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1.
Multimedia | Multimedia Resources | ID: multimedia-9734

ABSTRACT

O vídeo explica o que faz um médico infectologista. O aplicativo FioLibras é um projeto do Instituto de Comunicação e Informação Científica e Tecnológica em Saúde da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (Icict/Fiocruz), em parceria com o Núcleo de Estudos em Diversidade e Inclusão de Surdos da Universidade Federal Fluminense (Nuedis/UFF), e conta com financiamento do Fundo de Inovação da Fiocruz e do Ministério da Saúde, por meio do Programa Fiocruz de Fomento à Inovação (Inova Fiocruz).


Subject(s)
Infectious Disease Medicine , Coronavirus Infections , Information Dissemination , Sign Language , e-Accessibility
2.
Bol. malariol. salud ambient ; 62(1): 83-89, jun, 2022. tab, ilus
Article in Spanish | LILACS, LIVECS | ID: biblio-1381301

ABSTRACT

La incidencia de patologías infecciosas, tropicales, endémicas y emergentes, exige la creación permanente de conocimiento. La infectología como especialidad médica, integra el estudio de diversas áreas: bacteriología, virología, micología, parasitología e inmunología, entre otras; conjugando la investigación y la docencia que constituyen aspectos relacionados con el quehacer universitario. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal para conocer la cultura y gestión de investigación/innovación en infectología tropical, desarrollada por docentes investigadores de la Universidad Regional Autónoma de los Andes (UNIANDES). Se evaluó la relación agentes-ámbito de investigación, mediante encuesta semiestructurada con una escala de Likert; resultados-ámbito de investigación, mediante el número de publicaciones científicas de enfermedades tropicales y, organizaciónámbito de investigación, mediante la identificación de estímulos a los docentes investigadores por parte de la Universidad. Se encontró un nivel avanzado de competencia científica de los docentes en el área de infectología, mostrando compromiso, comodidad y disposición para la práctica investigativa, además de habilidades para la redacción y difusión de la investigación; lo que se traduce en la publicación de 2457 productos en diversas revistas científicas en los últimos 5 años. Se evidenció que los tres componentes: agente, organización y resultados participan de manera sinérgica en el desarrollo de la cultura y gestión de investigación/innovación en infectología tropical en la institución, garantizando la producción de conocimiento y su sostenibilidad en el tiempo(AU)


The incidence of infectious, tropical, endemic and emerging pathologies requires the permanent creation of knowledge. Infectology as a medical specialty integrates the study of various areas: bacteriology, virology, mycology, parasitology and immunology, among others; combining research and teaching that constitute aspects related to university work. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out to learn about the culture and management of research/innovation in tropical infectology, developed by research professors of the Universidad Regional Autónoma de los Andes (UNIANDES). The agent-research area relationship was evaluated by means of a semi-structured survey with a Likert scale; results-research area, through the number of scientific publications on tropical diseases and, organization-research area, through the identification of stimuli for research professors by the University. An advanced level of scientific competence of teachers in the area of infectology was found, showing commitment, comfort and disposition for investigative practice, as well as skills for writing and disseminating research; which translates into the publication of 2457 products in various scientific journals in the last 5 years. It was evidenced that the three components: agent, organization and results participate synergistically in the development of the culture and management of research/innovation in tropical infectology in the institution, guaranteeing the production of knowledge and its sustainability over time(AU)


Subject(s)
Universities , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Sciences, Technology, and Innovation Management , Knowledge Management for Health Research , Infectious Disease Medicine , Ecuador , Faculty
3.
J Hosp Med ; 17(2): 114-116, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35504579

ABSTRACT

GUIDELINE TITLE: Clinical practice guideline by the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society and the Infectious Disease Society of America: 2021 Guideline on Diagnosis and Management of Acute Hematogenous Osteomyelitis in Children RELEASE DATE: August 5, 2021 PRIOR VERSION(S): n/a DEVELOPER: Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS) and Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) FUNDING SOURCE: PIDS and IDSA TARGET POPULATION: Children with suspected or confirmed acute hematogenous osteomyelitis.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases , Hospitalists , Osteomyelitis , Child , Humans , Infectious Disease Medicine , Osteomyelitis/diagnosis , Osteomyelitis/therapy
4.
PLoS One ; 17(4): e0267587, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35446911

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The emergence of the novel coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) has led to huge disruptions in the medical field and society. The significance of training and education for experts has been increasingly acknowledged in Japan, where the number of infectious disease (ID) specialists is reportedly insufficient. In this paper, we report the results of a web-based survey that was conducted to reveal the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic has influenced medical students' awareness of ID specialists and future career choices. METHOD: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in March 2021 and targeted 717 medical students belonging to Medical School of Okayama University, Japan. The questionnaire consisted of four questions meant to assess students' knowledge and future intentions of becoming ID specialists. RESULTS: We obtained 328 eligible questionnaires (response rate: 45.7%). Of 227 (69.2%) students who were aware of ID specialists, 99 (43.6%) answered that they came to know about them only after the pandemic, 12 (3.7%) answered that their interest in being an ID specialist arose during the pandemic, while 36 (11.0%) responded that they would rather not become ID specialists. At the time of the survey, 5 students (1.5%) were aiming to become ID specialists. CONCLUSION: We observed a very low rate of interest to be an ID specialist among medical students. The experience of the pandemic does not seem to have influenced Japanese medical students to choose ID as a specialty for their careers. Continuous efforts to increase the number of ID specialists are necessary in Japan as a countermeasure against the coming pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , COVID-19/epidemiology , Career Choice , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Infectious Disease Medicine , Internet , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 232, 2021 Dec 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34876198

ABSTRACT

In this article, we describe the advances in the field of pediatrics that have been published in the Italian Journal of Pediatrics in 2020. We report progresses in understanding allergy, autoinflammatory disorders, critical care, endocrinology, genetics, infectious diseases, microbiota, neonatology, neurology, nutrition, orthopedics, respiratory tract illnesses, rheumatology in childhood.


Subject(s)
Pediatrics/trends , COVID-19 , Child Nutrition Sciences , Critical Care , Endocrinology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Humans , Hypersensitivity , Infectious Disease Medicine , Neonatology , Neurology , Orthopedics , Rare Diseases , Respiratory Tract Diseases , Rheumatology
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 21812, 2021 11 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34750498

ABSTRACT

An estimation of the impact of climatic conditions-measured with an index that combines temperature and humidity, the IPTCC-on the hospitalizations and deaths attributed to SARS-CoV-2 is proposed. The present paper uses weekly data from 54 French administrative regions between March 23, 2020 and January 10, 2021. Firstly, a Granger causal analysis is developed and reveals that past values of the IPTCC contain information that allow for a better prediction of hospitalizations or deaths than that obtained without the IPTCC. Finally, a vector autoregressive model is estimated to evaluate the dynamic response of hospitalizations and deaths after an increase in the IPTCC. It is estimated that a 10-point increase in the IPTCC causes hospitalizations to rise by 2.9% (90% CI 0.7-5.0) one week after the increase, and by 4.1% (90% CI 2.1-6.4) and 4.4% (90% CI 2.5-6.3) in the two following weeks. Over ten weeks, the cumulative effect is estimated to reach 20.1%. Two weeks after the increase in the IPTCC, deaths are estimated to rise by 3.7% (90% CI 1.6-5.8). The cumulative effect from the second to the tenth weeks reaches 15.8%. The results are robust to the inclusion of air pollution indicators.


Subject(s)
Air Pollutants , Air Pollution , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Climate , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Algorithms , Bayes Theorem , Decision Making , France/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans , Humidity , Infectious Disease Medicine , Reproducibility of Results , Respiration Disorders , Seasons , Temperature
10.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259257, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34739498

ABSTRACT

Protective behaviors such as mask wearing and physical distancing are critical to slow the spread of COVID-19, even in the context of vaccine scale-up. Understanding the variation in self-reported COVID-19 protective behaviors is critical to developing public health messaging. The purpose of the study is to provide nationally representative estimates of five self-reported COVID-19 protective behaviors and correlates of such behaviors. In this cross-sectional survey study of US adults, surveys were administered via internet and telephone. Adults were surveyed from April 30-May 4, 2020, a time of peaking COVID-19 incidence within the US. Participants were recruited from the probability-based AmeriSpeak® national panel. Brief surveys were completed by 994 adults, with 73.0% of respondents reported mask wearing, 82.7% reported physical distancing, 75.1% reported crowd avoidance, 89.8% reported increased hand-washing, and 7.7% reported having prior COVID-19 testing. Multivariate analysis (p critical value .05) indicates that women were more likely to report protective behaviors than men, as were those over age 60. Respondents who self-identified as having low incomes, histories of criminal justice involvement, and Republican Party affiliation, were less likely to report four protective behaviors, though Republicans and individuals with criminal justice histories were more likely to report having received COVID-19 testing. The majority of Americans engaged in COVID-19 protective behaviors, with low-income Americans, those with histories of criminal justice involvement, and self-identified Republicans less likely to engage in these preventive behaviors. Culturally competent public health messaging and interventions might focus on these latter groups to prevent future infections. These findings will remain highly relevant even with vaccines widely available, given the complementarities between vaccines and protective behaviors, as well as the many challenges in delivering vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hand Disinfection , Masks , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Geography , Health Behavior , Humans , Infectious Disease Medicine/methods , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Poverty , Probability , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
11.
Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging ; 48(13): 4272-4292, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34633509

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this review is to give an overview of the current status of targeted optical fluorescence imaging in the field of oncology, cardiovascular, infectious and inflammatory diseases to further promote clinical translation. METHODS: A meta-narrative approach was taken to systematically describe the relevant literature. Consecutively, each field was assigned a developmental stage regarding the clinical implementation of optical fluorescence imaging. RESULTS: Optical fluorescence imaging is leaning towards clinical implementation in gastrointestinal and head and neck cancers, closely followed by pulmonary, neuro, breast and gynaecological oncology. In cardiovascular and infectious disease, optical imaging is in a less advanced/proof of concept stage. CONCLUSION: Targeted optical fluorescence imaging is rapidly evolving and expanding into the clinic, especially in the field of oncology. However, the imaging modality still has to overcome some major challenges before it can be part of the standard of care in the clinic, such as the provision of pivotal trial data. Intensive multidisciplinary (pre-)clinical joined forces are essential to overcome the delivery of such compelling phase III registration trial data and subsequent regulatory approval and reimbursement hurdles to advance clinical implementation of targeted optical fluorescence imaging as part of standard practice.


Subject(s)
Fluorescence , Optical Imaging , Cardiology , Forecasting , Humans , Infectious Disease Medicine , Inflammation , Medical Oncology
13.
Pharmacol Res ; 174: 105955, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34715330

ABSTRACT

Severe Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is characterized by numerous complications, complex disease, and high mortality, making its treatment a top priority in the treatment of COVID-19. Integrated traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and western medicine played an important role in the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of COVID-19 during the epidemic. However, currently there are no evidence-based guidelines for the integrated treatment of severe COVID-19 with TCM and western medicine. Therefore, it is important to develop an evidence-based guideline on the treatment of severe COVID-19 with integrated TCM and western medicine, in order to provide clinical guidance and decision basis for healthcare professionals, public health personnel, and scientific researchers involved in the diagnosis, treatment, and care of COVID-19 patients. We developed and completed the guideline by referring to the standardization process of the "WHO handbook for guideline development", the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system, and the Reporting Items for Practice Guidelines in Healthcare (RIGHT).


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Infectious Disease Medicine/trends , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/trends , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/adverse effects , Evidence-Based Medicine/trends , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Patient Acuity , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Treatment Outcome
15.
Washington, D.C.; OPS; 2021-10-21. (OPS/IMS/EIH/COVID-19/21-040).
in Spanish | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr-55413

ABSTRACT

Esta guía de práctica clínica provee recomendaciones informadas en la evidencia para el control de la infección, recolección de muestras, cuidado de soporte, tratamiento farmacológico y prevención de complicaciones. Las recomendaciones están dirigidas a todo el personal de salud que atiende a los pacientes en el servicio de urgencias/emergencias y la unidad de cuidados intensivos (médicos con especialidad en medicina de urgencias, neumología, medicina intensiva, medicina interna, anestesiología, infectología, terapistas respiratorios, enfermeras, químicos farmacéuticos). La guía pretende ser usada por tomadores de decisiones y miembros de entidades gubernamentales relacionados con el manejo de pacientes con COVID-19 en las unidades de cuidado intensivo (UCI) de la región de las Américas.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , COVID-19 Testing , Medication Therapy Management , Health Personnel , Infection Control , Emergencies , Intensive Care Units , Pulmonary Medicine , Internal Medicine , Anesthesiology , Infectious Disease Medicine , Respiratory Therapy , Nurses , Pharmacists , Americas
16.
J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc ; 10(8): 801-844, 2021 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34350458

ABSTRACT

This clinical practice guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis (AHO) in children was developed by a multidisciplinary panel representing Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). This guideline is intended for use by healthcare professionals who care for children with AHO, including specialists in pediatric infectious diseases, orthopedics, emergency care physicians, hospitalists, and any clinicians and healthcare providers caring for these patients. The panel's recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of AHO are based upon evidence derived from topic-specific systematic literature reviews. Summarized below are the recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of AHO in children. The panel followed a systematic process used in the development of other IDSA and PIDS clinical practice guidelines, which included a standardized methodology for rating the certainty of the evidence and strength of recommendation using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. A detailed description of background, methods, evidence summary and rationale that support each recommendation, and knowledge gaps can be found online in the full text.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases , Osteomyelitis , Pediatrics , Acute Disease , Child , Communicable Diseases/diagnosis , Communicable Diseases/therapy , Humans , Infectious Disease Medicine , Osteomyelitis/diagnosis , Osteomyelitis/therapy
17.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 17368, 2021 08 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34462491

ABSTRACT

Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis, which is the most common tick-borne human disease in Europe and North America. Currently, the diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis is based on serological tests allowing indirect detection of anti-Borrelia antibodies produced by patients. Their main drawback is a lack of sensitivity in the early phase of disease and an incapacity to prove an active infection. Direct diagnostic tests are clearly needed. The objectives of this study were to produce tools allowing sensitive detection of potential circulating Borrelia antigens and to evaluate them in a mouse model. We focused on two potential early bacterial makers, the highly variable OspC protein and the conserved protein FlaB. High-affinity monoclonal antibodies were produced and used to establish various immunoassays and western blot detection. A very good limit of detection for OspC as low as 17 pg/mL of sample was achieved with SPIE-IA. In infected mice, we were able to measure OspC in plasma with a mean value of 10 ng/mL at 7 days post-inoculation. This result suggests that OspC could be a good blood marker for diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis and that the tools developed during this study could be very useful.


Subject(s)
Antigens/blood , Borrelia burgdorferi , Lyme Disease/microbiology , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antigens, Bacterial/genetics , Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins/genetics , Disease Models, Animal , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Flagellin/genetics , Immunoassay , Infectious Disease Medicine , Interferometry , Kinetics , Mice , Peptides/chemistry
19.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 27(11): 1693.e1-1693.e8, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34371206

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To define the status of infectious diseases (ID) as an approved specialty in Europe; to enumerate the number of specialists (in general and in relation to the overall population) and specialist trainees and describe the content, delivery and evaluation of postgraduate training in ID in different countries. METHODS: Structured web-based questionnaire surveys in March 2021 of responsible national authorities, specialist societies and individual country representatives to the Section of Infectious Diseases of the European Union for Medical Specialties. Descriptive analysis of quantitative and qualitative responses. RESULTS: In responses received from 33/35 (94.3%) countries, ID is recognized as a specialty in 24 and as a subspecialty of general internal medicine (GIM) in eight, but it is not recognized in Spain. The number of ID specialists per country varies from <5 per million inhabitants to 78 per million inhabitants. Median length of training is 5 years (interquartile range 4.0-6.0 years) with variable amounts of preceding and/or concurrent GIM. Only 21.2% of countries (7/33) provide the minimum recommended training of 6 months in microbiology and 30% cover competencies such as palliative care, team working and leadership, audit, and quality control. Training is monitored by personal logbook or e-portfolio in 75.8% (25/33) and assessed by final examinations in 69.7% (23/33) of countries, but yearly reviews with trainees only occur in 54.5% (18/33) of countries. CONCLUSIONS: There are substantial gaps in modernization of ID training in many countries to match current European training requirements. Joint training with clinical microbiology (CM) and in multidisciplinary team working should be extended. Training/monitoring trainers should find greater focus, together with regular feedback to trainees within many national training programmes.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases , Education, Medical , Infectious Disease Medicine/education , Communicable Diseases/diagnosis , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases/therapy , Curriculum , Education, Medical/trends , Europe , Humans , Specialization , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Annu Rev Biomed Eng ; 23: 547-577, 2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34255991

ABSTRACT

The host-to-host transmission of respiratory infectious diseases is fundamentally enabled by the interaction of pathogens with a variety of fluids (gas or liquid) that shape pathogen encapsulation and emission, transport and persistence in the environment, and new host invasion and infection. Deciphering the mechanisms and fluid properties that govern and promote these steps of pathogen transmission will enable better risk assessment and infection control strategies, and may reveal previously underappreciated ways in which the pathogens might actually adapt to or manipulate the physical and chemical characteristics of these carrier fluids to benefit their own transmission. In this article, I review our current understanding of the mechanisms shaping the fluid dynamics of respiratory infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases/physiopathology , Communicable Diseases/transmission , Hydrodynamics , Respiration Disorders/physiopathology , Aerosols , COVID-19/transmission , History, 19th Century , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Humans , Infectious Disease Medicine/history , Physical Distancing , Respiratory System/physiopathology , Respiratory System/virology , Rheology , SARS-CoV-2 , Saliva , Ventilation
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