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1.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 18: e95, 2024 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38829179

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The ongoing Russian-Ukrainian war has been linked to mental health problems in the Ukrainian general population. To date, however, scarce research has examined the mental health of psychosocial support workers (PSWs) in Ukraine who have a burdensome workload in the context of ongoing conflict. This study aimed to examine the prevalence and correlates of burnout, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and suicidal ideation (SI) in PSWs in Ukraine during the Russian-Ukrainian war. METHODS: One hundred seventy-eight PSWs in Ukraine completed a survey assessing war exposure, mental health, and psychosocial characteristics. RESULTS: A total 59.6% of PSWs screened positive for burnout, 38.2% for PTSD, and 10.7% for current SI. Lower optimism was associated with greater odds of burnout. Greater distress from witnessing war-related destruction, lower optimism, lower presence of meaning in life, and lower levels of close social relationships were associated with greater odds of burnout. Lower presence of meaning in life was associated with greater odds of SI. CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study highlight the mental health challenges faced by PSWs in Ukraine during the ongoing Russian-Ukrainian war. They further suggest that interventions to foster meaning in life and promote social connectedness may "help the helpers" during this ongoing conflict.


Subject(s)
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , Ukraine/epidemiology , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Russia/epidemiology , Prevalence , Psychosocial Support Systems , Suicidal Ideation , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data
2.
BMC Psychol ; 12(1): 322, 2024 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38824566

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19-related stigmatization refers to COVID-19-related judgements by others that devalue the individual. Such stigmatization towards healthcare workers may cause psychological burden and negative consequences. Such stigmatization may have particularly overwhelmed allied health trainees (AHTs) and post-graduate year doctors (PGYDs) because they just started their medical career. Social support and resource support have been reported to benefit psychological health and reduce stigmatization. Therefore, the present study used a cross-sectional study design to investigate the association between perceived stigma, self-stigma, psychological distress, and negative outcomes (including emotional exhaustion, insomnia and suicidal ideation) among AHTs and PGYDs in Taiwan. METHODS: An online survey distributed between July and December, 2022 received 522 responses. Variables were assessed using the 21-item Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, Insomnia Severity Index and a series of self-designed questions to assess social support, resource support, perceived stigma, self-stigma, emotional exhaustion, and suicidal ideation. RESULTS: Structural equation modeling showed that perceived stigma was associated with self-stigma (standardized coefficient [ß] = 0.428, p < 0.001), and self-stigma was associated with psychological distress (ß = 0.197, p < 0.001), as well as being associated with emotional exhaustion, insomnia, and suicidal ideation (ß = 0.349, 0.556 and 0.212, all p-values < 0.001). While social support and resource support were negatively associated with perceived stigma (ß= - 0.175 and - 0.152, p < 0.01), additional associations were found between social support and emotional exhaustion (ß= - 0.093, p < 0.001), as well as between resource support and insomnia (ß= - 0.120, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that COVID-19 related stigmatization was correlated to the detrimental consequences of emotional exhaustion, insomnia and suicidal ideation. Clear paths regarding the associations of social support and resource support with the three negative associations were found as the possible solutions. Strategies to reduce the stigmatization and these negative outcomes, or improve the psychological health will benefit AHTs and PGYDs in maintaining a healthy mental status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Social Stigma , Social Support , Suicidal Ideation , Humans , Taiwan , Male , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Female , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/psychology , Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Emotional Exhaustion
3.
Nurs Open ; 11(6): e2211, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38858855

ABSTRACT

AIM: Many people see nursing as a high-pressure, high-risk profession. Therefore, job burnout among nursing staff has become an important topic of study and has received widespread attention worldwide. This research intended to evaluate the frequency of and variables related with work burnout among nurses in public hospitals in China. DESIGN: Using a multistage random sample procedure, a cross-sectional survey was carried out in the eastern, central and western areas of China. METHODS: The Maslach Inventory-Human Service Survey and demographic information made up the two sections of the questionnaire. Of the 5250 questionnaires sent, 4865 were deemed legitimate, yielding an effective response rate of 92.67%. A linear regression analysis was performed to investigate the variables linked to nursing work burnout. RESULTS: Among the 4865 nurses, women accounted for 97.4% of the survey respondents, most of whom were aged 26-35 years. Results showed that the total scores of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) and reduced personal accomplishment (PA) were 20.02 ± 12.04, 4.78 ± 5.54 and 34.42 ± 10.32 respectively. 50.7% of subjects obtained high or moderated scores on EE, 32.8% of subjects obtained high or moderated scores on DP and 80.4% of subjects obtained low or moderated scores on PA. Age, department, position, post-establishment, work shift type in recent months, overtime times in recent months and night shift frequency in recent months were negatively correlated with EE, and child status, monthly income, working days per week and sleep quality in recent 1 month were positively correlated with it (F = 141.827, P < 0.01, R2 = 0.243). Age, gender, department, post-establishment, overtime hours in recent months and night shift frequency in recent months were negatively correlated with DP, and child status and sleep quality in the last 1 month were positively correlated with it (F = 78.794, p < 0.01, R2 = 0.115). Child status, years of nursing work and sleep quality in the last 1 month were negatively correlated with PA, whereas age, position, work shift type in recent months and night shift frequency in recent months were positively correlated with it (F = 67.981, p < 0.01, R2 = 0.089).


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Female , Adult , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Prevalence , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Job Satisfaction , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
4.
Crit Care Nurs Q ; 47(3): 257-268, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38860954

ABSTRACT

Burnout is a state of emotional and physical depletion. Its occurrence among critical care nurses (CCNs) is a concept that has gained traction yet remains an issue with global consequences. Nurses are especially vulnerable to burnout due to the persistent stressors they are exposed to, which include the general work environment, biological factors, and emerging changes caused by COVID-19. This study aims to assess the severity of burnout among CCNs during the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated factors. A descriptive cross-sectional questionnaire was used in this study to measure the estimated burnout rate among CCNs in Palestine and establish associations with potential factors. Maslach Burnout Inventory questionnaire was used for the task. The results showed out of the 173 participants, more than 35% reported severe overall burnout. Per burnout domains, it was found that around 70% of participants suffered from low personal accomplishment, while 59.5% had severe levels of depersonalization, and finally, more than 65% of critical nurses had severe emotional exhaustion. Out of the various variables tested, gender, age, type of hospital, PPE, and fear of transmission were found to be associated with overall burnout. CCNs in Palestine were found to be severely burned out and should be dealt with before getting out of hand. The research found variables related to burnout contributed to burnout. Recommendations for further studies and prioritization should be made.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Critical Care Nursing , Intensive Care Units , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Male , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Middle Aged
5.
Crit Care Nurs Q ; 47(3): 193-201, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38860949

ABSTRACT

Nurses are at high risk of burnout, desire to leave the profession, and possibly missed nursing care due to the exhausting nature of caring. Missed nursing care may also affect nurses' burnout and desire to leave the profession. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the missed nursing care and its relationship with burnout and desire to leave the profession among intensive care unit nurses. The participants of this descriptive analytical study were 249 Iranian nurses working in intensive care units in 2022. The data were collected using a Demographic Information Questionnaire, Kalish's Missed Nursing Care Questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory, and desire to leave the profession questionnaire. The majority of nurses (71%) were females. The generalized linear regression model showed that there was a significant relationship between missed care with gender (B = 5.55, P < .001), marital status (B = -7.37, P = .04), working shift (B = 7.80, P < .001), and employment status (B = -2.87, P = .02). Using structural equation modeling, it was found that the effect of missed care on burnout was significant. Considering the effect of missed care on burnout among nurses working in intensive care units, it seems that creating better working conditions, providing sufficient resources for nurses, supporting them, and changing the factors affecting missed care in order to improve the conditions can reduce the possibility of missing nursing care and, finally, burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Intensive Care Units , Humans , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Female , Iran , Male , Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Job Satisfaction , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Critical Care Nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Middle Aged , Personnel Turnover/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/psychology
6.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0293107, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38870169

ABSTRACT

Globally, healthcare systems are contending with a pronounced health human resource crisis marked by elevated rates of burnout, heightened job transitions, and an escalating demand for the limited supply of the existing health workforce. This crisis detrimentally affects the quality of patient care, contributing to long wait times, decreased patient satisfaction, and a heightened frequency of patient safety incidents and medical errors. In response to the heightened demand, healthcare organizations are proactively exploring solutions to retain their workforce. With women comprising over 70% of health human resources, this study seeks to gain insight into the unique experiences of women health professionals on the frontlines of healthcare and develop a conceptual framework aimed at facilitating organizations in effectively supporting the retention and advancement of women in healthcare frontline roles. We used grounded theory in this qualitative study. From January 2023 to May 2023, we conducted individual semi-structured interviews with 27 frontline HCWs working in Canada and representing diverse backgrounds. The data underwent thematic analysis, which involved identifying and comprehending recurring patterns across the information to elucidate emerging themes. Our analysis found that organizational, professional, and personal factors shape women's intentions to leave the frontline workforce. Reevaluating organizational strategies related to workforce, fostering a positive work culture, and building the capacity of management to create supportive work environment can collectively transform the work environment. By creating conditions that enable women to perform effectively and find satisfaction in their professional roles, organizations can enhance their ability to retain valuable talent.


Subject(s)
Health Personnel , Humans , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Canada , Adult , Job Satisfaction , Middle Aged , Health Workforce , Burnout, Professional , Qualitative Research , Organizational Culture , Workplace/psychology
7.
Med Educ Online ; 29(1): 2366557, 2024 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38870397

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: High rates of burnout, anxiety, and depression in medical students are widespread, yet we have limited knowledge of the medical school experiences of students with mental health issues. The aim of the study is to understand the impact of mental health issues on students' experience and training at medical school by adopting a qualitative approach. METHODS: Qualitative study using in-depth semi-structured interviews with 20 students with mental health issues from eight UK medical schools of varying size and location. Students were purposefully sampled to gain variety in the type of mental health issue experienced and demographic characteristics. Reflexive thematic analysis was employed using NVivo software. RESULTS: Three themes were identified. 1) Culture of medicine: medical culture contributed to causing mental ill-health through study demands, competitiveness with peers, a 'suck it up' mentality where the expectation is that medical school is tough and medical students must push through, and stigma towards mental ill-health. 2) Help-seeking: students feared others discovering their difficulties and thus initially tried to cope alone, hiding symptoms until they were severe. There were multiple barriers to help-seeking including stigma and fear of damage to their career. 3) Impact on academic life: mental health issues had a detrimental impact on academic commitments, with students' unable to keep up with their studies and some needing to take time out from medical school. CONCLUSION: This study provides insight into how medical culture contributes both to the cause of mental health difficulties and the reluctance of medical students to seek help. Mental health issues had a considerable negative impact on medical students' ability to learn and progress through their degree. Addressing the medical culture factors that contribute to the cause of mental health issues and the barriers to help-seeking must be a priority to ensure a healthier medical workforce.


Subject(s)
Mental Health , Qualitative Research , Schools, Medical , Students, Medical , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology , Female , Male , Interviews as Topic , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Social Stigma , Young Adult , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Adult , Help-Seeking Behavior , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology
8.
Hum Resour Health ; 22(1): 39, 2024 Jun 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38872223

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: According to previous studies, stress and job burnout among medical personnel increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study analyzed the effect of the experience of COVID-19 response work on the intention of municipal hospital staffs to leave their workplaces during the pandemic. METHODS: The 3556 employees who had worked for more than 1 year at one of the eight Seoul Municipal Hospitals that either provided inpatient treatment for quarantined COVID-19 patients or operated as screening clinics were taken as the study population. In total, 1227 employees completed a web or mobile survey between October 21 and November 18, 2020. A chi-squared test was performed to confirm the difference in the distribution of turnover intention depending on whether the employees performed COVID-19 response tasks. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the factors that affected the intention to leave. RESULTS: Of the 1227 respondents, 761 (62.0%) were frontline workers who were the first line of response to COVID-19. Experience with COVID-19 response tasks (OR = 1.59, p = 0.003) was significantly associated with the intention to leave. Additionally, the probability of turnover intention was significantly higher among workers aged 20-29 years (OR = 2.11, p = 0.038) and 40-49 years (OR = 1.57, p = 0.048), unmarried individuals (OR = 1.66, p = 0.005), doctors (OR = 2.41, p = 0.010), nurses (OR = 1.59, p = 0.036), and technical staff members (OR = 2.22, p = 0.009). High turnover intention was found among those who experienced high levels of burnout (OR = 2.03, p < 0.001) and those working in non-directly managed municipal hospitals (OR = 1.87, p = 0.018). CONCLUSION: Employees directly involved in COVID-19 response work displayed higher turnover intention. Various personal, job, and organizational factors significantly influenced employees' intentions to leave their positions in dedicated COVID-19 hospitals. These findings suggest the necessity of introducing management programs to aid workers who have experienced sudden changes in their duties and loss of autonomy while performing COVID-19 response tasks.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Intention , Personnel Turnover , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Personnel Turnover/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Male , Female , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Seoul , Surveys and Questionnaires , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Young Adult , Workplace/psychology , Pandemics , Job Satisfaction
9.
J Med Internet Res ; 26: e49450, 2024 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38838308

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Construction and nursing are critical industries. Although both careers involve physically and mentally demanding work, the risks to workers during the COVID-19 pandemic are not well understood. Nurses (both younger and older) are more likely to experience the ill effects of burnout and stress than construction workers, likely due to accelerated work demands and increased pressure on nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we analyzed a large social media data set using advanced natural language processing techniques to explore indicators of the mental status of workers across both industries before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: This social media analysis aims to fill a knowledge gap by comparing the tweets of younger and older construction workers and nurses to obtain insights into any potential risks to their mental health due to work health and safety issues. METHODS: We analyzed 1,505,638 tweets published on Twitter (subsequently rebranded as X) by younger and older (aged <45 vs >45 years) construction workers and nurses. The study period spanned 54 months, from January 2018 to June 2022, which equates to approximately 27 months before and 27 months after the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic on March 11, 2020. The tweets were analyzed using big data analytics and computational linguistic analyses. RESULTS: Text analyses revealed that nurses made greater use of hashtags and keywords (both monograms and bigrams) associated with burnout, health issues, and mental health compared to construction workers. The COVID-19 pandemic had a pronounced effect on nurses' tweets, and this was especially noticeable in younger nurses. Tweets about health and well-being contained more first-person singular pronouns and affect words, and health-related tweets contained more affect words. Sentiment analyses revealed that, overall, nurses had a higher proportion of positive sentiment in their tweets than construction workers. However, this changed markedly during the COVID-19 pandemic. Since early 2020, sentiment switched, and negative sentiment dominated the tweets of nurses. No such crossover was observed in the tweets of construction workers. CONCLUSIONS: The social media analysis revealed that younger nurses had language use patterns consistent with someone experiencing the ill effects of burnout and stress. Older construction workers had more negative sentiments than younger workers, who were more focused on communicating about social and recreational activities rather than work matters. More broadly, these findings demonstrate the utility of large data sets enabled by social media to understand the well-being of target populations, especially during times of rapid societal change.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Humans , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Adult , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health , Pandemics , Aging/psychology , Linguistics , Occupational Health , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Natural Language Processing
10.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 27(5): 654-663, 2024 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38842716

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is increasing awareness of burnout and job disaffection among many professions like health profession, teachers, armed personnel and lawyers. However not much has been studied about university lecturers. AIM: To obtain the prevalence and determine predictors of burnout and job satisfaction among lecturers in public universities in Enugu State, Nigeria. METHODS: It was a cross sectional analytical study. The participants were academic staff from University of Nigeria Nsukka and Enugu State University of Technology who met inclusion criteria. They were selected using multistage sampling technique. Data were collected using Oldenberg Burnout Inventory for burnout and Job Descriptive Index for job satisfaction. RESULTS: A total of 392 lecturers were studied: The males were 221 (56.3%), and the modal age group was 41-50 years: 152 (38.8%). The majority were married 303 (77.3%) and had worked for ≤10 years (65.8%). The prevalence of burnout was 57.7%. In general, 150 (38.3%) had a high level of job satisfaction. However, in most facets, < 50% were satisfied. Most socio-demographic variables were not associated with either burnout or job satisfaction. There is significant association between burnout and job satisfaction. Almost all 205 (90.7%) who had burnout had low job satisfaction and this was statistically significant (p value = 0.011). Present work condition, pay, opportunities, supervision were used as predictors to level of burnout. Present condition of work was a significant contributor (p = < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of burnout was high and many had low to moderate job satisfaction. Most socio-demographic variables were not associated with burnout or job satisfaction. There was a negative association between job satisfaction and burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Job Satisfaction , Humans , Male , Nigeria/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Universities , Surveys and Questionnaires , Faculty/psychology , Faculty/statistics & numerical data
11.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 16(1): e1-e9, 2024 May 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38832374

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:  Burnout in doctors is an important issue with far-reaching consequences. Community service doctors may be particularly vulnerable because of their specific roles (rural settings, junior positions and reduced supervision). AIM:  This study aimed to determine the prevalence of burnout among community service doctors in South Africa (SA), the potential contributory and protective factors and the consequences thereof. SETTING:  This was a national study of community service doctors in SA. METHODS:  A quantitative, descriptive cross-sectional study was performed. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used to measure burnout. The online questionnaire also included demographic data, workplace and individual characteristics. RESULTS:  Of the 208 community service doctors analysed, 89% and 94% had high emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation, respectively, while 97% had a low personal accomplishment. Mental illness, financial difficulties, unmanageable volume of patients and female gender were found to be potential contributory factors. Having manageable patient volumes, satisfaction with their decision to study medicine, talking to colleagues and feeling supported by healthcare facility management were among the significant potential protective factors. Significant potential consequences of burnout included: leaving the government sector, ever being diagnosed with a mental illness, using alcohol as a coping mechanism and possible current major depression. CONCLUSION:  Burnout among community service doctors in SA is highly prevalent with significant potential consequences. There are a number of modifiable possible contributory and protective factors identified that may be targets for mental health interventions.Contribution: Healthcare burnout research is lacking in the African and specifically SA context. This void includes community service doctors.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Physicians , Humans , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , South Africa/epidemiology , Female , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adult , Middle Aged , Physicians/psychology , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires , Community Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Job Satisfaction
12.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 1488, 2024 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38831272

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the pandemic, many police dentists had the crucial responsibility of ensuring law and order while providing dental care by taking government-approved health measures to stop the spread of the coronavirus. The aim of this study was to assess the association between the fear of COVID-19 and Burnout syndrome in Peruvian dentists belonging to the Health Department of the National Police of Peru (PNP), taking into account possible confounding variables. METHODS: This cross-sectional and analytical study included 182 PNP dentists. The Fear COVID-19 Scale assessed fear of COVID-19 and the Maslach Burnout Inventory Test assessed burnout syndrome. The association between the fear of COVID-19 and Burnout syndrome (self-fulfilment) was analyzed using Spearman's Rho. A multivariable Poisson regression model with a robust variance estimation method was employed to evaluate the impact of fear of COVID-19 on the various dimensions of Burnout syndrome, considering possible confounding variables. The statistical significance level was set at p < 0.05. RESULTS: Under bivariate analysis, fear of COVID-19 was significantly linked with low direct intensity toward emotional exhaustion (Rho = 0.325, p < 0.001), very low direct intensity toward depersonalization (Rho = 0.180, p = 0.015), and very low inverse intensity toward self-fulfilment (Rho =-0.186, p = 0.012). Under multivariable analysis, it was observed that dentists who exhibited fear of COVID-19 were 3.4 and 3.7 times more likely to experience emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, respectively (APR = 3.40, 95% CI: 1.74-6.63 and APR = 3.68, 95% CI: 1.31-10.37), as compared to those who did not display fear of COVID-19. Moreover, none of the potential confounding factors were found to have a significant impact on emotional exhaustion (p > 0.05), depersonalization (p > 0.05), and self-fulfilment (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Fear of COVID-19 was significantly associated with emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and inversely associated with self-fulfilment. PNP dentists who exhibited fear of COVID-19 were at greater risk for emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. In developing Burnout syndrome, no significant impact was observed from factors such as age, gender, marital status, children, hierarchy, years of service, work area, private practice, work over 40 h per week, type of service, work performed, sport practice and daily exercise time.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Dentists , Fear , Police , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Male , Female , Dentists/psychology , Dentists/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Peru/epidemiology , Police/psychology , Fear/psychology , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
13.
BMC Psychol ; 12(1): 331, 2024 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38840137

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coaching has been demonstrated to be an effective physician wellness intervention. However, this evidence-based intervention has not yet been widely adopted in the physician community. Documentation and implementation research of interventions to address physician burnout in real world settings is much needed. OBJECTIVE: Assess the impact of a virtual physician coaching program in women physicians. DESIGN: Pre- and post-intervention surveys administered to participants enrolled in the program (N = 329). Effect size was calculated comparing pre- and post-intervention paired data (N = 201). PARTICIPANTS: 201 women physicians from 40 states in the United States of America and 3 international participants. INTERVENTIONS: Participants were given access to an 8 week virtual coaching program including eight individual, six small group, and 24 large group sessions. MAIN MEASURES: Stanford Professional Fulfillment Inventory (PFI) containing categories for assessing professional fulfillment, burnout, and the Clinician Self-Valuation (SV) Scale (a measure of self-compassion). KEY RESULTS: Burnout was found in 77.1% (N = 155) of participants at baseline, which reduced to 33.3% (N = 67) at completion with large effect size (Cohen's d 1.11). The percentage of participants who endorsed significant professional fulfillment started at 27.4% (N = 55) and improved to 68.2% (N = 137) with a large effect size (Cohen's d 0.95). Self-valuation improved from 17.9% (N = 36) of the participants endorsing a compassionate self-improvement perspective to 64% of the same participants eight weeks later. The self-valuation metric showed a very large effect size (Cohen's d 1.28). CONCLUSIONS: Virtual physician coaching programs led by physician coaches can decrease burnout, improve professional fulfillment, and increase self-compassion. Non-institution-based opportunities for coaching available to any physician across the United States and internationally can facilitate access to effective physician well-being interventions.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Mentoring , Physicians, Women , Humans , Female , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Adult , Mentoring/methods , Middle Aged , Physicians, Women/psychology , United States , Job Satisfaction
14.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0303425, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38843149

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurses, the largest workforce in healthcare, are at high risk of depression, anxiety, burnout, and suicidal ideation. Suicide among nurses is higher than the general population. This randomized controlled trial pairs the MINDBODYSTRONG© cognitive-behavioral skills building program with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention's (AFSP) Modified Interactive Screening Program (mISP) to reduce depression, suicidal ideation, post-traumatic stress, anxiety, and burnout, and improve healthy lifestyle beliefs, healthy lifestyle behaviors, and job satisfaction in nurses with moderate to high risk of suicide. AIMS: This study aims to determine the effects of the mISP combined with the digitized MINDBODYSTRONG© program versus the mISP alone on depression, suicidal ideation, burnout, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, healthy lifestyle beliefs, healthy lifestyle behaviors, and job satisfaction in 364 U.S. nurses. METHODS: A digitized version of MINDBODYSTRONG© combined with the mISP screening and referral platform will be compared to the AFSP mISP alone through a two-arm randomized controlled trial. Follow-up post-intervention data will be collected at week eight and months three, six, and 12. DISCUSSION: If successful, this study's findings could assist nurses who are hesitant to use conventional mental health resources by providing them with confidential aid and learning opportunities to reduce suicidality, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, and burnout and improve healthy lifestyle beliefs, healthy lifestyle behaviors, and job satisfaction. TRIAL/STUDY REGISTRATION: The Ohio State University Protocol Record 2021B0417, Modified Interactive Screening Program Plus MINDBODYSTRONG: A Mental Health Resiliency Intervention for Nurses, is registered and posted at ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT05582343. First posted date is October 17, 2022.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Mental Health , Nurses , Humans , Nurses/psychology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Depression , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/prevention & control , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Anxiety , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide Prevention , Female , Resilience, Psychological , Adult , Job Satisfaction , Male , Mass Screening/methods
15.
JAMA Netw Open ; 7(6): e2418090, 2024 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38874920

ABSTRACT

Importance: Given the high rates of burnout and associated negative mental health outcomes (eg, depression, suicidal ideation, substance abuse) among medical students and physicians, it is imperative to identify strategies for supporting the future health workforce, particularly when considering trends indicating a future shortage of physicians. Understanding the associations of medical school students' learning mindsets (eg, growth mindset, purpose and relevance, and sense of belonging) with indicators of well-being (eg, flourishing) and ill-being (eg, burnout) could provide a foundation for future research to consider when attempting to combat the negative mental health trends among medical students and physicians. Objectives: To understand the associations of medical school students' learning mindsets (ie, their beliefs about themselves as learners and their learning environment) with critical student health outcomes (ie, well-being and ill-being). Design, Setting, and Participants: This survey study used a nationally representative sample of first-year osteopathic medical school students across the US who responded to a survey of learning mindsets as well as measures of well-being and ill-being in fall 2022. Data were analyzed from January to April 2024. Main Outcomes and Measures: Learning mindsets were categorized as growth mindset, purpose and relevance, and sense of belonging. Well-being was categorized as flourishing and resilience, and ill-being was categorized as burnout and psychological symptoms. Outcomes were regressed on learning mindset and demographics variables, and interactions of demographic variables and learning mindsets were assessed. Results: A total of 7839 students were surveyed, and 6622 students (mean [SD] age, 25.05 [3.20]; 3678 [55.5%] women) responded and were included in analyses. The 3 learning mindsets were significantly associated with flourishing (growth mindset: b = 0.34; 95% CI, 0.23 to 0.45; P < .001; purpose and relevance: b = 2.02; 95% CI, 1.83 to 2.20; P < .001; belonging uncertainty: b = -0.98; 95% CI, -1.08 to -0.89; P < .001) and resilience (growth mindset: b = 0.28; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.40; P < .001; purpose and relevance: b = 1.62; 95% CI, 1.43 to 1.82; P < .001; belonging uncertainty: b = -1.50; 95% CI, -1.60 to -1.40; P < .001) well-being outcomes and burnout (growth mindset: b = -0.09; 95% CI, -0.11 to -0.07; P < .001; purpose and relevance: b = -0.29; 95% CI, -0.32 to -0.25; P < .001; belonging uncertainty: b = 0.28; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.30; P < .001) and psychological symptoms (growth mindset: b = -0.22; 95% CI, -0.30 to -0.14; P < .001; purpose and relevance: b = -0.51; 95% CI, -0.64 to -0.38; P < .001; belonging uncertainty: b = 1.33; 95% CI, 1.27 to 1.40; P < .001) ill-being outcomes, even when controlling for important demographic characteristics (eg, race and ethnicity, gender identity, age). Furthermore, several significant interactions indicated that these learning mindsets may be particularly salient for students from historically marginalized communities: there was a significant interaction between growth mindset and race and ethnicity (b = 0.58; 95% CI, 0.08 to 1.09, P = .02), such that growth mindset was more strongly associated with flourishing among American Indian or Alaska Native, Black, Latine, or Native Hawaiian students. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that identifying strategies for supporting students' learning mindsets may be an effective way to support medical student well-being and reduce ill-being, particularly among students from historically marginalized backgrounds.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Students, Medical , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Female , Male , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Adult , Osteopathic Medicine/education , Young Adult , United States , Surveys and Questionnaires , Learning , Mental Health
16.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 24(1): 703, 2024 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38835036

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, medical workers were concerned about the care of their children or family members and the impact of being separated from them. This increased stress could harm the relationship between nurses and patients. This study assessed how medical workers' parental role may affect burnout during such a high-stress period. METHODS: This cross-sectional observational study was carried out in 2021 during the COVID-19 pandemic. The client burnout (CB) scale of the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory, the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire, and a demographic questionnaire were used. Statistical methods such as the t-test, one-way ANOVA, and univariable/multiple linear regression were applied. RESULTS: A total of 612 nurses were included in this study. The likely risk factors of CB were identified and the parenthood effect was found to be associated with reduced CB. The parental role and leisure activity with family and friends on CB were found to have an impact. Engaging in leisure activity with family and playing the role of a parent diligently will help relieve nurses' burnout from frequent contact with patients and their families, thus lowering the risk of clinical burnout. CONCLUSION: The parental role, family/friends relationships, and a complex work environment associated with nurses' burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic. This finding allows us to re-examine the importance of family life and parent-child relationships in high-stress work environments.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Taiwan/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Adult , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Pandemics , Parents/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Middle Aged , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Risk Factors
17.
JAMA Netw Open ; 7(6): e2415593, 2024 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38857049

ABSTRACT

Importance: Studies reveal that most physicians report symptoms of burnout. Less is known about burnout in mid-career medical faculty specifically. Objective: To characterize burnout and its risk factors, particularly differences by gender, among mid-career medical faculty. Design, Setting, and Participants: Between August 2021 and August 2022, a survey was sent to 1430 individuals who received new National Institutes of Health K08 and K23 career development awards from 2006 to 2009. Data were analyzed between June and October 2023. Main Outcomes and Measures: Personal and work-related burnout as evaluated using the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI). The CBI score ranges from 0 to 100, with a score of 50 or higher indicating a high degree of burnout. Multivariable models were used to investigate associations between burnout and participant characteristics, including race and ethnicity, sexual orientation and gender identity, academic rank, work climate, experiences of workplace sexual harassment, sleep hours, work and domestic caregiving time, and time allocation changes in work and domestic work hours compared with before the COVID-19 pandemic. Work climate was evaluated by a general climate elements scale assessing elements such as friendliness, respect, and collegiality, and a diversity, equity, and inclusion climate elements scale assessing elements such as homogeneity, sexism, and homophobia; higher scores indicated a more favorable view of the climate. Results: In all, 1430 surveys were sent, 926 candidates responded (65% response rate), and the analytic cohort was limited to the 841 respondents who were still in academic medicine (50.7% men). Burnout was significantly more common for women than men (mean [SD] CBI personal scores, 46.6 [19.4] vs 37.5 [17.2]; P < .001; mean [SD] CBI work-related scores, 43.7 [20.4] vs 34.6 [19.7]; P < .001). In multivariable models, personal burnout was significantly more likely for women (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.29 [95% CI, 1.54-3.41]; P < .001) and with more weekly hours of patient care (AOR, 1.07 [95% CI, 1.00-1.15] for each 5-hour increase; P = .04). Personal burnout was less likely with more nightly sleep hours (AOR, 0.68 [95% CI, 0.56-0.81] for each 1-hour increase; P < .001) and with an improved general work climate rating (AOR, 0.64 [95% CI, 0.48-0.85] for each 1-point increase in general work climate scale score; P = .002). Work-related burnout was also significantly more likely for women than men (AOR, 1.77 [95% CI, 1.17-2.69]; P = .007). Greater work-related burnout was associated with an increase of 8 or more work hours per week compared with before the COVID-19 pandemic (AOR, 1.87 [95% CI, 1.13-3.08]; P = .01), more weekly hours of patient care (AOR, 1.11 [95% CI, 1.03-1.19] for each 5-hour increase; P = .007), and a workplace sexual harassment experience in the past 2 years (AOR, 1.71 [95% CI, 1.11-2.62]; P = .01). Work-related burnout was significantly less likely with more nightly sleep hours (AOR, 0.80 [95% CI, 0.66-0.96] for each 1-hour increase; P = .02) and with an improved general work climate rating (AOR, 0.49; [95% CI, 0.36-0.65] for each 1-point increase in general work climate scale score; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: This survey study of K grant awardees revealed substantial rates of burnout among mid-career medical faculty, and burnout rates differed by gender. Evidence-based interventions are needed to realize the benefits of workforce diversity and vitality.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Faculty, Medical , Humans , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Female , Male , Faculty, Medical/psychology , Faculty, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Workplace/psychology
18.
BMJ Open ; 14(6): e079304, 2024 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38834323

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Burnout is common among medical personnel in China and may be related to excessive and persistent work-related stressors by different specialties. The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of burnout, work overload and work-life imbalance according to different specialties and to explore the effect of specialty, work overload and work-life imbalance on burnout among medical personnel. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SETTING: This study was conducted in 1 tertiary general public hospital, 2 secondary general hospitals and 10 community health service stations in Liaoning, China. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 3299 medical personnel participated in the study. METHODS: We used the 15-item Chinese version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory General Survey (MBI-GS) to measure burnout. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to explore the association between medical specialty, work overload, work-life imbalance and burnout. RESULTS: 3299 medical personnel were included in this study. The prevalence of burnout, severe burnout, work overload and work-life imbalance were 88.7%, 13.6%, 23.4% and 23.2%, respectively. Compared with medical personnel in internal medicine, working in obstetrics and gynaecology (OR=0.61, 95% CI 0.38, 0.99) and management (OR=0.45, 95% CI 0.28, 0.72) was significantly associated with burnout, and working in ICU (Intensive Care Unit)(OR=2.48, 95% CI 1.07, 5.73), surgery (OR=1.66, 95% CI 1.18, 2.35) and paediatrics (OR=0.24, 95% CI 0.07, 0.81) was significantly associated with severe burnout. Work overload and work-life imbalance were associated with higher ORs for burnout (OR=1.64, 95% CI 1.16, 2.32; OR=2.79, 95% CI 1.84, 4.24) and severe burnout (OR=4.33, 95% CI 3.43, 5.46; OR=3.35, 95% CI 2.64, 4.24). CONCLUSIONS: Burnout, work overload and work-life imbalance were prevalent among Chinese medical personnel but varied considerably by clinical specialty. Burnout may be reduced by decreasing work overload and promoting work-life balance across different specialties.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Work-Life Balance , Workload , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , China/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Female , Male , Adult , Workload/psychology , Prevalence , Health Personnel/psychology , Logistic Models , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Specialization
19.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0304093, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38848338

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether Heartfulness meditation practice, compared to Gratitude practice, leads to measurable changes in mental wellbeing among healthcare providers across the US. METHOD: Participants were randomly assigned to one of the following 6-week interventions: the trainer-guided virtual Heartfulness meditation program or the podcast-based self-guided gratitude practice group. The Professional Quality of Life Scale-5 (ProQOL-5) was used to determine Compassion Satisfaction (CS) and risk for Burnout (BO) and secondary traumatic stress (STS). The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) was used to assess vigor, dedication, and absorption at work. Outcomes were collected at baseline and the end of the study period. Qualitative questions regarding the experience of learning and practicing were also offered at the end of the six weeks. RESULTS: The majority of participants were nurses (50%), followed by allied healthcare professionals (37%) and physicians (13%) (N = 83). There was a general trend towards increases in CS in the Heartfulness group compared to the gratitude group. However, this was not statistically significant. Strong evidence suggests there was a significant improvement in BO for the Heartfulness group between Week 0 and Week 6 (p = 0.002), as well as STS (p = 0.0004) and vigor (p = 0.0392). Qualitative data analysis revealed that the subjects in the Heartfulness arm reported improved sleep and decreased reactivity to stress. Subjects in the gratitude arm reported improved mood and favorable results using gratitude practices at home with family members. CONCLUSION: In our study, Heartfulness meditation practice was associated with a significant improvement in burnout and vigor at work, with a trend towards compassion satisfaction after six weeks compared with gratitude practices. Qualitative analysis indicates the benefits of both Heartfulness and Gratitude practices. Further randomized trials with a larger sample size are needed to explore these science-based practices for the wellbeing of healthcare workers.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Health Personnel , Meditation , Humans , Meditation/psychology , Meditation/methods , Female , Male , Adult , Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Middle Aged , Quality of Life , Work Engagement , Empathy , Job Satisfaction
20.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 640, 2024 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38849794

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Burnout levels in medical students are higher than in other student groups. Empathy is an increasingly desired outcome of medical schools. Empathy is negatively associated with burnout in physicians. Our objective was to quantitatively review the available literature on associations between empathy and burnout in medical students, and to explore associations between specific empathy aspects (cognitive and affective) and burnout sub-dimensions (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment). METHODS: A comprehensive search of the literature published up until January 2024 was undertaken in the PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO databases. Two independent reviewers screened 498 records and quality-rated and extracted data from eligible studies. The effect size correlations (ESr) were pooled using a random-effects model and between-study variation explored with meta-regression. The review was preregistered with PROSPERO (#CRD42023467670) and reported following the PRISMA guidelines. RESULTS: Twenty-one studies including a total of 27,129 medical students published between 2010 and 2023 were included. Overall, empathy and burnout were negatively and statistically significantly associated (ESr: -0.15, 95%CI [-0.21; -0.10], p < .001). When analyzing sub-dimensions, cognitive empathy was negatively associated with emotional exhaustion (ESr: -0.10, 95%CI [-0.17; -0.03], p = .006) and depersonalization (ESr: -0.15, 95%CI [-0.24; 0.05], p = .003), and positively associated with personal accomplishment (ESr: 0.21, 95%CI [0.12; 0.30], p < .001). Affective empathy was not statistically significantly associated with emotional exhaustion, depersonalization or personal accomplishment. Supplementary Bayesian analysis indicated the strongest evidence for the positive association between cognitive empathy and personal accomplishment. Response rate and gender moderated the relationship so that higher response rates and more male respondents strengthen the negative association between empathy and burnout. CONCLUSION: Greater empathy, in particular cognitive empathy, is associated with lower burnout levels in medical students. This appears to be primarily driven by cognitive empathy's positive association with personal accomplishment. PROTOCOL REGISTRATION: #CRD42023467670.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Empathy , Students, Medical , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Depersonalization/psychology
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