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1.
CBE Life Sci Educ ; 23(2): ar17, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38620008

ABSTRACT

LGBTQ+ undergraduates have higher attrition from science and engineering (S&E) than straight and cisgender undergraduates and perceive that having LGBTQ+ instructors would benefit them. However, it is unknown how many S&E instructors are LGBTQ+, the extent to which they disclose this information to students, and how disclosure affects all students, both LGBTQ+ and non-LGBTQ+. In study I, we surveyed 108 LGBTQ+ S&E instructors across the U.S. to explore the extent to which they reveal their LGBTQ+ identities across professional contexts and why they reveal or conceal their identities to undergraduates. Overall, 75% of instructors came out to at least some colleagues but only 48% came out to any undergraduates. Instructors most commonly chose to conceal LGBTQ+ identities from undergraduates because they perceived their identities to be irrelevant to course content and anticipated negative student reactions. In study II, 666 introductory biology undergraduates were randomly assigned to evaluate one of two identical teaching demonstration videos except the instructor revealed her LGBTQ+ identity in one but not the other. We assessed differences in students' impressions of the instructor across conditions. We found no differences in most ratings of the instructor except participants reported higher rapport with the instructor when she came out.


Subject(s)
Sexual and Gender Minorities , Students , Humans , Female , Faculty , Attitude , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
CBE Life Sci Educ ; 23(2): ar18, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38620006

ABSTRACT

Higher education has evolved in ways that may increase the challenges life science faculty face in providing accommodations for students with disabilities. Guided by Expectancy-Value Theory, we interviewed 34 life sciences faculty instructors from institutions nationwide to explore faculty motivation to create disability-inclusive educational experiences. We found that faculty in our sample perceive that providing most standard accommodations is a manageable but often challenging task. Further, faculty in our sample feel that improving accommodations necessitates additional support from their institutions. Most faculty had high attainment value for providing accommodations, in that they strongly believed that supporting students with disabilities is the fair and right thing to do. However, faculty did not perceive much utility value or intrinsic value in their task of providing accommodations, and most reported that providing accommodations can be a substantial burden on faculty. These findings imply that current approaches to providing inclusive educational experiences for students with disabilities rely primarily on the personal belief that providing accommodations is the right thing to do, which likely results in a flawed and inequitable system given that not all faculty equally share this conviction.


Subject(s)
Biological Science Disciplines , Disabled Persons , Humans , Students , Faculty , Motivation
3.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 382, 2024 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38589833

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Racism contributes to health disparities and is a serious threat to public health. Teaching physicians about racism, how to address it in medical practice, and developing high quality and sustainable curricula are essential to combating racism. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to (1) describe the experience of racism and anti-racism teaching in residency programs, and elicit recommendations from key informants, and (2) use these data and formative research to develop recommendations for other residencies creating, implementing, and evaluating anti-racism curricula in their own programs. METHODS: From May to July 2023, 20 faculty and residents were recruited via convenience sampling for key informant interviews conducted via Microsoft Teams. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and coded. An initial list of themes was developed using theoretical frameworks, and then refined using a grounded-theory approach. A brief online optional anonymous demographic survey was sent to participants in August of 2023.  RESULTS: Eighty percent (20/25) of participants approached were interviewed. Seventy-five percent (15/20) answered a brief optional demographic survey. Seven themes emerged: (1) Racism in medicine is ubiquitous; (2) Anti-racism teaching in medicine varies widely; (3) Sustainability strategies should be multifaceted and include recruitment, resource allocation, and outcome measures; (4) Resources are widely available and accessible if one knows where to look; (5) Outcomes and metrics of success should include resident- faculty-, patient- community-, and system-focused outcomes; (6) Curricular strategies should be multilayered, longitudinal, and woven into the curriculum; and (7) Self-reflection and discomfort are necessary parts of the process.  CONCLUSIONS: This study is one of the first to qualitatively examine perspectives of key stakeholders invested in anti-racism teaching for residents. The Support - Pipeline - Outcomes - Community (SPOC) Model, that was developed using information collected during this study, can be used in the future as a guide for others working to design and implement sustainable and high quality anti-racism curricula for residents.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , United States , Humans , Antiracism , Curriculum , Faculty , Public Health
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 379, 2024 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38589919

ABSTRACT

The United States government makes a substantial investment in biomedical training programs each year. However, for most trainees, these opportunities do not translate into career progression in academic research pathways. Only about one-fifth of postdoctoral fellows eventually secure a tenure-track faculty position, and even among these candidates, attrition is high. Although a number of factors govern career choices and career longevity, the transition from trainee to faculty is a challenging process and requires knowledge and skills that are not necessarily developed during a traditional university experience. Many postdoctoral fellows receive adequate training in research skills and scientific communication, but new faculty report not being sufficiently prepared for the job search process and for starting their labs. To address this critical training gap, the ITERT core (Interdisciplinary Translational Education and Research Training) and the Office of Postdoctoral Fellows at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center implemented a structured course for both postdoctoral fellows and senior PhD students to provide formalized training for successfully navigating academic positions in biomedical research. Here we report on the pilot Navigating Academic Careers course conducted in 2021-2022 for 30 PhD students and postdocs. The nine-module course was conducted over 13 weeks in 25.5 h instructional sessions. The key educational objectives included 1) navigating the job application and the interview/negotiation process, 2) hiring, leading, and mentoring lab personnel and program support staff, 3) project administration and financial stewardship, 4) managing time and work-life balance and 5) developing collaborations, branding, personalized niche, and networking. Survey-based analysis at the time of the course was used to capture the participants' assessment of the course content, organization, and delivery, with a follow-up survey conducted approximately 2 years post-course (2024) to evaluate longer-term impacts of the training. Initial in-course assessment revealed that 89.9% of respondents found the scope and instructional content appropriate, and 91.1% found the course relevant and applicable to their career needs. Longer-term post-course evaluation indicated that 80% of respondents applied the learnings of the course, that 80% reported feeling more confident in navigating an academic job search, and that 66.6% continued to report agreement with the course preparing them for their current role/ongoing job search, with 46.7% already securing jobs in academic research, including as independent faculty. The outcomes of this pilot course suggest that integrating this into the broader postdoctoral training curriculum can enhance both the transition and early-career success of talented scientists-in-training into working professionals in biomedical careers, as faculty and science-trained staff.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , Mentoring , Humans , United States , Curriculum , Faculty , Mentors , Career Choice
5.
Am J Disaster Med ; 19(1): 5-13, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38597642

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic produced an unprecedented strain on the United States medical system. Prior to the pandemic, there was an estimated 20,000 physician shortage. This has been further stressed by physicians falling ill and the increased acuity of the COVID-19 patients. Federal medical team availability was stretched to its capabilities with the large numbers of deployments. With such severe staffing shortages, creative ways of force expansion were undertaken. New Orleans, Louisiana, was one of the hardest hit areas early in the pandemic. As the case counts built, a call was put out for help. The Louisiana State University (LSU) system responded with a faculty-led resident strike team out of the LSU Health Shreveport Academic Medical Center. Residents and faculty alike volunteered, forming a multispecialty, attending-led medical strike team of approximately 10 physicians. Administrative aspects such as institution-specific credentialing, malpractice coverage, resident distribution, attending physician oversight, among other aspects were addressed, managed, and agreed upon between the LSU Health Shreveport and the New Orleans hospital institutions and leadership prior to deployment in April 2020. In New Orleans, the residents managed patients within the departments of emergency medicine, medical floor, and intensive care unit (ICU). The residents assigned to the medical floor became a new hospitalist service team. The diversity of specialties allowed the team to address patient care in a multidisciplinary manner, leading to comprehensive patient care plans and unhindered team dynamic and workflow. During the first week alone, the team admitted and cared for over 100 patients combined from the medical floor and ICU. In a disaster situation compounded by staff shortages, a resident strike team is a beneficial solution for force expansion. This article qualitatively reviews the first published incidence of a faculty-led multispecialty resident strike team being used as a force expander in a disaster.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disasters , Internship and Residency , Humans , United States , Academic Medical Centers , Intensive Care Units , Faculty , COVID-19/epidemiology
6.
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr ; 78(4): 948-956, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38591669

ABSTRACT

A standard curriculum for pediatric colonoscopy training has neither been required nor universally implemented in North American fellowship programs. This qualitative study assessed the needs of colonoscopy training in pediatric gastroenterology to determine the standardized components of procedural teaching. Focus groups with pediatric gastroenterology attendings, fellows, procedural nurses, and interviews with advanced endoscopists, all practicing at a single institution, were conducted between March and June 2018. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis principles. Four themes emerged: (1) lack of standardization of colonoscopy performance, (2) lack of professional development of procedure teaching skills, (3) need for teaching behaviors that promote learner's performance, and (4) barriers to effective teaching and learning. A conceptual framework was created for developing a standardized "train-the-trainer" curriculum. Our needs assessment supports expansion of efforts to make this comprehensive training available to all pediatric gastroenterologists involved in procedure teaching.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Faculty , Humans , Child , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Colonoscopy , Reference Standards , Fellowships and Scholarships
7.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 374, 2024 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38580971

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although women comprise the majority of medical students, gender disparities emerge early and remain at the highest levels of academia. Most leadership courses focus on faculty or students rather than women graduate medical education (GME) trainees. AIM: To promote the leadership development of women GME trainees through empowerment, community building, networking and mentorship, and concrete leadership skills development. SETTING: University of California, San Francisco. PARTICIPANTS: 359 women residents and fellows from 41 specialties. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: A longitudinal curriculum of monthly workshops designed to support leadership development for women trainees. Sessions and learning objectives were designed via needs assessments and literature review. PROGRAM EVALUATION: A mixed-methods evaluation was performed for 3 years of WILD programming. Quantitative surveys assessed participant satisfaction and fulfillment of learning objectives. Structured interview questions were asked in focus groups and analyzed qualitatively. DISCUSSION: 23% of invited participants attended at least one session from 2018 to 2021, despite challenging trainee schedules. Surveys demonstrated acceptability and satisfaction of all sessions, and learning objectives were met at 100% of matched sessions. Focus groups highlighted positive impact in domains of community-building, leadership skills, mentorship, and empowerment. This program has demonstrated WILD's longitudinal sustainability and impact for women trainees.


Subject(s)
Leadership , Women , Humans , Female , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Curriculum , Faculty
8.
J Prof Nurs ; 51: 58-63, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38614675

ABSTRACT

DNP-prepared faculty report challenges and barriers to achieving success in academic roles when criteria for promotion includes scholarship. The purpose of this evidence-based initiative was to explore thoughtful scholarship standards for DNP-prepared faculty which can be adapted and transferred across academic institutions with the goal of elevating faculty scholarship. Given a paucity of available research evidence, a review and synthesis of non-research evidence was conducted. DNP scholarship standards from high-ranking intuitions were critically appraised, and this evidence, along with the diverse and collective expertise of the authors, was translated into recommendations for an inclusive model of rigor for DNP-prepared faculty scholarship. A template for appraising the scholarship of DNP-prepared faculty based on strategic evaluation of impact is included. Academic institutions may use this work to expand the fundamental level of evolving scholarship, determine parameters, and provide clarity and support to DNP-prepared faculty as they seek to progress in rank.


Subject(s)
Faculty , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans , Schools , Universities
9.
J Prof Nurs ; 51: 16-26, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38614669

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Boyer's framework of scholarship, the basis of many academic models for faculty promotion, is comprised of the components of discovery, teaching, integration, application, and engagement. Yet, the scholarship component of application (containing goal-based clinical practice) is undervalued by many academic models. PURPOSE: This study explores the nursing activities currently qualifying as scholarship in several international academic models. METHODS: Using the Delphi approach, an international nine-member panel from seven countries participated in a six-question, structured brainstorming session to explore the nursing activities qualifying as scholarship by academic models. Follow-up sessions were attended by six panel members. RESULTS: Panel members reported that the nursing activities, which most often were recognized as scholarship, fit the scholarship components of discovery, teaching and integration but few fit the components of application or engagement. Although this project originally focused on clinical practice, far more recommendations for an academic model targeted the scholarship component of engagement. CONCLUSION: Academic models' lack of appreciation for the scholarship components of application (goal-based clinical practice) and engagement (partnering with community groups) discourages faculty from participating in these activities. Yet, these nursing activities demonstrate scholarship and are essential for the continued development of the nursing profession and discipline.


Subject(s)
60649 , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans , Faculty , Organizations
10.
J Frailty Aging ; 13(2): 189-192, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38616377

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Knowledge of frailty is essential for meeting the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies for US trainees. The UK General Medical Council requires that frailty be included in undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula. Trainees are expected to appropriately modify care plans and help make patient-centered decisions, while incorporating diagnostic uncertainty, such as frailty, in older adults. Little is known about current needs for frailty instruction in graduate medical education in the US and beyond. OBJECTIVE: We sought to capture faculty perceptions on how frailty should be defined and identified, and what aspects and level of detail should be taught to residents. DESIGN: The authors developed a 4-item short response questionnaire, and faculty had the option to respond via electronic survey or via semi-structured interviews. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: Respondents included 24 fellowship-trained geriatricians based at 6 different academic medical centers in a single urban metropolitan area. METHODS: An invitation to participate in either an electronic survey or semi-structured virtual interview was e-mailed to 30 geriatricians affiliated with an academic multi-campus Geriatric Medicine fellowship. Responses were transcribed and coded independently by two authors. RESULTS: Responses were received from 24 geriatricians via a combination of digital questionnaires (n=18) and semi-structured online interviews (n=6), for a response rate of 80%. Responses revealed significant diversity of opinion on how to define and identify frailty and how these concepts should be taught. CONCLUSIONS: As frailty is increasingly incorporated into clinical practice, consensus is needed on how to define and teach frailty to residents.


Subject(s)
Frailty , Geriatrics , Internship and Residency , Humans , Aged , Needs Assessment , Frailty/diagnosis , Faculty
11.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 20(4): e1011994, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38603635

ABSTRACT

Participating in mentored research is an enormous benefit to undergraduate students. These immersive experiences can dramatically improve retention and completion rates, especially for students from traditionally underserved populations in STEM disciplines. Scientists typically do not receive any formal training in management or group dynamics before taking on the role of a lab head. Thus, peer forums and shared wisdom are crucial for developing the vision and skills involved with mentorship and leading a successful research lab. Faculty at any institution can help improve student outcomes and the success of their labs by thoughtfully including undergraduates in their research programs. Moreover, faculty at primarily undergraduate institutions have special challenges that are not often acknowledged or addressed in public discussions about best practices for running a lab. Here, we present 10 simple rules for fostering a successful undergraduate research lab. While much of the advice herein is applicable to mentoring undergraduates in any setting, it is especially tailored to the special circumstances found at primarily undergraduate institutions.


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Students , Humans , Mentors , Faculty , Universities
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 402, 2024 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38605334

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Simulation now is widely used for training and education in different fields including healthcare education. Medicine and healthcare students can be trained in a secure, efficient, and engaging setting by Simulation-based Education (SBE). Therefore, this study aimed to assess the perception of faculty members in the community health departments towards SBE to be used in practical subjects for clinical nutrition undergraduate courses. METHOD: This cross-sectional survey was conducted among community health sciences faculty members. The perception was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire that included three sections. RESULTS: This questionnaire was completed by 125 faculty members, of whom 36 (28.8%) were male and 89 (71.2%) were female. Overall, faculty members had positive perceptions, with a mean score of 3.86 ± 0.74, but a high level of anxiety toward SBE, with a mean score of 3.42 ± 0.75. There was a statistically significant difference between the responses of the faculty members based on the training they received in simulation (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: The study results indicate that community health sciences faculty members' perception of SBE in Saudi Arabia is generally positive. However, the results show high levels of anxiety among faculty members toward SBE.


Subject(s)
Faculty , Public Health , Humans , Male , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Students , Perception
13.
Rev Esp Patol ; 57(2): 91-96, 2024.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38599742

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: Artificial intelligence is fully present in our lives. In education, the possibilities of its use are endless, both for students and teachers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The capacity of ChatGPT has been explored when solving multiple choice questions based on the exam of the subject «Anatomopathological Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures¼ of the first call of the 2022-23 academic year. In addition, to comparing their results with those of the rest of the students presented the probable causes of incorrect answers have been evaluated. Finally, its ability to formulate new test questions based on specific instructions has been evaluated. RESULTS: ChatGPT correctly answered 47 out of 68 questions, achieving a grade higher than the course average and median. Most failed questions present negative statements, using the words «no¼, «false¼ or «incorrect¼ in their statement. After interacting with it, the program can realize its mistake and change its initial response to the correct answer. Finally, ChatGPT can develop new questions based on a theoretical assumption or a specific clinical simulation. CONCLUSIONS: As teachers we are obliged to explore the uses of artificial intelligence and try to use it to our benefit. Carrying out tasks that involve significant consumption, such as preparing multiple-choice questions for content evaluation, is a good example.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Faculty , Humans , Students , Teaching Materials , Probability
14.
BMJ ; 385: q786, 2024 04 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38565245

Subject(s)
Faculty , Public Health , Humans
15.
Med Educ Online ; 29(1): 2336332, 2024 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38560892

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) is a field of academic research that focuses on improving learning through reflective and informed teaching. Currently, most SoTL-related work is faculty-driven; however, student involvement in SoTL has been shown to benefit both learners and educators. Our study aims to develop a framework for increasing medical students' interest, confidence, and engagement in SoTL. METHODS: A student-led SoTL interest group was developed and a year-round program of SoTL was designed and delivered by student leaders of the group under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Individual post-session surveys were administered to evaluate participants' perceptions of each session. Pre- and post-program surveys were administered to evaluate the program impact. RESULTS: The year-round SoTL program consistently attracted the participation of medical students and faculty. Survey responses indicated strong medical student interest in the program and positive impact of the program. Increased interest and confidence in medical education research were reported by the student participants. The program design provided opportunities for student participants to network and receive ongoing feedback about medical education research they were interested or involved in. CONCLUSION: Our study provides insights for developing a framework that other institutions can reference and build upon to educate and engage students in SoTL.


Subject(s)
Students, Medical , Humans , Fellowships and Scholarships , Learning , Faculty , Feedback , Teaching , Curriculum
16.
MedEdPORTAL ; 20: 11387, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38495039

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Appreciative inquiry harnesses an individual's strengths to realize positive change, and a flourishing-focused mindset emphasizes engagement, social connectivity, and seeking meaningful work. Though the impact of these models on physician well-being and career planning has been evaluated in graduate medical education, their integration into career development initiatives for faculty has been limited. We designed a workshop to nurture hospitalist career development, based on our CORE2 conceptual framework (character strengths, overall vision, role assessment, explicit goals, and evaluation). Methods: We presented the workshop at the 2022 and 2023 Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) annual conferences. This 1.5-hour workshop comprised four modules and three small-group activities designed to help participants identify their signature character strengths, draft a professional vision statement, prioritize professional roles, and develop SMART goals aligned with these roles. Results: At the 2023 SHM annual conference, 36 participants attended the workshop, and 32 (89%) completed pre- and postworkshop surveys. After workshop completion, participants' self-assessed familiarity with their signature character strengths, knowledge of evidence-based principles to develop SMART goals, and confidence in their ability to write a vision statement and SMART goals all increased significantly (p < .05). Discussion: This workshop provides a valuable framework for self-directed longitudinal career development and reflection. We build on prior curricula on educator identity formation by guiding participants from identity definition to professional vision development to professional role evaluation to aligned goal creation and iterative evaluation. Our workshop's principles are readily generalizable to clinician-educators across medical disciplines.


Subject(s)
Hospitalists , Humans , Curriculum , Motivation , Faculty , Education, Medical, Graduate
17.
PLoS One ; 19(3): e0300542, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38498493

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Comprehensive abortion care is an emerging intervention being integrated into nursing and midwifery curricula. Yet, no studies have been conducted in Rwanda to determine whether faculty perceive themselves as capable of teaching comprehensive abortion care. This study aims to evaluate the perceived self-efficacy to teach comprehensive abortion care among nursing and midwifery faculty in higher learning institutions in Rwanda. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The University of Rwanda College of Medicine and Health Sciences Institutional Review Board approved this study (UR-CMHS-IRB No 335/CMHSIRB/2022). In quantitative, a self-administered questionnaire was administered to 98 study participants. Data were entered into Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 26 and analyzed using Chi-square test with a p-value of 0.05 set as the significance level. In the qualitative part, an interview guide was developed based on quantitative data to understand comprehensive abortion care teaching fully. Data were collected from four focus group discussions with eight participants in each group, entered in Dedoose, and analyzed thematically. RESULTS: Among the 98 study participants who were invited to participate in this study, only 85 filled out the questionnaires. This translates into 86.7% of the response rate. More than half 58.8% had adequate self-efficacy in teaching comprehensive abortion care. A Chi-square test has revealed that being a male, being a midwife, and having more years of working experience in nursing education were significantly associated with self-efficacy in teaching comprehensive abortion care (p value <0.05). In the qualitative phase, 32 study participants participated in four focus group discussions and four themes were identified: a) variability in confidence levels to teach comprehensive abortion care; b) readiness about teaching comprehensive abortion care; c) facilitators of teaching comprehensive abortion care; and d) contextual challenges to teach comprehensive abortion care. CONCLUSIONS: The findings revealed that faculty's self-efficacy in teaching comprehensive abortion care was not adequate. Personal and religious beliefs and institutional barriers were also reported to hinder self-efficacy in teaching comprehensive abortion care. Therefore, intensive comprehensive abortion care training for nursing and midwifery faculty in higher learning institutions should be provided, including values clarification and attitude transformation training for attitudes and beliefs. It is also critical for higher learning institutions to develop strategies for overcoming the challenges faculty face when teaching comprehensive abortion care.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Spontaneous , Education, Nursing , Midwifery , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Male , Self Efficacy , Rwanda , Faculty , Faculty, Nursing
18.
J Christ Nurs ; 41(2): E18-E31, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38436350

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The "Spirit of the Second Mile Nursing" (SSMN) has been cultivated in nurses who graduated from McCormick Faculty of Nursing, Thailand. These nurses were taught and they practice to care for clients, family members, and colleagues with compassion, consideration, love, enthusiasm, and willingness throughout the program. This study aimed to explore the SSMN concept using a Grounded Theory Methodology (GTM). The findings show that the SSMN concept is based on "Loving and Giving for others" principles. It consisted of three categories: the Spirit of the Second Mile nurse characteristics, nursing care, and consequences of the SSMN. Knowledge from this study provides nurses with a better understanding of the SSMN concept within the context of a Thai and American Christian view.


Subject(s)
Christianity , Nursing Care , Humans , Emotions , Faculty , Family
19.
JAMA ; 331(13): 1087-1088, 2024 04 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38451544
20.
PLoS One ; 19(3): e0296884, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38427639

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Modern patient care depends on the continuous improvement of community and clinical pharmacy services, and artificial intelligence (AI) has the potential to play a key role in this evolution. Although AI has been increasingly implemented in various fields of pharmacy, little is known about the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of pharmacy students and faculty members towards this technology. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this study was to investigate the KAP of pharmacy students and faculty members regarding AI in six countries in the Middle East as well as to identify the predictive factors behind the understanding of the principles and practical applications of AI in healthcare processes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was a descriptive cross-sectional survey. A total of 875 pharmacy students and faculty members in the faculty of pharmacy in Jordan, Palestine, Lebanon, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Libya participated in the study. Data was collected through an online electronic questionnaire. The data collected included information about socio-demographics, understanding of AI basic principles, participants' attitudes toward AI, the participants' AI practices. RESULTS: Most participants (92.6%) reported having heard of AI technology in their practice, but only a small proportion (39.5%) had a good understanding of its concepts. The overall level of knowledge about AI among the study participants was moderate, with the mean knowledge score being 42.3 ± 21.8 out of 100 and students having a significantly higher knowledge score than faculty members. The attitude towards AI among pharmacy students and faculty members was positive, but there were still concerns about the impact of AI on job security and patient safety. Pharmacy students and faculty members had limited experience using AI tools in their practice. The majority of respondents (96.2%) believed that AI could improve patient care and pharmacy services. However, only a minority (18.6%) reported having received education or training on AI technology. High income, a strong educational level and background, and previous experience with technologies were predictors of KAP toward using AI in pharmacy practice. Finally, there was a positive correlation between knowledge about AI and attitudes towards AI as well as a significant positive correlation between AI knowledge and overall KAP scores. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that while there is a growing awareness of AI technology among pharmacy professionals in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, there are still significant gaps in understanding and adopting AI in pharmacy Practice.


Subject(s)
Pharmaceutical Services , Pharmacy , Students, Pharmacy , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Artificial Intelligence , Attitude of Health Personnel , Faculty , Lebanon
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