Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 10.772
Filter
1.
Accid Anal Prev ; 202: 107538, 2024 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38703589

ABSTRACT

Using mobile phones while riding is a form of distracted riding that significantly elevates crash risk. Regrettably, the factors contributing to mobile phone use while riding (MPUWR) among food delivery riders remain under-researched. Addressing this literature gap, the current study employs the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model and various socio-economic factors to examine the determinants of MPUWR. The research incorporates data from 558 delivery workers in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The study utilizes two analytical methods to empirically test the hypotheses, considering non-linear relationships between variables: Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modelling (PLS-SEM) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The results reveal mixed impacts of factors connected to job resources. Although social support appears to deter MPUWR, work autonomy and rewards seemingly encourage it. Furthermore, a predisposition towards risk-taking behaviour significantly impacts the frequency of mobile phone usage among delivery riders. Interestingly, riders with higher incomes and those who have previously been fined by the police exhibit more frequent mobile phone use. The findings of this study present valuable insights into the crucial factors to be addressed when designing interventions aimed at reducing phone use among food delivery riders.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone , Distracted Driving , Humans , Male , Adult , Female , Cell Phone/statistics & numerical data , Vietnam , Distracted Driving/statistics & numerical data , Neural Networks, Computer , Social Support , Latent Class Analysis , Risk-Taking , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Least-Squares Analysis , Cell Phone Use/statistics & numerical data , Restaurants/statistics & numerical data , Socioeconomic Factors
2.
Food Chem ; 449: 139291, 2024 Aug 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38608609

ABSTRACT

The residues of erythromycin (ERY) may have negative impacts on the ecological environment, health, and food safety. How to detect ERY effectively and visually is a challenging issue. Herein, we synthesized a molecularly imprinted polymer based nanozymes for selective detection of erythromycin (ERY-MIPNs) at neutral pH, and developed a mobile phone-assisted bicolor colorimetric detection system. This system produced a wide range of color changes from blue to pinkish purple as the ERY concentration increased, making it easy to capture the visualization result. Also, the system showed good sensitivity to ERY ranging from 15 to 135 µM, with a detection limit of 1.78 µM. In addition, the system worked well in the detection of ERY in river water and milk, with the recoveries of 95.57% âˆ¼ 103.20%. These data suggests that this strategy is of considerable potential for practical applications and it provides a new idea for visual detection with portable measurement.


Subject(s)
Colorimetry , Erythromycin , Milk , Rivers , Water Pollutants, Chemical , Milk/chemistry , Colorimetry/methods , Animals , Rivers/chemistry , Erythromycin/analysis , Erythromycin/isolation & purification , Water Pollutants, Chemical/analysis , Cell Phone , Molecular Imprinting , Food Contamination/analysis , Limit of Detection , Anti-Bacterial Agents/analysis , Molecularly Imprinted Polymers/chemistry
3.
Nutrients ; 16(7)2024 Apr 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38613115

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular and metabolic diseases include a large group of pathologies and constitute one of the most serious chronic health problems facing the 21st century, with high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Unhealthy diets influence the development of these pathologies. The Mediterranean diet can be an important part in the treatment of these diseases. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of a program that aims to increase adherence to the Mediterranean diet on the improvement of different cardiometabolic risk parameters. METHODS: A prospective intervention study was carried out on 7034 Spanish workers. Prior to the intervention, 22 cardiometabolic risk scales were evaluated. Participants in this study were informed both orally and in writing of the characteristics and benefits of the Mediterranean diet and were given the website of the Ministry of Health, Consumption and Social Welfare of Spain, which provides advice on nutrition. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was reinforced by sending a monthly SMS to their mobile phones. After six months of follow-up, the 22 risk scales were re-evaluated to assess changes. Means and standard deviations were calculated using Student's t test to analyse quantitative variables. Prevalence was calculated using the Chi-square test when the variables were qualitative. RESULTS: All the cardiometabolic risk scales studied decreased after implementing a program to improve and enhance adherence to the Mediterranean diet. The number of losses in the sample was very low, standing at 4.31%. CONCLUSIONS: The Mediterranean diet is effective in reducing all cardiovascular risk scales evaluated. The mean values and prevalence of high values of the different cardiometabolic risk scales analysed led to lower values after the implementation of the program to increase adherence to the Mediterranean diet. We observed a significant positive difference in metabolic age in both sexes. We have obtained a significant improvement in the insulin resistance index, especially in the SPISE-IR index, data that we have not found in previous publications. Easy access to the Internet and new information and communication technologies facilitate adherence to a diet and can reduce the number of losses.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Cell Phone , Diet, Mediterranean , Female , Male , Humans , Prospective Studies , Head , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control
4.
Sci Data ; 11(1): 397, 2024 Apr 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38637602

ABSTRACT

Modeling and predicting human mobility trajectories in urban areas is an essential task for various applications including transportation modeling, disaster management, and urban planning. The recent availability of large-scale human movement data collected from mobile devices has enabled the development of complex human mobility prediction models. However, human mobility prediction methods are often trained and tested on different datasets, due to the lack of open-source large-scale human mobility datasets amid privacy concerns, posing a challenge towards conducting transparent performance comparisons between methods. To this end, we created an open-source, anonymized, metropolitan scale, and longitudinal (75 days) dataset of 100,000 individuals' human mobility trajectories, using mobile phone location data provided by Yahoo Japan Corporation (currently renamed to LY Corporation), named YJMob100K. The location pings are spatially and temporally discretized, and the metropolitan area is undisclosed to protect users' privacy. The 90-day period is composed of 75 days of business-as-usual and 15 days during an emergency, to test human mobility predictability during both normal and anomalous situations.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone , Movement , Humans , Cities , Japan , Privacy
5.
AORN J ; 119(5): e1-e10, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38661447

ABSTRACT

Few studies have focused on the use of cell phones in the OR. In Norway, researchers sought to assess perioperative nurses' knowledge, practice, and attitudes associated with cell phone use in the OR and distributed a nationwide questionnaire via a social media platform. More than 80% of the 332 respondents thought that cell phones were contaminated and that pathogens could contaminate hands. Almost all respondents brought their phone to work; approximately 61% of respondents carried it in their pocket in the OR. Responses to questions about phone cleaning showed that 39 (11.7%) of the respondents routinely cleaned their phone before entering the OR and 33 (9.9%) of the respondents cleaned it when leaving the OR. Less than 20% of respondents indicated their facility had guidelines for cleaning personal cell phones. Opportunities for improvement in cell phone cleaning in ORs exist and additional research involving all perioperative team members is needed.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone , Humans , Norway , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Cell Phone/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Male , Female , Operating Rooms/standards , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Perioperative Nursing/methods , Middle Aged , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data
6.
Technol Cult ; 65(1): 293-314, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38661802

ABSTRACT

Why was Italy the first country to introduce prepaid mobile phone billing services in 1996? What was the key to its success that led seventy-five telecommunications operators to introduce prepaid billing by 1998 and accelerated the mass adoption of mobile phones around the world? This article examines why prepaid was successful in light of national policies and sociocultural shifts. Along with SMS, handhelds, GSM, and the digitization of mobile communications, prepaid billing played a role in the rapid and immense spread of the mobile phone worldwide. As an innovative means of paying for mobile phone usage, prepaid represented a departure from operators' previous mobile phone payment methods. The article argues that by overlooking the contribution of this form of payment, telephone historians, the media, and business scholars have ignored this important driver of the success of mobile phones.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone , Italy , Cell Phone/history , History, 20th Century , Humans , History, 21st Century
7.
Zhongguo Yi Liao Qi Xie Za Zhi ; 48(2): 173-178, 2024 Mar 30.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38605617

ABSTRACT

A wireless wearable sleep monitoring system based on EEG signals is developed. The collected EEG signals are wirelessly sent to the PC or mobile phone Bluetooth APP for real-time display. The system is small in size, low in power consumption, and light in weight. It can be worn on the patient's forehead and is comfortable. It can be applied to home sleep monitoring scenarios and has good application value. The key performance indicators of the system are compared with the industry-related medical device measurement standards, and the measurement results are better than the special standards.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone , Wearable Electronic Devices , Humans , Polysomnography , Electrocardiography , Wireless Technology , Electroencephalography
8.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 927, 2024 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38556892

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The escalating global prevalence of type 2 diabetes and prediabetes presents a major public health challenge. Physical activity plays a critical role in managing (pre)diabetes; however, adherence to physical activity recommendations remains low. The ENERGISED trial was designed to address these challenges by integrating mHealth tools into the routine practice of general practitioners, aiming for a significant, scalable impact in (pre)diabetes patient care through increased physical activity and reduced sedentary behaviour. METHODS: The mHealth intervention for the ENERGISED trial was developed according to the mHealth development and evaluation framework, which includes the active participation of (pre)diabetes patients. This iterative process encompasses four sequential phases: (a) conceptualisation to identify key aspects of the intervention; (b) formative research including two focus groups with (pre)diabetes patients (n = 14) to tailor the intervention to the needs and preferences of the target population; (c) pre-testing using think-aloud patient interviews (n = 7) to optimise the intervention components; and (d) piloting (n = 10) to refine the intervention to its final form. RESULTS: The final intervention comprises six types of text messages, each embodying different behaviour change techniques. Some of the messages, such as those providing interim reviews of the patients' weekly step goal or feedback on their weekly performance, are delivered at fixed times of the week. Others are triggered just in time by specific physical behaviour events as detected by the Fitbit activity tracker: for example, prompts to increase walking pace are triggered after 5 min of continuous walking; and prompts to interrupt sitting following 30 min of uninterrupted sitting. For patients without a smartphone or reliable internet connection, the intervention is adapted to ensure inclusivity. Patients receive on average three to six messages per week for 12 months. During the first six months, the text messaging is supplemented with monthly phone counselling to enable personalisation of the intervention, assistance with technical issues, and enhancement of adherence. CONCLUSIONS: The participatory development of the ENERGISED mHealth intervention, incorporating just-in-time prompts, has the potential to significantly enhance the capacity of general practitioners for personalised behavioural counselling on physical activity in (pre)diabetes patients, with implications for broader applications in primary care.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , General Practice , Prediabetic State , Telemedicine , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/prevention & control , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Prediabetic State/therapy , Sedentary Behavior , Exercise , Telemedicine/methods
9.
Iran J Med Sci ; 49(4): 237-246, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38680223

ABSTRACT

Background: Cell phone and Ultra-High Frequency (UHF) waves produce oxidative stress and cause testicular toxicity. This investigation was directed to evaluate the effectiveness of Rosmarinic Acid (RA) against oxidative stress caused by UHF radiation in rats. Methods: Forty-two male Wistar rats were divided into six groups. The control received 5 mL normal saline (0.9% NaCl) by gavage, the cell phone group received 915 MHz, the UHF waves group just received 2450 MHz, the RA/cell phone group received RA plus 915 MHz, RA/UHF waves group received RA plus 2450 MHz, and RA just received RA (20 mg/kg). After 30 days of consecutive radiation, the biochemical and histopathological parameters of their testes were measured. Statistical comparison was made using one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results: Cell phone and UHF wave radiation significantly diminished the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione content (P<0.001). On the opposite, UHF significantly increased oxidative stress indices including malondialdehyde level, nitric oxide level, and protein carbonyl content (P<0.001). UHF also significantly reduced the number of Sertoli cells, spermatogonia, primary spermatocyte, epithelial height, and seminiferous tubular and luminal diameters (P<0.001). RA, as an effective antioxidant, reverses the above-mentioned harms and moderates the adverse effects of UHF on the testes of rats by significantly diminishing the oxidative stress indices and antioxidant enzyme rise and improving the histological parameters (P<0.001). Conclusion: RA can protect the testes of rats from UHF-induced toxicity by reducing oxidative stress. RA as a food supplement might be useful for protecting humans exposed to UHF environmental contamination.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone , Cinnamates , Depsides , Oxidative Stress , Rats, Wistar , Rosmarinic Acid , Testis , Animals , Male , Depsides/pharmacology , Cinnamates/pharmacology , Testis/drug effects , Testis/radiation effects , Rats , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Antioxidants/pharmacology
10.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 24(1): 306, 2024 Apr 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38658860

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: HIV partner counselling and testing in antenatal care (ANC) is a crucial strategy to raise the number of males who know their HIV status. However, in many settings like Tanzania, male involvement in antenatal care remains low, and there is a definite need for innovative strategies to increase male partner involvement. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of mobile phone intervention increase male partner ANC attendance for HIV testing in Moshi municipal, Tanzania. METHODS: Between April and July 2022, we enrolled pregnant women presenting to a first ANC visit at Majengo and St. Joseph reproductive health facilities without their male partners. Eligible pregnant women were randomly assigned to invitation of their male partners either via phone calls, text messages from clinic staff and verbal invites from pregnant partners (intervention arm) or verbal invites only from the pregnant partners (control arm). Neither healthcare provider nor participant were blinded. The primary outcome was the proportion of male partners who attended ANC with their pregnant partners during a follow-up period of two consecutive visits. The secondary outcome measure was HIV testing among male partners following the invitation. Participants were analyzed as originally assigned (intention to treat). RESULTS: A total of 350 pregnant women presenting to ANC for the first time were enrolled, with 175 women enrolled in each arm. The efficacy of male attendance with their pregnant women following the invitations was 83.4% (147/175) in the intervention arm and 46.3% (81/175) in the control arm. Overall, the results suggest a positive and statistically significant average treatment effect among men who received mobile phone intervention on ANC attendance. For the secondary outcome, the percent of male partners who accepted HIV counselling and testing was 99.3% (146/147) in the intervention arm and 93.8% (76/81) in the control arm. Married men were having higher odds of ANC attendance compared with single men (aOR:6.40(3.26-12.56), Males with multigravida women were having lower odds of ANC attendance compared with primigravida women (aOR:0.17(0.09-0.33). CONCLUSION: The study demonstrates that supplementing verbal invitations with mobile phone calls and text messages from clinic staff can significantly increase male partner ANC attendance and HIV testing. This combined approach is recommended in improving ANC attendance and HIV testing of male partners who do not accompany their pregnant partners to antenatal clinics in the first visits. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PACTR202209769991162.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone , HIV Infections , HIV Testing , Prenatal Care , Sexual Partners , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Pregnancy , Young Adult , Counseling/methods , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/prevention & control , HIV Testing/methods , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Prenatal Care/methods , Tanzania , Text Messaging
11.
Addict Behav ; 155: 108026, 2024 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38593598

ABSTRACT

Social anxiety is a common comorbid factor of problematic mobile phone use, but the relationship between them from the inside structure has been underexplored. This two-wave longitudinal study aims to identify the central symptoms of problematic mobile phone use and social anxiety, respectively, as well as the bridge symptoms between the two disorders. Furthermore, this study examined the time and gender differences. A total of 3,294 Chinese adolescents were recruited during two waves (T1: January 2023; T2: August 2023), and completed the questionnaires of social anxiety and problematic mobile phone use. Through network analysis, the results showed that 1) the central symptom of problematic mobile phone use was "loss of control" both at T1 and T2, 2) the central symptom of social anxiety was "fear of negative evaluation" both at T1 and T2, and 3) the bridge symptom between social anxiety and problematic mobile phone use was "withdrawal" both at T1 and T2. Moreover, the network comparison test indicated that the nodes of social anxiety were more strongly associated with "craving", "loss of control", and "negative life consequences" of problematic mobile phone use at T2 than at T1. The nodes of social anxiety were more strongly associated with "negative life consequences" of problematic mobile phone use for boys than for girls, while the "fear of negative evaluation" was more strongly associated with "loss of control" for girls than for boys. These findings provide new scientific basis for interventions targeting adolescents who are susceptible to social anxiety and problematic mobile phone use.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Cell Phone Use , Humans , Adolescent , Male , Female , Longitudinal Studies , China/epidemiology , Cell Phone Use/statistics & numerical data , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Sex Factors , Cell Phone/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent Behavior/psychology , Behavior, Addictive/psychology , Behavior, Addictive/epidemiology , East Asian People
12.
J Med Internet Res ; 26: e55031, 2024 Apr 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38630515

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The high prevalence of cannabis use among young adults poses substantial global health concerns due to the associated acute and long-term health and psychosocial risks. Digital modalities, including websites, digital platforms, and mobile apps, have emerged as promising tools to enhance the accessibility and availability of evidence-based interventions for young adults for cannabis use. However, existing reviews do not consider young adults specifically, combine cannabis-related outcomes with those of many other substances in their meta-analytical results, and do not solely target interventions for cannabis use. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and active ingredients of digital interventions designed specifically for cannabis use among young adults living in the community. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of 7 databases for empirical studies published between database inception and February 13, 2023, assessing the following outcomes: cannabis use (frequency, quantity, or both) and cannabis-related negative consequences. The reference lists of included studies were consulted, and forward citation searching was also conducted. We included randomized studies assessing web- or mobile-based interventions that included a comparator or control group. Studies were excluded if they targeted other substance use (eg, alcohol), did not report cannabis use separately as an outcome, did not include young adults (aged 16-35 y), had unpublished data, were delivered via teleconference through mobile phones and computers or in a hospital-based setting, or involved people with mental health disorders or substance use disorders or dependence. Data were independently extracted by 2 reviewers using a pilot-tested extraction form. Authors were contacted to clarify study details and obtain additional data. The characteristics of the included studies, study participants, digital interventions, and their comparators were summarized. Meta-analysis results were combined using a random-effects model and pooled as standardized mean differences. RESULTS: Of 6606 unique records, 19 (0.29%) were included (n=6710 participants). Half (9/19, 47%) of these articles reported an intervention effect on cannabis use frequency. The digital interventions included in the review were mostly web-based. A total of 184 behavior change techniques were identified across the interventions (range 5-19), and feedback on behavior was the most frequently used (17/19, 89%). Digital interventions for young adults reduced cannabis use frequency at the 3-month follow-up compared to control conditions (including passive and active controls) by -6.79 days of use in the previous month (95% CI -9.59 to -4.00; P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate the potential of digital interventions to reduce cannabis use in young adults but raise important questions about what optimal exposure dose could be more effective, both in terms of intervention duration and frequency. Further high-quality research is still needed to investigate the effects of digital interventions on cannabis use among young adults. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42020196959; https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?RecordID=196959.


Subject(s)
Behavior Therapy , Marijuana Use , Humans , Young Adult , Cannabis , Cell Phone , Databases, Factual , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
13.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 3: CD011851, 2024 03 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38533994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of death globally, accounting for almost 18 million deaths annually. People with CVDs have a five times greater chance of suffering a recurrent cardiovascular event than people without known CVDs. Although drug interventions have been shown to be cost-effective in reducing the risk of recurrent cardiovascular events, adherence to medication remains suboptimal. As a scalable and cost-effective approach, mobile phone text messaging presents an opportunity to convey health information, deliver electronic reminders, and encourage behaviour change. However, it is uncertain whether text messaging can improve medication adherence and clinical outcomes. This is an update of a Cochrane review published in 2017. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the benefits and harms of mobile phone text messaging for improving medication adherence in people with CVDs compared to usual care. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, four other databases, and two trial registers. We also checked the reference lists of all primary included studies and relevant systematic reviews and meta-analyses. The date of the latest search was 30 August 2023. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with participants with established arterial occlusive events. We included trials investigating interventions using short message service (SMS) or multimedia messaging service (MMS) with the aim of improving adherence to medication for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. The comparator was usual care. We excluded cluster-RCTs and quasi-RCTs. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard Cochrane methods. Our primary outcomes were medication adherence, fatal cardiovascular events, non-fatal cardiovascular events, and combined CVD event. Secondary outcomes were low-density lipoprotein cholesterol for the effect of statins, blood pressure for antihypertensive drugs, heart rate for the effect of beta-blockers, urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 for the antiplatelet effects of aspirin, adverse effects, and patient-reported experience. We used GRADE to assess the certainty of the evidence for each outcome. MAIN RESULTS: We included 18 RCTs involving a total of 8136 participants with CVDs. We identified 11 new studies in the review update and seven studies in the previous version of the review. Participants had various CVDs including acute coronary syndrome, coronary heart disease, stroke, myocardial infarction, and angina. All studies were conducted in middle- and high-income countries, with no studies conducted in low-income countries. The mean age of participants was 53 to 64 years. Participants were recruited from hospitals or cardiac rehabilitation facilities. Follow-up ranged from one to 12 months. There was variation in the characteristics of text messages amongst studies (e.g. delivery method, frequency, theoretical grounding, content used, personalisation, and directionality). The content of text messages varied across studies, but generally included medication reminders and healthy lifestyle information such as diet, physical activity, and weight loss. Text messages offered advice, motivation, social support, and health education to promote behaviour changes and regular medication-taking. We assessed risk of bias for all studies as high, as all studies had at least one domain at unclear or high risk of bias. Medication adherence Due to different evaluation score systems and inconsistent definitions applied for the measurement of medication adherence, we did not conduct meta-analysis for medication adherence. Ten out of 18 studies showed a beneficial effect of mobile phone text messaging for medication adherence compared to usual care, whereas the other eight studies showed either a reduction or no difference in medication adherence with text messaging compared to usual care. Overall, the evidence is very uncertain about the effects of mobile phone text messaging for medication adherence when compared to usual care. Fatal cardiovascular events Text messaging may have little to no effect on fatal cardiovascular events compared to usual care (odds ratio 0.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.47 to 1.45; 4 studies, 1654 participants; low-certainty evidence). Non-fatal cardiovascular events We found very low-certainty evidence that text messaging may have little to no effect on non-fatal cardiovascular events. Two studies reported non-fatal cardiovascular events, neither of which found evidence of a difference between groups. Combined CVD events We found very low-certainty evidence that text messaging may have little to no effect on combined CVD events. Only one study reported combined CVD events, and did not find evidence of a difference between groups. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol Text messaging may have little to no effect on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared to usual care (mean difference (MD) -1.79 mg/dL, 95% CI -4.71 to 1.12; 8 studies, 4983 participants; very low-certainty evidence). Blood pressure Text messaging may have little to no effect on systolic blood pressure (MD -0.93 mmHg, 95% CI -3.55 to 1.69; 8 studies, 5173 participants; very low-certainty evidence) and diastolic blood pressure (MD -1.00 mmHg, 95% CI -2.49 to 0.50; 5 studies, 3137 participants; very low-certainty evidence) when compared to usual care. Heart rate Text messaging may have little to no effect on heart rate compared to usual care (MD -0.46 beats per minute, 95% CI -1.74 to 0.82; 4 studies, 2946 participants; very low-certainty evidence). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Due to limited evidence, we are uncertain if text messaging reduces medication adherence, fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events, and combined cardiovascular events in people with cardiovascular diseases when compared to usual care. Furthermore, text messaging may result in little or no effect on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, blood pressure, and heart rate compared to usual care. The included studies were of low methodological quality, and no studies assessed the effects of text messaging in low-income countries or beyond the 12-month follow-up. Long-term and high-quality randomised trials are needed, particularly in low-income countries.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Cell Phone , Text Messaging , Humans , Middle Aged , Cardiovascular Diseases/prevention & control , Secondary Prevention/methods , Cholesterol, LDL , Medication Adherence
14.
Traffic Inj Prev ; 25(3): 364-371, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38426905

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Given the prevalence of illegal mobile phone use while driving and reliance upon messaging campaigns in deterring the behavior, there is a need to explore to what extent comparative judgements may influence desired outcomes of such campaigns. This exploratory study investigated (a) the perceived relevance and influence of different mobile phone road safety campaigns within a sample of Queensland motorists who reported using their mobile phone while driving and (b) if these varied depending on whether participants believed that their crash risk whilst using a phone was higher (comparative pessimism), lower (comparative optimism) or similar to the same-age and sex driver. METHODS: A total of 350 licensed drivers residing within Queensland (Australia) were included in this study, of which 200 reported using their hand-held phone on some occasion. Participation involved completing a 20-25 min online anonymous survey, which included viewing three mobile phone road safety campaigns (injury-based, sanction-based and humor) and responding to questions about the perceived relevance and impact of each campaign. RESULTS: A total of 64 (32%) participants displayed comparative optimism, 50 displayed similar judgements (25%) and 86 (43%) exhibited comparative pessimism. First, it was found that the injury-based campaign was perceived to be significantly more relevant than the humor campaign. Second, whilst the relevance of each campaign did not vary as a function of group membership, the campaigns were significantly less relevant to those displaying comparative optimism relative to those with similar judgements and comparative pessimism. Finally, the injury-based campaign was perceived to be significantly more influential than the other campaigns. However, overall, participants displaying comparative optimism believed that they would be less influenced by the campaigns compared to those with comparative pessimism. CONCLUSIONS: Although preliminary, these findings suggest that low perceptions of risk may dilute or extinguish the desired behavioral outcomes of mobile phone road safety campaigns. Nonetheless, experimental research is needed to examine these effects directly.


Subject(s)
Automobile Driving , Cell Phone , Humans , Accidents, Traffic , Judgment , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 892, 2024 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38528452

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mobile phones can be an ideal platform to engage adolescents to maintain, improve, and promote self-care. Therefore, the current study aims to design and evaluate the usability of a mobile application for self-care in adolescents with a user-centered approach. METHODS: The current applied developmental study was done in four steps. The first step, polling and examining opinions was conducted through in-depth semi-structured interviews, with the aim of user-centered mobile application design with the involvement of 30 participants. The second step, extracting and compiling the educational content related to the main themes of the self-care app, was obtained from national and international guidelines and instructions, including the World Health Organization, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, the Ministry of Health and Medical Education, etc. In the third step, the initial version of the mobile application was developed. In the fourth step, app usability was evaluated by 30 participants from the target group, 2 weeks after using the app, using the MAUQ questionnaire. RESULTS: In the first step, 789 codes, 12 sub-categories, and 3 categories were extracted. These codes were used in the design of the mobile application. In the second step, educational information was prepared and arranged in 5 sections (physical activity, nutrition, personal hygiene, risky behaviors and safety and events) in the form of text, images and short videos. In the third step, the mobile application was designed based on step 1 and 2. This application operates in online mode and under the Android operating system. the initial version of the mobile application was developed using JavaScript and Typescript programming languages in a Visual Studio Code environment. In the fourth step, the participants the overall level of usability of the application as very good with an average of 6.28 ± 0.55. The highest average score was given to the user interface and satisfaction with an average score of 6.43 ± 0.58. CONCLUSIONS: The "My-Care" app is a collaboratively designed smartphone app for adolescents that targets 5 dimensions of physical self-care. This app has the potential to teach, assess, and promote self-care among adolescents.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone , Mobile Applications , Humans , Adolescent , Iran , Self Care , Educational Status
16.
Breastfeed Med ; 19(4): 284-290, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38526564

ABSTRACT

Background: In modern world, the pervasive use of media technologies has seen a significant increase across various domains. The study aimed to assess the level of distraction among lactating women during feeding and infant care, along with exploring associated factors. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 120 lactating mothers who visited comprehensive health centers in Zanjan City in 2023. The inclusion criteria were lactating mothers older than 18 years, who were within 42 days postpartum. A multistage sampling method was used for participant selection. Data were gathered using a standard maternal distraction questionnaire and analyzed using descriptive statistics, independent t-tests, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) test with a confidence level of 95%. Results: The study found that smartphone use (69.7%) was the most common source of distraction for mothers during breastfeeding, while reading books (17.5%) was the least distracting. In addition, 85% of mothers watched television while caring for their babies (except during breastfeeding), and a significant percentage used landline phones (92.5%) and mobile phones (79.2%). It was noted that older mothers tended to be less distracted during feeding or baby care compared with young mothers. Furthermore, maternal attention during baby feeding increased with higher education levels and having more children (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The study concludes that young mothers with lower levels of education experience significantly high levels of distraction while caring for their babies or breastfeeding. Given the substantial availability of media products, interventions are needed to raise mothers' awareness about the importance of maintaining eye contact with their babies and implementing strategies for managing distractions.


Subject(s)
Attention , Breast Feeding , Mothers , Humans , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Breast Feeding/statistics & numerical data , Breast Feeding/psychology , Adult , Mothers/psychology , Mothers/statistics & numerical data , Infant , Surveys and Questionnaires , Infant Care/methods , Infant, Newborn , Smartphone , Young Adult , Television/statistics & numerical data , Cell Phone , Lactation
17.
BMC Geriatr ; 24(1): 217, 2024 Mar 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38438870

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Currently, there is no systematic review to investigate the effectiveness of digital interventions for healthy ageing and cognitive health of older adults. This study aimed to conduct a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of digital intervention studies for facilitating healthy ageing and cognitive health and further identify the considerations of its application to older adults. METHODS: A systematic review and meta-analysis of literature were conducted across CINAHL, Medline, ProQuest, Cochrane, Scopus, and PubMed databases following the PRISMA guideline. All included studies were appraised using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool Checklist by independent reviewers. Meta-analyses were performed using JBI SUMARI software to compare quantitative studies. Thematic analyses were used for qualitative studies and synthesised into the emerging themes. RESULTS: Thirteen studies were included. Quantitative results showed no statistically significant pooled effect between health knowledge and healthy behaviour (I2 =76, p=0.436, 95% CI [-0.32,0.74]), and between cardiovascular-related health risks and care dependency I2=0, p=0.426, 95% CI [0.90,1.29]). However, a statistically significant cognitive function preservation was found in older adults who had long-term use of laptop/cellphone devices and had engaged in the computer-based physical activity program (I2=0, p<0.001, 95% CI [0.01, 0.21]). Qualitative themes for the considerations of digital application to older adults were digital engagement, communication, independence, human connection, privacy, and cost. CONCLUSIONS: Digital interventions used in older adults to facilitate healthy ageing were not always effective. Health knowledge improvement does not necessarily result in health risk reduction in that knowledge translation is key. Factors influencing knowledge translation (i.e., digital engagement, human coaching etc) were identified to determine the intervention effects. However, using digital devices appeared beneficial to maintain older adults' cognitive functions in the longer term. Therefore, the review findings suggest that the expanded meaning of a person-centred concept (i.e., from social, environmental, and healthcare system aspects) should be pursued in future practice. Privacy and cost concerns of technologies need ongoing scrutiny from policy bodies. Future research looking into the respective health benefits can provide more understanding of the current digital intervention applied to older adults. STUDY REGISTRATION: PROSPERO record ID: CRD42023400707 https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?RecordID=400707 .


Subject(s)
Cognition , Healthy Aging , Aged , Humans , Cell Phone , Communication , Digital Health
18.
Environ Int ; 185: 108552, 2024 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38458118

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Each new generation of mobile phone technology has triggered discussions about potential carcinogenicity from exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF). Available evidence has been insufficient to conclude about long-term and heavy mobile phone use, limited by differential recall and selection bias, or crude exposure assessment. The Cohort Study on Mobile Phones and Health (COSMOS) was specifically designed to overcome these shortcomings. METHODS: We recruited participants in Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the UK 2007-2012. The baseline questionnaire assessed lifetime history of mobile phone use. Participants were followed through population-based cancer registers to identify glioma, meningioma, and acoustic neuroma cases during follow-up. Non-differential exposure misclassification was reduced by adjusting estimates of mobile phone call-time through regression calibration methods based on self-reported data and objective operator-recorded information at baseline. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for glioma, meningioma, and acoustic neuroma in relation to lifetime history of mobile phone use were estimated with Cox regression models with attained age as the underlying time-scale, adjusted for country, sex, educational level, and marital status. RESULTS: 264,574 participants accrued 1,836,479 person-years. During a median follow-up of 7.12 years, 149 glioma, 89 meningioma, and 29 incident cases of acoustic neuroma were diagnosed. The adjusted HR per 100 regression-calibrated cumulative hours of mobile phone call-time was 1.00 (95 % CI 0.98-1.02) for glioma, 1.01 (95 % CI 0.96-1.06) for meningioma, and 1.02 (95 % CI 0.99-1.06) for acoustic neuroma. For glioma, the HR for ≥ 1908 regression-calibrated cumulative hours (90th percentile cut-point) was 1.07 (95 % CI 0.62-1.86). Over 15 years of mobile phone use was not associated with an increased tumour risk; for glioma the HR was 0.97 (95 % CI 0.62-1.52). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the cumulative amount of mobile phone use is not associated with the risk of developing glioma, meningioma, or acoustic neuroma.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms , Cell Phone Use , Cell Phone , Glioma , Meningeal Neoplasms , Meningioma , Neuroma, Acoustic , Humans , Meningioma/epidemiology , Meningioma/etiology , Cohort Studies , Neuroma, Acoustic/epidemiology , Neuroma, Acoustic/etiology , Prospective Studies , Brain Neoplasms/epidemiology , Brain Neoplasms/etiology , Glioma/epidemiology , Glioma/etiology , Electromagnetic Fields , Surveys and Questionnaires , Case-Control Studies
19.
Med Anthropol ; 43(3): 219-232, 2024 04 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38451490

ABSTRACT

Drawing on a two-year ethnography of care practices during the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany, we discuss the affordances of voice-based technologies (smartphones, basic mobile phones, and landline telephones) in collecting ethnographic data and crafting relationships with participants. We illustrate how such technologies allowed us to move with participants, eased data collection through the social expectations around their use, and reoriented our attention to the multiple qualities of sound. Adapting research on the performativity of technology, we argue that voice-based technologies integrated us into participants' everyday lives while also maintaining physical distance in times of infectious sociality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cell Phone , Humans , Pandemics , Anthropology, Medical , Anthropology, Cultural
20.
Accid Anal Prev ; 200: 107563, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38555805

ABSTRACT

The growing public concern over traffic safety hazards caused by pedestrians' distracted behavior, particularly related to mobile phone usage at pedestrian crossings. Through video recording of pedestrians' street-crossing behaviors on 12 sidewalks across 9 urban road intersections in Nanjing city, 1778 valid pedestrian samples were collected. The study categorizes mobile phone use during the crossing into five distinct types: no use, voice call, screen gaze, screen gaze with operation, and listening to music with headphones. Then, the effects of gender, age and companion conditions on the mobile phone during the crossing were examined by chi-square tests. Utilizing binomial logistic and Relogit regression models, the study analyzed the impact and safety risks of distraction on crossing behavior. Additionally, a random parameters (RP) logit model with heterogeneity in means was used to investigate the determinants affecting mobile phone usage. Notably, individuals aged 18 to 30 years were identified as the random parameter, while factors such as being under 18 years old, having a companion without interaction, having a companion with interaction, weekdays, sidewalk length, and the total number of other pedestrians were identified as fixed parameters. The study also presented significant variables affecting the probability of mobile phone usage through marginal effects, highlighting the potential safety risks associated with mobile phone usage during street crossing. These findings emphasize the need for heightened pedestrian safety awareness and a reduction in distracted behaviors to enhance overall traffic safety.


Subject(s)
Cell Phone , Pedestrians , Humans , Adolescent , Safety , Accidents, Traffic/prevention & control , Walking
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...