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1.
Health Expect ; 27(2): e14026, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38618991

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Awareness and understanding of dementia remain limited in ethnically diverse populations in multicultural societies due to culturally inappropriate and inaccessible information. OBJECTIVE: To establish the impact, helpers and hinderers of an online multilingual dementia awareness initiative co-created with and for English, Arabic and Vietnamese speaking people. DESIGN: A case study using mixed methods to assess the impact and implementation of an information session on dementia knowledge. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The study was conducted with English, Arabic and Vietnamese speaking individuals in Canterbury-Bankstown, Australia. INTERVENTION STUDIED: A dementia alliance co-created an online multilingual dementia information session, which was delivered synchronously in English, Arabic and Vietnamese by trained facilitators. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: In-session group discussions, quizzes and a postsession survey assessed the impact on dementia knowledge. A postimplementation focus group explored the factors that helped and hindered the initiative. RESULTS: The online dementia information session successfully supported participants understanding of dementia causes, impacts and care strategies. The initiative was hindered by competing priorities and limited accessibility to target audiences, while it was helped by the support of an established organisation and feedback mechanisms. DISCUSSION: Ongoing dementia education and awareness-raising campaigns that are culturally sensitive are needed in communities to promote dementia literacy and help-seeking. CONCLUSIONS: An online multilingual dementia information session can be an effective way to improve dementia literacy and advocate for change in multicultural communities. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: English, Arabic and Vietnamese speaking members of the Canterbury Bankstown Dementia Alliance participated in the co-creation and evaluation of this initiative.


Subject(s)
Cultural Diversity , Dementia , Humans , Vietnam , Australia , Education, Continuing
2.
J Consult Clin Psychol ; 92(4): 199-201, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38573712

ABSTRACT

Prior to the advent of multiculturalism, mainstream psychology mirrored the Euro-American culture. In contrast, multiculturalism acts as a prism that reveals the diversity in the human condition. Since most empirical research is still conducted on Western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic populations, we need to construct a representative map of the human psychological and behavioral phenome. To work toward this goal, multicultural psychologists go beyond personal transformation and openness to the other. They question power relations, oppose oppressive systems, address psychology's fallacy of neutrality, and engage in social justice action. Specifically, multicultural psychologists work to restore the humanity of both the oppressed and the oppressor. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Cultural Diversity , Social Justice , Humans , Databases, Factual
3.
Int Rev Psychiatry ; 36(1-2): 180-191, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38557347

ABSTRACT

In recent years the historical subject base in psychobiography has expanded from a traditional focus on White (Caucasian) subjects to a broader more culturally inclusive population of significant personalities throughout history. A critical component of strong multicultural psychobiography is the inclusion of anchoring theories of psychology that are rooted in socio-cultural-political context. To psychologically profile culturally diverse individuals with only traditional Western theories of psychology and psychiatry (e.g. medical models, psychodynamic, existential, cognitive-behavioral) limits the ability of the research to accurately capture the erlebnis (lived experience) of extraordinary individuals in proper cultural context. This article reviews specific psychological theories that have recently set a foundation for more nuanced and culturally contextualised psychological profiles of historic personalities who represent diverse racial/ethnic/cultural backgrounds. Among the theories covered are the Integrated African Psychology Perspective (IAPP), an Indigenous (Native American) model of psychobiography, as well as theories and models on Psychological Nigrescence (Black racial identity development), Intersectionality, Politicised Collective Identity (PCI), Queered Black Racial Identity Development (QBRID), and Adultification of Black Children, among others. Examples of applications of these culture-centered theories to psychobiography, drawn from the present authors recently completed psychobiographies, as well as from other researchers internationally, are presented.


Subject(s)
Culture , Personality , Child , Humans , Cultural Diversity , Black People
4.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1256572, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38601499

ABSTRACT

Background: While cultural backgrounds are well-documented to be relevant to intentional self-harm, little is known about how cultural and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds affect mortality outcomes following self-harm. Aim: This study aimed to compare the risk of all-cause mortality and suicide after intentional hospital admissions for self-harm among people from CALD (vs. non-CALD) backgrounds. Method: Linked hospital and mortality data in Victoria, Australia, was used to assess suicide and all-cause death after hospital admissions for self-harm among patients aged 15+ years. All-cause death was identified by following up on 42,122 self-harm patients (hospitalized between 01 July 2007 and 30 June 2019) until death or 15 February 2021. Suicide death was evaluated in 16,928 self-harm inpatients (01 January 2013 and 31 December 2017) until death or 28 March 2018. Cox regression models were fitted to compare mortality outcomes in self-harm patients from CALD vs. non-CALD backgrounds. Outcomes: During the follow-up periods, 3,716 of 42,122 (8.8%) participants died by any cause (by 15 February 2021), and 304 of 16,928 (1.8%) people died by suicide (by 28 March 2018). Compared to the non-CALD group, CALD intentional self-harm inpatients had a 20% lower risk of all-cause mortality (HR: 0.8, 95% CI: 0.7-0.9) and a 30% lower risk of suicide (HR: 0.7, 95% CI: 049-0.97). Specifically, being from North Africa/Middle East and Asian backgrounds lowered the all-cause mortality risk; however, the suicide risk in Asians was as high as in non-CALD people. Conclusion: Overall, people from CALD backgrounds exhibited lower risks of all-cause mortality and suicide following hospital admission for self-harm compared to the non-CALD group. However, when comparing risks based on regions of birth, significant variations were observed. These findings underscore the importance of implementing culturally tailored background-specific suicide preventive actions. The study focussed on outcomes following hospital admission for self-harm and did not capture outcomes for cases of self-harm that did not result in hospital admission. This limits generalisability, as some CALD people might avoid accessing healthcare after self-harm due to cultural factors. Future research that not limited to hospital data is suggested to build on the results.


Subject(s)
Self-Injurious Behavior , Suicide , Humans , Victoria/epidemiology , Culture , Cultural Diversity , Self-Injurious Behavior/epidemiology
5.
Nurs Health Sci ; 26(2): e13115, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38605597

ABSTRACT

Active migration and globalization have led to increased opportunities for critical care nurses to care for patients from diverse racial and cultural backgrounds. This study thus aimed to identify the individual, interpersonal, and organizational factors affecting cultural competence levels among neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses based on an ecological model. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study that included 135 NICU nurses in South Korea. A hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis was conducted using the proposed ecological model, and a regression model for each of the four subdomains of cultural competence was constructed and compared. NICU nurses' cultural competencies were influenced not only by the "necessity of multicultural education" and "ethnocultural empathy" at the individual level but by the "hospital's readiness and support for cultural competencies" at the organizational level. To promote the cultural competence of nurses in critical care settings, environmental and organizational support should be improved, along with developing strategies that focus on nurses' individual characteristics. It is also necessary to investigate the "intersectionality" of the effects of individual and environmental factors on cultural competence.


Subject(s)
Cultural Competency , Intensive Care Units, Neonatal , Infant, Newborn , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Cultural Diversity
6.
PLoS One ; 19(4): e0301053, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38573942

ABSTRACT

Variations in political participation are linked to demographic factors, socioeconomic disparities, and cultural-ethnic diversity. Existing research has primarily explored reduced political involvement among individuals with disabilities, particularly in electoral politics. However, little research has attended the involvement of deaf people specifically. This is of interest because deaf youth are at an intersection of disability, language and cultural identity with their language affiliations and rejection or acceptance of disability evolving through childhood. This study draws from original data collected via an online survey, comprising 163 deaf young respondents aged 16-19 in Great Britain. We compare their levels of political participation with those of general population peers to explore how sociodemographic factors, alongside variations in self-identification as deaf, and meaningful interactions with other deaf people contribute to explain their political engagement. The results challenge conventional wisdom by demonstrating that deaf youth participate more actively in politics than their hearing peers in various forms of political involvement, including collective, contact, and institutional activism. We also recognize differences among deaf youth and propose that social aspects of identity formation, particularly embracing a deaf identity and having deaf friends, can boost certain forms of political engagement. In summary, this study underscores the importance of acknowledging the diversity of deaf youth in terms of affiliation with various forms of deaf identity, rendering their experience different from both disabled and hearing youth. By identifying the factors driving heightened political participation, policymakers and advocates can develop strategies to enhance political engagement among all young people, regardless of their hearing status.


Subject(s)
Disabled Persons , Humans , Adolescent , Child , United Kingdom , Politics , Peer Group , Cultural Diversity
9.
Stud Hist Philos Sci ; 104: 61-67, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38467080

ABSTRACT

There seems to be an emerging consensus among many philosophers of science that non-epistemic values ought to play a role in the process of scientific reasoning itself. Recently, a number of philosophers have focused on the role of values in scientific classification or taxonomy. Their claim is that a choice of ontology or taxonomic scheme can only be made, or should only be made, by appealing to non-epistemic or social values. In this paper, I take on this "argument from ontological choice," claiming that it equivocates on the notion of choice. An ontological choice can be understood either in terms of determining which taxonomic scheme is valid, or in terms of deciding which taxonomic scheme to deploy in a given context. I try to show that while the latter can be determined in part by social values, the former ought not to be so determined.


Subject(s)
Cultural Diversity , Social Values , Problem Solving , Dissent and Disputes , Consensus
10.
Glob Public Health ; 19(1): 2326016, 2024 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38471035

ABSTRACT

To achieve Sustainable Development Goal 5 for gender equality by 2030, it is crucial for health and development professionals and governmental officials to understand how legal systems empower or oppress populations on the basis of gender worldwide, including opportunities and challenges of statutory provisions created by legal pluralism. Using Ethiopia as a case study, this paper examines how local laws applied in Sharia and Customary Dispute Resolution courts impact gender equality and the health of women and girls inspite of the inculcation of human rights statutes into national legislation, including the Constitution. We identify several key issues with the substantive law and its enforcement. First, laws which have been instituted at the national level to improve gender equally have been poorly enforced at the local level. Second, there is a sustained enforcement of laws that oppress women and that protect male perpetrators of gender-based violations. Third, local courts limit female representation and uphold patriarchy. To improve the health of women and girls, stakeholders must take into consideration the ways in which legal systems uphold harmful gender norms and obstruct and/or advance progress towards equal representation, opportunities, and constitutionally-mandated protections for all.


Subject(s)
Cultural Diversity , Human Rights , Female , Humans , Male , Ethiopia
12.
PLoS One ; 19(3): e0301366, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38547238

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A global catastrophe-the COVID-19 pandemic-appears to have two-dimensional health consequences for older adults: high risk of being infected and psychological distress. There is limited evidence on how the pandemic has impacted the life and coping of older adults who are culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD), women in particular. This study explored the COVID-19 risk perception and coping strategies of older CALD women in South Australia. METHODS: A mixed-methods research design was employed, involving a 31-items coping and emergency preparation scale for survey and semi-structured interviews with participants. The older CALD women were approached through 11 multicultural NGOs. One hundred and nine women participants from 28 CALD communities completed the online surveys; 25 of them agreed to a telephone interview and provided their contact details. 15 older CALD women ultimately participated in interviews. RESULTS: Mean sum-score of dread risk, unknown risk, and fear (M: 43.5; SD: 4.9) indicated that the participants were somewhat anxious and worried. Mean sum-score of coping (M: 79.8; SD: 9.3) reported their compliance with expert advice and disinfection practices but accessing health information (M: 2.8; SD 1.4) and tendency to minimize anxiety (M: 2.1; SD: 1.2) were below neutral. Significant variations were found in coping in terms of age, meaning that the women aged 75 years and older were less likely to cope with the pandemic (P = 0.01). Emergency preparation differed based on the participants' residence and occupation status. The deductive-inductive thematic analysis of interview data was framed around three priori themes: risks of being affected, emotional and behavioral coping, and emergency preparation and access to services. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence shows a fear among the older CALD women with an endeavor to cope and prepare for emergency situations. This suggests the requirements for interventions that improve coping and reduce the risk of stress among them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Female , Aged , South Australia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cultural Diversity , Adaptation, Psychological , Perception
13.
Ecol Lett ; 27(3): e14410, 2024 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38519453

ABSTRACT

Local minority languages and dialects, through the local knowledge and expertise associated with them, can play major roles in analysing climate change and biodiversity loss, in facilitating community awareness of environmental crises and in setting up locally-adapted resilience and sustainability strategies. While the situation and contribution of Indigenous and Tribal Peoples are of emblematic importance, the issue of the relationships between cultural and linguistic diversity and environmental awareness and protection does not solely concern peripheral highly-specialized communities in specific ecosystems of the Global South, but constitutes a worldwide challenge, throughout all of the countries, whatever their geographical location, their economical development, or their political status. Environmental emergency and climate change resilience should therefore raise international awareness on the need to promote the survival and development of minority languages and dialects and to take into account their creativity and expertise in relation to the dynamics of their local environments.


Subject(s)
Ecosystem , Resilience, Psychological , Climate Change , Linguistics , Cultural Diversity
14.
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed ; 20(1): 35, 2024 Mar 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38486237

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The intensification of production and socio-economic changes have accelerated the loss of local traditional knowledge and plant resources. Understanding the distribution and determinants of such biocultural diversity is essential in planning efficient surveys and conservation efforts. Because the concept of biocultural diversity in socio-ecological adaptive systems comprises biological, cultural, and linguistic diversity, linguistic information should serve as a surrogate for the distribution of local biological and cultural diversity. In this study, we spatio-linguistically evaluated the names of local trees and rice landraces recorded in Ehime Prefecture, southwestern Japan. METHODS: Hierarchical clustering was performed separately for the names of local trees and rice landraces. By considering innate flora differences and species having multiple local names, a novel distance index was adopted for local tree names. For the names of rice landraces, Jaccard distance was adopted. V-measure and factor detector analysis were used to evaluate the spatial association between the isogloss maps of the folk nomenclature derived from the clustering and multiple thematic maps. RESULTS: Local tree names showed stronger spatial association with geographical factors than rice landrace names. One folk nomenclature group of trees overlapped well with the slash-and-burn cultivation area, suggesting a link between the naming of trees and the traditional production system. In contrast, rice landraces exhibited stronger associations with folklore practices. Moreover, influences of road networks and pilgrimages on rice landraces indicated the importance of human mobility and traditional rituals on rice seed transfer. High homogeneity and low completeness in the V-measure analysis indicated that the names of local trees and rice landraces were mostly homogenous within current municipalities and were shared with a couple of adjacent municipalities. The isogloss maps help to illustrate how the biological and cultural diversity of wild trees and rice landraces are distributed. They also help to identify units for inter-municipal collaboration for effective conservation of traditional knowledge related to those plant resources and traditional rice varieties themselves. CONCLUSIONS: Our spatio-linguistic evaluation indicated that complex geographical and sociological processes influence the formation of plant folk nomenclature groups and implies a promising approach using quantitative lexico-statistical analysis to help to identify areas for biocultural diversity conservation.


Subject(s)
Oryza , Trees , Humans , Seeds , Cluster Analysis , Cultural Diversity
15.
PLoS One ; 19(3): e0294471, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38442102

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of health myths is increasing with the rise of Internet use. Left unaddressed, online falsehoods can lead to harmful behaviours. In times of crisis, such as the recent COVID-19 pandemic, the circulation of many myths is exacerbated, often to varying degrees among different cultures. Singapore is a multicultural hub in Asia with Western and Asian influences. Although several studies have examined health myths from a Western or Eastern perspective, little research has investigated online health falsehoods in a population that is culturally exposed to both. Furthermore, most studies examined myths cross-sectionally instead of capturing trends in myth prevalence over time, particularly during crisis situations. Given these literature gaps, we investigated popular myths surrounding the recent COVID-19 pandemic within the multicultural setting of Singapore, by examining its general population. We further examined changes in myth beliefs over the two-year period during the pandemic, and population demographic differences in myth beliefs. Using randomised sampling, two online surveys of nationally representative samples of adults (aged 21-70 years) residing in Singapore were conducted, the first between October 2020 and February 2021 (N = 949), and the second between March and April 2022 (N = 1084). Results showed that 12.7% to 57.5% of the population were unable to identify various myths, such as COVID-19 was manmade, and that three of these myths persisted significantly over time (increases ranging from 3.9% to 9.8%). However, belief in myths varied across population demographics, with ethnic minorities (Indians and Malays), females, young adults and those with lower education levels being more susceptible to myths than their counterparts (p < 0.05). Our findings suggest that current debunking efforts are insufficient to effectively counter misinformation beliefs during health crises. Instead, a post-COVID-19 landscape will require targeted approaches aimed at vulnerable population sub-groups, that also focus on the erroneous beliefs with long staying power.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Young Adult , Asia , Asian , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cultural Diversity , Pandemics , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged
16.
Musculoskeletal Care ; 22(1): e1874, 2024 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38423991

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore the experiences of socio-culturally diverse community members attempting to manage their chronic pain and enact evidence-based management plans following an index Emergency Department (ED) visit. METHODS: A convergent parallel mixed-methods design with qualitative interviews and descriptive analysis was undertaken in two public hospitals in a multicultural region in Sydney, Australia. Consecutive adults were recruited from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD: n = 45) or Australian-born (n = 45) backgrounds, who presented to the ED for a chronic neuromusculoskeletal pain condition. Consenting participants were prescribed an individualised chronic pain management plan following examination by a physiotherapist, who collected standardised measures of pain and health literacy. Six months later, participants underwent a structured phone survey regarding their pain status and whether they had actioned management plans. Participants were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview. RESULTS: Six-month data were available for 82 of 90 participants who attended the ED and consented to the baseline assessment (40 CALD and 42 Australian-born). Participants were 52% females, predominately middle-aged (mean age 54.7 years), with an overall mean symptom duration of 10 years (SD 9.0). At 6 months, there were nine representations by six CALD participants and 23 by nine Australian-born participants. Overall, 52% reported unchanged pain, 24% were worse and 23% improved, with similar action plan progress for CALD (58%) and Australian-born (53%) participants. Pain features and health literacy were similar, irrespective of progress with pain management plans. From 41 participants who consented to phone interviews, three themes emerged to explain their progress with recommendations: 'illness model', 'urgency' and 'control orientation'. CONCLUSIONS: Patients presenting to the ED with chronic pain might be more likely to action discharge recommendations if primary care providers identify patient-specific and contextual barriers to implementation.


Subject(s)
Chronic Pain , Adult , Middle Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Australia , Chronic Pain/therapy , Cultural Diversity , Emergency Service, Hospital , Patient Outcome Assessment
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