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1.
Minerva Surg ; 79(3): 273-285, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38847766

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Colorectal (CRC) cancer is becoming a disease of the elderly. Ageing is the most significant risk factor for presenting CRC. Early diagnosis of CRC and management is the best way in achieving good outcomes and longer survival but patients aged ≥75 years are usually not screened for CRC. This group of patients is often required to be managed when they are symptomatic in the emergency setting with high morbidity and mortality rates. Our main aim is to provide clinical data about the management of elderly patients presenting complicated colorectal cancer who required emergency surgical management to improve their care. METHODS: The management of complicated COlorectal cancer in OLDER patients (CO-OLDER; ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT05788224; evaluated by the local ethical committee CPP EST III-France with the national number 2023-A01094-41) in the emergency setting project provides carrying out an observational multicenter international cohort study aimed to collect data about patients aged ≥75 years to assess modifiable risk factors for negative outcomes and mortality correlated to the emergency surgical management of this group of patients at risk admitted with a complicated (obstructed and perforated) CRC. The CO-OLDER protocol was approved by Institutional Review Board and released. Each CO-OLDER collaborator is asked to enroll ≥25 patients over a study period from 1st January 2018 to 30th October 2023. Data will be analyzed comparing two periods of study: before and after the COVID-19 pandemic. A sample size of 240 prospectively enrolled patients with obstructed colorectal cancer in a 5-month period was calculated. The secured database for entering anonymized data will be available for the period necessary to achieve the highest possible participation. RESULTS: One hundred eighty hospitals asked to be a CO-OLDER collaborator, with 36 potentially involved countries over the world. CONCLUSIONS: The CO-OLDER project aims to improve the management of elderly people presenting with a complicated colorectal cancer in the emergency setting. Our observational global study can provide valuable data on the effectiveness of different management strategies in improving primary assessment, management and outcomes for elderly patients with obstructed or perforated colorectal cancer in the emergency setting, guiding clinical decision-making. This information can help healthcare providers make informed decisions about the best course of action for these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Male , Female , Risk Factors , Global Health , Intestinal Obstruction/surgery , Intestinal Obstruction/epidemiology
2.
J Headache Pain ; 25(1): 96, 2024 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38844846

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Migraine, a neurological disorder with a significant female predilection, is the leading cause of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) in women of childbearing age (WCBA). There is currently a lack of comprehensive literature analysis on the overall global burden and changing trends of migraines in WCBA. METHODS: This study extracted three main indicators, including prevalence, incidence, and DALYs, related to migraine in WCBA from the Global Burden of Disease(GBD) database from 1990 to 2021. Our study presented point estimates with 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs). It evaluated the changing trends in the burden of migraine in WCBA using the estimated annual percentage change (EAPC) and percentage change. RESULTS: In 2021, the global prevalence, incidence, and DALYs cases of migraine among WCBA were 493.94 million, 33.33 million, and 18.25 million, respectively, with percentage changes of 48%, 43%, and 47% compared to 1990. Over the past 32 years, global prevalence rates and DALYs rates globally have increased, with an EAPC of 0.03 (95% UI: 0.02 to 0.05) and 0.04 (95% UI: 0.03 to 0.05), while incidence rates have decreased with an EAPC of -0.07 (95% UI: -0.08 to -0.05). Among the 5 Socio-Demographic Index (SDI) regions, in 2021, the middle SDI region recorded the highest cases of prevalence, incidence, and DALYs of migraine among WCBA, estimated at 157.1 million, 10.56 million, and 5.81 million, respectively, approximately one-third of the global total. In terms of age, in 2021, the global incidence cases for the age group 15-19 years were 5942.5 thousand, with an incidence rate per 100,000 population of 1957.02, the highest among all age groups. The total number of migraine cases and incidence rate among WCBA show an increasing trend with age, particularly in the 45-49 age group. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the burden of migraine among WCBA has significantly increased globally over the past 32 years, particularly within the middle SDI and the 45-49 age group. Research findings emphasize the importance of customized interventions aimed at addressing the issue of migraines in WCBA, thus contributing to the attainment of Sustainable Development Goal 3 set by the World Health Organization.


Subject(s)
Global Burden of Disease , Global Health , Migraine Disorders , Humans , Migraine Disorders/epidemiology , Female , Global Burden of Disease/trends , Adult , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Incidence , Disability-Adjusted Life Years/trends , Young Adult , Middle Aged , Adolescent
4.
Lancet Planet Health ; 8(6): e352, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38851192
6.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1371253, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38832227

ABSTRACT

Background: This study assesses the changes over time and geographical locations in the disease burden of type 2 diabetes (T2D) attributed to ambient particulate matter pollution (APMP) from 1990 to 2019 in 204 countries and regions with different socio-demographic indexes (SDI). Methods: The Global Burden of Diseases Study 2019 (GBD2019) database was used to analyze the global burden of T2D attributed to APMP. This study evaluated both the age-standardized death rate (ASDR) and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) related to T2D, comparing data from 1990 to 2019. Estimated Annual Percentage Changes (EAPCs) were also utilized to investigate the trends over the 30-year study period. Results: The global age-standardized DALY rate and ASDR exhibited an increasing trend, with an EAPC of 2.21 (95% CI: 2.15 to 2.27) and 1.50 (95% CI: 1.43 to 1.58), respectively. This rise was most notable among older adult populations, men, regions in Africa and Asia, as well as low-middle SDI regions. In 2019, the ASDR for T2D caused by APMP was recorded at 2.47 per 100,000 population, while the DALY rate stood at 108.98 per 100,000 population. Males and countries with middle SDI levels displayed significantly high age-standardized death and DALY rates, particularly noticeable in Southern Sub-Saharan Africa. Conversely, regions with high SDI levels like High-income North America demonstrated decreasing trends. Conclusion: This study reveals a significant increase in T2D worldwide as a result of APMP from 1990 to 2019, with a particular emphasis on its impact on men, the older adult, and regions with low to middle SDI levels. These results underscore the urgent necessity for implementing policies aimed at addressing air pollution in order to reduce the prevalence of T2D, especially in the areas most heavily affected.


Subject(s)
Air Pollution , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Global Burden of Disease , Particulate Matter , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/mortality , Particulate Matter/adverse effects , Male , Female , Global Burden of Disease/trends , Middle Aged , Air Pollution/adverse effects , Air Pollution/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Disability-Adjusted Life Years , Global Health/statistics & numerical data
7.
NPJ Prim Care Respir Med ; 34(1): 14, 2024 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38834570

ABSTRACT

The FRESHAIR4Life study aims to reduce the non-communicable disease (NCD) burden by implementing preventive interventions targeting adolescents' exposure to tobacco use and air pollution (AP) worldwide. This paper presents the FRESHAIR4Life methodology and initial rapid review results. The rapid review, using various databases and PubMed, aimed to guide decision-making on risk factor focus, target areas, and populations. It showed variable NCD mortality rates related to tobacco use and AP across the participating countries, with tobacco as the main risk factor in the Kyrgyz Republic, Greece, and Romania, and AP prevailing in Pakistan and Uganda. Adolescent exposure levels, sources, and correlates varied. The study will continue with an in-depth situational analysis to guide the selection, adaptation, and integration of evidence-based interventions into the FRESHAIR4Life prevention package. This package will be implemented, evaluated, assessed for cost-effectiveness, and iteratively refined. The research places a strong emphasis on co-creation, capacity building, and comprehensive communication and dissemination.


Subject(s)
Air Pollution , Noncommunicable Diseases , Humans , Adolescent , Air Pollution/adverse effects , Noncommunicable Diseases/prevention & control , Vulnerable Populations , Tobacco Use/prevention & control , Romania , Pakistan , Uganda/epidemiology , Greece/epidemiology , Environmental Exposure/adverse effects , Environmental Exposure/prevention & control , Global Health , Risk Factors
9.
J Natl Cancer Inst Monogr ; 2024(63): 4-10, 2024 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38836530

ABSTRACT

Stigma is a social process characterized by negative beliefs, attitudes, and stereotypes associated with a specific attribute or characteristic that leads to discrimination and social exclusion. Stigma manifests across the cancer control continuum and remains a key challenge for cancer prevention and control worldwide. In this commentary, we provide an overview of the U.S. National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Global Cancer Stigma Research Workshop, a multi-disciplinary international conference held virtually in September 2022, which focused on the intersection of cancer and stigma. The meeting was unique in its convening of researchers, advocates, clinicians, and non-governmental and governmental organizations, who-as a collective-provided overarching topics, cross-cutting considerations, and future directions for the cancer stigma research community to consider, which we describe herein. In summary, studying cancer stigma comprehensively requires a holistic, adaptive, and multifaceted approach-and should consider interrelated factors and their intersection within diverse cultural and social contexts worldwide. Collectively, there was a call for: an inclusive approach, encouraging researchers and practitioners to identify and measure cancer stigma as a driver for cancer health inequities globally; an expansion of existing research methodology to include diversity of experiences, contexts, and perspectives; and collaborations among diverse stakeholders to develop more effective strategies for reducing stigma and improving cancer outcomes. Such efforts are essential to cultivating effective and equitable approaches to preventing and treating cancer worldwide.


Subject(s)
National Cancer Institute (U.S.) , Neoplasms , Social Stigma , Humans , Neoplasms/psychology , Neoplasms/therapy , United States/epidemiology , Biomedical Research , Global Health
10.
J Glob Health ; 14: 04113, 2024 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38843039

ABSTRACT

Background: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a prevalent neuro-sensory disorder that impairs quality of life. In this systematic review and modelling study, we estimated the global and regional prevalence of RLS and its associated factors. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, and Medline for population-based studies on RLS prevalence published up to 12 November 2023. The included studies reported prevalence using the International Restless Leg Syndrome Study Group's (IRLSSG) minimal diagnostic criteria without limitations on frequency, duration, or severity. We applied a multilevel multivariable mixed-effects meta-regression to generate the age-specific and sex-specific prevalence of RLS for high socio-demographic index (H-SDI) and low and middle socio-demographic index (LM-SDI) regions. We pooled odds ratios (ORs) for RLS associated factors using random-effects models. Finally, we derived the regional prevalence and cases of RLS based on an associated factor-based model. Results: From 52 articles across 23 countries, the global RLS prevalence in 2019 was estimated to be 7.12% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 5.15-9.76) among adults 20-79 years of age, equating to 356.07 million (95% CI = 257.61-488.09) affected individuals. Prevalence was similar in H-SDI (7.29%; 95% CI = 5.04-10.41) and LM-SDI (7.10%; 95% CI = 5.16-9.70) regions, with the majority of cases in LM-SDI countries (323.06 million; 90.73%). Europe had the highest (7.60%; 95% CI = 5.44-10.52) and Africa the lowest regional prevalence (6.48%; 95% CI = 4.70-8.87). The Western Pacific Region, meanwhile, had the most cases (111.91 million; 95% CI = 80.93-153.42). Factors positively associated with RLS included advanced age (OR = 1.13; 95% CI = 1.04-1.24), smoking (OR = 1.46; 95% CI = 1.29-1.64), depression (OR = 1.71; 95% CI = 1.26-2.32), and diabetes (OR = 1.54; 95% CI = 1.19-1.97). Conclusions: A considerable global burden of RLS exists. Effective strategies are needed to increase awareness and optimise resource allocation to address this often-overlooked condition. High-quality epidemiological investigations employing standardised and rigorous criteria for RLS are essential for addressing RLS burden more effectively. Registration: PROSPERO: CRD42020161860.


Subject(s)
Global Health , Restless Legs Syndrome , Adult , Humans , Middle Aged , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Restless Legs Syndrome/epidemiology , Aged
11.
J Glob Health ; 14: 05019, 2024 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38843040

ABSTRACT

Background: In this study, we assessed the general population's fears towards various diseases and events, aiming to inform public health strategies that balance health-seeking behaviours. Methods: We surveyed adults from 30 countries across all World Health Organization (WHO) regions between July 2020 and August 2021. Participants rated their fear of 11 factors on an 11-point Likert scale. We stratified the data by age and gender and examined variations across countries and regions through multidimensional preference analysis. Results: Of the 16 512 adult participants, 62.7% (n = 10 351) were women. The most feared factor was the loss of family members, reported by 4232 participants (25.9%), followed by cancer (n = 2248, 13.7%) and stroke (n = 1416, 8.7%). The highest weighted fear scores were for loss of family members (mean (x̄) = 7.46, standard deviation (SD) = 3.04), cancer (x̄ = 7.00, SD = 3.09), and stroke (x̄ = 6.61, SD = 3.24). The least feared factors included animals/insects (x̄ = 3.72, SD = 2.96), loss of a mobile phone (x̄ = 4.27, SD = 2.98), and social isolation (x̄ = 4.83, SD = 3.13). Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was the sixth most feared factor (x̄ = 6.23, SD = 2.92). Multidimensional preference analyses showed distinct fears of COVID-19 and job loss in Australia and Burundi. The other countries primarily feared loss of family members, cancer, stroke, and heart attacks; this ranking was consistent across WHO regions, economic levels, and COVID-19 severity levels. Conclusions: Fear of family loss can improve public health messaging, highlighting the need for bereavement support and the prevention of early death-causing diseases. Addressing cancer fears is crucial to encouraging the use of preventive services. Fear of non-communicable diseases remains high during health emergencies. Top fears require more resources and countries with similar concerns should collaborate internationally for effective fear management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fear , Humans , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Fear/psychology , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Young Adult , Life Change Events , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adolescent , Global Health , Neoplasms/psychology
12.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 28(3): 238-239, 2024 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38830255

ABSTRACT

Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Past President Judi L. Johnson, PhD, RN, FAAN, dedicated her career to guiding cancer education, patient- centered care, and oncology nursing excellence. On Saturday, April 20, 2024, Johnson pas.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Oncology Nursing , Societies, Nursing , Humans , History, 21st Century , Female , Global Health , Male , History, 20th Century , Middle Aged
13.
PeerJ ; 12: e17394, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38827296

ABSTRACT

The increasing frequency of zoonotic spillover events and viral mutations in low and middle-income countries presents a critical global health challenge. Contributing factors encompass cultural practices like bushmeat consumption, wildlife trade for traditional medicine, habitat disruption, and the encroachment of impoverished settlements onto natural habitats. The existing "vaccine gap" in many developing countries exacerbates the situation by allowing unchecked viral replication and the emergence of novel mutant viruses. Despite global health policies addressing the root causes of zoonotic disease emergence, there is a significant absence of concrete prevention-oriented initiatives, posing a potential risk to vulnerable populations. This article is targeted at policymakers, public health professionals, researchers, and global health stakeholders, particularly those engaged in zoonotic disease prevention and control in low and middle-income countries. The article underscores the importance of assessing potential zoonotic diseases at the animal-human interface and comprehending historical factors contributing to spillover events. To bridge policy gaps, comprehensive strategies are proposed that include education, collaborations, specialized task forces, environmental sampling, and the establishment of integrated diagnostic laboratories. These strategies advocate simplicity and unity, breaking down barriers, and placing humanity at the forefront of addressing global health challenges. Such a strategic and mental shift is crucial for constructing a more resilient and equitable world in the face of emerging zoonotic threats.


Subject(s)
Developing Countries , Zoonoses , Humans , Animals , Zoonoses/prevention & control , Zoonoses/virology , Zoonoses/epidemiology , Zoonoses/transmission , Mutation , Health Policy/legislation & jurisprudence , Global Health , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/prevention & control , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/virology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/transmission
14.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1305304, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38827607

ABSTRACT

Background: With the rapid increase in the prevalence of DM, studies on the awareness, treatment, and control of this condition are essential. Therefore, this study aimed to review the literature and pool the awareness, treatment, and control of diabetes at the global, regional, and national levels. Methods: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, several databases, including MEDLINE/PubMed, Institute of Scientific Information (ISI), Scopus, and Google Scholar, were searched using appropriate keywords up to June 2022. Observational studies investigating the awareness, treatment, and control of glucose levels among diabetic individuals were included. Awareness, treatment, and control were defined as the proportion of participants who were aware of their diabetes condition, treated pharmacologically, and achieved adequate glucose control, respectively. Two investigators independently conducted the study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment. Heterogeneity among studies was calculated using Chi-square, and a random-effect meta-analysis was used to pool the rates. Results: A total of 233 studies published between 1985 and 2022 met the inclusion criteria. The included studies had a combined population of 12,537,968. The pooled awareness of DM was 60% (95%CI: 56-63) and ranged from 41% (25-57) in low-income countries to 68% (64-72) in high-income countries, with no significant trend observed over the assessed periods at the global level. The pooled treatment of DM globally was 45% (42-48) and varied from 37% (31-43) in lower-middle-income countries to 53% (47-59) in high-income countries, showing variation over the examined time period. Before 2000, the proportion of adequate DM control was 16% (12-20), which significantly improved and reached 22% (19-25) after 2010. The pooled awareness, treatment, and control of DM were higher in females, high-income countries, and urban areas compared to males, upper and lower-middle-income countries, and rural areas, respectively. The older adults population had higher awareness and treatment rates than the adult population, but their DM control did not differ significantly. Conclusion: Despite the high level of awareness and treatment among the diabetic population, treatment success (control) is considerably low, particularly in low-income countries and rural areas. It is crucial to improve awareness, treatment, and control by strengthening the primary care system in all countries.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus , Global Health , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Male , Female
15.
AMA J Ethics ; 26(6): E472-478, 2024 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38833422

ABSTRACT

Poor-quality antimicrobial medicines continue to proliferate across supply chains, threatening patients' health and safety, especially in low- and middle-income regions. This article discusses consequences and risks of antimicrobial resistance and other ways in which antimicrobial medicines can be of poor quality and recommends regulatory and policy reforms to help maintain supply chain resilience and quality of antimicrobial medicines.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents , Humans , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , Global Health , Drug Resistance, Microbial , Health Policy
17.
Bull World Health Organ ; 102(6): 376-377, 2024 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38828060
18.
Lancet ; 403(10442): 2363, 2024 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38824943
19.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 28(10): 3669-3682, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38856143

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Currently, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) without extensive drug resistance (XDR) are significant challenges in terms of the global burden of disease. This study aimed to evaluate the trends of the global burden of MDR-TB without XDR and HIV/AIDS-MDR-TB without XDR, focusing on differences in socioeconomic status and sex for 204 countries and territories across periods from 1990 to 2019. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2019 study were obtained to construct a separate index measuring the burden of MDR-TB without XDR and HIV/AIDS-MDR-TB without XDR. Incidence, prevalence, mortality, and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) were calculated for each case and group. A population-attributable fraction approach was used to assess mortality and incidence of HIV/AIDS and MDR-TB coinfection. 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs) were presented for all measures. RESULTS: Our global estimates suggest that there were approximately 450,000 (95% UI 247,000-785,000) incident cases of MDR-TB without XDR and 109,000 (43,000-210,000) deaths caused by MDR-TB without XDR among individuals who were HIV-negative in 2019. For HIV-positive individuals, the corresponding figures were approximately 47,000 (33,000-67,000) incident cases of MDR-TB and 19,000 (8,000-36,000) deaths due to MDR-TB in the same year. In 2019, higher numbers of incident cases and deaths were observed in males compared to females among individuals who were HIV-negative. Conversely, for HIV-positive individuals, females had higher numbers of incident cases and deaths compared to males. Specifically, the estimated numbers for incident cases were 23,000 (15,000-33,000) for females and 24,000 (17,000-35,000) for males, while the estimated numbers for deaths were 9,600 (4,000-17,900) for females and 9,800 (4,100-18,500) for males. Male-to-female ratios have remained above 1.0 from 1990 to 2019 in both incident cases and number of deaths for HIV-negative individuals. However, for HIV and MDR-TB coinfection, both ratios were below 1.0 in most of the time series. CONCLUSIONS: Males had more cases and deaths due to MDR-TB without XDR than females in HIV-negative patients, while females faced a higher incidence and mortality in HIV/AIDS-MDR-TB without XDR. Interventions are needed to deal with such factors, which increase the burden of coinfection among females across the world.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections , Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant , Humans , Female , Male , Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant/epidemiology , Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Incidence , Global Health , Global Burden of Disease , Sex Factors , Coinfection/epidemiology , Prevalence , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/drug therapy , Sex Characteristics
20.
Birth Defects Res ; 116(6): e2364, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38847124

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Patients with cleft lip/palate need an interdisciplinary approach. Delays in the care of these patients and difficulties in accessing health services have been reported in different low-, middle-, and high-income countries. This study aimed to characterize worldwide publications on access to cleft lip and palate health treatment. METHODS: Databases were selected systematically and searched until July 2021. The review process followed standard methods for systematic reviews. The study quality was evaluated using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology guidelines for observational studies. RESULTS: A total of 289 publications were identified using our search strategy. After reviewing the titles and reading the abstracts and full text, 16 studies met the inclusion criteria in the review. In one study, financial difficulties obtained the attention of the professionals who attended to cleft lip/palate patients. Ethnic disparities, problems in transportation, and long distances between users and health centers were found. Additionally, there was misinformation about treatment and follow-up among the caregivers of patients with cleft lip/palate. CONCLUSION: When reviewing the literature on access to health services for patients with cleft lip/palate, barriers were reported in access to information, physical access to care centers, financial resources to cover expenses for treatment, and opportunities in care.


Subject(s)
Cleft Lip , Cleft Palate , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Cleft Lip/therapy , Cleft Palate/therapy , Global Health
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