Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 147.135
Filter
1.
Univ. salud ; 26(2): D16-D27, mayo-agosto 2024. tab, ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS | ID: biblio-1553971

ABSTRACT

Introducción: La pandemia por COVID-19 ha afectado significativamente la calidad de los servicios de cuidado de la salud. Objetivo: Analizar los efectos en los atributos de la calidad en salud de los servicios de atención de enfermedades diferentes a la COVID-19 en Colombia, durante el periodo 2020-2022. Materiales y métodos: Se analizaron 24 artículos de alcance nacional y otros específicos de departamentos como Antioquia, Córdoba, Santander y Cundinamarca. Resultados: La pandemia por COVID-19 impactó la calidad de los servicios en la atención de enfermedades como cáncer, accidentes cerebrovasculares y de eventos como la interrupción voluntaria del embarazo. Conclusión: La calidad de la salud se vio afectada en todas sus dimensiones durante las fases de la pandemia, especialmente en la población con enfermedades crónicas y relacionadas con la salud infantil y materna. Además, se destacaron respuestas como el uso de la telemedicina y de la atención domiciliaria para contribuir a la calidad de la salud en Colombia.


Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly affected the quality of health care services. Objective: To analyze the effects of COVID-19 on the quality of health care services focused on treating diseases other than COVID-19 in Colombia during the 2020-2022 period. Materials and methods: 24 articles were analyzed, which included some studies focused on national issues and others specific to the departments of Antioquia, Cordoba, Santander, and Cundinamarca. Results: The COVID-19 pandemic affected the quality of health services caring for diseases such as cancer, strokes, and critical circumstances like voluntary termination of pregnancy. Conclusion: All dimensions of health care were affected during the pandemic, especially impacting populations with chronic diseases and diseases related to child and maternal health. It is important to highlight that telemedicine and home care contributed to improving the quality of health in Colombia.


Introdução: A pandemia de COVID-19 afetou significativamente a qualidade dos serviços de saúde. Objetivo: Analisar os efeitos da COVID-19 nos atributos de qualidade em saúde dos serviços de atenção a outras doenças além da COVID-19 na Colômbia, durante o período 2020-2022. Materiais e métodos: foram analisados 24 artigos de âmbito nacional e outros específicos de departamentos como Antioquia, Córdoba, Santander e Cundinamarca. Resultados: A pandemia da COVID-19 impactou a qualidade dos serviços no cuidado de doenças como câncer, acidente vascular cerebral e eventos como a interrupção voluntária da gravidez. Conclusão: A qualidade da saúde foi afetada em todas as suas dimensões durante as fases da pandemia, especialmente na população com doenças crônicas e doenças relacionadas à saúde infantil e materna. Além disso, foram destacadas respostas como o uso da telemedicina e do atendimento domiciliar para contribuir para a qualidade da saúde na Colômbia.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Delivery of Health Care , Health Services Accessibility
4.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 144(6): 587-590, 2024.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38825464

ABSTRACT

As populations grow older, the sustainability of current healthcare systems is being questioned. This paper considers what is necessary to ensure the sustainability of the healthcare system in Japan from the perspective of economics and public finance. In particular, it addresses the cost-effective use of limited medical resources. It also considers the problems of current regulations and regulatory regimes, which tend to protect vested interests. It may be necessary to carry out fundamental reforms of the regulatory system to deliver a sustainable healthcare system.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Japan , Delivery of Health Care/economics , Humans , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Health Care Reform/economics
5.
Philos Trans A Math Phys Eng Sci ; 382(2274): 20230257, 2024 Jul 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38826050

ABSTRACT

The OpenFlexure Microscope is an accessible, three-dimensional-printed robotic microscope, with sufficient image quality to resolve diagnostic features including parasites and cancerous cells. As access to lab-grade microscopes is a major challenge in global healthcare, the OpenFlexure Microscope has been developed to be manufactured, maintained and used in remote environments, supporting point-of-care diagnosis. The steps taken in transforming the hardware and software from an academic prototype towards an accepted medical device include addressing technical and social challenges, and are key for any innovation targeting improved effectiveness in low-resource healthcare. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue 'Open, reproducible hardware for microscopy'.


Subject(s)
Microscopy , Microscopy/instrumentation , Microscopy/methods , Humans , Robotics/instrumentation , Robotics/trends , Robotics/statistics & numerical data , Equipment Design , Printing, Three-Dimensional/instrumentation , Delivery of Health Care , Software , Point-of-Care Systems
6.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 22(1): 65, 2024 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38822374

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Research evidence has demonstrably improved health care practices and patient outcomes. However, systemic translation of evidence into practice is far from optimal. The reasons are complex, but often because research is not well aligned with health service priorities. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and perspectives of senior health service executives on two issues: (1) the alignment between local research activity and the needs and priorities of their health services, and (2) the extent to which research is or can be integrated as part of usual health care practice. METHODS: In this qualitative study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with senior health leaders from four large health service organisations that are members of Sydney Health Partners (SHP), one of Australia's nationally accredited research translation centres committed to accelerating the translation of research findings into evidence-based health care. The interviews were conducted between November 2022 and January 2023, and were either audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim or recorded in the interviewer field notes. A thematic analysis of the interview data was conducted by two researchers, using the framework method to identify common themes. RESULTS: Seventeen health executives were interviewed, including chief executives, directors of medical services, nursing, allied health, research, and others in executive leadership roles. Responses to issue (1) included themes on re-balancing curiosity- and priority-driven research; providing more support for research activity within health organisations; and helping health professionals and researchers discuss researchable priorities. Responses to issue (2) included identification of elements considered essential for embedding research in health care; and the need to break down silos between research and health care, as well as within health organisations. CONCLUSIONS: Health service leaders value research but want more research that aligns with their needs and priorities. Discussions with researchers about those priorities may need some facilitation. Making research a more integrated part of health care will require strong and broad executive leadership, resources and infrastructure, and investing in capacity- and capability-building across health clinicians, managers and executive staff.


Subject(s)
Health Services Research , Leadership , Qualitative Research , Translational Research, Biomedical , Humans , Australia , Evidence-Based Practice , Health Priorities , Interviews as Topic , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Health Services , Administrative Personnel
7.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 12600, 2024 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38824156

ABSTRACT

Lymphedema is a progressive lymphatic disease that potentiates physical and psychosocial distress. Despite its impact, patients reportedly encounter lymphatic ignorance throughout the healthcare system. This cross-sectional study aims to summarize clinical characteristics and interactions of lymphedema patients within the healthcare system. Two lymphedema patient cohorts were included: The Global Registry Analysis Cohort included lymphedema patients who contributed to an international digital lymphatic registry and the Interactions Cohort included patients who initiated a questionnaire about interactions with the medical system. The global registry was used to obtain demographic and clinical characteristics from affiliated lymphedema patients. A 23-item online questionnaire on healthcare experiences and satisfaction with lymphatic healthcare was then distributed to the Interactions Cohort. Complete responses were obtained from 2474 participants. Participants were a mean age of 57.5 ± 16.1 years and 51.4% had a cancer history. Participants reported substantial delays in diagnosis and treatment. Cancer-related and non-cancer-related lymphedema patients reported similar levels of perceived physician disinterest in their lymphedema; however, non-cancer-related lymphedema patients reported more care dissatisfaction. Ultimately, patients continue to face delays in lymphedema diagnosis and treatment. We developed an evidence-based model highlighting areas of reform needed to improve lymphatic education and healthcare.


Subject(s)
Lymphedema , Humans , Lymphedema/epidemiology , Lymphedema/psychology , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Middle Aged , Male , Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Delivery of Health Care , Patient Satisfaction , Registries , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/psychology
8.
Support Care Cancer ; 32(7): 408, 2024 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38834829

ABSTRACT

Due to perceived methodological complications, scientific studies have often excluded females. As a result, male-based findings have been generalized to females, despite physiological and biological differences between sexes. Gender has been even less considered in the literature, with little exploration specifically beyond traditional man/woman representation. This practice is compounded by a lack of what sex and gender encompass, including their erroneous use as synonyms. Sex- and gender-based differences, which are not clearly defined and recognized in scientific literature, are disregarded in health care delivery and, specifically relevant to the focus of this commentary, the development of cancer care programs. Conversely, accounting for sex- and gender in anti-cancer treatments and pathways can help create effective and personalized programming which could lead to an increased likelihood of adoption and adherence to treatment protocols. Although sex- and gender-specific programming may not be necessary in all situations, awareness of the concepts and possible impact on cancer care programs is paramount as more inclusive and personalized methodologies take shape. The goals of this commentary are to (a) clarify the terms sex and gender and (b) raise awareness of their applications and considerations for cancer care program design.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Humans , Neoplasms/therapy , Male , Female , Sex Factors , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration
9.
Rev Prat ; 74(5): 477-479, 2024 May.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38833221

ABSTRACT

HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATION FOR 2024 OLYMPICS AND PARALYMPICS GAMES. The 2024 olympic and paralympic Games (JOP 2024) constitute the largest global festive event. While this major international gathering is primarily synonymous with celebrations, health security represents a major challenge for the French healthcare system in a highly tense national and international context. The health security of the JOP 2024 relies on close collaboration between the medical service of the organizer Paris 2024, responsible for care at the Olympic sites, and state services (SAMU, Law Enforcement, Firefighters) providing support in the event of serious health incidents or exceptional health situations (SSE). The projected impact on our healthcare structures (excluding SSE) appears moderate, as a 5% increase in hospital activity and approximately 150 additional daily emergencies are expected during the Olympic period compared to a normal summer season. In the event of a major incident resulting in a large number of casualties, state services will take over the governance of relief efforts by activating the ORSEC-NOVI and ORSAN-AMAVI plans for health response. The preparation of this health coverage involves an unprecedented mobilization of all healthcare stakeholders and is manifested by the organization of exercises at a very brisk pace.


ORGANISATION DU SYSTÈME DE SOINS POUR LES JEUX OLYMPIQUES ET PARALYMPIQUES 2024. Les Jeux olympiques et paralympiques 2024 (JOP 2024) constituent le plus important événement festif mondial. Si ce grand rassemblement international se veut avant tout synonyme de fête, la sécurité sanitaire représente un enjeu majeur pour le système de soins français, dans un contexte national et international en tension majeure. La sécurité sanitaire des JOP 2024 relève d'une étroite collaboration entre le service médical de l'organisateur Paris 2024, responsable des soins sur les sites olympiques, et les services de l'État (Samu, forces de l'ordre, sapeurs-pompiers) venant en soutien en cas d'événements sanitaires graves ou en cas de situation sanitaire exceptionnelle. La prévision de l'impact sur les structures sanitaires (en dehors de situation sanitaire exceptionnelle) semble modérée, puisque l'on attend une augmentation de 5 % de l'activité hospitalière et environ 150 urgences journalières de plus pendant la période olympique par rapport à une saison estivale normale. En cas d'événement majeur générant un grand nombre de victimes, les services de l'État prendront la gouvernance des secours par le déclenchement des plans ORSECNOVI et ORSAN-AMAVI pour la valence sanitaire. La préparation de cette couverture sanitaire fait appel à une mobilisation sans précédent de tous les acteurs de santé et se concrétise par l'organisation d'exercices à un r ythme très soutenu.


Subject(s)
Anniversaries and Special Events , Sports , Humans , France , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration
10.
Rev Prat ; 74(5): 542-548, 2024 May.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38833240

ABSTRACT

THE ETHICS OF IA IN MEDICINE MUST BE BASED ON THE PRACTICAL ETHICS OF THE HEALTHCARE RELATIONSHIP. Artificial intelligence (AI) offers more and more applications on the Internet, smartphones, computers, telemedicine. AI is growing rapidly in health. Transdisciplinary, AI must respect software engineering (reliability, robustness, security), knowledge obsolescence, law, ethics because a wide variety of algorithms, more or less opaque, process personal data help clinical decision. Hospital or city doctors and caregivers question the benefits/risks/costs of AI for the patient, the care relationship, deontology and medical ethics. Drawing on 30 years of experience in AI and medical ethics, the author proposes a first indicator of the ethical risks of AI (axis 1) evaluated by the surface of a radar diagram defined on the other 6 axes: Semantics, Opacity and acceptability, Complexity and autonomy, Target population, Actors (roles and motivations). Highly autonomous strong AI carries the most ethic risks.


L'ÉTHIQUE DE L'IA EN MÉDECINE DOIT REPOSER SUR L'ÉTHIQUE PRATIQUE DE LA RELATION DE SOIN. L'intelligence artificielle (IA) offre de plus en plus d'applications de santé sur smartphones, ordinateurs, télémédecine, internet des objets. Transdisciplinaire, l'IA doit respecter l'ingénierie logicielle (fiabilité, robustesse, sécurité), l'obsolescence des connaissances, le droit, l'éthique, car une grande variété d'algorithmes, plus ou moins opaques, traitent des données personnelles dans l'aide à la décision clinique. Médecins et soignants hospitaliers ou libéraux s'interrogent sur les bénéfices, risques, coûts de l'IA pour le patient, la relation de soin, la déontologie et l'éthique médicale. S'appuyant sur trente ans d'expérience en IA et en éthique médicale, cet article propose un premier indicateur des risques éthiques de l'IA (premier axe) défini par la surface du diagramme radar des autres axes (sémantique ; opacité et acceptabilité ; complexité et autonomie ; population cible ; acteurs [rôles et motivations]). L'IA forte autonome est celle qui comporte le plus de risques éthiques.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Ethics, Medical , Artificial Intelligence/ethics , Humans , Delivery of Health Care/ethics
11.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 24(1): 701, 2024 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38831298

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Artificial intelligence (AI) technologies are expected to "revolutionise" healthcare. However, despite their promises, their integration within healthcare organisations and systems remains limited. The objective of this study is to explore and understand the systemic challenges and implications of their integration in a leading Canadian academic hospital. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 29 stakeholders concerned by the integration of a large set of AI technologies within the organisation (e.g., managers, clinicians, researchers, patients, technology providers). Data were collected and analysed using the Non-Adoption, Abandonment, Scale-up, Spread, Sustainability (NASSS) framework. RESULTS: Among enabling factors and conditions, our findings highlight: a supportive organisational culture and leadership leading to a coherent organisational innovation narrative; mutual trust and transparent communication between senior management and frontline teams; the presence of champions, translators, and boundary spanners for AI able to build bridges and trust; and the capacity to attract technical and clinical talents and expertise. Constraints and barriers include: contrasting definitions of the value of AI technologies and ways to measure such value; lack of real-life and context-based evidence; varying patients' digital and health literacy capacities; misalignments between organisational dynamics, clinical and administrative processes, infrastructures, and AI technologies; lack of funding mechanisms covering the implementation, adaptation, and expertise required; challenges arising from practice change, new expertise development, and professional identities; lack of official professional, reimbursement, and insurance guidelines; lack of pre- and post-market approval legal and governance frameworks; diversity of the business and financing models for AI technologies; and misalignments between investors' priorities and the needs and expectations of healthcare organisations and systems. CONCLUSION: Thanks to the multidimensional NASSS framework, this study provides original insights and a detailed learning base for analysing AI technologies in healthcare from a thorough socio-technical perspective. Our findings highlight the importance of considering the complexity characterising healthcare organisations and systems in current efforts to introduce AI technologies within clinical routines. This study adds to the existing literature and can inform decision-making towards a judicious, responsible, and sustainable integration of these technologies in healthcare organisations and systems.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Qualitative Research , Humans , Canada , Interviews as Topic , Organizational Culture , Organizational Innovation , Leadership , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration
12.
Int Wound J ; 21(6): e14928, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38832363

ABSTRACT

To assess all published studies which describe what happens to the delivery of pressure ulcer/injury (PI/PU) care pathways as a result of detecting raised sub-epidermal moisture (SEM) delta (∆ ≥ 0.6). We undertook a systematic review of the literature, and included original research studies using either a prospective or retrospective study design that report the impact that assessment using SEM assessments have on healthcare practitioners' delivery of PI/PU care pathways in adults at risk of developing PI/PUs. The review protocol was registered on PROSPERO (CRD42023416975). A literature search was conducted in May 2023, using PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, Cochrane, EMBASE, Web of Science and Science Direct databases. Data were extracted using a data extraction tool including elements such as country, setting, sample size, intervention, control and quality appraisal was undertaken using the Evidence-based Librarianship. We identified nine papers published between 2017 and 2022. The majority of these studies were conducted in England (n = 6; 67%). The systematic review included studies conducted across multiple care settings including acute care, medical-surgical units, and palliative care, highlighting the importance of PI/PU prevention and management across diverse patient populations. The PI/PU care pathways implemented in the studies varied, but commonly included elements such as the application or increased use of pressure-redistributing mattresses/cushions, implementation of repositioning plans, management of incontinence and moisture, regular skin inspection, and assessment of patient mobility. Out of the nine studies identified, seven reported PI/PU incidence. A meta-analysis of seven studies (N = 18 451) demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in visual PI/PU development in favour of SEM-guided care pathways compared to usual care (the odds ratio = 0.36 [95% confidence interval: 0.24-0.53, p < 0.00001]). This systematic review provides evidence that implementing SEM assessments in patients at risk of developing PI/PUs prompts anatomy-specific clinical actions. The subsequent implementation of enhanced and targeted skin care interventions leads to consistent and sustained reductions in hospital-acquired PU incidence. The findings emphasise the importance of incorporating SEM assessments as part of comprehensive PI/PU prevention strategies in all care settings and patient populations. This systematic review is limited by the predominance of observational studies and variable study quality. Future research should focus on randomised trials in different care settings that monitor the efficacy of preventive interventions and their impact in reducing PI/PU incidence when implemented based on SEM assessments.


Subject(s)
Pressure Ulcer , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control , Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Aged , Adult , Aged, 80 and over , Critical Pathways , Delivery of Health Care
13.
Sci Eng Ethics ; 30(3): 24, 2024 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38833207

ABSTRACT

While the technologies that enable Artificial Intelligence (AI) continue to advance rapidly, there are increasing promises regarding AI's beneficial outputs and concerns about the challenges of human-computer interaction in healthcare. To address these concerns, institutions have increasingly resorted to publishing AI guidelines for healthcare, aiming to align AI with ethical practices. However, guidelines as a form of written language can be analyzed to recognize the reciprocal links between its textual communication and underlying societal ideas. From this perspective, we conducted a discourse analysis to understand how these guidelines construct, articulate, and frame ethics for AI in healthcare. We included eight guidelines and identified three prevalent and interwoven discourses: (1) AI is unavoidable and desirable; (2) AI needs to be guided with (some forms of) principles (3) trust in AI is instrumental and primary. These discourses signal an over-spillage of technical ideals to AI ethics, such as over-optimism and resulting hyper-criticism. This research provides insights into the underlying ideas present in AI guidelines and how guidelines influence the practice and alignment of AI with ethical, legal, and societal values expected to shape AI in healthcare.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Delivery of Health Care , Guidelines as Topic , Trust , Artificial Intelligence/ethics , Humans , Delivery of Health Care/ethics , Morals
14.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0303907, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38833462

ABSTRACT

The number of refugees globally grew to 35.3 million in 2022, and many refugees are exposed to various health risks along their migration journey. As a result, they may arrive in host communities with numerous health issues, including communicable diseases and chronic and mental health conditions. Navigating the healthcare system in a host country proves to be a significant challenge for them, leading to delayed care. This qualitative study explored the convolute healthcare needs of refugees in the United States by soliciting insights from stakeholders involved in refugee resettlement and healthcare. In-depth interviews were conducted with fifteen stakeholders who work closely with refugees, including healthcare providers, cultural/clinical health navigators supporting refugees, staff from refugee resettlement agencies and governmental entities, and researchers studying refugee health. Following informed consent, interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and imported into MAXQDA 2022 (VERBI Software) for thematic analysis. The results revealed key themes, including the heterogeneity of refugee populations, limited awareness of preventive healthcare, high prevalence and suboptimal management of chronic conditions, complexity of the healthcare system, lack of follow-up, and language barriers. Further research is warranted concerning the long-term health of refugee populations in the United States. Additionally, more tailored programs involving peer educators are recommended to support refugee communities in navigating the complex healthcare system in the host country.


Subject(s)
Qualitative Research , Refugees , Refugees/psychology , Humans , United States , Female , Male , Health Services Needs and Demand , Health Services Accessibility , Delivery of Health Care , Adult , Stakeholder Participation , Health Personnel/psychology , Chronic Disease/epidemiology
15.
J Health Organ Manag ; 38(9): 216-240, 2024 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38847796

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study examines innovation configurations (i.e. sets of product/service, social and business model innovations) and configuration linkages (i.e. factors that help to combine innovations) across six organizations as contingent upon organizational structure. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Using semi-structured interviews and available public information, qualitative data were collected and examined using content analysis to characterize innovation configurations and linkages in three local/private organizations and three foreign-led/public-private partnerships in Repiblik Ayiti (Haiti). FINDINGS: Organizations tend to combine product/service, social, and business model innovations simultaneously in locally founded private organizations and sequentially in foreign-based public-private partnerships. Linkages for simultaneous combination include limited external support, determined autonomy and shifting from a "beneficiary mindset," and financial need identification. Sequential combination linkages include social need identification, community connections and flexibility. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: The generalizability of our findings for this qualitative study is subject to additional quantitative studies to empirically test the suggested factors and to examine other health care organizations and countries. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Locally led private organizations in low- and middle-income settings may benefit from considering how their innovations are in service to one another as they may have limited resources. Foreign based public-private partnerships may benefit from pacing their efforts alongside a broader set of stakeholders and ecosystem partners. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: This study is the first, to our knowledge, to examine how organizations combine sets of innovations, i.e. innovation configurations, in a healthcare setting and the first of any setting to examine innovation configuration linkages.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Interviews as Topic , Public-Private Sector Partnerships , Qualitative Research , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , Organizational Innovation , Humans
16.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0304859, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38829875

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: One of the aims of value-based healthcare (VBHC) is to deliver more patient-centred care. However, little is known about the effect of VBHC interventions on patient experiences. We aim to explore how patients experience VBHC as implemented in an HIV outpatient clinic in an academic hospital in the Netherlands. METHODS: The HIV outpatient clinic of the Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands, an academic tertiary hospital, implemented a VBHC intervention consisting of 1) implementation of a generic quality of life questionnaire, administered before each visit, 2) a change in consultation schedule; from twice a year face-to-face to one face-to-face double consultation and one remote consultation per year, and 3) a change in consultation structure; from a single face-to-face consultation with the infectious diseases (ID) specialist to a double consultation in which the patient visits both the nurse and the ID specialist. Semi-structured interviews were held with Dutch or English-speaking adult patients, that had been a patient within Erasmus MC for more than 5 years, on their experiences with the implemented changes. RESULTS: Thirty patients were interviewed. Patients had no objections towards completing the questionnaires especially if it could provide the professionals with additional information. Patients were primarily positive about the change in consultation schedule. For the yearly remote consultation they preferred a telephone-consultation above a video-consultation. The change in consultation structure ensured that more topics, including psychosocial and medical aspects could be discussed. Some patients did not see the added value of talking to two professionals on the same day or completing the quality of life questionnaire before their consultation. CONCLUSION: Patients are generally positive towards the VBHC interventions implemented at the HIV outpatient clinic. Our findings may inform further optimization of VBHC interventions and improve patient-centred care in outpatient HIV clinics.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care Facilities , HIV Infections , Patient-Centered Care , Quality of Life , Humans , HIV Infections/therapy , HIV Infections/psychology , Male , Female , Netherlands , Adult , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Patient Satisfaction , Delivery of Health Care , Value-Based Health Care
17.
BMJ Open Qual ; 13(2)2024 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38830729

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The demand for healthcare services during the COVID-19 pandemic was excessive for less-resourced settings, with intensive care units (ICUs) taking the heaviest toll. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to achieve adequate personal protective equipment (PPE) use in 90% of patient encounters, to reach 90% compliance with objectives of patient flow (OPF) and to provide emotional support tools to 90% of healthcare workers (HCWs). METHODS: We conducted a quasi-experimental study with an interrupted time-series design in 14 ICUs in Argentina. We randomly selected adult critically ill patients admitted from July 2020 to July 2021 and active HCWs in the same period. We implemented a quality improvement collaborative (QIC) with a baseline phase (BP) and an intervention phase (IP). The QIC included learning sessions, periods of action and improvement cycles (plan-do-study-act) virtually coached by experts via platform web-based activities. The main study outcomes encompassed the following elements: proper utilisation of PPE, compliance with nine specific OPF using daily goal sheets through direct observations and utilisation of a web-based tool for tracking emotional well-being among HCWs. RESULTS: We collected 7341 observations of PPE use (977 in BP and 6364 in IP) with an improvement in adequate use from 58.4% to 71.9% (RR 1.2, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.29, p<0.001). We observed 7428 patient encounters to evaluate compliance with 9 OPF (879 in BP and 6549 in IP) with an improvement in compliance from 53.9% to 67% (RR 1.24, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.32, p<0.001). The results showed that HCWs did not use the support tool for self-mental health evaluation as much as expected. CONCLUSION: A QIC was effective in improving healthcare processes and adequate PPE use, even in the context of a pandemic, indicating the possibility of expanding QIC networks nationwide to improve overall healthcare delivery. The limited reception of emotional support tools requires further analyses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Argentina , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Female , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Adult , Public Health/methods , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/psychology , Interrupted Time Series Analysis/methods
20.
BMJ Open ; 14(6): e081152, 2024 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38844391

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to identify the types of transparency interventions in the health systems of the low-income and middle-income countries and the outcomes of such interventions in those systems. METHOD: We searched major medical databases including PubMed, Embase and Scopus, for any kind of interventional study on transparency in health systems. We also looked for additional sources of information in organisational websites, grey literature and reference checking. Using the PRISMA algorithm for identifying related studies, we included 24 articles. RESULTS: Our initial search, from 1980 to August 2021, retrieved 407 articles, 24 of which were narratively analysed. Response to a problem (mostly corruption) was the main reason for the initiation of a transparency intervention. Transparency interventions differed in terms of types, performance methods, collaboration partners and outcomes. They help improve the health system mostly in the short term and in some cases, long term. CONCLUSION: Although our findings revealed that transparency initiatives could reduce some problems such as counterfeit drugs and corruption, and improve health indicators in a short term, still their sustainability remains a concern. Health systems need robust interventions with clearly defined and measured outcomes, especially sustainable outcomes to tackle corruption fundamentally.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Developing Countries , Humans , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Quality Improvement
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...