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1.
Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being ; 19(1): 2361494, 2024 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38824661

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To examine the lived experiences of children and adolescents coping with mental health issues and seeking mental health services in Saskatchewan during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In our descriptive phenomenological qualitative study, we interviewed forty-six individuals, including children aged 8-15 and their parents. Thematic analysis was applied to interpret the interview data. RESULTS: Our analysis identified three key themes: pyscho-behavioural impact, academic impact, and social impact. The pandemic adversely affected children due to factors like changes in behaviours such as increased screen time and decreased physical activity, limited access to mental health services, and disruptions to schooling and social interactions. Coping mechanisms varied, ranging from the utilization of available mental health supports and services to individual and family-based strategies. Disparities in timely access to mental health services were evident, with financially stable families accessing private services, while others struggled, particularly in rural areas. Families demonstrated resilience through parental efforts to seek balance and prioritize safety amidst COVID-19 challenges. CONCLUSIONS: Social connectedness served as a crucial buffer against pandemic-induced stress. Children faced difficulty in accessing timely mental health services and supports. Echoing participant experiences, our findings emphasize the urgency of targeted interventions and policy adjustments to address existing gaps in mental health service accessibility and availability.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19 , Mental Health Services , Mental Health , Qualitative Research , Humans , COVID-19/psychology , Saskatchewan , Adolescent , Child , Male , Female , SARS-CoV-2 , Parents/psychology , Family/psychology , Health Services Accessibility , Adult , Pandemics
2.
Nihon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi ; 61(2): 145-154, 2024.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38839313

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between difficulties experienced by family in supporting elderly patients with diabetes and these patients' higher-level functions. METHODS: The subjects were outpatients with diabetes ≥65 years old at Ise Red Cross Hospital and their family members. The Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence (TMIG-IC) was used to assess patients' higher-level functions. The Japanese version of the Diabetes Caregiver Activity and Support Scale (D-CASS-J) was used to measure difficulties experienced by family in supporting elderly patients with diabetes. Using a multiple regression analysis with TMIG-IC scores (instrumental ADL, intellectual activity, and social participation) as the dependent variable and D-CASS-J scores (based on the highest scoring Q1 group among the three quartiles of D-CASS-J scores) as the explanatory variables, standardized regression coefficients (ß) for higher-level functions on the family's perceived support difficulties were calculated. RESULTS: In total, 429 patients (254 male patients and 175 female patients) were included in the analysis. For male patients, the adjusted beta values for TMIG-IC scores in Q2 and Q3 were -0.039 (P=0.649) and -0.352 (P<0.001), respectively, and the adjusted beta values for the instrumental ADL scores were -0.064 (P=0.455), -0.192 (P=0.047), -0.090 (P=0.375), and -0.360 (P=0.002) for the Intellectually Active scores, respectively, and the adjusted beta for social role scores were 0.054 (P=0.581) and -0.261 (P=0.019), respectively. However, there was no association between the patients' higher-level functions and family support difficulties among female patients. CONCLUSIONS: Difficulty experienced by the family in supporting elderly male patients with diabetes is associated with reduced higher-level functioning.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Humans , Male , Female , Aged , Diabetes Mellitus/psychology , Family/psychology , Activities of Daily Living , Aged, 80 and over , Caregivers/psychology , Social Support
3.
Arch Esp Urol ; 77(4): 397-404, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38840283

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to analyse the family resilience of patients with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after cervical cancer surgery and its influencing factors. METHODS: Patients with cervical cancer postoperative SUI admitted to our hospital from May 2020, to May 2023, were retrospectively selected. They were divided into low-resilience group and high-resilience group in accordance with the Family Resilience Questionnaire (FaREQ). The general demographic data of the two groups were statistically analysed, and correlation and logistic regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: The FaREQ score of 222 patients was (93.61 ± 8.45). Amongst these patients, 21.62% scored less than 84 points, and 78.38% scored more than 84 points. Significant differences were found in the educational level, indwelling catheter time, family monthly income, religious belief, hope index, psychological resilience, family function and social support between the two groups (p < 0.05). A significant positive correlation was observed between family resilience and the above indicators (p < 0.05). The variance inflation coefficient values of educational level and indwelling catheter time were 15.764 and 43.766, and the tolerance values were 0.063 and 0.023, respectively. After removing them, family monthly income, religious belief, hope index, psychological resilience, family function and social support were the factors affecting the family resilience level of patients with SUI after cervical cancer surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The level of family resilience of patients with SUI after cervical cancer surgery is low. Many factors, such as family monthly income and religious belief, affect the level of resilience. Therefore, corresponding measures could be formulated in advance to improve the level of family resilience of such patients.


Subject(s)
Postoperative Complications , Resilience, Psychological , Urinary Incontinence, Stress , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Humans , Female , Retrospective Studies , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/surgery , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/psychology , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/psychology , Urinary Incontinence, Stress/surgery , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/psychology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Family/psychology , Adult , Aged
4.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 24(1): 199, 2024 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38840039

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the surgical process information sharing system could alleviate the parental anxiety during a pediatric selective operation. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. METHODS: A questionnaire survey was conducted one day before surgery for the enrolled participants. Family members assigned to the intervention group received real-time process information sharing through service reminders during the surgical period, while the control group received standard perioperative education. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to evaluate sleep quality during the perioperative period, and the State of Cohesion-13 Scale (SOC-13) and Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) were used to assess anxiety levels. Satisfaction levels during the perioperative period were assessed through a follow-up survey conducted one day after surgery. RESULTS: The intervention group showed better scores in terms of PSQI, SOC-13, SAS, and postoperative satisfaction levels at various time points compared to the control group, with statistically significant differences observed (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Real-time process information sharing is effective in reducing perioperative sleep disorders and anxiety among family members of pediatric patients, as well as improving satisfaction levels. This approach not only establishes a process and mechanism for effective doctor-patient communication but also helps implement continuous perioperative care, thereby optimizing internet healthcare services.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Elective Surgical Procedures , Humans , Male , Female , Elective Surgical Procedures/psychology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Child , Information Dissemination/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Child, Preschool , Parents/psychology , Sleep Quality , Patient Satisfaction , Family/psychology , Perioperative Period
5.
BMC Palliat Care ; 23(1): 140, 2024 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38840255

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Palliative care and the integration of health and social care have gradually become the key direction of development to address the aging of the population and the growing burden of multimorbidity at the end of life in the elderly. AIMS: To explore the benefits/effectiveness of the availability and stability of palliative care for family members of terminally ill patients in an integrated institution for health and social care. METHODS: This prospective observational study was conducted at an integrated institution for health and social care. 230 patients with terminal illness who received palliative care and their family members were included. Questionnaires and scales were administered to the family members of patients during the palliative care process, including quality-of-life (SF-8), family burden (FBSD, CBI), anxiety (HAMA), and distress (DT). We used paired t-tests and correlation analyses to analyze the data pertaining to our research questions. RESULTS: In the integrated institution for health and social care, palliative care can effectively improve quality of life, reduce the family's burden and relieve psychological impact for family members of terminally ill patients. Palliative care was an independent influencing factor on the quality of life, family burden, and psychosocial status. Independently of patient-related and family-related factors, the results are stable and widely applicable. CONCLUSION: The findings underline the availability and stability of palliative care and the popularization of an integrated service model of health and social care for elder adults.


Subject(s)
Family , Palliative Care , Terminally Ill , Humans , Palliative Care/methods , Palliative Care/psychology , Palliative Care/standards , Male , Female , Prospective Studies , Aged , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Family/psychology , Aged, 80 and over , Terminally Ill/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Adult
6.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0300834, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38843190

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Family group conferences (FGCs) in child welfare bring immediate and wider family members together to decide on the best way to meet a child's needs. Unlike professionally led meetings, the aim is for decisions to be made by or with family members. Qualitative and mixed-method research with FGC participants tends to show positive experiences: most participants feel their voices are heard; FGCs facilitate family-driven solutions and closer relationships-within families and with social workers. Although there is existing literature on FGCs, there is a paucity of robust comparative UK evaluations, i.e., randomised controlled trials or quasi-experimental studies. Comparative studies internationally have focused on a narrow range of outcomes, not recognised the importance of context, and paid little attention to the quality of delivery. Some qualitative studies have considered process and context but there is scant measurement of these. The aims of this study are, firstly, to establish how FGCs improve outcomes for families and what factors vary their quality, and, secondly, to assess longer-term outcomes in terms of service use and associated costs. METHODS: Given the importance of process and context, evaluation informed by realist and complex systems approaches is needed. This multi-method evaluation includes a survey of FGC services in all UK local authorities (n = 212) to map service provision; co-design of programme theory and evaluation measures with family members who have experienced an FGC (n = 16-24) and practitioners (n = 16-24) in two sites; a prospective single-arm study of FGC variability and outcomes after six months; and comparison of service use and costs in FGC participants (n≥300 families) and a control group (n≥1000) after two years using a quasi-experiment. DISCUSSION: This is a pragmatic evaluation of an existing intervention, to identify what mechanisms and contexts influence effective process and longer-term outcomes. The study is registered with Research Registry (ref. 7432).


Subject(s)
Family , Humans , Family/psychology , Child , Female , Child Welfare , United Kingdom , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
AACN Adv Crit Care ; 35(2): 97-108, 2024 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38848572

ABSTRACT

Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) increasingly are expected to eventually return home after acute hospital care. Yet transitional care for ICU patients and their families is often delayed until the patient is about to be transferred to another location or level of care. Transitions theory is a middle-range nursing theory that aims to provide guidance for safe and effective nursing care and research while an individual experiences a transition. Intensive care unit nurses are well positioned to provide ICU transitional care planning early. This article applies the transitions theory as a theoretical model to guide the study of the transition to home after acute hospital care for ICU patients and their families. This theory application can help ICU nurses provide holistic patient- and family-centered transitional care to achieve optimal outcomes by addressing the predischarge and postdischarge needs of patients and families.


Subject(s)
Family , Intensive Care Units , Patient Discharge , Transitional Care , Humans , Male , Female , Patient Discharge/standards , Transitional Care/standards , Middle Aged , Family/psychology , Adult , Aged , Critical Care Nursing/standards , Aged, 80 and over , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Critical Care , Patient Transfer/standards
8.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1349169, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38855450

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a prevalent health issue with significant effects on patients' lives. Understanding and attitudes toward mTBI among patients and their families can influence management and outcomes. This study aimed to assess knowledge and attitudes toward mTBI in these groups. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at Zhejiang Hospital from July 1, 2023, to September 30, 2023. Patients with mTBI and their family members participated. Data were collected via an online questionnaire covering demographic information and mTBI knowledge and attitudes. Knowledge scores ranged from 0 to 20 and attitude scores from 8 to 40. Multivariate logistic regression identified factors influencing these scores. Results: A total of 573 valid questionnaires were analyzed (289 males, 50.44%; 284 females, 49.56%). Among respondents, 258 (45.03%) had experienced a concussion. Mean knowledge and attitude scores were 11.00 ± 2.75 and 27.78 ± 4.07, respectively. Monthly per capita income of 5,000-10,000 RMB was negatively associated with knowledge and attitude scores (ß = 0.160, 95% CI: [3.245 to 0.210], P = 0.026). Middle school education decreased the likelihood of positive attitudes toward mTBI (OR = 0.378, 95% CI: [0.1630.874], P = 0.023). mTBI due to falls was associated with increased likelihood of positive attitudes (OR = 3.588, 95% CI: [1.274-10.111], P = 0.016). Discussion: Significant gaps in knowledge and attitudes toward mTBI exist among patients and their families, influenced by income and education levels. Personal experience with mTBI from falls correlates with more positive attitudes. These findings highlight the need for targeted educational interventions to improve understanding and attitudes, ultimately enhancing patient care and management. Comprehensive, accessible mTBI education is crucial for fostering positive attitudes and better knowledge among patients and their families.


Subject(s)
Family , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Female , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adult , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Family/psychology , China , Brain Concussion/psychology , Aged , Young Adult , Adolescent
9.
J Christ Nurs ; 41(3): E40-E46, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38853326

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Nurses care for patients of diverse cultures. Persons in and from the Caribbean region have specific needs and concerns related to the support they need when a family member is admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Nurses familiar with Caribbean patient culture can provide these family members with knowledgeable and culturally competent care. However, little research exists about the unique needs of this population. This pilot study explored the nursing support needs of adult Caribbean family members of patients in the ICU.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Family , Humans , Critical Illness/nursing , Female , Male , Caribbean Region/ethnology , Adult , Family/psychology , Family/ethnology , Middle Aged , Pilot Projects , Intensive Care Units , Social Support , Aged , Christianity , Culturally Competent Care , Critical Care Nursing , Needs Assessment
10.
J Appl Res Intellect Disabil ; 37(4): e13267, 2024 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38863165

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to identify perspectives of relatives and healthcare professionals regarding self-determination support for people with severe or profound intellectual and multiple disabilities, highlighting agreements and differences in their viewpoints. METHOD: Following a concept mapping study, online focus group meetings yielded statements on self-determination support from relatives (residential facilities: n = 6, family homes: n = 7) and healthcare professionals (residential facilities: n = 9, family home: n = 5). Participants clustered and rated statements, resulting in four concept maps interpreted by experts (N = 6). RESULTS: The 285 statements were categorised into 5-7 clusters per map, revealing key strategies for self-determination support: communication and choice making (facilitated by aids), sensitivity, familiarity, and collaboration among involved parties. CONCLUSION: Each group placed different emphasis on these strategies, highlighting importance of continuous support in their implementation. Future research should prioritise practical implementations of these strategies to enhance self-determination.


Subject(s)
Family , Health Personnel , Intellectual Disability , Personal Autonomy , Humans , Intellectual Disability/psychology , Adult , Male , Health Personnel/psychology , Female , Family/psychology , Middle Aged , Disabled Persons , Qualitative Research , Focus Groups , Young Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel
11.
Support Care Cancer ; 32(7): 425, 2024 Jun 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38864918

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The beneficial effects of family resilience and meaning in life on patients are established, but limited is known for the effect of perceived social support. We aim to investigate the impact of family resilience on the meaning of life among Chinese patients with breast cancer (BC) and to further detect whether perceived social support mediated this association. METHODS: From February to June 2022, we conducted this cross-sectional study with 276 women who were diagnosed with BC in a tertial hospital in Guangdong province, China. The Chinese version of Meaning in Life Scale (C-MiLS) was used to measure the meaning in life. The Chinese version of the family resilience assessment scale (C-FRAS) and the perceived social support scale (PSSS) were adopted to obtain the family resilience and perceived social support, respectively. The mediating effect of perceived spousal support was estimated using the bootstrapped confidence interval (CI) via IBM SPSS AMOS 22.0. RESULTS: The mean scores were 60.79 ± 11.63 for meaning in life, 82.08 ± 11.48 for family resilience, and 62.72 ± 12.19 for perceived social support, respectively. Our results indicated the positive correlations of meaning in life with family resilience (ß = 0.822, P < 0.05) and perceived social support (ß = 0.886, P < 0.05). The perceived social support exerted the mediating effect in the relationship between family resilience and meaning in life (ß = 0.368 [95%CI, 0.274, 0.450], P < 0.001), accounting for 54.6% of the variance in meaning in life. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight that family resilience and perceived social support should be enhanced for BC patients to improve their meaning in life. In particular, the association between family resilience and meaning in life was positively mediated by perceived social support. Thus, interventions for improving family resilience and perceived social support might be useful in easing psychological distress and improving meaning in life in individuals with BC.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Resilience, Psychological , Social Support , Humans , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Middle Aged , Adult , China , Family/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Aged , Quality of Life/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological
12.
BMC Palliat Care ; 23(1): 142, 2024 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38849809

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dignity is integral to palliative care. Illness can diminish it, causing hopelessness and the wish to hasten death. Yet, dignity is a complex multidimensional phenomenon, influenced by values and context. Understanding its varying interpretations can inform practice and policy. The aim of the study is to explore the understanding of dignity in adult patients with palliative care needs from a Lebanese perspective and how it is preserved during illness and while receiving health services. DESIGN: Qualitative interview study underpinned with a social constructionist lens. Fourteen patients recruited from home-based hospice and outpatient clinics in Lebanon. Data analysed using reflexive thematic analysis. RESULTS: Four themes were developed across all the interviews: (a) Dignity anchored through faith in God and religious practices; (b) Family support in maintaining physical, psychological wellbeing, and social connectedness; (c) Physical fitness, mental acuity, and healthy appearance through which patients may escape the stigma of disease, (d) accessible, equitable, and compassionate healthcare. DISCUSSION: Dignity is elusive and difficult to define but faith and religious beliefs play a significant contribution in this study. For the participants, illness is seen as a natural part of life that does not necessarily diminish dignity, but it is the illness related changes that potentially affect dignity. Findings show the importance of family and children in preserving dignity during illness and how their active presence provide a sense of pride and identity. Participants aspired to restore physical, social, and mental well-being to reclaim their dignity and normalize their lives. Challenges related to physical appearance, memory loss, vitality, and social stigma associated with illness diminished dignity. Accessible, equitable and compassionate healthcare services are also crucial in preserving dignity. Participants valued clear communication, respect, and empathy from healthcare providers and identified affordability of care essential for maintaining dignity. CONCLUSION: Faith in God, and strong family ties are dominant elements to maintaining dignity in the Lebanese context. Relational connectedness with family, children or God is also a need in maintaining dignity in other communal countries with variations in emphasis. The study indicates that religious and cultural context shapes the needs and perceptions of dignity during illness. These findings are likely to be transferable to many Middle Eastern countries but also countries with strong religious and family ties globally.


Subject(s)
Palliative Care , Qualitative Research , Humans , Male , Female , Palliative Care/psychology , Palliative Care/methods , Palliative Care/standards , Middle Aged , Aged , Lebanon , Adult , Family/psychology , Social Support , Aged, 80 and over , Respect , Personhood , Interviews as Topic/methods , Family Support
13.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 15(1): 2353530, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38836407

ABSTRACT

Background: Symptom accommodation by family members (FMs) of individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) includes FMs' participation in patients' avoidance/safety behaviours and constraining self-expression to minimise conflict, potentially maintaining patients' symptoms. The Significant Others' Responses to Trauma Scale (SORTS) is the only existing measure of accommodation in PTSD but has not been rigorously psychometrically tested.Objective: We aimed to conduct further psychometric analyses to determine the factor structure and overall performance of the SORTS. Method: We conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses using a sample of N = 715 FMs (85.7% female, 62.1% White, 86.7% romantic partners of individuals with elevated PTSD symptoms).Results: After dropping cross-loading items, results indicated good fit for a higher-order model of accommodation with two factors: an anger-related accommodation factor encompassed items related largely to minimising conflict, and an anxiety-related accommodation factor encompassed items related primarily to changes to the FM's activities. Accommodation was positively related to PTSD severity and negatively related to relationship satisfaction, although the factors showed somewhat distinct associations. Item Response Theory analyses indicated that the scale provided good information and robust coverage of different accommodation levels.Conclusions: SORTS data should be analysed as both a single score as well as two factors to explore the factors' potential differential performance across treatment and relationship outcomes.


We examined the Significant Others' Responses to Trauma Scale (SORTS), a measure of symptom accommodation in PTSD, among a large sample of family members.As measured by the SORTS, accommodation in PTSD could be broken down into two aspects: anger-related accommodation and anxiety-related accommodation.Accommodation was positively related to PTSD severity and negatively related to relationship satisfaction.


Subject(s)
Psychometrics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Female , Male , Factor Analysis, Statistical , Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Family/psychology , Middle Aged
14.
JMIR Aging ; 7: e53141, 2024 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38825851

ABSTRACT

Background: During COVID-19 lockdowns, older adults' engagement in daily activities was severely affected, causing negative physical and mental health implications. Technology flourished as a means of performing daily activities in this complex situation; however, older adults often struggled to effectively use these opportunities. Despite the important role of older adults' social environments-including their families and health professionals-in influencing their technology use, research into their unique perspectives is lacking. Objective: This study aimed to explore the daily activity performance, health, and technology use experiences of healthy independent Israeli adults (aged ≥65 years) during COVID-19 from a 3-dimensional perspective: older adults, older adults' family members, and health professionals. Methods: Nine online focus groups, averaging 6-7 participants per group, were conducted with older adults, family members, and health professionals (N=59). Data were analyzed using thematic analysis and constant comparative methods. Results: The intertwining of daily activity performance and health emerged as a central theme, with differences between the groups. Older adults prioritized their self-fulfilling routines based on motivation and choice, especially in social-familial activities. In contrast, family members and health professionals focused on serious physical and mental health COVID-19-related consequences. A consensus among all three groups revealed the meaningful role of technology use during this period in bridging functional limitations. Participants delved into technology's transformative power, focusing on the need for technology to get engaged in daily activities. Conclusions: This study illustrates the profound interplay between daily activity performances, physical and mental health, and technology use, using a 3-dimensional approach. Its focus on technology's uses and benefits sheds light on what older adults need to increase their technology use. Interventions for improving digital activity performance can be tailored to meet older adults' needs and preferences by focusing on motivational and preference-related activities.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , COVID-19 , Focus Groups , Humans , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Aged , Male , Female , Activities of Daily Living/psychology , Israel/epidemiology , Aged, 80 and over , Family/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Health Status
15.
BMJ Open ; 14(6): e081560, 2024 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38830739

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Families with children who have cystic fibrosis (CF) face a multitude of challenges. They require complex and time-consuming daily care, various forms of knowledge and intricate care responsibilities. One of the most critical challenges that Iranian families of children with CF face is the lack of adequate support from health teams in the early stages of diagnosis, frequent hospitalisation and the postdischarge process. Unfortunately, limited studies have been conducted in this field, and the Iranian society lacks a comprehensive support programme for these families after leaving treatment centres or home care teams. Therefore, it is necessary to identify and redefine the needs of these families for better care and support in Iran. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A mixed-method research design with an exploratory sequential approach will be used in this study. The study consists of three stages: stage (1) the qualitative phase (conventional content analysis and scoping review); stage (2) the programme design phase (development of a support programme) and stage (3) the quantitative phase (validation of the programme through the Delphi method). In the first stage, data will be collected through interviews. Key concepts, evidence and gaps in research will also be identified, collected and analysed through a scoping review. In the second stage, a support programme will be designed based on the results of the content analysis of interviews and the findings from the scoping review. In the final phase, the study will aim to validate the designed programme through a Delphi study. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study formed part of a Ph.D. degree and was approved by the ethics committee of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (IR.TBZMED.REC.1402.395). Informed consent will be obtained from all study participants. Findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Cystic Fibrosis , Humans , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Caregivers/education , Iran , Child , Research Design , Delphi Technique , Program Development , Qualitative Research , Social Support , Family
16.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 611, 2024 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38831320

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Professional behaviour is the first manifestation of professionalism. In teaching hospitals, the residents can be considered vulnerable to lapses in professional behaviour when they fail to meet the set standards of professionalism. Residents of some specialties are more at risk of lapses in professional behaviour due to the demanding nature of work. Research focusing on the behaviour of residents in the field of Gynae and the underlying factors contributing to such behaviour is notably lacking in the literature. Additionally, there is a gap in understanding the perspectives of patients from Pakistan on this matter, as it remains unexplored thus far, which constitutes the central focus of this study. An increase in complaints lodged against Gynae resident's professional behaviour in Pakistan Citizen Portal (PCP) was observed. Therefore, an exploratory qualitative study was conducted to investigate the factors and rationales contributing to the lapses in resident's professional behaviour. The study collected the viewpoints of three stakeholder groups: patients and their families, consultants and residents. The study was conducted in three phases. First, the document analysis of written complaints was conducted, followed by face-to-face interviews (11 per group) conducted by trained researchers from an independent 3rd party. Finally, the interview data was transcribed, coded and analysed. In total 15 themes were identified from the interviews with 3 stakeholders, which were then categorized and resulted in 6 overlapping themes. The most prevalent lapse reported by all 3 stakeholders was poor verbal behaviour of residents. CONCLUSION: The highly ranked factors contributing to triggering the situation were associated with workplace challenges, well-being of residents, limited resources, patients and family characteristics, patients' expectations, lack of administrative and paramedic support, cultural factors and challenges specific to Gynae specialty. Another intriguing and emerging theme was related to the characteristics of patients and attendants which helped in understanding the causes and implications of conflicting environments. The value of competency also emphasized that can be accomplished by training and mentoring systems. The thorough examination of these factors by key stakeholders aided in accurately analysing the issue, its causes, and possible solutions. The study's findings will assist higher authorities in implementing corrective actions and offering evidence-based guidance to policymakers to improve healthcare system.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Professionalism , Qualitative Research , Humans , Pakistan , Female , Male , Adult , Consultants , Family/psychology , Professional Misconduct
17.
Glob Health Action ; 17(1): 2354009, 2024 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38832537

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Family interactions, which are always multi-faceted, are complicated further by family members with disabilities. In resource-poor settings, policies and programmes that address the needs of and challenges faced by families are often inaccessible or unavailable. Approximately 13% of the families in Tanzania have at least one member with a disability, yet family-centred research on caring for disabled children and adolescents is scarce in this context. OBJECTIVE: The aim is to explore the needs and challenges faced by families that care for children and adolescents with physical disabilities in the Kilimanjaro Region of north-eastern Tanzania. METHODS: This qualitative study had a constructivist grounded-theory design. In-depth interviews, using a semi-structured interview guide based on the social-capital framework, were conducted with 12 female participants aged between 24 and 80. A conceptual model of family needs, inspired by Maslow's hierarchy of needs, informed the analysis. RESULTS: Challenging needs were grouped into five categories, which were linked to Maslow's hierarchy of needs and related to the central concept of 'adaptive adjustment': (1) 'barely surviving'; (2) 'safety needs in jeopardy'; (3) 'sociocultural protection'; (4) 'self-esteem far beyond reach', and (5) 'dreaming of self-actualisation'. CONCLUSION: Families caring for children and adolescents with physical disabilities in north-eastern Tanzania have needs that extend beyond the available and accessible resources. Families can adjust and adapt by avoiding certain situations, accepting the reality of their circumstances and exploring alternative ways of coping. A sustainable support system, including social networks, is essential for meeting basic needs and ensuring safety.


Main findings: The challenges associated with caring for children and adolescents with disabilities are related to various environmental and social barriers, any of which can significantly impact the wellbeing of all family members.Added knowledge: In the context of a study conducted in north-eastern Tanzania, both nuclear and extended family networks were found to be valuable sources of support for these families.Global health impact for policy and action: Families must take considerable steps to strengthen their sociocultural support systems while, the support of the government and other stakeholders is crucial in addressing the challenges faced by families caring for children and adolescents with disabilities.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Disabled Children , Grounded Theory , Qualitative Research , Humans , Tanzania , Adolescent , Female , Child , Disabled Children/psychology , Adult , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Aged , Interviews as Topic , Family/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Disabled Persons/psychology , Male , Health Services Needs and Demand
19.
BMC Psychol ; 12(1): 341, 2024 Jun 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38858753

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social media addiction (SMA) is an increasing problem, especially among young adults. Little is known about university students' SMA and family functioning. This study aimed to explore the mediating effect of depressive symptoms and the moderating effect of peer support in the relationship between family functioning and SMA among young adults. METHODS: A sample of 1862 Chinese university students completed an online survey including the Bergen Social Media Addiction Scale (BSMAS), Family APGAR, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), peer support, and demographic characteristics. Hierarchical regression and moderated mediation analysis were used to test the effects and pathways among them. RESULTS: Of the 1840 participants, 30.11% experienced SMA, 38.80% had family dysfunction and 15.98% had depressive symptoms. Hierarchical multiple regression showed better family functioning significantly predicted less SMA (ß = -0.26, p < 0.001) and lower depressive symptoms (ß = -0.58, p < 0.001), after adjusting for covariates. Mediation analysis verified that depressive symptoms mediated the effect of family functioning on SMA (indirect effect = -0.22, 95%CI[-0.28, -0.17]). Furthermore, the interaction of family functioning and peer support was negatively related to depressive symptoms (ß= -0.03, 95% CI[-0.05, -0.01]) and the interaction of depressive symptoms and peer support was positively related to SMA (ß = 0.01, 95%CI[0.004, 0.02]). Additional analysis further confirmed that peer support decreased depressive symptoms among young adults from dysfunctional families, and increased SMA behaviors in individuals with depressive symptoms. CONCLUSION: Better family functioning and lower depressive symptoms may contribute to less social media addiction among Chinese university students. Peer support could moderate the mediating role of depressive symptoms on social media addiction in individuals with family dysfunction.


Subject(s)
Depression , Peer Group , Social Support , Students , Humans , Male , Female , Students/psychology , Students/statistics & numerical data , Depression/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Young Adult , Universities , Adult , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Internet Addiction Disorder/psychology , China , Adolescent , Surveys and Questionnaires , Family Relations/psychology , Family/psychology , Mediation Analysis
20.
Turk Psikiyatri Derg ; 35(2): 102-115, 2024.
Article in English, Turkish | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38842152

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The effects of antipsychotics on negative symptoms are limited. The most appropriate approach in the treatment of schizophrenia is the integration of drug therapy with psychological and social interventions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of art therapy and psychosocial skills training (PSST) in the treatment of schizophrenia. METHODS: A total of 15 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia according to the criteria in DSM-5 and 12 patient relatives were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided into 2 groups, 7 were included in the art therapy program and 8 were included in the PSST program for schizophrenia. 90-minute sessions of art therapy and PSST were carried out once a week for 17 weeks. Participants with schizophrenia were evaluated with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Social Functioning Scale (SFS) and the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia and the relatives were given Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory and Zarit Burden Interview. RESULTS: There was a significant decrease in the PANSS negative symptoms, PANSS general psychopathology, SFS pro-social activities and SFS recreation scores in both groups, while the SFS social withdrawal scores decreased significantly only in the art therapy group. In the PANSS negative symptoms subscale, passive social withdrawal, difficulty in abstract thinking, lack of spontaneity and flow of conversation and stereotyped thinking scores were significantly lower in the art therapy group. In the PSST group only the score for difficulty in abstract thinking declined significantly. CONCLUSION: The findings of the present study suggest that art therapy and PSST have positive effects on the improvement of negative symptoms as well as improvements in social and cognitive functionality in schizophrenia.


Subject(s)
Art Therapy , Schizophrenia , Schizophrenic Psychology , Humans , Schizophrenia/therapy , Male , Female , Adult , Treatment Outcome , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Middle Aged , Psychosocial Functioning , Family/psychology
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