Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 57.218
Filter
2.
Antivir Ther ; 27(2): 13596535221083179, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35499176

ABSTRACT

Background: Tools to eliminate Hepatitis B and C have been available and in 2016, the World Health Assembly endorsed the Global Health Sector Strategy for Viral Hepatitis. However, the adoption of hepatitis elimination programs has remained slow. Research design: The Center for Disease Analysis created a universal registry, the Polaris Observatory, to support informed decision-making at the national, regional, and global level for HCV and HBV elimination. The observatory covers 110 countries for HCV and 135 countries for HBV and provides decision analytics, disease burden modeling, economic impact assessments, and training to help countries with their national hepatitis elimination programs. Results: By providing reliable and up-to-date country specific data and analyses, demonstrating the impact of decisions, and providing costing estimates of national programs, our collaborating countries are making informed decisions. Our economic impact analyses also helped countries fund their elimination programs and negotiate prices. Polaris Observatory is an example of impactful private-public partnership where funding by the John C. Martin Foundation allowed support for informed decision-making by public agencies and national governments who would not/could not support such programs on their own. Conclusions: The catalytic funding allowed the Polaris Observatory to demonstrate the utility of such a program resulting in other donors to support this work. The Polaris Observatory is now supported through a portfolio of funders while our work and outputs remain independent to continue support for viral hepatitis elimination by year 2030.


Subject(s)
Hepatitis B , Hepatitis C , Hepatitis, Viral, Human , Global Health , Hepatitis B/epidemiology , Hepatitis B/prevention & control , Hepatitis C/epidemiology , Hepatitis C/prevention & control , Humans
3.
Trop Med Int Health ; 27(5): 467, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35505491
4.
J Adv Res ; 37: 185-196, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35499053

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Breast cancer (BC) is the most widely studied disease due to its higher prevalence, heterogeneity and mortality. Objectives: This study aimed to compare female BC trends among 21 world regions and globally over 28 year of data and to assess the association between sociodemographic transitions and female BC risks. Methods: We used Global burden of disease study data and measure the female BC burden according to 21 world regions and sociodemographic indices (SDI). Age-period-cohort (APC) analysis was used to estimate time and cohort trend of BC in different SDI regions. Results: By world regions, age-standardised rate of female BC incidence were high in high-income-North America (ASR, 92.9; (95 %UI, 89.2, 96.6)), Western Europe (84.7; (73.4, 97.2)) and Australia (86; (81.7, 90.2)) in 2017. Whereas this rate was significantly increased by 89.5% between 1990 and 2017 in East Asia. We observed negative association between SDI and death, and DALYs in 25th and below percentiles of death and DALYs for the worldwide regions. Further, there was observed a strong negative correlation between SDI and case fatality percent (r2017 = -0.93; r1990 = -0.92) in both 2017 and 1990 worldwide and highest case fatality percentage was observed in Central Sub-Saharan Africa. Overall, the risk of case-fatality rate tends to decrease most noticeably in high middle SDI countries, and the reduction of the risk of case-fatality rate in the recent cohort was the lowest in the low SDI countries. Conclusions: Remarkable variations exist among various regions in BC burden. There is a need to reduce the health burden from BC in less developed and under developing countries, because under-developed countries are facing higher degree of health-related burden. Public health managers should execute more classified and cost-effective screening and treatment interferences to lessen the deaths caused by BC, predominantly among middle and low SDI countries having inadequate healthcare supplies.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Global Burden of Disease , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Disability-Adjusted Life Years , Female , Global Health , Humans , Incidence , Male , Quality-Adjusted Life Years
5.
Bull World Health Organ ; 100(5): 296-297, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35521032
6.
Bull World Health Organ ; 100(5): 315-328, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35521037

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate equity in the allocation and distribution of vaccines for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to countries and territories participating in the COVID-19 Vaccines Global Access (COVAX) Facility. Methods: We used publicly available data on the numbers of COVAX vaccine doses allocated and distributed to 88 countries and territories qualifying for COVAX-sponsored vaccine doses and 60 countries self-financing their vaccine doses facilitated by COVAX. We conducted a benefit-incident analysis to examine the allocation and distribution of vaccines based on countries' gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. We plotted cumulative country-level per capita allocation and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines from COVAX against the ranked per capita GDP of the countries and territories to generate a measure of the equity of COVAX benefits. Findings: By 23 January 2022 the COVAX Facility had allocated a total of 1 678 517 990 COVID-19 vaccine doses, of which 1 028 291 430 (61%) doses were distributed to 148 countries and territories. Taking account of COVAX subsidies, we found that countries and territories with low per capita GDP benefited more than higher-income countries in the numbers of vaccines. The benefits increased further when the analysis was adjusted by population age group (aged 65 years and older). Conclusion: The COVAX Facility is helping to balance global inequities in the allocation and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines. However, COVAX alone has not been enough to reverse the inequality of total COVID-19 vaccine distribution. Future studies could examine the equity of all COVID-19 vaccine allocation and distribution beyond the COVAX-facilitated vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Global Health , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 11(1): 48, 2022 May 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35505361

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The One Health (OH) concept has been promoted widely around the globe. OH framework is expected to be applied as an integrated approach to support addressing zoonotic diseases as a significant global health issue and to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of zoonosis prevention and control. This review is intended to overview the social impact of the implementation of OH on zoonosis prevention and control. METHODS: A scoping review of studies in the past 10 years was performed to overview the integration feature of OH in zoonosis prevention and control and the social impacts of OH. PubMed and Web of Science were searched for studies published in English between January 2011 and June 2021. The included studies were selected based on predefined criteria. RESULTS: Thirty-two studies were included in this review, and most of them adopted qualitative and semi-qualitative methods. More than 50% of the studies focused on zoonosis prevention and control. Most studies were conducted in low- and middle-income countries in Africa and Asia. Applying OH approach in diseases control integrates policymakers, stakeholders, and academics from various backgrounds. The impact of OH on economic is estimated that it may alleviate the burden of diseases and poverty in the long term, even though more financial support might be needed at the initial stage of OH implementation. OH implementation considers social and ecological factors related to zoonosis transmission and provides comprehensive strategies to assess and address related risks in different communities according to regions and customs. CONCLUSIONS: Based on reviewed literature, although there seems to be a lack of guidelines for assessing and visualizing the outcomes of OH implementation, which may limit the large-scale adoption of it, evidence on the contributions of implementing OH concepts on zoonosis prevention and control indicates long-term benefits to society, including a better integration of politics, stakeholders and academics to improve their cooperation, a potential to address economic issues caused by zoonosis, and a comprehensive consideration on social determinants of health during zoonosis prevention and control.


Subject(s)
One Health , Animals , Global Health , Income , Poverty , Zoonoses/prevention & control
8.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0263550, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35507535

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2016, WHO launched the Global Health Sector Strategy on STIs, 2016-2021 (GHSS) to provide guidance and benchmarks for country achievement by 2020 and four global targets for achievement by 2030. METHODS: A country survey jointly developed by experienced technical personnel at WHO Headquarters (HQ) and WHO regional offices was reviewed and distributed by WHO regional advisors to 194 WHO Member States in September-March 2020. The survey sought to assess implementation and prioritization of STI policy, surveillance, service delivery, commodity availability, and surveillance based on targets of the GHSS. RESULTS: A majority (58%, 112/194) of countries returned a completed survey reflecting current (2019) STI activities. The regions with the highest survey completion rates were South-East Asia Region (91%, 10/11), Region of the Americas (71%, 25/35) and Western Pacific Region (67%, 18/27). Having a national STI strategy was reported by 64% (72/112) and performing STI surveillance activities by 88% (97/110) of reporting countries. Availability of STI services within primary health clinics was reported by 88% of countries (99/112); within HIV clinics by 92% (103/112), and within reproductive health services by 85% (95/112). Existence of a national strategy to eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphilis (EMTCT) was reported by 70% of countries (78/112). Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) monitoring for gonococcal infection (gonorrhoea) was reported by 64% (57/89) of reporting countries with this laboratory capacity. Inclusion of HPV vaccine for young women in the national immunization schedule was reported by 59% (65/110) and availability of cervical cancer screening was reported by 91% (95/104). Stockouts of STI medicines, primarily benzathine penicillin, within the prior four years were reported by 34% (37/110) of countries. CONCLUSIONS: Mechanisms to support improvements to STI service delivery through national-level policy, commitment, programming and surveillance are needed to operationalize, accelerate and monitor progress towards achievement of the 2030 global STI strategy targets.


Subject(s)
Gonorrhea , HIV Infections , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Global Health , Gonorrhea/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/diagnosis , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , World Health Organization
9.
Future Cardiol ; 18(5): 355-357, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35506472

ABSTRACT

Bibliography Dr Sanne Peters is an Associate Professor at The George Institute for Global Health and a Senior Lecturer at Imperial College London. She is also Associate Professor at the University Medical Center Utrecht. After completing her MSc in Epidemiology in 2009, she obtained a PhD in Epidemiology from Utrecht University in 2012. Her PhD focused on subclinical imaging measures of atherosclerosis as a means to identify people at high-risk for future cardiovascular disease. As part of her PhD training, she spent 6 months at The George Institute in Sydney. This is where she started her research on sex differences in cardiovascular disease. In 2013, she was awarded a postdoctoral fellowship, which enabled her to continue her work on sex differences at the University of Cambridge. In 2014, she was offered a position at the George Institute offices at the University of Oxford (now in collaboration with Imperial College London). In 2018, she relocated back to the Netherlands and was also appointed as Associate Professor in Utrecht.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Female , Global Health , Humans , London , Male , Prescriptions , Sex Characteristics
11.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 20(1): 50, 2022 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35501898

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The shift in the global burden of disease from communicable to noncommunicable was a factor in mobilizing support for a broader post-Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) health agenda. To curb these and other global health problems, 193 Member States of the United Nations (UN) became signatories of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and committed to achieving universal health coverage (UHC) by 2030. In the context of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the importance of health systems governance (HSG) is felt now more than ever for addressing the pandemic and continuing to provide essential health services. However, little is known about the successes and challenges of HSG with respect to UHC and health security. This study, therefore, aims to synthesize the evidence and identify successes and challenges of HSG towards UHC and health security. METHODS: We conducted a structured narrative review of studies published through 28 July 2021. We searched the existing literature using three databases: PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science. Search terms included three themes: HSG, UHC and health security. We synthesized the findings using the five core functions of HSG: policy formulation and strategic plans; intelligence; regulation; collaboration and coalition; and accountability. RESULTS: A total of 58 articles were included in the final review. We identified that context-specific health policy and health financing modalities helped to speed up the progress towards UHC and health security. Robust health intelligence, intersectoral collaboration and coalition were also essential to combat the pandemic and ensure the delivery of essential health services. On the contrary, execution of a one-size-fits-all HSG approach, lack of healthcare funding, corruption, inadequate health workforce, and weak regulatory and health government policies were major challenges to achieving UHC and health security. CONCLUSIONS: Countries, individually and collectively, need strong HSG to speed up the progress towards UHC and health security. Decentralization of health services to grass root levels, support of stakeholders, fair contribution and distribution of resources are essential to support the implementation of programmes towards UHC and health security. It is also vital to ensure independent regulatory accreditation of organizations in the health system and to integrate quality- and equity-related health service indicators into the national social protection monitoring and evaluation system; these will speed up the progress towards UHC and health security.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Universal Health Insurance , Global Health , Government Programs , Health Policy , Humans
12.
Syst Rev ; 11(1): 83, 2022 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35501908

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adolescents have been overlooked in global public health initiatives as this period is generally considered to be the healthiest in an individual's life course. However, the growth of the global adolescent population and their changing health profiles have called attention to the diverse health needs of adolescents. The increased attention toward adolescent health has accentuated existing gaps as global health reports have emphasised that there is a continued need for valid and reliable health data. In this context, evidence has shown that mental health issues constitute one of the greatest burdens of disease for adolescents. This integrative review aims to unpack the meaning of mental wellness among adolescents and its associated constructs by analysing and synthesising empirical and theoretical research on adolescent mental wellness. In doing this, we will develop a working definition of adolescent mental wellness that can be used to develop an instrument aimed at measuring adolescent mental wellness. METHODS: The integrative review is guided by the five steps described by Whittemore and Knafl. A comprehensive search strategy which will include carefully selected terms that correspond to the domains of interest (positive mental health/mental wellness) will be used to search for relevant literature on electronic databases, grey literature and government or non-governmental organisations (NGO) websites. Studies will be included if they describe and/or define general mental wellness in adolescent populations aged 10-19. The screening and reporting of the review will be conducted following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Data from the integrative review will be analysed using narrative framework synthesis for qualitative and quantitative studies. DISCUSSION: This integrative review aims to search for and synthesise current research regarding adolescent mental wellness to identify how wellness is being described and conceptualised. We aim to identify gaps and to contribute to a more comprehensive definition of mental wellness which can aid in the development of an age- and culturally appropriate measure of adolescent mental wellness.


Subject(s)
Health Status , Mental Health , Adolescent , Global Health , Humans , Public Health , Review Literature as Topic
13.
BMJ Glob Health ; 7(5)2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35501069

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Uncertainty is an inevitable part of healthcare and a source of confusion and challenge to decision-making. Several taxonomies of uncertainty have been developed, but mainly focus on decisions in clinical settings. Our goal was to develop a holistic model of uncertainty that can be applied to both clinical as well as public and global health scenarios. METHODS: We searched Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Scopus and Google scholar in March 2021 for literature reviews, qualitative studies and case studies related to classifications or models of uncertainty in healthcare. Empirical articles were assessed for study limitations using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) checklist. We synthesised the literature using a thematic analysis and developed a dynamic multilevel model of uncertainty. We sought patient input to assess relatability of the model and applied it to two case examples. RESULTS: We screened 4125 studies and included 15 empirical studies, 13 literature reviews and 5 case studies. We identified 77 codes and organised these into 26 descriptive and 11 analytical themes of uncertainty. The themes identified are global, public health, healthcare system, clinical, ethical, relational, personal, knowledge exchange, epistemic, aleatoric and parameter uncertainty. The themes were included in a model, which captures the macro, meso and microlevels and the inter-relatedness of uncertainty. We successfully piloted the model on one public health example and an environmental topic. The main limitations are that the research input into our model predominantly came from North America and Europe, and that we have not yet tested the model in a real-life setting. CONCLUSION: We developed a model that can comprehensively capture uncertainty in public and global health scenarios. It builds on models that focus solely on clinical settings by including social and political contexts and emphasising the dynamic interplay between different areas of uncertainty.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Public Health , Global Health , Humans , Qualitative Research , Uncertainty
14.
Ann Plast Surg ; 88(3 Suppl 3): S284-S287, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35513332

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Over the last several years, various social media platforms have been used to increase collaboration, education, and research internationally. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how plastic surgery residency programs use social media to promote global surgery education, research, and collaboration. METHODS: A full list of active integrated residency programs was obtained from the American College of Academic Plastic Surgeons website. A total of 82 programs were identified. Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter were searched for active accounts. Only accounts dedicated to plastic surgery programs or had a significant amount of residency-related content were included. Inclusion criteria included posts relating to global health, global surgery, mission trips, international plastic surgery education, and global surgery research. Caption language was analyzed and classified as either "resident education in global surgery," "an individual's interest in global surgery," "research in global surgery," "visiting international professor," or "global collaboration." Image content was then assessed for "images with patients," "images with other surgeons/residents," "images of international location," a combination thereof, "other," or "none." RESULTS: Instagram was by far the most used by plastic surgery residency programs with a total of 76 programs having accounts compared with only 32 programs and 33 programs having Facebook and Twitter accounts, respectively. There was no significant difference in the proportional number of posts relating to global surgery across the 3 platforms (P = 0.1911). On all 3 social media platforms, the majority of posts fell into the category of "international collaboration" with 42.5%, 50.7%, and 48.8% on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, respectively. None of the caption categories examined showed a significantly different proportion of posts across the 3 platforms. Image analysis showed a significant difference in the proportional representation across the 3 platforms in the categories of "images with other surgeons/residents" (P = 0.0196) "images with patients" (P = 0.0082), combination (P = 0.0225), and other (P = 0.0114). CONCLUSIONS: Although social media offers programs an easy way to promote global surgery research, collaboration, and education with a wider audience, it is being underused for this purpose as evident by the relatively lower number of postings on each platform relating to this content.


Subject(s)
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , Social Media , Surgeons , Surgery, Plastic , Global Health , Humans , Surgery, Plastic/education
15.
East Mediterr Health J ; 28(4): 247-248, 2022 Apr 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35545904

ABSTRACT

Cognizant that every human has the right to the highest attainable standard of health, the World Health Organization (WHO) is promoting the health and well-being of all by all. To achieve this mission in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR), a strategic vision was adopted calling on Member States and partners to anchor solidarity and action to achieve Health for All by All in the Region. The vision focuses on the need to address the environmental causes of diseases while targeting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and fulfilling the human rights to live in a healthy environment.


Subject(s)
Planets , Sustainable Development , Global Health , Human Rights , Humans , Mediterranean Region , World Health Organization
16.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 882, 2022 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35509027

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study examines the 20-year trend of suicide in 46 Muslim-majority countries throughout the world and compares their suicide rates and trends with the global average. Ecological-level associations between the proportion of the Muslim population, the age-standardized suicide rates, male-to-female suicide rate ratio, and the Human Development Index (HDI) in 2019 were examined. METHODS: Age-standardized suicide rates were extracted from the WHO Global Health Estimates database for the period between 2000 and 2019. The rates in each country were compared with the age-standardized global average during the past 20 years. The countries were further grouped according to their regions/sub-regions to calculate the regional and sub-regional weighted age-standardized suicide rates involving Muslim-majority countries. Correlation analyses were conducted between the proportion of Muslims, age-standardized suicide rate, male: female suicide rate ratio, and the HDI in all countries. Joinpoint regression was used to analyze the age-standardized suicide rates in 2000-2019. RESULTS: The 46 countries retained for analysis included an estimated 1.39 billion Muslims from a total worldwide Muslim population of 1.57 billion. Of these countries, eleven (23.9%) had an age-standardized suicide rate above the global average in 2019. In terms of regional/sub-regional suicide rates, Muslim-majority countries in the Sub-Saharan region recorded the highest weighted average age-standardized suicide rate of 10.02/100,000 population, and Southeastern Asia recorded the lowest rate (2.58/100,000 population). There were significant correlations between the Muslim population proportion and male-to-female rate ratios (r=-0.324, p=0.028), HDI index and age-standardized suicide rates (r=-0.506, p<0.001), and HDI index and male-to-female rate ratios (r=0.503, p<0.001) in 2019. Joinpoint analysis revealed that seven Muslim-majority countries (15.2%) recorded an increase in the average annual percentage change regarding age-standardized suicide rates during 2000-2019. CONCLUSIONS: Most Muslim-majority countries had lower age-standardized suicide rates than the global average, which might reflect religious belief and practice or due to Muslim laws in their judicial and social structure which may lead to underreporting. This finding needs further in-depth country and region-specific study with regard to its implication for public policy.


Subject(s)
Islam , Suicide , Adult , Africa, Northern , Female , Global Health , Humans , Male , Young Adult
17.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 613, 2022 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35524209

ABSTRACT

Sepsis causes 20% of global deaths, particularly among children and vulnerable populations living in developing countries. This study investigated how sepsis is prioritised in Malawi's health system to inform health policy. In this mixed-methods study, twenty multisectoral stakeholders were qualitatively interviewed and asked to quantitatively rate the likelihood of sepsis-related medium-term policy outcomes being realised. Respondents indicated that sepsis is not prioritised in Malawi due to a lack of local sepsis-related evidence and policies. However, they highlighted strong linkages between sepsis and maternal health, antimicrobial resistance and COVID-19, which are already existing national priorities, and offers opportunities for sepsis researchers as policy entrepreneurs. To address the burden of sepsis, we recommend that funding should be channelled to the generation of local evidence, evidence uptake, procurement of resources and treatment of sepsis cases, development of appropriate indicators for sepsis, adherence to infection prevention and control measures, and antimicrobial stewardship.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sepsis , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Female , Global Health , Humans , Malawi/epidemiology , Sepsis/drug therapy , Sepsis/epidemiology
18.
Int J Qual Health Care ; 34(2)2022 Apr 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35434737

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With an increase in the incidence and prevalence of non-rheumatic valvular heart diseases (NRVHDs), having a proper understanding of the disease current status in terms of quality of care and healthcare access can considerably affect further planning for the healthcare system. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we aimed to evaluate and compare the quality and equity of care concerning NRVHDs in terms of gender and sociodemographic index (SDI) using a newly proposed index. METHODS: We obtained the primary measures (e.g. incidence) from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) data about NRVHD from 1990 to 2017 to calculate the subsequent secondary indices (e.g. mortality-to-incidence ratio) with close association to quality of care. Then, using principal component analysis (PCA), quality of care index (QCI) was calculated as a novel index from the secondary indices, rescaled to 0-100. QCI was calculated for all age groups and both genders, globally, regionally and nationally between 1990 and 2017. RESULTS: Globally, the QCI for NRVHDs in 2017 was 87.3, and it appears that gender inequity was unremarkable (gender disparity ratio = 1.00, female QCI: 90.2, male QCI: 89.7) in 2017 similar to the past three decades. Among WHO world regions, the Western Pacific Region and Eastern Mediterranean Region showed the highest (90.1) and lowest (74.0) QCI scores. Regarding SDI, the high-middle-SDI quintile with a QCI of 89.4 and the low-SDI quintile with a QCI of 77.8 were the two extremes of healthcare quality in 2017. CONCLUSION: Although global status regarding the NRVHD's quality of care is acceptable, higher attention is required for lower SDI countries.


Subject(s)
Global Burden of Disease , Heart Valve Diseases , Female , Global Health , Health Services Accessibility , Heart Valve Diseases/epidemiology , Heart Valve Diseases/therapy , Humans , Incidence , Male , Quality of Health Care , Quality-Adjusted Life Years
19.
Am J Public Health ; 112(5): 694, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35417222
20.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 43(4): 483-487, 2022 Apr 10.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35443301

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of COVID-19 threatens the health and safety of the people all over the world. COVID-19 vaccine is the key public product to establish population immune barrier and achieve the global contain of the pandemic. The World Health Organization, the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations established COVID-19 Vaccines Global Access Facility (COVAX) in 2020, aiming to enable the fair access to COVID-19 vaccine by all countries in the world, especially the low- and middle-income countries. Although COVAX has facilitated the production and research of COVID-19 vaccine by coordinating the global supply chain, the implementation of COVAX is still facing many difficulties in financing, implementation and the awareness of public, revealing the problems of global health governance. Taking COVAX as an example, this paper analyzes the difficulties faced by global health governance and explore the underlying causes, so as to suggest feasible short and long-term paths for China's participation in global governance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Global Health , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...