Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 26.832
Filter
1.
Am J Case Rep ; 25: e942581, 2024 Apr 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38581119

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Endometriosis is a common cause of chronic pelvic pain among women globally. Pharmacological therapy for endometriosis includes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and hormonal contraceptives, while surgical therapy often involves either laparoscopic excision and ablation of endometriosis implants or open surgery. Surgical therapy is one of the mainstays of treatment especially for extrapelvic endometriomas. However, little guidance exists for the treatment of non-palpable or intermittently palpable lesions of this nature. CASE REPORT A 33-year-old woman with a previous cesarean section presented with complaints of intermittent discomfort in the area between her umbilicus and the surgical incision, for the previous 7 years, that worsened during her menstrual cycle. A 3×3-cm area of fullness was only intermittently palpable during various clinic visits, but was visualizable on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Given the lesion's varying palpability, a Savi Scout radar localization device was placed into the lesion pre-operatively to aid with surgical resection. The mass was excised, pathologic examination revealed endometrial tissue, and the patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course with resolution of her symptoms. CONCLUSIONS Surgical removal of extrapelvic endometrioma lesions can be made difficult by varying levels of palpability or localizability due to a patient's menstrual cycle. The Savi Scout, most commonly used in breast mass localization, is a useful tool in guiding surgical excision of non-palpable or intermittently palpable extrapelvic endometrioma lesions.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis , Laparoscopy , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Adult , Endometriosis/surgery , Endometriosis/complications , Cesarean Section , Breast/pathology , Laparoscopy/methods , Pelvic Pain/complications , Pelvic Pain/surgery
2.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 8382, 2024 04 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38600147

ABSTRACT

Endometriosis is a prevalent and chronic inflammatory gynecologic disorder affecting approximately 6-10% of women globally, and has been associated with an increased risk of cancer. Nevertheless, previous studies have been hindered by methodological limitations that compromise the validity and robustness of their findings. In this study we conducted a comprehensive two-sample Mendelian randomization analysis to explore the genetically driven causal relationship between endometriosis and the risk of cancer. We conducted the analysis via the inverse variance weighted method, MR Egger method, and weighted median method utilizing publicly available genome-wide association study summary statistics. Furthermore, we implemented additional sensitivity analyses to assess the robustness and validity of the causal associations identified. We found strong evidence of a significant causal effect of endometriosis on a higher risk of ovarian cancer via inverse-variance weighted method (OR = 1.19, 95% CI 1.11-1.29, p < 0.0001), MR-Egger regression, and weighted median methodologies. Remarkably, our findings revealed a significant association between endometriosis and an increased risk of clear cell ovarian cancer (OR = 2.04, 95% CI 1.66-2.51, p < 0.0001) and endometrioid ovarian cancer (OR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.27-1.65, p < 0.0001). No association between endometriosis and other types of cancer was observed. We uncovered a causal relationship between endometriosis and an elevated risk of ovarian cancer, particularly clear cell ovarian cancer and endometrioid ovarian cancer. No significant associations between endometriosis and other types of cancer could be identified.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Endometrioid , Endometriosis , Ovarian Neoplasms , Female , Humans , Endometriosis/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Ovarian Neoplasms/epidemiology , Ovarian Neoplasms/genetics , Carcinoma, Ovarian Epithelial
3.
Lipids Health Dis ; 23(1): 110, 2024 Apr 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38627726

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is evidence for an association between the gut microbiome and endometriosis. However, their causal relationship and the mediating role of lipid metabolism remain unclear. METHODS: Using genome-wide association study (GWAS) data, we conducted a bidirectional Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis to investigate the causal relationships between gut microbiome and endometriosis. The inverse variance weighted (IVW) method was used as the primary model, with other MR models used for comparison. Sensitivity analysis based on different statistical assumptions was used to evaluate whether the results were robust. A two-step MR analysis was further conducted to explore the mediating effects of lipids, by integrating univariable MR and the multivariate MR method based on the Bayesian model averaging method (MR-BMA). RESULTS: We identified four possible intestinal bacteria genera associated with the risk of endometriosis through the IVW method, including Eubacterium ruminantium group (odds ratio [OR] = 0.881, 95% CI: 0.795-0.976, P = 0.015), Anaerotruncus (OR = 1.252, 95% CI: 1.028-1.525, P = 0.025), Olsenella (OR = 1.110, 95% CI: 1.007-1.223, P = 0.036), and Oscillospira (OR = 1.215, 95% CI: 1.014-1.456, P = 0.035). The further two-step MR analysis identified that the effect of Olsenella on endometriosis was mediated by triglycerides (proportion mediated: 3.3%; 95% CI = 1.5-5.1%). CONCLUSION: This MR study found evidence for specific gut microbiomes associated with the risk of endometriosis, which might partially be mediated by triglycerides.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Female , Humans , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/genetics , Endometriosis/genetics , Bayes Theorem , Genome-Wide Association Study , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Lipids , Triglycerides
4.
Wiad Lek ; 77(2): 247-253, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38592985

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Aim: based on a retrospective analysis, the relationship between external genital endometriosis and comorbid breast pathology was established and risk factors were identified, their comparison and the formation of a prognostic risk criterion were determined. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Materials and Methods: to address the objectives of the study, a retrospective analysis of 470 cases of patients treated for external genital endometriosis after surgical treatment and comorbid breast pathology was conducted. The control group included 30 healthy non-pregnant women. Statistical processing was performed on a personal computer using the statistical software package Statistica 10. RESULTS: Results: As a result of the analysis, the age of the patients ranged from 23 to 40 years. The average age of patients in the study group was (32.2}1.18) years, and in the control group (31.1}1.35) (p>0.05). The groups were homogeneous in terms of age (p>0.05), marital status (p>0.05) and level of education (p>0.05). Close relatives in 208 (44.25}2.18) % (OR=8.86; 95 % CI: (0.68-10.53); p<0.002) cases suffered from benign (hormone-dependent) tumours and tumour-like diseases of the uterus and appendages in isolation or in various combinations (fibroids, adenomyosis, endometrial hyperplasia). It was also found that 102 (21.70}1.67) % of patients had endometriosis, which may indicate a genetic predisposition to this disease. In the closest relatives of EM patients: in 118 (25.10}2.01) % of the examined parents, breast problems were noted, in 66 (14.04}1.12) % - diabetes mellitus, and in 98 (20.85}1.22) % thyroid diseases were detected, which in total amounted to (60.00}2.23) % (OR=9.12; 95 % CI: (0.58-11.54); p<0.002). Early menarche almost tripled the risk of EM (OR=2.72; 95% CI: (1.02-5.11); p<0.002), and menstrual irregularities doubled it (OR=2.04; 95% CI: (1.09-3.14); p<0.05), higher education, urban residents - 2.2 times higher (OR= 2.27; 95 % CI: (1.11-3.63); p<0.05), diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and hepatobiliary complex - 5.2 times higher (OR=5.27; 95 % CI: (1.89-12.03); p<0.05), frequently recurrent inflammatory diseases of the appendages - 3 times higher (OR=3.14; 95 % CI: (0.91-5.14); p<0.05), dysmetabolic manifestations (thyroid dysfunction) - 5 times higher (OR=5.11; 95 % CI: (1.61-9.503); p<0.002). CONCLUSION: Conclusions: Thus, in endometriosis and dyshormonal diseases of the mammary glands, menstrual and generative function disorders, along with clinical symptoms of pelvic pain, dysmenorrhoea, autonomic nervous system disorders and sexual dysfunction, are significant components of this problem, initiating comorbidity processes in target organs in the setting of hormonal maladaptation. Therefore, these comorbidities become a trigger for the activation of systemic hormonal imbalance and become an urgent interdisciplinary problem that requires further study.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis , Mammary Glands, Human , Female , Humans , Infant , Young Adult , Adult , Endometriosis/epidemiology , Mammary Glands, Human/pathology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Comorbidity , Prognosis
5.
J Health Popul Nutr ; 43(1): 50, 2024 Apr 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38594768

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways with a gender differences in the prevalence after puberty. Recent studies have reported a relationship between asthma and endometriosis, possibly related to the immune response mechanisms, but the evidences are limited and inconsistent. Herein, this research aimed to investigate the association of endometriosis with asthma based on the representative population in the United States (U.S.) to provide some reference for further exploration on mechanism of gender difference in asthma. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, data of women aged ≥ 20 years old were extracted from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) database in 1999-2006. Weighted univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were utilized to explore the association of endometriosis with asthma. The multivariate models adjusted for covariates including age, race, education level, marital status, poverty income ratio (PIR), body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, smoking, estrogen and progesterone hormones use, uterine fibroids, at least one ovary removed, and birth control pills intake. The evaluation indexes were odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup analyses of age, race, BMI, and pregnancy history were also performed. RESULTS: Among 5,556 eligible women, 782 had asthma, and 380 had endometriosis. The average age of participants was 37.19 years old, and more than half of them were non-Hispanic White (68.44%). After adjusting for covariates, endometriosis was associated with higher odds of asthma compared with non-endometriosis [OR = 1.48, 95%CI: (1.10-1.99)]. This relationship was also found in 40-49 years old [OR = 2.26, 95%CI: (1.21-4.23)], BMI of 25-29.9 kg/m2 [OR = 2.87, 95%CI: (1.52-5.44)], and pregnancy history [OR = 1.44, 95%CI: (1.01-2.06)] subgroups. CONCLUSION: Endometriosis had a positive association with asthma in adult women. Females aged 40-49 years old, with BMI of 25-29.9 kg/m2 and had a history of pregnancy should take care about monitoring endometriosis to reduce the potential risk of asthma. Further studies are still needed to clarify the causal association between endometriosis and asthma.


Subject(s)
Asthma , Endometriosis , Adult , Pregnancy , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Female , Young Adult , Middle Aged , Nutrition Surveys , Endometriosis/complications , Endometriosis/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Body Mass Index , Asthma/complications , Asthma/epidemiology
6.
Radiology ; 311(1): e232191, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38591980

ABSTRACT

Endometriosis is a prevalent and potentially debilitating condition that mostly affects individuals of reproductive age, and often has a substantial diagnostic delay. US is usually the first-line imaging modality used when patients report chronic pelvic pain or have issues of infertility, both common symptoms of endometriosis. Other than the visualization of an endometrioma, sonologists frequently do not appreciate endometriosis on routine transvaginal US images. Given a substantial body of literature describing techniques to depict endometriosis at US, the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound convened a multidisciplinary panel of experts to make recommendations aimed at improving the screening process for endometriosis. The panel was composed of experts in the imaging and management of endometriosis, including radiologists, sonographers, gynecologists, reproductive endocrinologists, and minimally invasive gynecologic surgeons. A comprehensive literature review combined with a modified Delphi technique achieved a consensus. This statement defines the targeted screening population, describes techniques for augmenting pelvic US, establishes direct and indirect observations for endometriosis at US, creates an observational grading and reporting system, and makes recommendations for additional imaging and patient management. The panel recommends transvaginal US of the posterior compartment, observation of the relative positioning of the uterus and ovaries, and the uterine sliding sign maneuver to improve the detection of endometriosis. These additional techniques can be performed in 5 minutes or less and could ultimately decrease the delay of an endometriosis diagnosis in at-risk patients.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis , Humans , Female , Endometriosis/diagnostic imaging , Consensus , Delayed Diagnosis , Ultrasonography , Radiologists
7.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 24(1): 237, 2024 Apr 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38575880

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Endometriosis frequently results in pain and infertility. While conservative surgery offers some relief, it often falls short of ensuring satisfactory pregnancy outcomes. Adjuvant GnRH-a is administered post-surgery to mitigate recurrence; however, its impact on pregnancy outcomes remains debated. This study endeavors to assess the efficacy of adjuvant GnRH-a in enhancing pregnancy outcomes post-conservative surgery in endometriosis patients. METHODS: Databases including PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Medline (Ovid), Web of Science, and Scopus were rigorously searched up to 02 August 2023, without linguistic constraints. Identified articles were screened using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. Evaluated outcomes encompassed pregnancy rate, live birth rate, miscarriage rate, ectopic pregnancy rate, multiple pregnancy rate, mean postoperative pregnancy interval, recurrence rate, and adverse reaction rate. The Cochrane risk of bias tool and the Jadad score evaluated the included studies' quality. Subgroup and sensitivity analysis were implemented to analyze the pooled results. A meta-analysis model expressed results as standardized mean difference (SMD) and Risk ratio (RR). RESULTS: A total of 17 studies about 2485 patients were assimilated. Meta-analysis revealed that post-surgery, the GnRH-a cohort experienced a marginally elevated pregnancy rate (RR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.02-1.41; P = 0.03) and a reduced mean time to conceive (RR = -1.17, 95% CI = -1.70- -0.64; P < 0.0001). Contrarily, other evaluated outcomes did not exhibit notable statistical differences. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating adjuvant GnRH-a following conservative surgery may be deemed beneficial for women with endometriosis, especially before Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART). Nonetheless, owing to pronounced heterogeneity, subsequent research is warranted to substantiate these potential advantages conclusively. REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42023448280.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnancy , Humans , Female , Endometriosis/surgery , Pregnancy Rate , Pregnancy, Multiple , Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
8.
Gynecol Endocrinol ; 40(1): 2336121, 2024 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38579790

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dienogest (DNG) improves endometriosis-associated pain (EAP) and patients' quality of life; however, the modern cornerstone of the management of endometriosis is the long-term adherence of the patient to medical treatment. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate DNG as a long-term treatment of endometriosis, focusing on patients' compliance and side effects, also correlating with different phenotypes of endometriosis. METHODS: This was a cohort study on a group of patients with endometriosis (n = 114) undergoing long-term treatment with DNG. During the follow up visits (12, 24, and 36 months) patients were interviewed: an assessment of EAP was performed by using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and side effects were evaluated by using a specific questionnaire of 15 items. RESULTS: At 12 months, 81% were continuing the DNG treatment, with a significant reduction of dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, dyschezia, dysuria and chronic pelvic pain. Of the 19% that discontinued the treatment: 62% was due to spotting, reduced sexual drive, vaginal dryness, and mood disorders. The improvement of EAP was significant for all endometriosis phenotypes, especially in patients with the deep infiltrating type. At 36 months, 73% of patients were continuing the treatment, showing a significant reduction of EAP through the follow up, along with an increase of amenorrhea (from 77% at 12 months to 93% at 36 months). In a subgroup of 18 patients with gastrointestinal disorders, DNG was administered vaginally at the same dosage, showing similar results in terms of efficacy and tolerability. CONCLUSIONS: DNG was an effective long-term treatment for all endometriosis phenotypes, with few side effects that caused the discontinuation of the treatment mainly during the first year. Thus, the course of 1-year treatment is a predictive indicator for long-term treatment adherence.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis , Nandrolone , Nandrolone/analogs & derivatives , Female , Humans , Endometriosis/complications , Endometriosis/drug therapy , Endometriosis/chemically induced , Treatment Outcome , Cohort Studies , Quality of Life , Pelvic Pain/drug therapy , Pelvic Pain/etiology , Nandrolone/adverse effects
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 25(7)2024 Mar 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38612425

ABSTRACT

Resveratrol is a polyphenol present in various plant sources. Studies have reported numerous potential health benefits of resveratrol, exhibiting anti-aging, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, and anti-carcinogenic activity. Due to the reported effects, resveratrol is also being tested in reproductive disorders, including female infertility. Numerous cellular, animal, and even human studies were performed with a focus on the effect of resveratrol on female infertility. In this review, we reviewed some of its molecular mechanisms of action and summarized animal and human studies regarding resveratrol and female infertility, with a focus on age-related infertility, polycystic ovary syndrome, and endometriosis.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis , Infertility, Female , Animals , Female , Humans , Infertility, Female/drug therapy , Resveratrol/pharmacology , Resveratrol/therapeutic use , Endometriosis/drug therapy , Polyphenols , Aging
10.
Int J Mol Sci ; 25(7)2024 Mar 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38612490

ABSTRACT

Endometriosis is one of the leading pathologies of the reproductive system of women of fertile age, which shows changes in cell metabolism in the lesions. We conducted a study of the cellular respiration according to the polarography and the mRNA content of the main metabolic proteins using qRT-PCR of intraoperative endometrial biopsies from patients in the control group and with different localizations of endometriosis (adenomyosis, endometrioma, pelvic peritoneum). In biopsy samples of patients with endometriomas and pelvic peritoneum endometriotic lesions, the rate of oxygen absorption was significantly reduced, and, moreover, in the extragenital case, there was a shift to succinate utilization. The mRNA content of the cytochrome c, cytochrome c oxidase, and ATP synthase was also reduced, but hexokinase HK2 as well as pyruvate kinase were significantly higher than in the control. These oxidative phosphorylation and gene expression profiles suggest the Warburg effect and a shift in metabolism toward glycolysis. For adenomyosis, on the contrary, cellular respiration was significantly higher than in the control group due to the terminal region of the respiratory chain, ATP synthase, and its mRNA was increased as well. These data allow us to suggest that the therapeutic strategies of endometriosis based on modulation energy metabolism should take lesion localization into account.


Subject(s)
Adenomyosis , Endometriosis , Humans , Female , Endometriosis/genetics , Cell Respiration , Biopsy , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Adenosine Triphosphate
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 25(7)2024 Mar 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38612685

ABSTRACT

Endometriosis is a complex gynecological disease that affects more than 10% of women in their reproductive years. While surgery can provide temporary relief from women's pain, symptoms often return in as many as 75% of cases within two years. Previous literature has contributed to theories about the development of endometriosis; however, the exact pathogenesis and etiology remain elusive. We conducted a preliminary investigation into the influence of primary endometrial cells (ECs) on the development and progression of endometriosis. In vitro studies, they were involved in inducing Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rat-isolated primary endometrial cells, which resulted in increased nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA gene expression (quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis, qPCR) and protein expression (western blot analysis). Additionally, in vivo studies utilized autogenic and allogeneic transplantations (rat to rat) to investigate endometriosis-like lesion cyst size, body weight, protein levels (immunohistochemistry), and mRNA gene expression. These studies demonstrated that estrogen upregulates the gene and protein regulation of cytoskeletal (CK)-18, transforming growth factor-ß (TGF-ß), VEGF, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, particularly in the peritoneum. These findings may influence cell proliferation, angiogenesis, fibrosis, and inflammation markers. Consequently, this could exacerbate the occurrence and progression of endometriosis.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis , Female , Humans , Animals , Rats , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/genetics , Cell Proliferation , Cytoskeleton , RNA, Messenger
12.
J Nepal Health Res Counc ; 21(4): 689-691, 2024 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38616605

ABSTRACT

Endometrioma is the localization of endometriosis in ovary which often develops as cyst. The condition can be complicated with infection, torsion and rupture leading to significant hemoperitoneum and ascites. We present here a 28-year female P2 L1 presented with the features of acute abdomen and severe anemia referred from other hospital where pain management was done. She had raised Ca-125 level, negative Urine Beta HCG and USG findings of left endometrioma with degenerating subserosal fibroid. The improvement of her general condition with analgesics was misleading however a static hematocrit level despite blood transfusion raised suspicion of ongoing pathology leading to blood loss and diagnostic paracentesis confirmed the hemoperitoneum while awaiting of CT report. She underwent Emergency Laparotomy which revealed hemoperitoneum of 2000ml and right ruptured ovarian endometrioma measuring and left ovarian cyst measuring 6x6 cm was noted. The postoperative period was uneventful. Keywords: Acute abdomen; case report; endometriosis; hemoperitoneum; ruptured endometrioma.


Subject(s)
Abdomen, Acute , Endometriosis , Female , Humans , Hemoperitoneum/etiology , Hemoperitoneum/surgery , Endometriosis/complications , Endometriosis/surgery , Abdomen, Acute/etiology , Abdomen, Acute/surgery , Laparotomy , Nepal
13.
World J Gastroenterol ; 30(12): 1655-1662, 2024 Mar 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38617735

ABSTRACT

The gut microbiota is recognized as an endocrine organ with the capacity to influence distant organs and associated biological pathways. Recent advancements underscore the critical role of gut microbial homeostasis in female health; with dysbiosis potentially leading to diseases among women such as polycystic ovarian syndrome, endometriosis, breast cancer, cervical cancer, and ovarian cancer etc. Despite this, there has been limited discussion on the underlying mechanisms. This editorial explores the three potential mechanisms through which gut microbiota dysbiosis may impact the development of diseases among women, namely, the immune system, the gut microbiota-estrogen axis, and the metabolite pathway. We focused on approaches for treating diseases in women by addressing gut microbiota imbalances through probiotics, prebiotics supplementation, and fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). Future studies should focus on determining the molecular mechanisms underlying associations between dysbiosis of gut microbiota and female diseases to realize precision medicine, with FMT emerging as a promising intervention.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Endometriosis , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Female , Humans , Dysbiosis , Estrogens
14.
World J Gastroenterol ; 30(12): 1706-1713, 2024 Mar 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38617738

ABSTRACT

Endoscopic resection (ER) of colorectal polyps has become a daily practice in most endoscopic units providing a colorectal cancer screening program and requires the availability of local experts and high-end endoscopic devices. ER procedures have evolved over the past few years from endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) to more advanced techniques, such as endoscopic submucosal dissection and endo-scopic full-thickness resection. Complete resection and disease eradication are the ultimate goals of ER-based techniques, and novel devices have been developed to achieve these goals. The EndoRotor® Endoscopic Powered Resection System (Interscope Medical, Inc., Northbridge, Massachusetts, United States) is one such device. The EndoRotor is a powered resection tool for the removal of alimentary tract mucosa, including post-EMR persistent lesions with scarring, and has both CE Mark and FDA clearance. This review covers available published evidence documenting the usefulness of EndoRotor for the management of recurrent colorectal polyps.


Subject(s)
Colonic Polyps , Endometriosis , Humans , Female , Cicatrix , Colonic Polyps/surgery , Endoscopy , Disease Eradication
15.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 15: 1336496, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38559689

ABSTRACT

Immune dysfunction is one of the central components in the development and progression of endometriosis by establishing a chronic inflammatory environment. Western-style high-fat diets (HFD) have been linked to greater systemic inflammation to cause metabolic and chronic inflammatory diseases, and are also considered an environmental risk factor for gynecologic diseases. Here, we aimed to examine how HFD cause an inflammatory environment in endometriosis and discern their contribution to endometriotic-associated hyperalgesia. Our results showed that HFD-induced obesity enhanced abdominal hyperalgesia that was induced by endometriotic lesions. Peritoneal inflammatory macrophages and cytokine levels increased by lesion induction were elevated by chronic exposure to HFD. Increased expression of pain-related mediators in the dorsal root ganglia was observed after lesion induction under the HFD condition. Although HFD did not affect inflammatory macrophages in the peritoneal cavity without lesion induction, the diversity and composition of the gut microbiota were clearly altered by HFD as a sign of low-grade systemic inflammation. Thus, HFD alone might not establish a local inflammatory environment in the pelvic cavity, but it can contribute to further enhancing chronic inflammation, leading to the exacerbation of endometriosis-associated abdominal hyperalgesia following the establishment and progression of the disease.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis , Female , Humans , Endometriosis/complications , Endometriosis/metabolism , Hyperalgesia/etiology , Diet, High-Fat/adverse effects , Inflammation/metabolism , Abdomen
16.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 15: 1359649, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38562412

ABSTRACT

Background: The objective of our study was to investigate the risk factors for a decrease in ovarian reserve in patients with endometriomas after standardized laparoscopic procedures and evaluation to provide corresponding clinical guidance for patients with fertility requirements. Methods: Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels and other clinical data from 233 patients with endometriomas and 57 patients with non-endometrioma ovarian cysts admitted to the Peking Union Medical College Hospital between January 2018 and September 2023 were prospectively analysed. The pretreatment AMH levels of the study groups were compared to assess the impact of endometrioma on ovarian reserve, and the decrease in AMH after treatment was analysed to determine potential risk factors contributing to this change. Results: Pretreatment AMH levels did not significantly differ between patients with endometriomas and those with non-endometrioma ovarian cysts. Within the endometrioma group, older age, higher body mass index (BMI), and shorter menstrual cycles were found to be associated with decreased AMH levels prior to treatment (p<0.05). Participants presenting with bilateral cysts, advanced surgical staging, or a completely enclosed Douglas pouch demonstrated significantly lower levels of AMH prior to treatment compared to those without these conditions (p<0.05). Furthermore, their AMH levels further declined within one year after undergoing laparoscopic cystectomy (p<0.05). However, there was no difference in AMH levels after surgery between patients who successfully became pregnant and those who did not (p>0.05). Conclusion: Laparoscopic removal of endometriomas can adversely affect ovarian reserve, especially during bilateral cysts removal and when patients are diagnosed as having a higher stage of endometriosis, further impacting ovarian function. It should be noted that a decrease in AMH levels may not necessarily indicate an absolute decline in fertility. Therefore, it is crucial to conduct thorough patient evaluations and provide comprehensive patient education to offer appropriate guidance for fertility preservation.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis , Laparoscopy , Ovarian Cysts , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Endometriosis/surgery , Endometriosis/etiology , Anti-Mullerian Hormone , Cystectomy , Ovarian Cysts/surgery , Risk Factors , Laparoscopy/adverse effects , Laparoscopy/methods
17.
JSLS ; 28(1)2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38562950

ABSTRACT

A Comparison of Ovarian Loss Following Laparoscopic versus Robotic Cystectomy As Analyzed by Artificial Intelligence-Powered Pathology Software. Background and Objective: To compare the area of ovarian tissue and follicular loss in the excised cystectomy specimen of endometrioma performed by laparoscopic or robotic technique. Methods: Prospective observational study performed between April 2023 to August 2023. There were 14 patients each in Laparoscopic group (LC) and Robotic group (RC). Excised cyst wall sent was for to the pathologist who was blinded to the technique used for cystectomy. The pathological assessment was done by artificial intelligence-Whole Slide Imaging (WSI) software. Results: The age was significantly lower in LC group; the rest of demographic results were comparable. The mean of the median ovarian area loss [Mean Rank, LC group (9.1 ± 15.1); RC (8.1 ± 12.4)] was higher in LC group. The mean of the median total follicular loss was higher in LC group (8.9 ± 9.2) when compared to RC group (6.3 ± 8.9) and was not significant. The area of ovarian loss in bilateral endometrioma was significantly higher in LC group (mean rank 7.5) as compared to RC group (mean rank 3) - (P = .016) despite more cases of bilateral disease in RC group. With increasing cyst size the LC group showed increased median loss of follicles when compared to RC group (strong correlation coefficient 0.347) but not statistically significant (P = .225). AAGL (American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists) score did not have any impact on the two techniques. Conclusion: Robotic assistance reduces the area of ovarian and follicular loss during cystectomy of endometrioma especially in bilateral disease and increasing cyst size. It should be considered over the laparoscopic approach if available.


Subject(s)
Cysts , Endometriosis , Laparoscopy , Ovarian Cysts , Ovarian Diseases , Robotic Surgical Procedures , Humans , Female , Ovarian Cysts/surgery , Endometriosis/surgery , Artificial Intelligence , Cystectomy/methods , Cysts/surgery , Laparoscopy/methods , Ovarian Diseases/surgery
18.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 15: 1359182, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38567305

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to analyze the concentration of leptin in peritoneal fluid and plasma and to assess their role as potential biomarkers in the diagnosis of endometriosis. Materials & methods: Leptin adjusted for BMI (leptin/BMI ratio) was measured using surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) biosensors. Patients with suspected endometriosis were included in the study. Plasma was collected from 70 cases, and peritoneal fluid from 67 cases. Based on the presence of endometriosis lesions detected during laparoscopy, patients were divided into a study group and a control group (patients without endometriosis). Results: Leptin/BMI ratio in plasma did not differ between women with endometriosis and the control group (0.7159 ± 0.259 vs 0.6992 ± 0.273, p= 0,7988). No significant differences were observed in peritoneal leptin/BMI ratio levels in patients with and without endometriosis (0.6206 ± 0.258 vs 0.6215 ± 0.264, p= 0,9896). Plasma and peritoneal leptin/BMI ratios were significantly lower in women with endometriosis - related primary infertility compared to women with endometriosis without primary infertility (0.640 ± 0.502 vs 0.878 ± 0.623, p < 0.05). The difference was observed in case of primary infertility, but not in terms of the secondary one. No significant differences were noted between leptin/BMI ratio in the proliferative phase and the secretory phase (0.716 ± 0.252 vs 0.697 ± 0.288, p= 0,7785). Conclusion: The results of present study do not support the relevance of leptin concentration determination as a biomarker of the endometriosis. Due to the limited number of samples in the tested group, further studies are needed to confirm its role.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis , Infertility, Female , Humans , Female , Endometriosis/pathology , Leptin , Body Mass Index , Biomarkers
20.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 24(1): 230, 2024 Apr 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38566020

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cumulative live birth rate (CLBR) is considered as the most important endpoint for assessing the probability of having a baby in a complete in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI) treatment cycle. Many previous studies have focused on the association between thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) and live birth rate after first embryo transfer cycle, however, evidence on whether the presence of TAI affects the CLBR is lacking. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of TAI on the CLBR in a complete IVF/ICSI cycle. METHODS: This retrospective study included 12,796 women who underwent their first IVF/ICSI treatment between January 2019 and February 2021. Based on the levels of thyroid antibodies, 2,603 women were assigned to the TAI group, and 10,193 women were assigned to the control group. Subgroup analysis was performed according to the different causes of infertility (including male factor only, ovulation disorder, tubal factor, endometriosis and unexplained infertility) and different types and titres of thyroid antibodies. The primary outcome in this study was CLBR, which included live births from the fresh embryo transfer cycle and all subsequent frozen-thawed embryo transfer cycles performed before December 2021. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the CLBR between the TAI and control groups, even after adjusting for relevant confounders including age, body mass index, cause of infertility, thyroid function, protocols of controlled ovarian stimulation, type of transfer (fresh vs. frozen), type of transferred embryo (cleavage-stage embryo vs. blastocyst), and fertilization method (IVF vs. ICSI) (cumulative live birth: 50.6% vs. 52.1%, OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.86-1.02, adjusted OR 0.97, 95%CI 0.89-1.06). Subgroup analysis showed that no significant difference was observed in CLBR between the TAI and control groups for all causes of infertility, except for infertility attributed to endometriosis. Among women with endometriosis, the CLBR was significantly lower in the TAI group than that in the control group; however, this difference was not significant after adjusting for potential confounders including age, body mass index, thyroid function, protocols of controlled ovarian stimulation, type of transfer (fresh vs. frozen), type of transferred embryo (cleavage-stage embryo vs. blastocyst), and fertilization method (IVF vs. ICSI) (cumulative live births: 43.1% vs. 51.0%, OR 0.73, 95% CI 0.53-0.99, adjusted OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.53-1.02). Another subgroup analysis demonstrated that the type and titre of thyroid antibody did not affect CLBR in women with TAI. CONCLUSIONS: In our study, there was no significant difference in the CLBR between women with TAI and those without TAI, which suggests that TAI did not affect the chances of having a baby in a complete IVF/ICSI treatment cycle.


Subject(s)
Endometriosis , Infertility , Pregnancy , Male , Female , Humans , Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic/methods , Birth Rate , Retrospective Studies , Autoimmunity , Thyroid Gland , Semen , Fertilization in Vitro/methods , Live Birth/epidemiology , Pregnancy Rate
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...