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1.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 13922, 2024 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38886456

ABSTRACT

Artificial intelligence (AI) holds immense promise for K-12 education, yet understanding the factors influencing students' engagement with AI courses remains a challenge. This study addresses this gap by extending the technology acceptance model (TAM) to incorporate cognitive factors such as AI intrinsic motivation (AIIM), AI readiness (AIRD), AI confidence (AICF), and AI anxiety (AIAX), alongside human-computer interaction (HCI) elements like user interface (UI), content (C), and learner-interface interactivity (LINT) in the context of using generative AI (GenAI) tools. By including these factors, an expanded model is presented to capture the complexity of student engagement with AI education. To validate the model, 210 Chinese students spanning grades K7 to K9 participated in a 1 month artificial intelligence course. Survey data and structural equation modeling reveal significant relationships between cognitive and HCI factors and perceived usefulness (PU) and ease of use (PEOU). Specifically, AIIM, AIRD, AICF, UI, C, and LINT positively influence PU and PEOU, while AIAX negatively affects both. Furthermore, PU and PEOU significantly predict students' attitudes toward AI curriculum learning. These findings underscore the importance of considering cognitive and HCI factors in the design and implementation of AI education initiatives. By providing a theoretical foundation and practical insights, this study informs curriculum development and aids educational institutions and businesses in evaluating and optimizing AI4K12 curriculum design and implementation strategies.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Students , Humans , Male , Female , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Motivation , Learning , Surveys and Questionnaires , Curriculum , China
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 669, 2024 Jun 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38886678

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Clinical associates are a health professional cadre that could be utilised in mental health task sharing in South Africa but this is training dependent. The objectives of the study were to identify the potential curricula content, training sites, and teaching modalities for undergraduate and potential postgraduate clinical associate mental health training and to identify the tasks that they should perform based on these curricula. METHODS: We utilised the Delphi method to reach consensus on items with the panel comprising psychiatrists and family physicians. The first round questionnaire of the Delphi survey was developed based on a literature review and the results from earlier phases of the overall study. The survey was administered electronically and consisted of three rounds. Following both the first and second rounds, an updated questionnaire was constructed omitting the items on which consensus was reached. The questionnaire consisted primarily of nine-point scales with consensus based on 70% of participants rating 1,2,3 or 7,8,9. RESULTS: There were 26 participants in the first round with this number falling to 23 in later rounds. There was strong consensus on a training attachment to a mental health clinic at a community health centre (CHC) at undergraduate (96.2%) and postgraduate level (100%). Consensus was reached on the importance of training on the management of six categories of disorders at the undergraduate level and nine categories of disorders at the postgraduate level. Clerking patients as a teaching modality reached 100% consensus at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. PHC clinics, CHCs and district hospitals reached consensus as appropriate settings for clinical associates to provide mental health services. In addition, GP practices and secondary hospitals reached consensus for those with postgraduate training. Consensus was reached on ten of the 21 listed tasks that could be performed based on undergraduate training and 20 of the 21 tasks based on a postgraduate qualification in mental health. CONCLUSIONS: The Delphi panel's recommendations provide a clear roadmap for enhancing mental health curricula for clinical associates, enabling their utilisation in mental health service provision. A future postgraduate mental health qualification for clinical associates would allow for expanded task sharing.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Delphi Technique , Psychiatry , South Africa , Humans , Psychiatry/education , Mental Health Services , Physicians, Family/education , Surveys and Questionnaires , Male , Mental Health , Female , Consensus , Education, Medical, Graduate , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Psychiatrists
3.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 666, 2024 Jun 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38886688

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) is the gold standard of initial assessment of trauma patients and therefore a widely used training program for medical professionals. Practical application of the knowledge taught can be challenging for medical students and inexperienced clinicians. Simulation-based training, including virtual reality (VR), has proven to be a valuable adjunct to real-world experiences in trauma education. Previous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of VR simulations for surgical and technical skills training. However, there is limited evidence on VR simulation training specifically for trauma education, particularly within the ATLS curriculum. The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and acceptance of using a fully immersive VR trauma simulation to prepare medical students for the ATLS course. METHODS: This was a prospective randomised controlled pilot study on a convenience sample of advanced medical students (n = 56; intervention group with adjunct training using a commercially available semi-automated trauma VR simulation, n = 28, vs control group, n = 28) taking part in the ATLS course of the Military Physician Officer School. Feasibility was assessed by evaluating factors related to technical factors of the VR training (e.g. rate of interruptions and premature termination). Objective and subjective effectiveness was assessed using confidence ratings at four pre-specified points in the curriculum, validated surveys, clinical scenario scores, multiple choice knowledge tests, and ATLS final clinical scenario and course pass rates. Acceptance was measured using validated instruments to assess variables of media use (Technology acceptance, usability, presence and immersion, workload, and user satisfaction). RESULTS: The feasibility assessment demonstrated that only one premature termination occurred and that all remaining participants in the intervention group correctly stabilised the patient. No significant differences between the two groups in terms of objective effectiveness were observed (p = 0.832 and p = 0.237 for the pretest and final knowledge test, respectively; p = 0.485 for the pass rates for the final clinical scenario on the first attempt; all participants passed the ATLS course). In terms of subjective effectiveness, the authors found significantly improved confidence post-VR intervention (p < .001) in providing emergency care using the ATLS principles. Perceived usefulness in the TEI was stated with a mean of 4 (SD 0.8; range 0-5). Overall acceptance and usability of the VR simulation was rated as positive (System Usability Scale total score mean 79.4 (SD 11.3, range 0-100). CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this prospective pilot study indicate the potential of using VR trauma simulations as a feasible and acceptable supplementary tool for the ATLS training course. Where objective effectiveness regarding test and scenario scores remained unchanged, subjective effectiveness demonstrated improvement. Future research should focus on identifying specific scenarios and domains where VR can outperform or enhance traditional learning methods in trauma simulation.


Subject(s)
Advanced Trauma Life Support Care , Simulation Training , Virtual Reality , Humans , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , Male , Female , Adult , Clinical Competence , Feasibility Studies , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Educational Measurement , Young Adult
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 672, 2024 Jun 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38886696

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infectious diseases are becoming more widespread and re-emerging, causing psychological, social, economic, and health effects at both national and international levels. Specialist nurses can help prevent and control these infections. However, in Iran, there are currently no specialist infection prevention and control (IPC) nurses to manage and control infections. This study aims to explore clinical and academic nurses' attitudes toward IPC nursing curriculum and duties. METHODS: The study used a qualitative content analysis approach. Thirty-six participants, including clinical and academic nurses, were selected using a purposeful sampling method. Data was collected through seven focused group discussions. The accuracy and validity of the research tools were measured using the Four-Dimension Criteria developed by Lincoln and Guba. Data analysis was conducted using directed content analysis. RESULTS: The data analysis of the discussions held in the seven focus groups extracted 628 codes. Three themes were developed from the qualitative analysis: "Core characteristics of the curriculum", "Expected competencies and skills", and "Evaluation." These themes were derived from nine main categories and 25 subcategories. CONCLUSIONS: Specialist IPC nurses can play important roles in various positions and environments. Therefore, educational policymakers in Iran should consider establishing IPC nursing courses. It is also recommended that policymakers and decision-makers in the nursing field of other less developed countries should prioritize this issue.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Curriculum , Focus Groups , Qualitative Research , Humans , Iran , Adult , Female , Male , Infection Control , Clinical Competence , Education, Nursing
5.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 668, 2024 Jun 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38886706

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The positive effects of active and passive music activities on older people with dementia are well and largely documented by the literature. Nevertheless, the use of music as a non-pharmacological intervention is not so common both in private and public older people care facilities because in-home staff have no competencies for delivering such activities. Conversely, the realization and implementation of a co-designed music-based curriculum for dementia care professionals may help the diffusion of music in the older people care facilities. This study was aimed at evaluating the learning outcomes of the SOUND training, based on an original co-designed music-based curriculum for dementia care professionals and implemented in Italy, Portugal and Romania. METHODS: The SOUND training study was developed through three phases: a) the co-design of the music-based curriculum for dementia care professionals, involving 55 people in the three participating countries; b) the teaching of the training curriculum to 63 dementia care professionals (29 in Italy, 17 in Portugal and 17 in Romania), delivered both in person and via a Moodle platform named Virtual Music Circle; c) the learning outcomes assessment, carried out by means of 13 self-evaluation tests, and a practical test, and the trainees' course evaluation by a questionnaire. RESULTS: Most of the trainees reached the highest score in the evaluation of the theoretical competencies in the three study countries. Conversely, some practical competencies in the facilitation of music activities need to be fine-tuned. The SOUND training course was evaluated very positively in the overall structure, theoretical contents, and practical workshops by the trainees. Nevertheless, they preferred the face-to-face compared to the distance learning methodology in the three countries. CONCLUSIONS: The SOUND training curriculum was effective in teaching music techniques and neurocognitive knowledge to dementia care professionals. Nevertheless, future courses should be differentiated for dementia care professionals with or without previous music knowledge and competencies. Moreover, the course is fully sustainable, because it does not require additional costs given that the curriculum is fully accessible online and it is also replicable because it trains professionals who can continue to apply the method in their working routine.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Dementia , Humans , Dementia/therapy , Portugal , Romania , Italy , Male , Female , Music Therapy , Adult , Health Personnel/education , Music
6.
J Extra Corpor Technol ; 56(2): 71-76, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38888550

ABSTRACT

While the process of teaching student perfusionists has been in development since the 1950s, the publication of the processes to improve perfusion clinical education has been largely lacking. Publications regarding education from other allied health and medical fields have shown the value of student-centered learning. The use of reflective practice to move perfusion students from thinking about actions after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) to reflecting and reacting on actions during CPB is better encouraged by moving from a teacher-centered to a student-centered clinical model. Our institution's teaching process has developed into a multi-point procedure to make our students into reflective practicing clinicians. Student preceptor evaluations were reversed to allow the students to evaluate themselves first, with feedback from the preceptor given subsequently. Additionally, a biweekly student educational session, where the student chooses a topic and reviews current evidence-based practice, was instituted. The clinical program director serves as the moderator and clinical expert to facilitate problem-based learning during the sessions. Students were also given three skill/experience levels with goals to reach and move through during the rotation. These student levels were also helpful to our preceptors in knowing what each student's skill level was throughout their rotation. Overall, moving from a teacher-centered to a student-centered clinical rotation has helped make students familiar with reflective practice, self-evaluation, evidence-based practice, and problem-based learning. The incorporation of these processes will hopefully lead students to become lifelong reflective perfusionists.


Subject(s)
Cardiopulmonary Bypass , Humans , Cardiopulmonary Bypass/education , Curriculum , Clinical Competence , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Preceptorship/methods
8.
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 676, 2024 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38890623

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Studies using spaced repetition for teaching and learning in undergraduate clinical rotations such as paediatrics are limited, even more so in the South Asian region. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the effectiveness of utilizing spaced repetition compared to traditional learning methods among undergraduate medical students during their paediatric rotation at a medical university in Pakistan. METHODS: Bahria University Medical and Dental College (BUMDC) conducted quasii-experimental research in Karachi. Four topics were identified from the Year 5 Pediatrics curriculum to be used in the study, using which the study content was developed along with 50 multiple choice questions (MCQs) for assessment. All BUMDC Year 5 medical students rotating in Pediatrics were included and randomly allocated to the control or intervention group. In the control group, they provided the students with traditional study methods consisting of books and lectures to learn topics. In the intervention group, we created an Anki flashcard deck of the same topics to enable learning via spaced repetition. The researchers conducted a pretest and post test assessment of the 50 MCQs in both groups at the beginning and after the four-week study interval. The data were analysed using SPSS 19. RESULTS: A total of 115 BUMDC medical students agreed to participate in the study; 70 (59.1%) were in the intervention group, and 45 (41.7%) were in the control group. The pretest mean score of the control group was 27.96 ± 3.70, and the posttest mean score was 27.22 ± 5.02, with no statistically significant difference at the 95% confidence level. The mean score of the pretest for the intervention group was 27.93 ± 4.53, and that of the posttest was 30.8 ± 4.56, with a statistically significant difference at the 95% confidence level. The intervention showed a significant effect size of 0.8. CONCLUSION: The use of spaced repetitions resulted in significantly greater scores for medical students studying paediatrics than for those using more traditional methods of learning, compromising medical books and lectures. Considering that medical students need to retain a vast amount of information, using spaced repetition through flashcards can be a more effective learning tool that is more cost-efficient and time-efficient than traditional learning methods.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Pediatrics , Students, Medical , Humans , Pakistan , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Pediatrics/education , Male , Female , Curriculum , Educational Measurement , Problem Solving , Problem-Based Learning
11.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 656, 2024 Jun 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38867222

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We present the first results of the Accreditation System of Medical Schools (Sistema de Acreditação de Escolas Médicas - SAEME) in Brazil. METHODS: We evaluated the results of the accreditation of medical schools from 2015 to 2023. The self-evaluation form of the SAEME is specific for medical education programs and has eighty domains, which results in final decisions that are sufficient or insufficient for each domain. We evaluated the results of the first seventy-six medical schools evaluated by the SAEME. RESULTS: Fifty-five medical schools (72.4%) were accredited, and 21 (27.6%) were not. Seventy-two (94.7%) medical schools were considered sufficient in social accountability, 93.4% in integration with the family health program, 75.0% in faculty development programs and 78.9% in environmental sustainability. There was an emphasis on SAEME in student well-being, with seventeen domains in this area, and 71.7% of these domains were sufficient. The areas with the lowest levels of sufficiency were interprofessional education, mentoring programs, student assessment and weekly distribution of educational activities. CONCLUSION: Medical schools in Brazil are strongly committed to social accountability, integration with the national health system, environmental sustainability and student well-being programs. SAEME is moving from episodic evaluations of medical schools to continuous quality improvement policies.


Subject(s)
Accreditation , Schools, Medical , Brazil , Accreditation/standards , Schools, Medical/standards , Humans , Education, Medical/standards , Curriculum , Social Responsibility
12.
J Korean Med Sci ; 39(22): e182, 2024 Jun 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38859740

ABSTRACT

The recent debate surrounding the expansion of enrollment in Korean medical schools has reignited interest in the Flexner Report, published in the United States in 1910. Historically, medical education in the United States transitioned from small proprietary schools to university-affiliated institutions, emphasizing basic science and clinical experience. The Flexner Report advocated for scientific medicine and led to significant reforms in medical education, including standardization of curricula and strengthened admission requirements. The influence of this report extended to Korean medical education, shaping its curriculum, accreditation system, and emphasis on academic excellence. The expansion of medical school enrollment has led to a crucial dilemma. Should we prioritize the training of physicians who provide practical medical services or continue to emphasize academic medicine as we do now? There has been insufficient discussion of the individualized curricula, necessary investments, and societal efforts to accommodate these changes. It is imperative to move beyond mere enrollment expansion debates and collectively determine the future trajectory of Korean medical education, devising actionable plans to achieve overarching goals.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Education, Medical , Schools, Medical , Republic of Korea , Humans , Accreditation , United States
13.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0305210, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38861535

ABSTRACT

This study presents a comprehensive needs analysis of English for Specific Purposes (ESP) courses in colleges of art and design in China. By examining the perspectives of undergraduate students, graduate students, art teachers, and English teachers, the research identifies consensus and divergence in ESP needs and implementation challenges. The analysis reveals a strong demand among students for specialized English learning, with a particular emphasis on receptive and interactive skills. However, there is a widespread acknowledgement of students' difficulties across ESP skills, indicating a gap between student competencies and the professional demands, thus highlighting the need for targeted educational interventions to effectively address the difficulties. Notably, reading and writing abilities emerge as the most lacking skills. While there is unanimous recognition of the positive impact of ESP on students' professional abilities and international competitiveness, a significant disparity exists in the enthusiasm for implementing ESP courses, paticularly with resistence from English teachers. The study highlights the critical challenges in ESP teaching, with teacher qualifications identified as the most prominent issue. Interestingly, English teachers attribute difficulties primarily to teaching materials, indicating a potential lack of readiness for ESP course delivery. A gap is also observed between teachers' evaluations of student abilities and students' self-assessment, especially among undergraduate freshmen, suggesting an overestimation of their English proficiency in professional contexts. The paper concludes with the implication that for effective ESP course implementation in colleges of art and design in China, targeted faculty development programs and a collaborative approach involving English teachers, art teachers, and professionals are essential. The collaboration should aim to develop materials that integrate specific professional knowledge with linguistic expertise. Additionally, a balanced approach combining general English proficiency and specialized English training is recommended to address both foundational and specialized language skills. Overall, the study underscores the need for targeted ESP courses in art and design education, tailored to bridge the gap between current proficiency levels and professional language requirements.


Subject(s)
Students , Humans , China , Needs Assessment , Art , Universities , Male , Female , Language , Consensus , Curriculum
14.
Perspect Med Educ ; 13(1): 324-331, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38863986

ABSTRACT

We describe the Life Experiences Curriculum (LEC), which attempts to integrate medical student well-being with trauma-informed medical education. The long-term goal of LEC is to help medical students flourish with adversity and trauma, where flourishing refers to having a sense of purpose that arises from awareness of one's strengths and limitations, shaped by life experiences. The short-term goal of LEC is to develop students' relational capacities, such as acceptance and awareness of self and others, while building and maintaining students' psychological safety. We describe the conceptual rationale for these goals and the curriculum's development, implementation, evaluation, and limitations. The curriculum extends over four years and involves a preclinical seminar and students' individual and group reflection sessions with LEC faculty. The seminar addresses the coexistence of trauma and flourishing across life experiences, as well as how safety in relationships is impaired by traumatic experiences and must be restored for healing and growth. The physician faculty have no role in student evaluation and co-lead all LEC activities. LEC is intended to provide students with new language for understanding the process of trauma and flourishing in both individuals and systems and to build and sustain students' relational capacities. There are ongoing efforts to re-imagine self-care as communal-care in which care and support are given and received in a community of students and faculty. Such a model may help build the relational capacities needed to deliver trauma-informed care and also promote flourishing with adversity in healers and in those seeking to be healed.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Humans , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Curriculum/trends , Curriculum/standards , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , Psychological Safety
15.
Wiad Lek ; 77(4): 853-858, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38865647

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Aim: To present the results of the analysis of educational standards and curricula of the second educational level of training of specialists, who may be managers of healthcare, on the content of the environmental component as an element of strategic management. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Materials and Methods: Content analysis 24 educational standards of the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine of Ukraine for 6 fields of knowledge and 200 master's curricula from 87 institutions of higher education of Ukraine. CONCLUSION: Conclusions: There is a distribution of basic leadership and management competencies both by types of these competencies and between specialties. The requirements for the inclusion of the environmental component in the framework documents are poorly expressed. The content of environmental issues in the curricula is insufficient.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Ukraine , Humans , Professional Competence/standards , Leadership , Delivery of Health Care/standards
16.
Rehabilitation (Stuttg) ; 63(3): 189-196, 2024 Jun.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38866029

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The learning objectives in the current cross-sectional subject "Rehabilitation, Physical Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine" have been revised as part of the further development of the National Competency-Based Catalogue of Learning Objectives for Medicine (NKLM) to its new version 2.0. Since the NKLM is designed as an interdisciplinary catalogue, a subject assignment seemed necessary from the point of view of various stakeholders. Thus, the German Association of Scientific Medical Societies (AWMF) and the German medical faculties initiated a subject assignment process. The assignment process for the subject "Physical and Rehabilitative Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine" (PRM-NHV; according to the subject list of the first draft of the planned novel medical license regulations from 2020) is presented in this paper. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The AWMF invited its member societies to participate in the assignment of learning objectives of chapters VI, VII, and VIII of the NKLM 2.0 to the individual subjects to which they consider to contribute in teaching. For "PRM-NHV", representatives of the societies for rehabilitation sciences (DGRW), physical and rehabilitation medicine (DGPRM), orthopaedics and traumatology (DGOU), as well as for naturopathy (DGNHK) participated. In a structured consensus process according to the DELPHI methodology, the learning objectives were selected and consented. Subsequently, subject recommendations were made by the AWMF for each learning objective. RESULTS: From the NKLM 2.0, a total of 100 competency-based learning objectives of chapters VII and VIII for the subject "PRM-NHV" were consented by the representatives of the involved societies for presentation on the NKLM 2.0 online platform. CONCLUSIONS: In the context of the revision process of medical studies in Germany and under the umbrella of the AWMF and the German medical faculties, a broad consensus of competency-based learning objectives in the subject "PRM-NHV" could be achieved. This provides an important orientation for all medical faculties both for the further development of teaching in the cross-sectional subject "Rehabilitation, Physical Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine" according to the 9th revision of the medical license regulations, which has been valid for twenty years, and for the preparation of the corresponding subjects in the draft bill of the novel license regulations.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Curriculum , Naturopathy , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine , Germany , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/education , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/standards , Catalogs as Topic , Competency-Based Education/standards , Societies, Medical , Societies, Scientific , Rehabilitation/standards , Humans , Licensure, Medical/standards , Licensure, Medical/legislation & jurisprudence
17.
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh ; 21(1)2024 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38864164

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This prospective cohort study evaluated the effect of unfolding case-based learning on undergraduate nursing students' self-perceived clinical decision-making ability. METHODS: Students' self-reported responses to Jenkins's Clinical Decision Making in Nursing Scale were compared between the unfolding case-based learning cohort (n=140) and the comparison cohort (n=126) at a school of nursing in the United States. RESULTS: The results revealed similar students' responses between the two study cohorts. However, unfolding case-based learning significantly increased students' perceived proficiency in "search for information and unbiased assimilation of new information". CONCLUSIONS: Findings from the present study highlight possibilities presented by unfolding case-based learning in undergraduate nursing education. The study supports that unfolding case studies can be introduced early on, and then nurtured throughout the undergraduate program to influence the development of nursing students' clinical decision-making skills.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Clinical Decision-Making , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Problem-Based Learning , Students, Nursing , Humans , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Students, Nursing/psychology , Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Female , Prospective Studies , Problem-Based Learning/methods , Male , United States , Adult , Young Adult , Curriculum , Nursing Education Research
18.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 648, 2024 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38862905

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Climate change (CC) is a global public health issue, and the role of health professionals in addressing its impact is crucial. However, to what extent health professionals are prepared to deal with CC-related health problems is unclear. We aimed to evaluate the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of health students about the CC. METHODS: We conducted a scoping review through systematic searches in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Proquest, and EBSCO. We included original scientific research with no language or time restrictions. Two authors independently reviewed and decided on the eligibility of the studies, then performed data extraction. RESULTS: 21 studies were included, with a total of 9205 undergraduate nursing, medical, pharmacy, and public health students mainly. Most health science students (> 75%) recognized human activities as the main cause of CC. However, they perceived a lack of knowledge on how to address CC. Moreover, we found inadequate coverage or limited development of CC in related curricula that may contribute to incomplete learning or low confidence in the theoretical and practical concepts of students. CONCLUSION: The findings of our scoping review suggest that while health sciences students possess a general understanding of CC, there is a significant gap in their knowledge regarding its specific health impacts. To address this gap, there is a need for targeted education and training for future health care professionals that emphasizes the health effects of CC.


Subject(s)
Climate Change , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Curriculum , Students, Health Occupations/psychology
19.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 654, 2024 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38862921

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to assess the impact of the pandemic of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on neonatology residency training in a tertiary children's hospital in Chongqing, located in southwest China. Specifically, the study encompassed the effects on residents' education, lived experiences, well-being, and the quality of neonatal care delivered. As higher educational institutions adapt to the post-COVID-19 era after the pandemic disruption, it is imperative that educational designers/academics learn from their experiences and challenges in curriculum design and delivery, ensuring quality and relevance in education. METHODS: This study employed a mixed-methods approach to investigate the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on neonatology residency training at a tertiary children's hospital in Chongqing. The first phase surveyed residents' perceptions and experiences of their clinical education and well-being during the crisis. The second phase compared the quality of neonatal care between the pre-pandemic and pandemic periods. RESULTS: The survey of 123 neonatology residents examines the effects of COVID-19 on their learning, training, and mental health. The survey showed that most residents adapted well to the situation. Still, some faced challenges in their clinical education and experiences, such as reduced clinical exposure and opportunities to see rare diseases and conditions. A retrospective analysis of clinical data revealed that 7,151 neonates were admitted to the neonatology department during the study period. There was a 27.6% decrease in neonatal admissions during COVID-19, with more premature births and transfers. Residents conducted fewer clinical procedures but managed more complex cases. During COVID, hospital stays and costs were higher, but antibiotic use was lower. Although the case-mix index (CMI) score increased during the pandemic (1.25 vs. 1.18, p < 0.05), there was no significant difference in the rates of readmission within 7 days or poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: Despite reduced clinical exposure, the quality of neonatal care was maintained through innovative training methods that enhanced comprehensive residency programs. The study suggested that neonatology residency education remained effective and resilient during the crisis. Exceptional health professional education is vital to train qualified physicians and enhance healthcare systems for future challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Neonatology , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Neonatology/education , Male , Female , Resilience, Psychological , Adaptation, Psychological , Infant, Newborn , Curriculum , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Education, Medical, Graduate
20.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 650, 2024 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38862956

ABSTRACT

Co-creation of education within the context of student inclusion alongside diverse stakeholders merits exploration. We studied the perspectives of students and teachers from different institutions who participated in co-creating a transition to residency curriculum. We conducted post-hoc in-depth interviews with 16 participants: final-year medical students, undergraduate, and postgraduate medical education stakeholders who were involved in the co-creation sessions. Findings build on the Framework of Stakeholders' Involvement in Co-creation and identify the four key components of co-creation with diverse faculty: immersion in positive feelings of inclusivity and appreciation, exchange of knowledge, engagement in a state of reflection and analysis, and translation of co-creation dialogues into intended outcomes. Despite power dynamics, participants valued open communication, constructive feedback, mutual respect, and effective moderation. The study broadened our understanding of the co-creation process in diverse stakeholder settings. Incorporating key elements in the presence of power relations can enrich co-creation by leveraging wider expertise.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Internship and Residency , Students, Medical , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology , Stakeholder Participation , Interviews as Topic , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Female , Qualitative Research , Faculty, Medical
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