs offer the potential to transform primary healthcare delivery to meet the health needs of local communities. Health workforce and integration policies and strategies are essential if the contribution of NPs is to be realized. The proposed framework offers an opportunity for further research to inform NP integration. IMPACT STATEMENT: Nurse practitioners (NPs) offer the potential to transform primary healthcare services to meet local community health needs and advance health equity. Globally, there is a lack of guidance and health policy to support the integration of the NP workforce. The developed framework provides guidance to successfully integrate NPs to deliver comprehensive primary healthcare grounded in social justice. Integrating NPs into PHC is complex and requires a multilevel approach at macro, meso and micro levels. The framework offers an opportunity for further research to inform NP integration, education and policy. SUMMARY STATEMENT: What problem did the study address: The challenges of integrating nurse practitioners (NPs) into primary healthcare (PHC) are internationally recognized. Attempts to establish NP roles in New Zealand have been ad hoc with limited research, evidence-informed frameworks or policy to guide integration initiatives. Our review builds on existing international literature to understand how NPs are successfully integrated into PHC to advance health equity and provide a guiding framework. What were the main findings: Six themes were identified across individual (micro), local health provider (meso) and national systems and structures (macro) levels as fundamental to NP integration: autonomy and agency; awareness and visibility of the NP and their role; a shared vision for the direction of primary healthcare utilizing NP scope of practice; leadership in all spaces; necessary funding and infrastructure; and intentional support and self-care. Where and on whom will the research have an impact: Given extant health workforce challenges together with persisting health inequities, NPs provide a solution to delivering comprehensive primary healthcare from a social justice lens to promote healthcare access and health equity. The proposed evidence-informed framework provides guidance for successful integration across the health sector, training providers, as well as the NP profession, and is a platform for future research. REPORTING METHOD: This integrative review adhered to the Preferred Reporting for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) method. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: No patient or public contribution.

20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38303610

ABSTRACT

Adolescents are sexually assaulted at remarkably high rates. Adolescents are also unique given the specific dynamics of adolescent sexual assault, their current stage in human development, their limited legal standing and rights, and their experiences navigating postassault services and resources. While literature exists within each of these domains, it is somewhat disconnected and overlooks how adolescents are often relegated to the margins in research and practice. The purpose of this integrative review is to (1) provide a more complete understanding of adolescent sexual assault and survivors' nuanced needs; (2) frame adolescent survivors as a too-often-overlooked oppressed group that researchers and responders must consider and center in their work, lest contribute to their further marginalization; and (3) inspire and orient social justice-minded scholar activists to various action steps to take to center and prioritize adolescents in research and practice. Through our intersectional feminist approach, we offer specific action steps for social justice-minded scholar activists to recenter adolescents in their research and practice.

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