Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 138.342
Filter
1.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 155(6): 515-525.e1, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38839239

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Dental unit waterline (DWL) infection control is critical to infection prevention. Identifying challenges and barriers to its implementation is a first step toward understanding how to improve engagement. METHODS: A survey was distributed to dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants via the Qualtrics XM platform (Qualtrics). Responses were analyzed to quantify engagement in practices contrary to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance and identify avenues to improve engagement. RESULTS: Although oral health care providers recognized DWL infection control was important, there was a lack of clarity about appropriate routine engagement (eg, what lines should be tested), what should be noted in practice infection control records, and steps to be taken in response to a failed test result (ie, ≥ 500 colony-forming units/mL), such as taking a chair out of service. CONCLUSIONS: Survey results showed there were considerable gaps in knowledge and practice that could lead to patient harm. Oral health care provider training may not prepare personnel adequately to engage in, let alone supervise, DWL infection control. DWL infection control, like other aspects of infection control, requires action informed via an understanding of what needs to be done. Although good intentions are appreciated, better approaches to DWL infection control information dissemination and strategies to engage dental assistants, dental hygienists, and dentists in best practices are needed. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Evolving standards of care, including infection control, should be reflected in the provision of dental treatment. Improvements in communicating and ensuring engagement in best practices are needed when it comes to DWL infection control.


Subject(s)
Infection Control, Dental , Humans , Infection Control, Dental/methods , Dental Hygienists , Surveys and Questionnaires , Dentists , Dental Equipment , Equipment Contamination/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Dental Assistants
3.
Health Promot Int ; 39(3)2024 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38842148

ABSTRACT

It is suggested that individuals with limited health literacy have less awareness about cancer and screening methods. However, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the relationship between cancer screening perception and health literacy levels among women. This study investigates the determinants of cancer screening perceptions in Turkish women, with a particular emphasis on the influence of health literacy. Employing a cross-sectional design, the study involved 428 women aged 18-69. Data were collected via online questionnaires. Hierarchical regression analysis was utilized to assess the effects of distinct variables on cancer screening perceptions. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were employed to validate and ensure reliability. The results indicated that the constructed hierarchical regression model explicated around 10% of the variance in cancer screening perceptions. Among the various factors examined, health literacy emerged as the most potent predictor of screening perceptions. Individuals possessing higher health literacy demonstrated more favorable attitudes toward cancer screening. Additionally, age surfaced as another notable determinant, with advanced age correlating positively with awareness and receptiveness to screening. This research reveals the pivotal role of health literacy in shaping how Turkish women perceive cancer screening. While a few factors have an impact, the study highlights the urgent need to elevate health literacy levels to foster heightened awareness and engagement in cancer screening programs. The study's findings offer valuable guidance for devising targeted interventions to address disparities in cancer screening perception and participation, particularly among women in low- to middle-income countries such as Turkey.


Subject(s)
Early Detection of Cancer , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Literacy , Humans , Female , Turkey , Adult , Middle Aged , Early Detection of Cancer/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Aged , Adolescent , Young Adult , Perception
4.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 27(5): 604-611, 2024 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38842710

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the type of cancer that is seen all over the world and ranks first among female cancers in terms of incidence and cause of death. OBJECTIVE: This research was conducted to determine the breast cancer risk level and breast cancer knowledge level in women living in Northern Cyprus. METHODS: The study, which was planned as a relational survey, was carried out as web-based. The research was completed with 657 adult female participants living in Northern Cyprus who volunteered to participate in the study. In order to collect data, the first section includes the introductory features, the second section includes the "Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Form" for determining breast cancer risk levels, the third section includes the "Comprehensive Breast Cancer Knowledge Test" to determine the breast cancer knowledge levels of the participants, and the fourth section includes the "Champion Health Belief Model Scale" was used. RESULTS: It was determined that 95.2% of women were in the low risk group for breast cancer. The knowledge test mean score is 12.05, and it can be said that the scores obtained are above the average (min:4- max:18). It was found that 55.7% of the women knew how to do Breast Self-Examination (BSE), but only 15.4% of them regularly performed BSE every month. It was found that 80.9% of the women never had mammography and their knowledge scores increased with increasing education level (p< 0.001) and there was a significant relationship between non-smokers and their knowledge levels (p< 0.01). IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Despite the high scores of women in knowledge tests, it was observed that the frequency of applying BSE and having mammography was very low. Regardless of the risk factors for breast cancer, the importance of regular check-ups and BSE for every woman should be taught to women by health professionals, and group trainings should be planned for women who do not have training on this subject.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Breast Self-Examination , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Female , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology , Cyprus/epidemiology , Adult , Middle Aged , Breast Self-Examination/statistics & numerical data , Breast Self-Examination/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Factors , Young Adult , Aged , Early Detection of Cancer , Adolescent
7.
Psychol Sci Public Interest ; 25(1): 4-29, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38832574

ABSTRACT

What solutions can we find in the research literature for preventing sexual violence, and what psychological theories have guided these efforts? We gather all primary prevention efforts to reduce sexual violence from 1985 to 2018 and provide a bird's-eye view of the literature. We first review predominant theoretical approaches to sexual-violence perpetration prevention by highlighting three interventions that exemplify the zeitgeist of primary prevention efforts at various points during this time period. We find a throughline in primary prevention interventions: They aim to change attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge (i.e., ideas) to reduce sexual-violence perpetration and victimization. Our meta-analysis of these studies tests the efficacy of this approach directly and finds that although many interventions are successful at changing ideas, behavior change does not follow. There is little to no relationship between changing attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge and reducing victimization or perpetration. We also observe trends over time, including a shift from targeting a reduction in perpetration to targeting an increase in bystander intervention. We conclude by highlighting promising new strategies for measuring victimization and perpetration and calling for interventions that are informed by theories of behavior change and that center sexually violent behavior as the key outcome of interest.


Subject(s)
Sex Offenses , Humans , Sex Offenses/prevention & control , Sex Offenses/psychology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Crime Victims/psychology , Primary Prevention , Psychological Theory
8.
Alcohol Alcohol ; 59(4)2024 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38832908

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is among the most prevalent substance use disorders in the USA. Despite availability of effective interventions, treatment initiation and engagement remain low. Existing interventions target motivation and practical barriers to accessing treatment among individuals established within treatment systems. In contrast, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Treatment-Seeking (CBT-TS) aims to elicit and modify treatment-seeking beliefs to increase treatment-seeking behaviors among treatment-naïve samples. We aim to understand which beliefs were endorsed by those who did/did not initiate treatment, including changes in number of drinking days. METHOD: We examined treatment seeking beliefs elicited during CBT-TS among community-based adults with moderate-severe AUD with no treatment history. In this study, we discuss which beliefs were modifiable (i.e. those discussed during the intervention among individuals who subsequently attended treatment and may be associated with treatment-seeking behaviors). RESULTS: Of the 194 participants who received the intervention, 16 categories of beliefs were endorsed. Of the 38 participants (19.6%) who attended treatment, the most frequently endorsed belief was 'Not wanting specific types of substance use treatment or supports' (50%), a belief that may inhibit treatment seeking. The idea 'Treatment is positive' (47%) was also frequently cited, a belief that may facilitate treatment seeking. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes the beliefs that were more frequently endorsed among adults with moderate-severe, but untreated AUD who reported attending treatment following CBT-TS. Findings point to the potential of discussing and modifying treatment-seeking beliefs among treatment-naïve adults with severe AUD to increase treatment-seeking behaviors.


Subject(s)
Alcoholism , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Humans , Male , Female , Alcoholism/therapy , Alcoholism/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Middle Aged , Adult , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Mental Health Services
9.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0304982, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38833494

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the dissemination of health information is one of the pillars of HIV prevention efforts in Ethiopia, a large segment of women in the country still lack adequate HIV/AIDS knowledge, attitude, and behaviours. Despite many studies being conducted in Ethiopia, they mostly focus on the level of women's knowledge about HIV/AIDS, failing to examine composite index of knowledge, attitude, and behaviour (KAB) domains comprehensively. In addition, the previous studies overlooked individual and community-level, and spatial predictors. Hence, this study aimed to estimate the prevalence, geographical variation (Hotspots), spatial predictors, and multilevel correlates of inadequate HIV/AIDS-Knowledge, Attitude, and Behaviour (HIV/AIDS-KAB) among Ethiopian women. METHODS: The study conducted using the 2016 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey data, included 12,672 women of reproductive age group (15-49 years). A stratified, two-stage cluster sampling technique was used; a random selection of enumeration areas (clusters) followed by selecting households per cluster. Composite index of HIV/AIDS-KAB was assessed using 11 items encompassing HIV/AIDS prevention, transmission, and misconceptions. Spatial analysis was carried out using Arc-GIS version 10.7 and SaTScan version 9.6 statistical software. Spatial autocorrelation (Moran's I) was used to determine the non-randomness of the spatial variation in inadequate knowledge about HIV/AIDS. Multilevel multivariable logistic regression was performed, with the measure of association reported using adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with its corresponding 95% CI. RESULTS: The prevalence of inadequate HIV/AIDS-KAB among Ethiopian women was 48.9% (95% CI: 48.1, 49.8), with significant spatial variations across regions (global Moran's I = 0.64, p<0.001). Ten most likely significant SaTScan clusters were identified with a high proportion of women with inadequate KAB. Somali and most parts of Afar regions were identified as hot spots for women with inadequate HIV/AIDS-KAB. Higher odds of inadequate HIV/AIDS-KAB was observed among women living in the poorest wealth quintile (AOR = 1.63; 95% CI: 1.21, 2.18), rural residents (AOR = 1.62; 95% CI: 1.18, 2.22), having no formal education (AOR = 2.66; 95% CI: 2.04, 3.48), non-autonomous (AOR = 1.71; 95% CI: (1.43, 2.28), never listen to radio (AOR = 1.56; 95% CI: (1.02, 2.39), never watched television (AOR = 1.50; 95% CI: 1.17, 1.92), not having a mobile phone (AOR = 1.45; 95% CI: 1.27, 1.88), and not visiting health facilities (AOR = 1.46; 95% CI: 1.28, 1.72). CONCLUSION: The level of inadequate HIV/AIDS-KAB in Ethiopia was high, with significant spatial variation across regions, and Somali, and Afar regions contributed much to this high prevalence. Thus, the government should work on integrating HIV/AIDS education and prevention efforts with existing reproductive health services, regular monitoring and evaluation, and collaboration and partnership to tackle this gap. Stakeholders in the health sector should strengthen their efforts to provide tailored health education, and information campaigns with an emphasis on women who lack formal education, live in rural areas, and poorest wealth quintile should be key measures to enhancing knowledge. enhanced effort is needed to increase women's autonomy to empower women to access HIV/AIDS information. The media agencies could prioritise the dissemination of culturally sensitive HIV/AIDS information to women of reproductive age. The identified hot spots with relatively poor knowledge of HIV/AIDS should be targeted during resource allocation and interventions.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Female , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Adult , Adolescent , Middle Aged , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Young Adult , Health Surveys , Multilevel Analysis , Socioeconomic Factors , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/prevention & control , Spatial Analysis , Prevalence
10.
BMC Oral Health ; 24(1): 653, 2024 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38834970

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pregnancy is a unique period of women's lives, and oral health is an important public health indicator during this period. Pregnant women have increased vulnerability to oral health problems. The study aimed to describe oral health knowledge, literacy and behavior of pregnant women in a northeastern province of Thailand. METHODS: A descriptive study was used. Twenty pregnant women who attended antenatal care clinics of eight public hospitals in the province were recruited by use of purposive sampling. They participated voluntarily in individual interview. The Health Belief Model was used as conception framework. All data were transcribed and subjected to content analysis. RESULTS: Five categories emerged: Misbelief and lack of knowledge, Oral health problems and dental care seeking, Oral health information from different persons, Self-care management of oral health, and Fear of and anxiety towards dental treatment. The findings showed that low knowledge of need for treatment, little importance to oral health and low priority of dental needs affect the demand for dental care. Fear of and anxiety towards dental treatment were the results of negative past experiences of neglecting dental care. Some women perceived health benefits of practicing self-care of oral health during pregnancy. CONCLUSION: The findings help to better understand the oral health issues of pregnant women and provide baseline information for oral health promotion. Such promotion and culturally appropriate care should be integrated in maternal health education classes.


Subject(s)
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Literacy , Oral Health , Qualitative Research , Humans , Female , Thailand , Pregnancy , Adult , Dental Care/statistics & numerical data , Health Behavior , Young Adult , Self Care , Pregnant Women/psychology , Attitude to Health , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Prenatal Care , Dental Anxiety/psychology
11.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control ; 13(1): 56, 2024 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38835090

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has become one of the major public health threats worldwide, emphasizing the necessity of preventing the development and transmission of drug resistant microorganisms. This is particularly important for people with vulnerable health conditions, such as people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and long-term care residents. This study aimed to assess the current status of AMR, antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) and infection prevention and control (IPC) in Dutch long-term care facilities for people with intellectual disabilities (ID-LTCFs). METHODS: A web-based cross-sectional survey distributed between July and November 2023, targeting (both nonmedically and medically trained) healthcare professionals working in ID-LTCFs in The Netherlands, to study knowledge, attitudes and perceptions regarding AMR, AMS and IPC. RESULTS: In total, 109 participants working in 37 long-term care organizations for people with intellectual disabilities throughout the Netherlands completed the questionnaire. The knowledge levels of AMR and IPC among nonmedically trained professionals (e.g., social care professionals) were lower than those among medically trained professionals (p = 0.026). In particular regarding the perceived protective value of glove use, insufficient knowledge levels were found. Furthermore, there was a lack of easy-read resources and useful information regarding IPC and AMR, for both healthcare professionals as well as people with disabilities. The majority of the participants (> 90%) reported that AMR and IPC need more attention within the disability care sector, but paradoxically, only 38.5% mentioned that they would like to receive additional information and training about IPC, and 72.5% would like to receive additional information and training about AMR. CONCLUSION: Although the importance of AMR and IPC is acknowledged by professionals working in ID-LTCFs, there is room for improvement in regards to appropriate glove use and setting-specific IPC and hygiene policies. As nonmedically trained professionals comprise most of the workforce within ID-LTCFs, it is also important to evaluate their needs. This can have a substantial impact on developing and implementing AMR, AMS and/or IPC guidelines and policies in ID-LTCFs.


Subject(s)
Antimicrobial Stewardship , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel , Infection Control , Long-Term Care , Humans , Netherlands , Cross-Sectional Studies , Male , Female , Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Middle Aged , Infection Control/methods , Health Personnel/psychology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Disabled Persons , Intellectual Disability , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Drug Resistance, Microbial , Drug Resistance, Bacterial
12.
Korean J Med Educ ; 36(2): 157-174, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38835309

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study examines various aspects related to medical professionalism in medical students during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, focusing on their medical professionalism attributes, KPA (knowledge, practices, and attitudes) toward COVID-19 and attitudes toward provision of care in pandemic. We assessed whether these aspects related to medical professionalism were varied by their demographics and mental health level. METHODS: Six questionnaires related to medical professionalism were distributed online to medical students in six grades at a single medical school. A one-way analysis of variance was used to examine differences in scores related to medical professionalism based on their demographics, for examples, gender, grade, residence, religion, as well as their mental health levels. Pearson correlation analysis was used to examine correlations between each variable. RESULTS: Female students scored higher on medical professionalism attributes and attitudes toward duty-to-care than male students. Medical professionalism attribute scores were higher with higher relationship satisfaction and resilience levels but lower with higher anxiety levels. Furthermore, these scores were significantly associated with attitudes toward COVID-19 preparedness. However, COVID-19 knowledge and practice scores were negatively associated with attitudes toward COVID-19 preparedness and careers after graduation. Meanwhile, students who took the leave of absence related to 2020 doctors' strike had significantly lower scores on attitudes toward COVID-19 preparedness and duty to care than those who did not. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that mental health of medical students is strongly related to their various aspects related to medical professionalism, especially their attitudes toward COVID-19 preparedness. Good mental health was positively linked to medical professionalism attributes and attitudes toward COVID-19 preparedness. However, knowledge and practice of COVID-19 were negatively associated with willingness to participate in the pandemic response. Additionally, the experience of the 2020 leave of absence impacted the attitudes of medical students toward COVID-19 preparedness (p=0.015) and their duty to care (p=0.012) negatively.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Mental Health , Professionalism , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Female , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Pandemics , Adult , Young Adult , Republic of Korea
13.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1380710, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38835604

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices among anemia patients toward disease management. Methods: This web-based cross-sectional study was conducted between September and December 2023 at The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University (Zhejiang Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine). A self-designed questionnaire was developed to collect demographic information of anemia patients, and assess their knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) toward disease management. Results: A total of 396 valid questionnaires were collected. The mean age of the participants was 57.44 ± 16.80 years, and 52.02% were female. The mean knowledge, attitudes, and practices scores were 11.47 ± 1.73 (possible range: 0-14), 27.32 ± 2.96 (possible range: 7-35), and 40.49 ± 6.06 (possible range: 10-50), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that bachelor's degree or above was independently associated with sufficient knowledge (OR = 2.372, 95%CI: 1.160-4.853, p = 0.018). Knowledge (OR = 1.350, 95%CI: 1.166-1.563, p < 0.001) and hemoglobin within 60-90 g/L (OR = 1.782, 95%CI: 1.090-2.912, p = 0.021) were independently associated with positive attitudes. Moreover, attitudes (OR = 1.618, 95%CI: 1.454-1.799, p < 0.001) and diagnosis ≥1 year (OR = 1.949, 95%CI: 1.171-3.243, p = 0.010) were independently associated with proactive practices. The path analysis demonstrated that knowledge was directly and positively correlated with attitudes (ß = 0.484, 95% CI: 0.363-0.647, p = 0.008), and attitudes was directly and positively correlated with practices (ß = 1.195, 95% CI: 1.062-1.332, p = 0.007). Moreover, knowledge was indirectly and positively correlated with practice (ß = 0.579, 95% CI: 0.434-0.805, p = 0.004). Conclusion: Anemia patients have sufficient knowledge, negative attitudes, but proactive practices toward the toward disease management Comprehensive training programs are needed to improve anemia patients practices in this area.


Subject(s)
Anemia , Disease Management , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Female , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , Middle Aged , Anemia/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Aged , China
14.
Nurs Open ; 11(6): e2172, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38837592

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To explore the knowledge, attitudes and practice status of the intrahospital transport (IHT) of critically ill patients among clinical nurses and their influencing factors. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. METHODS: A questionnaire determined the nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practice scores. The questionnaire was used for data collection in a tertiary hospital from 10 January to 17 January 2023. Multivariate regression analysis was also used to evaluate the related factors of IHT of critically ill patients in different dimensions. RESULTS: Out of 670 distributed questionnaires, 612 nurses returned the completed questionnaire. The scores of KAP were (9.72 ± 1.61), (42.91 ± 4.58) and (82.84 ± 1.61), respectively. Pearson's correlation analysis showed that knowledge, attitude and behaviour scores were positively correlated. Variables that were associated with the scores of transfer knowledge were the scores of transfer practice, different departments and the scores of transfer attitude. The score of practice, number of IHT and received hospital-level training had statistical significance on the nurses' attitude scores. Furthermore, the score of the attitude and transport knowledge had statistical significance on the nurses' practice. CONCLUSION: The findings indicate a clear need for clinical nurses' knowledge of IHT of critically ill patients, especially in the emergency department (ED) and ICU. In addition, nurses need to be more active in transporting critically ill patients. Managers should enhance nurses' confidence in the IHT of critically ill patients and promote clinical nurses to establish a correct and positive attitude. IMPACT: The findings of this study benefit nursing managers in understanding the current situation of IHT of critically ill patients. Managers should apply new training methods to nursing education and develop a multi-level training program that is systematic, comprehensive and demand-oriented. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: The participants of this study were nurses and this contribution has been explained in the Data collection section. There was no patient contribution in this study.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Male , Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Attitude of Health Personnel , Patient Transfer/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology
15.
Clin Exp Dent Res ; 10(3): e904, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38837625

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Mouthguards (MGs) have the potential to prevent contact sport-related dental injuries. However, varying perceptions of their effectiveness persist, influencing recommendations by dental professionals. AIM: To assess the attitudes, knowledge, and perceptions of orthodontists, other dental practitioners (general dentists and other dental specialists), and orthodontic patients involved in contact sports regarding the use of MGs. METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional survey was designed to collect information from dental clinicians (orthodontists and other dental practitioners) and their orthodontic patients about using MGs during sports participation. A convenience sampling technique was used to recruit the participants for an online survey. A total of 107 (32 males/75 females) dental clinicians and 147 (75 males/72 females) orthodontic patients (mean age 17.5 ± 5.84 years) participated in the study. Pre-validated questionnaires, specifically designed for dental clinicians and orthodontic patients, were used. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 28.0; SPSS). RESULTS: Nearly 50% of dental clinicians have recently recommended MGs to their patients in their clinical practice out of which 59% preferred the stock type; 33% of dental clinicians enquired their patients about involvement in contact sports during initial visits. The majority of orthodontic patients acquired knowledge about MGs through the Internet. More than half of orthodontic patients expressed unwillingness to pay for MGs, and 89% of orthodontic patients found using MGs during contact sports uncomfortable. CONCLUSION: The findings provide valuable insights into the practices and attitudes of dental clinicians and orthodontic patients regarding MGs, their recommendations, and the comfort levels associated with using them during contact sports.


Subject(s)
Athletic Injuries , Dentists , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Mouth Protectors , Orthodontists , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Male , Mouth Protectors/statistics & numerical data , Orthodontists/psychology , Athletic Injuries/prevention & control , Athletic Injuries/psychology , Dentists/psychology , Dentists/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Tooth Injuries/prevention & control , Tooth Injuries/etiology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Orthodontics , Boxing , Sports
16.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0295719, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38837958

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Skin cancer comprises half of all cancers in England and Wales. Most skin cancers can be prevented with safer sun exposure. As over exposure as a child can greatly increase future skin cancer risk, early and accessible sun safety education and promotion of sun safe behaviours is critical. Scientists agree there is no such thing as a 'safe tan', yet the public, including children, often have positive perceptions of tanned skin. To protect against future skin cancer, it is important to understand and address these misconceptions. The Curriculum for Wales with its area for Health and Well-being, and autonomy for schools in designing curriculum content, presents an ideal way to facilitate this exploration. AIMS: Gather data regarding perceptions towards tanning to explore the perceived effects of a tan on health.Inform the development and testing of an educational toolkit for integration within the Curriculum for Wales to encourage positive health behaviours and attitudes of school children towards tanning and sun exposure. METHODS: SunChat is a mixed methods exploratory study comprising three work streams: Workshops with school children to understand their perceptions on tanning.An online multiple-choice survey with parents/carers to understand perceptions, attitudes and behaviours towards tanning both for themselves and their children.An informal focus group with primary school educators to explore challenges in engaging with the school community around the Health and Well-being Area in the Curriculum for Wales. DISCUSSION: To date, there has been no work in Wales exploring children's, parents/carers', and educators' perceptions of tanning and how healthier attitudes can be encouraged. This study will engage with participants to scope current perceptions on tanning and the perceived effects tanning has on health. Findings will feed into future toolkit and curriculum development for health in schools in Wales and beyond.


Subject(s)
Parents , Skin Neoplasms , Sunbathing , Humans , Wales , Child , Skin Neoplasms/prevention & control , Parents/psychology , Sunbathing/psychology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Schools , Adolescent , Health Education/methods , Health Behavior , Perception
17.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0304209, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38838036

ABSTRACT

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a hematological malignancy that requires effective pharmacotherapy for optimal management. There is limited information regarding Yemeni clinicians' knowledge and practice of NHL pharmacotherapy. This study aims to assess the knowledge and practice of physicians and nurses in Yemen regarding pharmacotherapy of NHL. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Sana'a, Yemen, from January 1, 2022, to January 31, 2023. Two self-administrated and validated questionnaires were distributed to 99 physicians and 164 nurses involved in pharmacotherapy for NHL in different oncology centers and units across Yemen. Convenience samples were used to recruit participants. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with nurses' and physicians' knowledge and practice. The correlation coefficient was used to examine the relationship between knowledge and practice. A total of 77 physicians and 105 nurses completed the questionnaires. The results showed that 54.3% of nurses and 66.2% of physicians had poor knowledge of NHL pharmacotherapy. In terms of practice, 83.8% of nurses and 75.3% of physicians exhibited poor practice regarding NHL pharmacotherapy. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified that nurses who received sufficient information about chemotherapy displayed a significant association with good knowledge, while nurses working in the chemotherapy administration department were significant predictors of good practice. Among physicians, those working in the National Oncology Center (NOC) in Sana'a demonstrated good practice. Correlation analysis revealed a positive relationship between nurses' knowledge and their practice. The study's results confirm deficiencies in knowledge and practice of pharmacotherapy for NHL among physicians and nurses in Yemen. Efforts should be made to enhance their understanding of treatment guidelines and to improve patient care. Improvement in educational programs and training opportunities may contribute to improving patient outcomes in the management of NHL.


Subject(s)
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin , Humans , Yemen , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/drug therapy , Male , Female , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Middle Aged , Physicians , Nurses , Clinical Competence , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data
18.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1388894, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38841661

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The World Health Organization has identified vaccine hesitancy as a global public health challenge. Healthcare providers are among the most influential and trusted figures for vaccine counseling. This article focuses on COVID-19 and influenza personal immunization behaviors, vaccine knowledge and opinions, and vaccine counseling confidence among future healthcare providers - dental and medical students. Methods: A cross-sectional anonymous online survey was conducted at four dental schools and one allopathic medical school in the United States. Items included personal vaccination status for the COVID-19 and influenza vaccines and vaccine-specific items developed based on past research to assess knowledge, opinions, and behaviors. Results: Two hundred and thirty-two medical and 221 dental students completed the survey. 68 and 55% scored average/above-average knowledge on COVID-19 and influenza vaccine items, respectively. There were significant differences between those with average/above-average and below-average knowledge scores regarding learning about, recommending, and advocating for vaccines and counseling vaccine-hesitant patients for both vaccines (p < 0.0001). Although higher-knowledge students had higher vaccination rates (p < 0.0001), many had insufficient knowledge about vaccines. Discussion: Healthcare providers play a crucial role in vaccine advocacy. The identified knowledge gaps are significant as they impact quality of patient care. And opinions about future vaccination practice such as recommending, providing, and counseling about vaccines. Equipping students with knowledge and communication skills will enable them to be strong vaccine advocates to improve overall public health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Students, Dental , Students, Medical , Humans , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cross-Sectional Studies , Students, Dental/psychology , Students, Dental/statistics & numerical data , Male , Female , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Vaccination Hesitancy/psychology , Vaccination Hesitancy/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1342490, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38841682

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Studies from developed and developing countries showed that the knowledge levels of stroke need improvement. Educational campaigns varied and were of limited influence predominantly because of their short duration and the need for financial support. The study aims to test the impact of a 3-min online video on the knowledge of stroke and factors influencing the knowledge score in four Arab countries. Methods: A cross-sectional web-based pre-post study was conducted in Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, and the United Arab Emirates. The data were collected using the snowball technique. Participants were adults aged 18 years and above. The questionnaire sequence was conducting a pretest, followed by the educational video explaining stroke occurrence, types, risks, warning signs, preventive measures, and treatment, and finally, a posttest to evaluate the differences in knowledge from baseline. Statistical analysis included paired t-tests comparing pre-post-education stroke knowledge scores, while repeated measures ANOVA, adjusting for covariates, assessed mean changes. Results: The total number of participants was 2,721, mainly younger than 55 years. The majority had a university degree and were not healthcare professionals. A significant improvement was noted in the total knowledge score in all countries from a mean average (Mpretest = 21.11; Mposttest = 23.70) with p < 0.001. Identification of the stroke risks (Mpretest = 7.40; Mposttest = 8.75) and warning signs (Mpretest = 4.19; Mposttest = 4.94), understanding the preventive measures (Mpretest = 5.27; Mposttest = 5.39) and the importance of acting fast (Mpretest = 0.82; Mposttest = 0.85) improved from baseline with (p < 0.001) for all score components. Conclusion: The educational tool successfully enhanced public understanding of stroke risks, the identification of stroke signs, and the critical need for emergency action. The advantages of this video include its short length, free online access, use of evidence-based content in lay language, and reflective images. The ultimate goal remains the long-term improvement of sustainability by mandating full-scale trials.


Subject(s)
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Stroke , Humans , Male , Female , Stroke/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Middle Aged , Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Health Education/methods , United Arab Emirates , Egypt , Internet , Video Recording , Aged , Jordan , Lebanon , Young Adult , Middle East , Adolescent
20.
Glob Health Action ; 17(1): 2354008, 2024 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38828500

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Postpartum depression (PPD) affects approximately 17% of the women worldwide with nearly half of all cases going undetected. More research on maternal mental health, particularly among healthcare professionals and pregnant mothers, could help identify PPD risks and reduce its prevalence. OBJECTIVE: Given that awareness of PPD is a crucial preventive factor, we studied PPD awareness among midwives and pregnant women in Arkhangelsk, Arctic Russia. METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted using in-depth semi-structured interviews. Midwives and pregnant women were recruited from the women's clinic of the Arkhangelsk municipal polyclinic. Seven midwives and 12 pregnant mothers were interviewed. RESULTS: Midwives described limited time for psychological counselling of pregnant women; they reported that their primary focus was on the physiological well-being of women. Pregnant women have expressed a desire for their families to share responsibilities. The participants considered PPD as a mix of psychological and physiological symptoms, and they also highlighted a discrepancy between the expectations of pregnant women and the reality of motherhood. The present study underscored the limited understanding of PPD identification. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that there is a need for increased awareness among midwives and pregnant women regarding PPD. Prevention programs targeting PPD with a specific emphasis on enhancing maternal mental health knowledge are warranted.


Main findings: Pregnant women and midwives in an Arctic Russian setting have low awareness of postpartum depression.Added knowledge: Improved awareness among pregnant women and midwives about the mental health of women after childbirth, educating pregnant women about symptoms of postpartum depression, encourage them to express their needs and collaboration with family supporters may help to reduce postpartum depression burden.Global health impact for policy and action: Updated campaigns and prevention programs with the focus on increasing the knowledge on mental health among pregnant women and health personnel may be effective support for Primary health care.


Subject(s)
Depression, Postpartum , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Midwifery , Qualitative Research , Humans , Female , Depression, Postpartum/psychology , Depression, Postpartum/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Russia , Adult , Pregnant Women/psychology , Arctic Regions , Interviews as Topic , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...