Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 59.974
Filter
1.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 1531, 2024 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38844910

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To investigate the changes in the unhealthy eye-related behaviors of junior middle school students during the COVID-19 pandemic and the double reduction policy and its relationship with myopia. METHODS: Data were obtained from the 2019-2022 Tianjin Children and Youth Myopia, Common Diseases and Health Influencing Factors Survey. Latent profile analysis (LPA) and a generalized linear model (GLM) were applied to analyze the effect of eye-related behavior classes on myopia. RESULTS: A total of 2508 junior middle school students were included. The types of eye-related behavior were categorized into the medium-healthy behavior group, heavy academic burden and near-eye behavior group, insufficient lighting group and high-healthy behavior group. Students with heavy academic burdens and near-eye behavior were more likely to develop myopia than were those in the high-healthy group (OR = 1.466, 95% CI = 1.203-1.787; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The dual reduction policy has a positive effect on improving unhealthy eye-related behaviors, and the prevention and control of myopia through the use of different combinations of eye-related behaviors are heterogeneous among junior middle school students. In the post-COVID-19 period, we should continue to implement a double reduction policy and formulate targeted eye-related behavior strategies to provide an important reference for the prevention and control of myopia among children and adolescents during public health emergencies in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myopia , Students , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Myopia/epidemiology , Myopia/psychology , Myopia/prevention & control , Male , Female , Adolescent , Child , Students/psychology , Students/statistics & numerical data , China/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Pandemics , Schools , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak ; 34(6): 737-739, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38840362

ABSTRACT

This cross-sectional study investigated health-related behaviours in Korean cancer survivors by time after cancer diagnosis. The data of 50,532 subjects (aged 40 to 79 years) who participated in the 2007-2019 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES) were subjected to analysis. Health-related behaviours included obesity, current smoking, frequent drinking, influenza vaccination, health screening, and cancer screening. The odds for these behaviours were estimated by multivariate logistic regression models with adjustment for potential covariates. Approximately 5% of subjects were cancer survivors, and among these three-fifths were long-term (≥5 years) survivors. Cancer survivors had healthier behaviours than non-survivors for almost all behaviours. However, these trends were attenuated in long-term survivors. In conclusion, healthy behaviour should be emphasised for long-term cancer survivors. Key Words: Cancer survivors, Cross-sectional studies, Health-related behaviours.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Health Behavior , Neoplasms , Nutrition Surveys , Humans , Middle Aged , Male , Female , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Cancer Survivors/statistics & numerical data , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adult , Aged , Neoplasms/psychology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Smoking/epidemiology , Smoking/psychology , Early Detection of Cancer , Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/psychology
3.
J Korean Acad Nurs ; 54(2): 162-177, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38863186

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate the influence of uncertainty-related factors on the health behavior of individuals with coronary artery disease (CAD) based on Mishel's uncertainty in illness theory (UIT). METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study and path analysis to investigate uncertainty and factors related to health behavior. The study participants were 228 CAD patients who visited the outpatient cardiology department between September 2020 and June 2021. We used SPSS 25.0 and AMOS 25.0 software to analyze the data. RESULTS: The final model demonstrated a good fit with the data. Eleven of the twelve paths were significant. Uncertainty positively affected danger and negatively affected self-efficacy and opportunity. Danger had a positive effect on perceived risk. Opportunity positively affected social support, self-efficacy, perceived benefit and intention, whereas it negatively affected perceived risk. Social support, self-efficacy, perceived benefit and intention had a positive effect on health behavior. We found that perceived benefit and intention had the most significant direct effects, whereas self-efficacy indirectly affected the relationship between uncertainty and health behavior. CONCLUSION: The path model is suitable for predicting the health behavior of CAD patients who experience uncertainty. When patients experience uncertainty, interventions to increase their self-efficacy are required first. Additionally, we need to develop programs that quickly shift to appraisal uncertainty as an opportunity, increase perceived benefits of health behavior, and improve intentions.


Subject(s)
Coronary Artery Disease , Health Behavior , Self Efficacy , Social Support , Humans , Uncertainty , Male , Female , Coronary Artery Disease/psychology , Coronary Artery Disease/pathology , Middle Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Intention , Adult
4.
J Korean Acad Nurs ; 54(2): 178-192, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38863187

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to examine the predictive factors of COVID-19 vaccination behavior by evaluating the moderating effect of perceived behavioral control on the theory of planned behavior. METHODS: Data were collected from August 6 to August 31, 2022 from 235 college students (aged 20~29 years) across 12 universities using a structured web-based survey. Statistical analyses were conducted using the SPSS and AMOS software. RESULTS: Attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccination, subjective norms, and intention to be vaccinated significantly influenced COVID-19 vaccination behavior. Attitudes and subjective norms indirectly affected COVID-19 vaccination behavior through intention to vaccinate, whereas intention to vaccinate had a direct effect. The moderating effect of perceived behavioral control on the relationship between subjective norms and intention to vaccinate was significant. CONCLUSION: Interventions that foster a positive attitude toward COVID-19 vaccination and bolster subjective norms and perceived behavioral control can boost the intention to be vaccinated and facilitate the uptake of COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Intention , Students , Vaccination , Humans , Female , Students/psychology , Male , Young Adult , Universities , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Vaccination/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Health Behavior , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Psychological Theory , Theory of Planned Behavior
5.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 13101, 2024 06 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38849465

ABSTRACT

Currently, a comprehensive assessment of the relationship between ideal cardiovascular health (CVH) indicators and cataract risk is lacking. Life's Essential 8 (LE8) is the latest concept proposed by the American Heart Association to comprehensively reflect CVH status. LE8 includes four health behaviors (diet, physical activity, smoking, and sleep) and four health factors (blood lipid, blood sugar, blood pressure, and body mass index). This study tried to evaluate the association between LE8 and cataract using data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005-2008, a continuous research program which aims to monitor and evaluate the health and nutrition status of the US population. A cross-sectional study of 2720 non-cataract participants and 602 cataract participants. All participants were assigned to the poor, intermediate, and ideal CVH status groups based on LE8 score. Weighted multiple logistic regression was used to investigate the correlation between the LE8 score and cataract, as well as the correlation between each of the eight subitems and cataract, with potential confounding variables being adjusted. Then, restricted cubic spline analysis was used to further explore whether there was a nonlinear relationship between LE8 score and cataract. The proportion of cataract participants was 14.1%, 18.2%, and 20.6% in the ideal, intermediate, and poor CVH groups, respectively (P < 0.05). LE8 score was inversely associated with cataract risk, with each 10-point increase in LE8 score associated with a 14% reduction in cataract risk [odds ratio (OR) = 0.86, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79-0.93, P < 0.01]. Among all the LE8 subitems, physical activity, sleep, and blood glucose were significantly associated with cataract risk (all P < 0.05). Better CVH, defined by a higher LE8 score, is associated with a lower cataract risk. Efforts to improve LE8 score (especially when it comes to physical activity, sleep, and blood glucose) may serve as a novel strategy to help reduce the risk of cataract.


Subject(s)
Cataract , Nutrition Surveys , Humans , Cataract/epidemiology , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , United States/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Risk Factors , Exercise , Body Mass Index , Health Behavior , Diet , Blood Pressure , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Blood Glucose/analysis , Blood Glucose/metabolism
6.
Pan Afr Med J ; 47: 122, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38854859

ABSTRACT

Handwashing is an effective public health intervention for preventing the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19). Maintenance of clean hands is particularly important during the pandemic, to break the cycle of human-to-human transmission of the virus. This study explored the potential impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the handwashing behaviours of residents before and during the pandemic. A mixed-method cross-sectional design using standardised questionnaire was used to examine hand handwashing behaviours among residents before and during the COVID-19 pandemic in the middle belt of Ghana. However, this paper reports on the quantitative data on handwashing behaviour only. A total of 517 participants between 18 to 60 years were randomly selected from the Kintampo Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) database. Descriptive statistics were performed and McNamar test was used to estimate the difference in the handwashing behaviour of residents. Majority of the respondents were females (54.6%). The majority of them 77.0% (398) usually wash their hands with soap and water. Those who washed hands 4 to 6 times a day before the pandemic increased from 39.9% (159) to 43.7% (174). About 34.8% (180) had received training on hand washing and television 53.3% (96) emerged as the main source of training. Ownership of handwashing facilities increased from 11.4% (59) to 22.8% (118) during the pandemic. The odds of handwashing after handshaking were lower 0.64 (95% C1: 0.44-0.92,) during the pandemic. Television (53.3%) was the main source of training for respondents who had received training on handwashing (34.8%). The odds of owning a handwashing facility during the pandemic were 3 times higher than before (OR = 2.97, 95% CI: 1.94 - 4.65). The odds of handwashing after sneezing were 1.8 (95% CI: 1.19-2.92) times higher during the pandemic. Handwashing behaviours during the pandemic improved among residents than before. However, there is a need to intensify health education and media engagement on proper handwashing practices to protect the population against infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Ghana/epidemiology , Female , Male , Adult , Middle Aged , Adolescent , Young Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Health Behavior , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
7.
Cancer Control ; 31: 10732748241261567, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38849203

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Roughly 25% of the U.S- Border city, El Paso, Texas is obese. Obesity is a major risk factor for 13 cancers. Cancer is the leading cause of death in El Paso. Therefore, there is a growing urgency to implement evidence-based programs that support behavioral change that helps curb the impact of obesity in El Paso and the U.S.-Mexico border region. PURPOSE: This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of an obesity-related cancer prevention program (Pasos Para Prevenir Cancer (PPPC) on changes in participant nutrition behaviors. METHODS: Culturally tailored, theory-based education was provided to adults through the PPPC program. A total of 256 PPPC participants agreed to take part in our program evaluation. Participants were asked to complete a survey at baseline and 6 months after they completed the program. Session included topics on obesity-related cancers, assessing your obesity risk, measuring body fat, SMART goal setting, and how to find the right type of physical activity. For this report we used the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) data to assess changes between baseline and six months. We also used perceived dietary barriers as moderators on the relationship between program participation and nutrition behaviors. RESULTS: Most participants (92.2%) identified as being of Mexican American descent, were between the ages of 41-75 years of age (n = 165) and identified as females (n = 225). 48.1% of the participants were born in Mexico while 50.4% were born in the U.S. Approximately 35-51% of participants improved and sustained their intake of healthier foods at 6 month follow up. Specifically, there was a statistically significant shift from higher fat and sugar content foods to light and low-fat foods, and fruits and vegetables. Participants also increased their consumption of ground chicken, lean red meat, and seafood. A key modifier in this relationship is perceived health risk. CONCLUSION: Latinos on the U.S.-Mexico border ascribe to a healthy living mindset. In general, they frequently eat fruits and vegetables. Participation in PPPC increased perceived barriers to healthy living around cost and convenience and enhanced decision-making around healthier options. Participants responded to our adapted evidence-based program resulting in sustained changes in nutrition behaviors. Using adapted evidence-based strategies developed outside of the U.S.-Mexico border region is a feasible approach to address persist health disparities.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Obesity , Humans , Texas/epidemiology , Female , Male , Neoplasms/prevention & control , Middle Aged , Adult , Feeding Behavior , Health Education/methods , Health Behavior , Diet , Aged , Exercise , Program Evaluation
8.
BMC Womens Health ; 24(1): 334, 2024 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38849787

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Urban poor women face dual challenges regarding gender inequalities and urban poverty, which make them more likely to have health problems and affect their health-seeking behaviour. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of health-seeking behaviour during times of illness and predictors of sought care among urban poor women in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was performed among 340 randomly selected women residents from April to May 2023. Data was collected using a validated and reliable self-administered questionnaire and analysed using SPSS version 28.0 software. The dependent variable in this study was health-seeking behaviour during times of illness, while the independent variables were sociodemographic characteristics, socioeconomic characteristics, medical conditions, women's autonomy in decision-making, social support, perceived stigma, and attitude towards health. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify the predictors of sought care during times of illness. RESULTS: Study response rate was 100%, where 72.4% sought care during times of illness. Being non-Malay (AOR = 4.33, 95% CI: 1.847, 10.161), having healthcare coverage (AOR = 2.60, 95% CI: 1.466, 4.612), rating their health as good (AOR = 1.87, 95% CI: 1.119, 3.118), and having pre-existing chronic diseases (AOR = 1.92, 95% CI: 1.130, 3.271) were identified as predictors of sought care during times of illness. CONCLUSION: The present study showed that health-seeking behaviour during times of illness among the participants was appropriate. Health promotion and education, with a focus on educating and raising awareness about the importance of seeking timely healthcare, are crucial to improving health-seeking behaviour among urban poor women. Collaboration with relevant stakeholders is needed to develop comprehensive strategies to improve access to healthcare facilities for these women.


Subject(s)
Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Poverty , Urban Population , Humans , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adult , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Urban Population/statistics & numerical data , Malaysia/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Poverty/psychology , Poverty/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult , Health Behavior , Social Stigma , Social Support , Socioeconomic Factors
9.
BMC Oral Health ; 24(1): 669, 2024 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38849799

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study adopts a novel approach of using single-item surveys to simplify the assessment of oral health status and behaviors among Japanese private sector employees. We aimed to establish the validity of self-reported oral health in relation to clinical dental examinations, and to elucidate the relationship between oral diseases, health behaviors, and self-assessments. A secondary aim was to explore the association of self-rated oral health with oral health behaviors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Self-administered questionnaires and dental examinations were obtained from 2262 Japanese private sector employees. Workers self-rated their overall oral health status according to five choices: "very good," "good," "fair," "poor," or "bad." Self-reports were then compared with the results of clinical dental examinations, which included measuring the oral hygiene index (DI-S), the number of decayed teeth, periodontal status (Community Periodontal Index) and number of missing teeth. Convergent validity was also tested by examining the correlations of self-reported oral health status with oral health behaviors. RESULTS: Overall, 30.8% of workers reported their oral health as "poor" or "bad." "Poor" or "bad" oral health status was significantly correlated with missing teeth, periodontitis, and decayed teeth. However, lower correlations were found for gingivitis and the oral hygiene index. Most self-reported oral health behaviors were correlated with self-rated oral health; exceptions were "tooth brushing instructions received in a dental clinic," "having a primary-care dentist," and "habitual snacking between meals." CONCLUSIONS: Self-rated oral health provides reasonably valid data, and correlated well with clinically assessed oral health status, including dental caries, periodontal status, and tooth loss. Convergent validity was also found for oral health behaviors. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical trial registration number: UMIN000023011 (UMIN-CTR). Date of clinical trial registration: 06/07/2016.


Subject(s)
Oral Health , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Japan , Self Report , Health Behavior , Surveys and Questionnaires , Health Status
10.
Rural Remote Health ; 24(2): 8602, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38832455

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths. and early diagnosis could reduce breast cancer deaths. Therefore, health literacy is one of the most important determinants of participation in cancer screening for early diagnosis. This study aimed to determine the relationship between women's mammography screening behaviors and health literacy levels. METHODS: The cross-sectional study included 312 women aged 40-69 years living in a rural area. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews using a personal information form and the Turkish Health Literacy Scale (THLS-32). RESULTS: Of the women, 28.5% had mammography in the last 2 years. Of concern was the low health literacy levels. In addition, there were significant differences in the THLS-32 subgroup scores, including the THLS-32 total score, among the mammography screening groups. CONCLUSION: Health literacy levels of women were related to mammography screening rates. For this reason, effective intervention studies aiming to increase society's health literacy levels may contribute to an increase in breast cancer screenings.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Early Detection of Cancer , Health Literacy , Mammography , Rural Population , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Mammography/statistics & numerical data , Turkey , Health Literacy/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/prevention & control , Rural Population/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Early Detection of Cancer/statistics & numerical data , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Behavior , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data
11.
BMC Public Health ; 24(1): 1505, 2024 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38840057

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Active transport- for example walking and bicycling to travel from place to place- may improve physical fitness and health and mitigate climate change if it replaces motorised transport. The aim of this study is to analyse the active transport behaviour of adults living in Germany, to investigate differences among population groups and to determine whether climate protection is a frequent motive for this behaviour. METHODS: This study uses self-reported data of 4,971 adults who participated in a national health survey (German Health Update 2021), which was conducted as a telephone survey from July to December 2021. Associations between active transport behaviour and corresponding motives with sociodemographic and health-related variables were analysed using logistic regression models. RESULTS: Of the adult population, 83% use active transport at least once a week. The frequency and duration of walking per week are significantly higher than those for bicycling (walking 214 min/week; bicycling 57 min/week). Those with a lower education level are less likely to practise active transport than those with a higher education level. Furthermore, women are less likely to use a bicycle for transport than men. Among those practising active transport, the most frequently mentioned motive is "is good for health" (84%) followed by "to be physically active" (74%) and "is good for the climate/environment" (68%). Women and frequent bicyclists (at least 4 days/week) mention climate protection as a motive more often than men and those bicycling occasionally. CONCLUSIONS: The improvement of active transport, especially among people with lower education and women (for bicycling), may benefit from better insights into motives and barriers. Climate protection is an important motivator for practising active transport within the adult population living in Germany and should therefore have greater emphasis in behavioural change programmes.


Subject(s)
Bicycling , Motivation , Transportation , Walking , Humans , Germany , Female , Male , Adult , Bicycling/statistics & numerical data , Bicycling/psychology , Middle Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Walking/statistics & numerical data , Walking/psychology , Young Adult , Aged , Transportation/statistics & numerical data , Transportation/methods , Adolescent , Climate Change , Health Behavior , Health Surveys
12.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 25(1): 440, 2024 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38840084

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) is a common health condition and the leading cause of years lived with disability worldwide. Most LBP episodes have a favourable prognosis, but recurrences within a year are common. Despite the individual and societal impact related to LBP recurrences, there is limited evidence on effective strategies for secondary prevention of LBP and successful implementation of intervention programmes in a real-world context. The aim of this study is to analyse the effectiveness of a tailored exercise and behavioural change programme (MyBack programme) in the secondary prevention of LBP; and evaluate acceptability, feasibility and determinants of implementation by the different stakeholders, as well as the implementation strategy of the MyBack programme in real context. METHODS: This protocol describes a hybrid type I, randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and implementation of MyBack programme in the context of primary health care. The Behaviour Change Wheel framework and FITT-VP principles will inform the development of the behaviour change and exercise component of MyBack programme, respectively. Patients who have recently recovered from an episode of non-specific LBP will be randomly assigned to MyBack and usual care group or usual care group. The primary outcome will be the risk of LBP recurrence. The secondary outcomes will include disability, pain intensity, musculoskeletal health, and health-related quality of life. Participants will be followed monthly for 1 year. Costs data related to health care use and the MyBack programme will be also collected. Implementation outcomes will be assessed in parallel with the effectiveness study using qualitative methods (focus groups with participants and health providers) and quantitative data (study enrolment and participation data; participants adherence). DISCUSSION: To our knowledge, this is the first study assessing the effectiveness and implementation of a tailored exercise and behaviour change programme for prevention of LBP recurrences. Despite challenges related to hybrid design, it is expected that data on the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and implementation of the MyBack programme may contribute to improve health care in patients at risk of LBP recurrences, contributing to direct and indirect costs reduction for patients and the health system. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT05841732.


Subject(s)
Exercise Therapy , Low Back Pain , Secondary Prevention , Humans , Low Back Pain/prevention & control , Low Back Pain/therapy , Exercise Therapy/methods , Secondary Prevention/methods , Recurrence , Treatment Outcome , Adult , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Male , Female , Quality of Life , Health Behavior , Pain Measurement
13.
BMC Oral Health ; 24(1): 653, 2024 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38834970

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pregnancy is a unique period of women's lives, and oral health is an important public health indicator during this period. Pregnant women have increased vulnerability to oral health problems. The study aimed to describe oral health knowledge, literacy and behavior of pregnant women in a northeastern province of Thailand. METHODS: A descriptive study was used. Twenty pregnant women who attended antenatal care clinics of eight public hospitals in the province were recruited by use of purposive sampling. They participated voluntarily in individual interview. The Health Belief Model was used as conception framework. All data were transcribed and subjected to content analysis. RESULTS: Five categories emerged: Misbelief and lack of knowledge, Oral health problems and dental care seeking, Oral health information from different persons, Self-care management of oral health, and Fear of and anxiety towards dental treatment. The findings showed that low knowledge of need for treatment, little importance to oral health and low priority of dental needs affect the demand for dental care. Fear of and anxiety towards dental treatment were the results of negative past experiences of neglecting dental care. Some women perceived health benefits of practicing self-care of oral health during pregnancy. CONCLUSION: The findings help to better understand the oral health issues of pregnant women and provide baseline information for oral health promotion. Such promotion and culturally appropriate care should be integrated in maternal health education classes.


Subject(s)
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Literacy , Oral Health , Qualitative Research , Humans , Female , Thailand , Pregnancy , Adult , Dental Care/statistics & numerical data , Health Behavior , Young Adult , Self Care , Pregnant Women/psychology , Attitude to Health , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Prenatal Care , Dental Anxiety/psychology
15.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0295719, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38837958

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Skin cancer comprises half of all cancers in England and Wales. Most skin cancers can be prevented with safer sun exposure. As over exposure as a child can greatly increase future skin cancer risk, early and accessible sun safety education and promotion of sun safe behaviours is critical. Scientists agree there is no such thing as a 'safe tan', yet the public, including children, often have positive perceptions of tanned skin. To protect against future skin cancer, it is important to understand and address these misconceptions. The Curriculum for Wales with its area for Health and Well-being, and autonomy for schools in designing curriculum content, presents an ideal way to facilitate this exploration. AIMS: Gather data regarding perceptions towards tanning to explore the perceived effects of a tan on health.Inform the development and testing of an educational toolkit for integration within the Curriculum for Wales to encourage positive health behaviours and attitudes of school children towards tanning and sun exposure. METHODS: SunChat is a mixed methods exploratory study comprising three work streams: Workshops with school children to understand their perceptions on tanning.An online multiple-choice survey with parents/carers to understand perceptions, attitudes and behaviours towards tanning both for themselves and their children.An informal focus group with primary school educators to explore challenges in engaging with the school community around the Health and Well-being Area in the Curriculum for Wales. DISCUSSION: To date, there has been no work in Wales exploring children's, parents/carers', and educators' perceptions of tanning and how healthier attitudes can be encouraged. This study will engage with participants to scope current perceptions on tanning and the perceived effects tanning has on health. Findings will feed into future toolkit and curriculum development for health in schools in Wales and beyond.


Subject(s)
Parents , Skin Neoplasms , Sunbathing , Humans , Wales , Child , Skin Neoplasms/prevention & control , Parents/psychology , Sunbathing/psychology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Schools , Adolescent , Health Education/methods , Health Behavior , Perception
17.
Health Lit Res Pract ; 8(2): e93-e101, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38852071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) account for more than 75% of deaths in Thailand, which is higher than the global average of 71%. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the Digital Health Literacy (DHL) and Sufficient Health Behavior (SHB) Program on Thai working-age adults age 20 to 65 years with risk factors for NCDs (i.e., overweight and lacking physical activity), and compare the health literacy (HL) and SHB of participants living in urban and semi-urban areas at posttest. METHODS: Using the lottery method, this one-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design randomly selected 200 participants and assigned them to two equally sized groups. The data were gathered through surveys with an item discrimination power between .20 and .86 and a reliability of 0.94 and were statistically analyzed using t-test and F-test. KEY RESULTS: The DHL and SHB Program comprises six sessions over a 12-week period, and activities designed to enhance knowledge of NCDs, HL, health communication, and health behavior modification. It was conducted by health care workers from urban and semi-urban public hospitals via Zoom using various digital toolkits such as YouTube, animations, infographics, role-play videos, clips, and e-books. At the posttest, the participants had higher HL (t = 2.67, p = .001) and SHB (t = 3.36, p = .001). There was a difference in SHB scores (F = 4.640, p = .032) between those living in urban and those in semi-urban areas, but no difference in HL scores (F = 1.436, p = .232). CONCLUSIONS: The DHL and SHB Program improved HL and SHB in Thai working-age adults with risk factors for NCDs in both urban and semi-urban communities. [HLRP: Health Literacy Research and Practice. 2024;8(2):e93-e101.].


PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARY: This study describes the implementation of a Digital Health Literacy and Sufficient Health Behavior Program via Zoom by health care workers in urban and semi-urban hospitals to effectively improve health literacy and sufficient health behavior among Thai working-age populations with risk factors for noncommunicable diseases. The Program was preliminarily shown to be extendable to other health care settings covered by the Internet.


Subject(s)
Health Behavior , Health Literacy , Noncommunicable Diseases , Humans , Health Literacy/statistics & numerical data , Health Literacy/methods , Thailand , Adult , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Digital Health , Southeast Asian People
18.
Gastroenterol Nurs ; 47(3): 185-194, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38847428

ABSTRACT

Gastrointestinal symptoms are very common worldwide. This study aimed to examine the relationship between gastrointestinal system symptoms, psychological resilience, emotional self-efficacy, and healthy living behaviors in patients. The study was conducted in a training and research hospital in Türkiye with 258 patients who had experienced gastrointestinal symptoms and were scheduled for upper endoscopy and/or colonoscopy. The data were obtained by using an information form, the Brief Resilience Scale, the Emotional Self-Efficacy Scale, the Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors Scale, and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. A statistically positive and significant relationship was found between the Emotional Self-Efficacy Scale and the Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors Scale (r = 0.376; p < .05). It was determined that there was a statistically significant negative relationship between the mean Brief Resilience Scale and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale scores (r = -0.150; p < .05). In addition, a positive and significant relationship was found between the mean Brief Resilience Scale and the Emotional Self-Efficacy Scale scores (r = 0.374; p < .05). Psychological factors and healthy living behaviors thus clearly affect gastrointestinal system symptoms. For this reason, it is thought that planning interventions to teach self-management through healthy living behaviors and promoting psychological resilience may reduce gastrointestinal system symptoms.


Subject(s)
Colonoscopy , Resilience, Psychological , Self Efficacy , Humans , Female , Male , Middle Aged , Adult , Aged , Colonoscopy/psychology , Health Behavior , Gastrointestinal Diseases/psychology , Healthy Lifestyle , Young Adult , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal/psychology , Aged, 80 and over
19.
Exerc Sport Sci Rev ; 52(3): 102-107, 2024 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38865162

ABSTRACT

The influence of habit on physical activity is computationally modeled as the aggregated influence of past behavioral choices a person makes in a given context. We hypothesize that the influence of habit on behavior can be enhanced through engagement of the target behavior in a particular context or weakened through engagement of alternative behaviors in that context.


Subject(s)
Exercise , Habits , Humans , Choice Behavior , Computer Simulation , Exercise/psychology , Exercise/physiology , Health Behavior
20.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0305043, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38865314

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, concerns emerged that vaccinated individuals might engage less in infection-preventive behaviors, potentially contributing to virus transmission. This study evaluates the causal effects of COVID-19 vaccination on such behaviors within Japan, highlighting the significance of understanding behavioral dynamics in public health strategies. METHODS: Utilizing Japan's age-based vaccination priority for those born before April 1, 1957, this research employs a regression discontinuity design (RDD) to assess the vaccination's impact. Data from the fourth round of a longitudinal online survey, conducted from July 20 to 27, 2021, served as the basis for analyzing 14 infection-protective behaviors, including mask usage, handwashing, and avoiding crowds. RESULTS: A total of 12067 participants completed the survey. The analyzed sample size varied by outcome variable, ranging from 1499 to 5233. The analysis revealed no significant differences in the 14 behaviors examined among fully vaccinated, partially vaccinated, and unvaccinated individuals. This consistency across groups suggests that vaccination status did not significantly alter engagement in protective behaviors during the observation period. CONCLUSIONS: Empirical findings highlight the complexity of behavioral responses following vaccination, indicating that such responses may be influenced by various factors, rather than by vaccination status alone. Additionally, this result underscores the importance of crafting public health policies that account for the intricate interplay between vaccination and behavior. This study contributes to the broader discourse on managing responses to the pandemic and tailoring interventions to sustain or enhance protective health behaviors amid vaccination rollouts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Vaccination , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Male , Adult , Vaccination/psychology , Middle Aged , Health Behavior , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Young Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adolescent , Pandemics/prevention & control , Longitudinal Studies , Regression Analysis
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...