Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 64.470
Filter
2.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0269562, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35930549

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed severe challenges on medical education at German university hospitals. In this first German nationwide expert survey, we addressed the responsible university teaching coordinators in obstetrics and gynecology departments and investigated their experiences during the pandemic as well as their opinions on future developments, especially with regard to the broader implementation of e-learning in the standard curriculum. METHODS: The questionnaire included 42 items and was disseminated among teaching coordinators at all 41 departments of obstetrics and gynecology at German university hospitals via an email that included a weblink to the online survey provider. Responses were collected between 19 April and 7 June 2021. RESULTS: In total, 30 responses were collected from 41 departments across Germany and their respective teaching coordinators in obstetrics and gynecology. The general opinion of the medical teaching provided during the pandemic was positive, whereas the teaching quality in practical skills was considered inferior and not equivalent to the standard face-to-face curriculum. Lectures and seminars had to be substituted by remote-learning alternatives, while clinical clerkships were reduced in length and provided less patient contact. Students in their final year experienced only a few differences in the clinical and teaching routine. Teaching coordinators in obstetrics and gynecology stated that they intend to incorporate more e-learning into the curriculum in the future. CONCLUSION: The medical educators' views presented here may help to complement the already-thoroughly investigated experiences of students under the restrictions of the COVID-19 pandemic. Medical educators in obstetrics and gynecology at German university hospitals have successfully established online and hybrid teaching alternatives to their standard face-to-face courses. Building on recent experiences, digitalization could help to improve future medical education.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Education, Medical , Gynecology , Obstetrics , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Gynecology/education , Hospitals, University , Humans , Obstetrics/education , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teaching
3.
J Natl Med Assoc ; 114(4): 363-368, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35931427

ABSTRACT

There has been increased focus on health disparities and how to address them (Baciu et al., 2017; National Institutes of Health, 2021; Williams et al., 2021). Greater integration of social determinants of health (SDoH) education into undergraduate medical education has been identified as one possible intervention (Mangold et al., 2019; Doobay-Persaud et al., 2019; Lewis et al., 2020). The Liaison Committee on Medical Education places this education among its accreditation requirements (Mangold et al., 2019); however, no consensus exists on the most effective programming for training culturally competent physicians. This paper describes the development, implementation, and reception of one such program; a combined two-week Diversity Retreat and Washington University Medical Plunge at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. This program exposed students to the historical, social, and cultural context of health disparities in the city and challenged them to recognize their own biases. Survey data showed that the program was well received and increased learners' subjective understandings of SDoH, the background of St. Louis, and patient-centered care. Learners also identified separation of SDoH material from other aspects of the curriculum and limited reinforcement of SDoH as areas for improvement. In 2020, the program was expanded and integrated into the broader curriculum. Here, we present WUMP, an example of one approach to SDoH training for medical students that was grounded in the local political and social context of St. Louis and prepared students to learn, train, and practice within that context.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , Cultural Competency/education , Cultural Diversity , Curriculum , Humans
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 607, 2022 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35932046

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Clinical examinations (assessments) are integral to ensuring that medical students can treat patients safely and effectively. The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted traditional formats of clinical examinations. This prompted Medical Schools to adapt their approaches to conducting these examinations to make them suitable for delivery in the pandemic. This systematic review aims to identify the approaches that Medical Schools, internationally, adopted in adapting their clinical examinations of medical students in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Three databases and four key medical education journals were systematically searched up to 22 October 2021; a grey literature search was also undertaken. Two reviewers independently screened at title, abstract stage and full text stage against predefined eligibility criteria. Discrepancies were resolved by discussion and involvement of senior authors. Risk of bias assessment was performed using an adapted version of a pre-existing risk of bias assessment tool for medical education developments. Results were summarised in a narrative synthesis. RESULTS: A total of 36 studies were included, which documented the approaches of 48 Medical Schools in 17 countries. Approaches were categorised into in-person clinical examinations (22 studies) or online clinical examinations (14 studies). Authors of studies reporting in-person clinical examinations described deploying enhanced infection control measures along with modified patient participation. Authors of studies reporting online clinical examinations described using online software to create online examination circuits. All authors reported that adapted examinations were feasible, scores were comparable to previous years' student cohorts, and participant feedback was positive. Risk of bias assessment highlighted heterogeneity in reporting of the clinical examinations. CONCLUSIONS: This review identified two broad approaches to adapting clinical examinations in the pandemic: in-person and online. Authors reported it was feasible to conduct clinical examinations in the pandemic where medical educators are given sufficient time and resources to carefully plan and introduce suitable adaptations. However, the risk of bias assessment identified few studies with high reporting quality, which highlights the need for a common framework for reporting of medical education developments to enhance reproducibility across wider contexts. Our review provides medical educators with the opportunity to reflect on past practises and facilitate the design and planning of future examinations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results
5.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 608, 2022 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35933354

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Basic medical laboratory courses (BMLCs) play an essential role in medical education and offer several benefits to students. Although various student-centered and active learning strategies have been increasingly incorporated into medical education, their applications in BMLCs are limited. This paper aimed to explore the educational effects of a flipped classroom (FC) combined with team-based learning (TBL) strategy in BMLCs at Zhejiang University School of Medicine. METHODS: Four hundred eight 3rd-Year medical students were assigned to either the FC-TBL group (n = 235) or the FC group (n = 173) to complete three experiments on the respiration block of BMLCs. The two groups' immediate and long-term academic performance were compared, and the FC-TBL students' perceptions of different instructional strategies were surveyed. RESULTS: Students in the FC-TBL group scored higher on the immediate post-tests after class and higher on the final exams in two of the three experiment sessions. They preferred FC-TBL to FC for its higher engagement, more feedback, and better learning environment. Students felt the FC with TBL blended instructional strategy stimulated their interest in learning and deep thinking. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the FC group, students in the FC-TBL group improved academic performance and had a more positive experience overall. Our findings support the feasibility and advantage of the flipped classroom with team-based learning as a blended learning strategy in the BMLC curriculum.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Educational Measurement , Humans , Problem-Based Learning
6.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0272496, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35925925

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Impostor syndrome is characterized by fraudulent self-doubt and correlates with burnout, and adverse mental health. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to investigate correlates of Impostor syndrome in a medical education cohort and determine if an interactive workshop can improve knowledge and perception of Impostor syndrome. METHODS: From June 2019 to February 2021 interactive educational workshops were conducted for medical education cohorts. Participants completed baseline knowledge and Impostor syndrome self-identification surveys, participated in interactive presentations and discussions, followed by post-intervention surveys. RESULTS: There were 198 participants including 19% residents, 10% medical students, 30% faculty and 41% Graduate Medical Education (GME) administrators. Overall, 57% were positive for Impostor syndrome. Participants classified as the following Impostor syndrome competence subtypes: Expert = 42%; Soloist = 34%; Super-person = 31%; Perfectionist = 25%; and Natural Genius = 21%. Self-identified contributors of IS included: parent expectations = 72%, female gender = 58%, and academic rat race = 37%. GME administrators compared to physicians/medical students had significantly higher number of self-identified contributors to Impostor syndrome. Knowledge survey scores increased from 4.94 (SD = 2.8) to 5.78 (2.48) post intervention (p = 0.045). Participants with Impostor syndrome competence subtypes had increased perceptions of Impostor syndrome as a cause of stress, failure to reach full potential, and negative relationships/teamwork (p = 0.032 -<0.001). CONCLUSION: Impostor syndrome was common in this medical education cohort, and those with Impostor syndrome significantly attributed negative personal and professional outcomes to Impostor syndrome. An interactive workshop on Impostor syndrome can be used to increase perceptions and knowledge regarding Impostor syndrome. The materials can be adapted for relevance to various audiences.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Education, Medical , Students, Medical , Anxiety Disorders , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Education, Medical, Graduate , Female , Humans , Male , Self Concept , Students, Medical/psychology
7.
Pediatr Ann ; 51(8): e319-e323, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35938900

ABSTRACT

The abrupt onset of the pandemic in early 2020 presented a clear challenge to medical and resident education across the nation. Numerous changes were made to allow educational efforts to continue, including the use of virtual formats. The benefits and challenges to virtual learning, as well as the difficulty in transitioning certain skills, such as thorough physical examination and procedural skills, are discussed. Future opportunities exist for hybrid virtual learning and conferences and the development of formal telehealth curricula. The effect of these changes on professional identity formation must be intentionally addressed and role model and mentor relationships fostered both virtually and in person. Given the availability of both vaccines and personal protective equipment, appropriately protected students and trainees should be afforded every opportunity to pursue hands-on medical learning in preparation for their future careers. [Pediatr Ann. 2022;51(8):e319-e323.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Telemedicine , COVID-19/prevention & control , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control
8.
Cir Esp (Engl Ed) ; 100(9): 573-579, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35940699

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Despite its toxic and carcinogenic nature, formaldehyde is a widely used reactant for specimen preservation. With the need of specimens for both anatomical and surgical training, alternative preservation solutions (PS) have been proposed, however, their use is limited due to high costs and complexity. Hence, a new formaldehyde-free solution (FFS) is evaluated as a potential alternative for anatomical and surgical training. METHODS: Qualitative and Quantitative data were acquired. Specimens preserved using three different methods were selected. Flexibility was measured by joints goniometry and pneumoperitoneum pressures were evaluated followed by an exploratory laparoscopy. Undergraduate student's perceptions on cadavers preserved with different PS were obtained using surveys and focus groups. RESULTS: The main reason why cadaveric specimens were considered as useful tools was the perceived interaction with real tissues and the 'practical' concept of getting in touch with what students would be facing in the future as physicians, what we call "hands on" activities. FFS treated specimens showed better joint-movement ranges in comparison to other methods and pneumoperitoneum was acquired after 5mmHg CO2 pressure. Students appreciated working with corpses regardless the technique used, however FFS specimens were defined as less uncomfortable, while presenting no sensory discomfort. CONCLUSIONS: Even though alternative PS are effective, high costs and complexity restrict their usage. Cadavers preserved with FFS had similar range of movements compared with Thiel. Students preferred to work with FFS rather than FF due to flexibility, color, and no sensorial hassles. Thus, we propose FFS as viable alternative to traditional PS.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Pneumoperitoneum , Cadaver , Education, Medical/methods , Formaldehyde , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Biomed Res Int ; 2022: 8999025, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35937387

ABSTRACT

This mixed method study explores medical students' perceptions and attitudes regarding the language(s) of medical instruction in two Palestinian universities. The researcher aimed to identify the way medical students look at the language of medical education as well as the merits and drawbacks of the language(s) used in medical instruction. A 25-item descriptive, online questionnaire was built to explore the way university students evaluate and perceive the medium of medical instruction at the Faculty of Medicine. To complement and inform the quantitative findings, fifty-five students from each university were randomly selected, and their responses to an open question about the merits and drawbacks of the language(s) were analyzed using MAXQDA. Of the too many medical students enrolled in the two universities, 604 completed and returned the survey, and 55 students were selected to interpret their open responses qualitatively. The study findings suggest that the students are divided into two camps concerning what the language of medical instruction should be; some prefer Arabic, their mother tongue, while the others showed no reservations about using the medical academic vocabulary in English. Some statistically significant differences were found when some demographic variables, i.e., gender, specific major, and year of study, interact. Finally, study respondents highlighted several issues which the researcher sorted into advantages and disadvantages for each language. There is a considerable discrepancy in the choice of the language of medical instruction at the Faculty of Medicine. Each language has its pros and cons; consequently, a mixture of a mother and a foreign language (e.g., English) could be a suitable compromise in a country like Palestine.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Students, Medical , Arabs , Education, Medical/methods , Humans , Language , Universities
11.
Bull Hist Med ; 96(2): 151-181, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35912617

ABSTRACT

By the mid-1950s, formal body donation programs began to supplant the decades-long reliance on the anatomy acts that made the bodies of the indigent and unclaimed available for medical education and research. By the mid-1980s, nearly all American medical schools relied on voluntary anatomical gifts of dead bodies. Throughout the nineteenth century, a handful of Americans requested through wills, letters, and suicide notes that their corpses be given to doctors and medical schools. The dramatic expansion of American newspapers after the Civil War helped establish bequeathing one's body as an available, albeit eccentric, afterlife. A significant shift in American deathways in the twentieth century, the rise of blood donation and organ transplantation, and a serious decline in the number of unclaimed bodies spurred anatomists finally to accept, and then to promote, this new corporeal philanthropy.


Subject(s)
Anatomy , Education, Medical , Anatomy/education , Anatomy/history , Cadaver , Humans , Schools, Medical
12.
Am J Med Genet A ; 188(8): 2273, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35822526
13.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 295: 16-19, 2022 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35773794

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: OpenWHO provides open-access, online, free and real-time learning responses to health emergencies, which includes capacitating healthcare providers, first liners, medical students and even the general public. During the pandemic and to date, an additional 40 courses for COVID-19 response have led to a massive increase in the number of learners and a change in user's trends. This paper presents initial findings on enrollment trends, use and completion rates of health emergency courses offered on OpenWHO. METHODS: The enrolment data statistics were drawn from OpenWHO's built-in reporting system, which tracks learners' enrolments, completion rates, demographics and other key course-related data, This information was collected from the beginning of the OpenWHO launch in 2017 up until October 2021. RESULTS: Average course completion rate on OpenWHO including all courses and languages was equal to 45.9%. Nearly half (46.4%) of all OpenWHO learners have enrolled in at least 2 courses and 71 000 superusers have completed at least 10 courses on the platform. CONCLUSION: WHO's learning platform during the pandemic registered record high completion rates and repeat learners enrollment. This highlights the massive impact of the OpenWHO online learning platform for health emergencies and the tangible knowledge transfer and access to health literacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical/methods , Health Personnel/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical/trends , Emergencies , Health Literacy/trends , Humans , Knowledge , Pandemics , Students, Medical , Transfer, Psychology , World Health Organization
14.
J Prof Nurs ; 41: 75-80, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35803662

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nursing students must be prepared to care for diverse patient populations, including sexual and gender minorities. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to conduct a national survey of graduating prelicensure nursing students to assess their perceived preparedness for and comfort level with providing care for LGBTQ+ patients. METHODS: A multisite descriptive correlational design was utilized in conjunction with a modified version of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, & Transgender Medical Education Assessment tool to survey graduating prelicensure nursing students' perceived levels of preparedness and comfort regarding their provision of care to LGBTQ+ individuals. RESULTS: Students indicated that LGBTQ+ health topics had been covered in their programs, but some required further attention. The majority reported feeling prepared and sufficiently comfortable to provide care for LGBTQ+ patients but did not attribute this to their academic nursing education. Select demographic variables were significantly correlated to student levels of preparedness and comfort. CONCLUSION: Nursing education programs must continue to evaluate curricular LGBTQ+ health content to ensure that graduates are equipped with the knowledge and confidence necessary to serve this unique patient population.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Students, Nursing , Female , Humans , Sexual Behavior , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2101180, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35850579

ABSTRACT

The ward round has traditionally been a learning activity in medical education. Apart from education, ward rounds have multiple roles including patient care and communication. Some studies have described the ward round as an ideal place to learn patient management while others reported that little learning happens on rounds due to lack of time and patient volume. This study aimed to develop a deeper understanding of ward round learning from the perspective of postgraduate trainees. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used and data was collected during focus group discussions. Data were analyzed by initial coding, then grouped into focused codes and development of a theoretical framework by the process of constant comparison. Six categories evolved which contributed to the framework. Postgraduate trainees perceive the ward round as an important space where they use different learning activities to acquire knowledge, attitude and skills required of a specialist doctor. They progress from novices to experts under supervision of faculty who lead ward rounds. The round can achieve its full learning potential if planned and organized well but can become a missed opportunity if the learning environment is unfriendly. Patient- and learner-related barriers exist that hinder ward round learning. The framework explains how ward round learning occurs in postgraduate medical education from a trainee perspective. The findings can guide interventions to improve the learning experience. Studies comparing perspectives of teachers to those of learners are needed to further understand the complex learning milieu of the ward round.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Teaching Rounds , Focus Groups , Grounded Theory , Humans
16.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0271872, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35862401

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Artificial intelligence (AI) has affected our day-to-day in a great extent. Healthcare industry is one of the mainstream fields among those and produced a noticeable change in treatment and education. Medical students must comprehend well why AI technologies mediate and frame their decisions on medical issues. Formalizing of instruction on AI concepts can facilitate learners to grasp AI outcomes in association with their sensory perceptions and thinking in the dynamic and ambiguous reality of daily medical practice. The purpose of this study is to provide consensus on the competencies required by medical graduates to be ready for artificial intelligence technologies and possible applications in medicine and reporting the results. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A three-round e-Delphi survey was conducted between February 2020 and November 2020. The Delphi panel accorporated experts from different backgrounds; (i) healthcare professionals/ academicians; (ii) computer and data science professionals/ academics; (iii) law and ethics professionals/ academics; and (iv) medical students. Round 1 in the Delphi survey began with exploratory open-ended questions. Responses received in the first round evaluated and refined to a 27-item questionnaire which then sent to the experts to be rated using a 7-point Likert type scale (1: Strongly Disagree-7: Strongly Agree). Similar to the second round, the participants repeated their assessments in the third round by using the second-round analysis. The agreement level and strength of the consensus was decided based on third phase results. Median scores was used to calculate the agreement level and the interquartile range (IQR) was used for determining the strength of the consensus. RESULTS: Among 128 invitees, a total of 94 agreed to become members of the expert panel. Of them 75 (79.8%) completed the Round 1 questionnaire, 69/75 (92.0%) completed the Round 2 and 60/69 (87.0%) responded to the Round 3. There was a strong agreement on the 23 items and weak agreement on the 4 items. CONCLUSIONS: This study has provided a consensus list of the competencies required by the medical graduates to be ready for AI implications that would bring new perspectives to medical education curricula. The unique feature of the current research is providing a guiding role in integrating AI into curriculum processes, syllabus content and training of medical students.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Education, Medical , Consensus , Curriculum , Delphi Technique , Humans
17.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0270862, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35797357

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Integrating training on health equity of sexual and gender minorities (SGM) in medical education has been challenging globally despite emphasis on the need for medical students to develop competence to provide adequate care for diverse patient groups. This study elicits Taiwanese medical students' perceptions of their values and preparedness to care for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender (LGBT) patients using a qualitative approach that considers broader societal changes, and more focused topics such as the provision of relevant training in medical education. METHODS: Eighty-nine medical students/trainees from two southern Taiwanese medical schools (one public and one private) participated in focus groups (n = 70) and individual interviews (n = 19). Qualitative analysis was conducted using inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Participants (i) expressed wide social acceptance and openness toward LGBT individuals, but were unsure of ways to communicate with LGBT patients; (ii) confirmed that stigmatization and biases might be developed during their training; (iii) recognized gender stereotypes could have negative impacts on clinical reasoning; (iv) considered themselves prepared to care for LGBT patients, yet equated non-discriminatory attitudes to preparedness; (v) acknowledged a lack of relevant professional skills; (vi) implicated curriculum did not address LGBT issues systematically and explicitly. CONCLUSION: This study has identified the insufficiencies of current medical training and inadequate preparedness of medical students/trainees to provide better care for LGBT patients. It provides insights for medical educators to design and implement effective medical curriculum and training, and faculty development programs to equip medical students/trainees with self-awareness and competencies to more readily provide holistic care for SGM, in keeping up with social progress, and promote health equity for a more diverse patient population.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Students, Medical , Transgender Persons , Curriculum , Female , Health Promotion , Humans , Taiwan
18.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 580, 2022 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35902846

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Instant messaging applications and texting are useful for educating and communicating with medical students; however, they present patient privacy concerns and do not address the challenge of student inclusion in patient care communication. EMR-integrated secure messaging offers an opportunity to include students on team communication, enhance their medical education, and ensure patient privacy. METHODS: Between July 2019 through March 2020, we performed a mixed method study to evaluate use of EPIC® Secure Chat as a means of enhancing student education and team communication. We promoted use of secure messaging in orientation, performed a pre- and post-rotation survey to assess perceptions of Secure Chat effect on communication, and directly reviewed and categorized messages. RESULTS: Twenty-four 3rd and 4th year students completed the pre-rotation survey, and 22 completed the post-rotation survey. Twelve (50%) students reported the quality of communication with faculty was either good or very good prior to internal medicine rotation, while 20 (91%) reported this post-rotation (p-value 0.001). There was a similar improvement in communication with ancillary staff. Nineteen (86%) students felt that secure messaging improved their communication with faculty. On message review, threads were frequently logistical, but also often included discussions of patient management. CONCLUSIONS: Students viewed Secure Chat as having a favorable effect on their communication with team members and reported communication on internal medicine to be improved compared to prior rotations. Messages included students on important patient care conversations. Secure messaging offers a novel medium to improve team communication, enhance student education, and maintain patient privacy.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical , Students, Medical , Text Messaging , Communication , Confidentiality , Humans
19.
Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 30(4): 226-229, 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35774022

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The COVID-19 pandemic catalyzed the rapid adoption of digital tools and virtual learning platforms by rhinoplasty educators and trainees alike. This review provides an overview of the variety of digital software and web-based tools rhinoplasty educators have adopted and highlights the advantages and potential drawbacks of virtual learning via e-content. RECENT FINDINGS: Medical education including subspecialty surgical training has recently undergone a dramatic digital transformation. Rhinoplasty surgeon-educators have been forced to embrace new digital tools, including videoconferencing, podcasts, virtual simulation and social media to reach and teach trainees. Recognizing the advantages of this new, limitless digital space, rhinoplasty surgeons are also engaging in virtual transcontinental collaboration and distance mentorship. SUMMARY: The dramatic evolution in how clinical educational materials are now digitally created, curated, disseminated and consumed is likely to far outlast the COVID-19 pandemic itself. Rapid, exponential growth of this digital library, however, places increased responsibility on educators to guide trainees towards evidence-based and state-of-the-art content.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Education, Medical , Rhinoplasty , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
20.
Med Teach ; 44(7): 699-701, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35882384
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...