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2.
Lipids Health Dis ; 23(1): 186, 2024 Jun 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38872138

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Evidence on the association between visceral lipid accumulation and infertility remains limited and controversial. Therefore, the current investigation is the first investigation to unveil this correlation by utilizing novel indicators of visceral lipid accumulation. METHODS: The present study utilized the NHANES 2013-2020 dataset. Researchers utilized multiple logistic regression, smoothed curve fitting, and subgroup analysis to investigate the associations of waist circumference (WC), metabolic score for visceral fat (METS-VF), lipid accumulation product (LAP), visceral adiposity index (VAI) with infertility. Additionally, the eXtreme Gradient Boosting (XGBoost) algorithm model was utilized to evaluate the relative importance of the factors. RESULTS: After adjusting for potential factors that could influence the results, researchers discovered that all these four indicators of visceral lipid accumulation exhibited strong positive correlations with the probability of infertility. The subgroup analysis demonstrated that the correlations remained consistent in the majority of subgroups (P for interaction > 0.05). The results of XGBoost algorithm model indicate that METS-VF is the most meaningful factor in infertility. The ROC curve research revealed that while METS-VF had the greatest AUC values, there was no variation in the AUC value of different markers of visceral fat accumulation (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The present investigation discovered that increased WC, METS-VF, LAP, and VAI were associated with a heightened prevalence of infertility.


Subject(s)
Intra-Abdominal Fat , Waist Circumference , Humans , Female , Intra-Abdominal Fat/metabolism , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , United States/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Infertility, Female/metabolism , ROC Curve , Infertility/metabolism , Lipid Metabolism , Metabolic Syndrome/metabolism , Nutrition Surveys , Adiposity
3.
Womens Health (Lond) ; 20: 17455057241260027, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38836384

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, infertility is known as a major problem which can ruin a couple's relationship. In recent years, many studies have addressed the causes of infertility, the outcomes of treatments for infertility, and the effects of infertility on couples' mental health; however, the concept of dignity of women living with infertility has never been examined in depth. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the dignity of women living with infertility in Iran. DESIGN: This qualitative research was conducted via conventional content analysis approach. METHODS: This qualitative study was conducted in Iran from February to December 2022. In this research, the data were collected through face-to-face semi-structured in-depth interviews with 23 women living with infertility selected via purposive sampling. The interviews were continued until reaching the data saturation point. Data analysis was performed simultaneously with data collection. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed through Graneheim and Lundman style content analysis, with data management done using the MAXQDA software. To achieve the accuracy and validity of the study, the four-dimension criteria by Lincoln and Guba, namely credibility, dependability, conformability, and transformability, were considered and used. RESULTS: Analysis of the qualitative data yielded three themes and eight subthemes. The three main themes were (1) overcoming identity crises (overcoming dysthymia, coping with unaccomplished motherhood), (2) respect for personal identity (respect for confidentiality; respect for beliefs, values, and attitudes; avoidance of stigma and pity), and (3) compassion-focused therapy (sympathizing, mental and spiritual support, and enhancement of life skills). CONCLUSION: Dignity of women living with infertility encompasses overcoming identity crises, respect for personal identity, and compassion therapy. The policymakers and administrators in the healthcare system can use the findings of this study to create a proper clinical environment toward preserving the dignity of women living with infertility.


Subject(s)
Infertility, Female , Qualitative Research , Humans , Female , Iran , Adult , Infertility, Female/psychology , Infertility, Female/therapy , Respect , Personhood , Interviews as Topic , Infertility/psychology , Infertility/therapy , Perception
4.
Rev Med Liege ; 79(5-6): 442-447, 2024 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38869137

ABSTRACT

Follow-up consultations in gynaecology and general practice offer valuable opportunities to discuss fertility and the importance of a pre-conceptional assessment before attempting pregnancy. During these consultations, it is vital for healthcare professionals to provide patients with essential information about considerations before conceiving a child. Additionally, it is important to educate patients about basic hygiene practices that can impact both male and female fertility. The prevention of fertility disorders requires a holistic approach identifying and targeting numerous risk factors.


Les consultations de suivi en gynécologie et en médecine générale offrent des opportunités précieuses pour discuter de la fertilité et de l'importance d'une évaluation préconceptionnelle avant toute tentative de grossesse. Au cours de ces consultations, il est primordial pour les professionnels de santé de fournir aux patients des informations essentielles concernant les aspects à considérer avant de concevoir un enfant. De plus, il convient de sensibiliser les patients aux pratiques d'hygiène de base qui peuvent avoir un impact sur la fertilité masculine et féminine. La prévention des troubles de la fertilité nécessite une approche holistique identifiant et ciblant de nombreux facteurs de risque.


Subject(s)
Infertility , Humans , Risk Factors , Female , Male , Infertility/prevention & control , Pregnancy , Infertility, Female/prevention & control
5.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0304216, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38848344

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The causal relationship between sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and infertility has remained unclear. Thus, we used Mendelian randomization (MR) to investigate this relationship. METHODS: Risk factors for SHBG were extracted from European individuals within the UK Biobank using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. Summary-level data for infertility outcomes were obtained from the FinnGen dataset. The causal relationship between SHBG and infertility was examined using inverse variance weighted, weighted model, weighted median, and MR-Egger regression analyses. Additionally, Cochran's Q test and Egger intercept tests were used to confirm the heterogeneity and pleiotropy of identified instrumental variables (IVs). RESULTS: Our findings revealed a significant negative association between sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) levels and infertility, particularly with anovulation, a specific form of female infertility. However, SHBG did not exert a causal impact on male infertility or on female infertility of tubal origin. CONCLUSIONS: SHBG expression offers protection against the development of certain types of female infertility, suggesting it is a potential therapeutic target for infertility.


Subject(s)
Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin , Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin/genetics , Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin/metabolism , Humans , Female , Male , Infertility, Female/genetics , Infertility, Female/blood , Infertility, Male/genetics , Infertility, Male/blood , Risk Factors , Infertility/genetics , Anovulation/genetics , Anovulation/blood
6.
BMC Psychol ; 12(1): 309, 2024 May 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38812064

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: The relationship between psychological factors and treatment outcomes with assisted reproductive technology has sparked considerable debate. This study aims to investigate the emotional risk factors in couples seeking infertility treatment using assisted reproductive technology in Sari, Iran, from 2020 to 2022. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This research is a cross-sectional study and emotional risk factors and other related factors were examined using the Persian version of the SCREENIVF demographic, social, and clinical status questionnaire, social, and clinical status questionnaire before using Assisted reproductive technology in 460 infertile couples selected from infertility treatment centers in Sari City, Iran. The samples were randomly selected using a table of random numbers. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 22 software. RESULTS: The mean age of the male and female participants were 31.70 ± 5.71 and 35.22 ± 5.48, respectively. The results regarding emotional risk factors and other related factors revealed that the variables of remarriage (P = 0.048) and exposure of spouse to emotional risk factors (P = 0.001), history of depression disorder (P = 0.007), and history of anxiety disorder (P = 0.009) were significantly correlated with the exposure of women to emotional risk factors. Furthermore, men's exposure to emotional risk factors was significantly correlated with primary education (P = 0.026) and diploma (P = 0.043) levels, age (P = 0.006), and wife's exposure to emotional risk factors (P = 0.001). CONCLUSION: By identifying infertile couples who are at risk of emotional risk factors, healthcare professionals can provide appropriate support and interventions to mitigate the emotional challenges associated with infertility. This proactive approach can significantly enhance couples undergoing infertility treatment's well-being and mental health.


Subject(s)
Fertilization in Vitro , Infertility , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Iran , Cross-Sectional Studies , Risk Factors , Fertilization in Vitro/psychology , Infertility/psychology , Emotions , Depression/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Spouses/psychology
9.
Phytomedicine ; 129: 155681, 2024 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38718638

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infertility patients account for an astonishing proportion of individuals worldwide. Due to its complex etiology and challenging treatment, infertility has imposed significant psychological and economic burdens on many patients. C. Herba (Cistanche tubulosa (Schenk) Wight and Cistanche deserticola Ma), renowned as one of the most prominent Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs), is abundant in diverse bioactive compounds that exhibit therapeutic effects on many diseases related to oxidative stress (OS) and disorders of sex hormone levels. OBJECTIVE: Due to the limited drugs currently used in clinical practice to improve reproductive outcomes and their inevitable side effects, developing safe and effective new medications for infertility is of significance. This article comprehensively reviewed the phytochemicals of C. Herba, focusing on their efficacy and mechanisms on infertility and their safety for the first time, aiming to offer valuable insights for the development and application of C. Herba, and for developing novel strategies for treating infertility. METHODS: We used "Cistanche" and its known bioactive components in combination with "sperm", "testicles", "epididymis", "ovaries", "uterus", and "infertility" as keywords to search in PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus and CNKI up to November 2023. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) 2020 guideline was followed. RESULTS: The therapeutic effects of C. Herba on infertility are mainly attributed to echinacoside (ECH), verbascoside (VB), salidroside (SAL), polysaccharides, and betaine. They can effectively improve spermatogenic dysfunction, gonadal dysfunction and erectile dysfunction (ED) by exerting anti-oxidation, sex hormones regulation and anti-hypoxia. Moreover, they can also improve premature ovarian failure (POF), ovarian and uterine cancer, oocyte maturation by exerting anti-oxidation, anti-apoptosis, and anti-cancer. C. Herba and its active ingredients also exhibit pleasing safety. CONCLUSION: C. Herba is a promising source of natural medicine for infertility. Additionally, compared to current therapeutic drugs, its favorable safety also supports its development as a nutritional supplement. However, high-quality clinical studies are required to validate its effectiveness for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.


Subject(s)
Cistanche , Drugs, Chinese Herbal , Animals , Female , Humans , Male , Cistanche/chemistry , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/pharmacology , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/chemistry , Glucosides/pharmacology , Glucosides/therapeutic use , Glycosides , Infertility/drug therapy , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Phenols/pharmacology , Phenols/therapeutic use , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Phytochemicals/therapeutic use , Polyphenols , Reproduction/drug effects
10.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 24(1): 398, 2024 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38816754

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The causes of infertility have remained an important challenge. The relationship between VDR gene polymorphisms and infertility has been reported, with controversial findings. OBJECTIVE AND RATIONALE: We aimed to determine this relationship by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis. SEARCH METHODS: The study was started with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) declaration and the final draft was registered as a protocol in PROSPERO (ID: CRD42023416535). The international electronic databases including PubMed (Medline), Scopus, Web of Sciences, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINHAL) were searched until January 30, 2023, by using appropriate keywords. The quality of the final studies was assessed using the NOS Checklist for case-control studies. The odds ratios (ORs) for each of the genetic models were pooled, and a subgroup analysis based on geographical region and types of infertility was carried out by the MetaGenyo online tool. OUTCOMES: Case-control studies including 18 and 2 studies about infertility in women and men, respectively, and 4 miscarriage studies were entered into the meta-analysis. The VDR gene TaqI polymorphism was associated with infertility susceptibility in women in the allele contrast [OR = 1.2065, 95% CI (1.0846-1.3421); P = 0.0005], Recessive model [OR = 1.3836, 95% CI (1.1197-1.7096); P = 0.002], Dominant model [OR = 1.2146, 95% CI (0.0484-1.4072); P = 0.009], Homozygote [OR = 1.4596, 95% CI (1.1627-1.8325); P = 0.001], and TT vs. Tt [OR = 1.2853, 95% CI (1.0249-1.6117); P = 0.029. ApaI and FokI gene polymorphisms were found to be significantly protective SNPs against women and men infertility in the Dominant model [OR = 0.8379, 95% CI (0.7039- 0.9975); P = 0.046] and Recessive model [OR = 0.421, 95% CI (0.1821-0.9767); P = 0.043], respectively. Sub-group meta-analysis showed a protection association of ApaI in dominant [OR = 0.7738, 95% CI = 0.6249-0.9580; P = 0.018] and AA vs. aa [OR = 0.7404, 95 CI% (0.5860-0.9353) P = 0.011725] models in PCOS subgroup, however, a negative association with idiopathic infertility was found in AA vs. Aa [OR = 1.7063, 95% CI (1.1039-2.6375); P = 0.016187] and Aa vs. aa [OR = 0.6069, 95% CI (0.3761-0.9792); P = 0.040754]. TaqI SNP was significantly associated with infertility in the African population and BsmI was associated with the disease mostly in the Asian population. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis showed that the TaqI polymorphism may be linked to women's infertility susceptibility. However, ApaI and FokI might be the protective SNPs against infertility in Women and men, respectively.


Subject(s)
Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Receptors, Calcitriol , Humans , Receptors, Calcitriol/genetics , Female , Male , Polymorphism, Genetic , Infertility, Female/genetics , Case-Control Studies , Infertility/genetics , Infertility, Male/genetics
13.
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf ; 278: 116428, 2024 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38723384

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Phthalates (PAEs) are endocrine-disrupting chemicals ubiquitously found in the environment. This study aimed to examine the association between exposure of PAEs and subfecundity in preconception couples. METHODS: This is a nested case-control study based on preconception cohort. Preconception couples with intention to conceive were enrolled and followed up until a clinically confirmed pregnancy or 12 menstrual cycles of preparation for conception. A total of 107 couples with subfecundity- time to pregnancy (TTP) more than 12 menstrual cycles, and 144 couples ≤12 cycles were included in the analysis. The levels of PAE metabolites in one spot urine samples were detected and compared between the groups. The weighted quantile sum (WQS) regression model and Bayesian kernel machine regression (BKMR) model were used to examine the joint effects of couples' exposure to PAEs on subfecundity. RESULTS: Using the multivariate binary logistic regression model, compared to the lowest quartile of urinary ∑PAEs concentration group, both preconception females (aOR=2.42, 95% CI: 1.10-5.30, p=0.027) and males (aOR=2.99, 95% CI: 1.36-6.58, p=0.006) in the highest quartile group had an increased risk of subfecundity, and a dose-response relationship was observed between PAEs and the risk of subfecundity. The WQS analyses found that co-exposure to PAE mixture was a risk factor for subfecundity in preconception female (aOR=1.76, 95% CI: 1.38-2.26, p<0.001), male (aOR=1.58, 95% CI: 1.20-2.08, p=0.001), and couple (aOR=2.39, 95% CI: 1.61-3.52, p<0.001). The BKMR model found a positive combined effect of mixed exposure to PAEs on the risk of subfecundity. CONCLUSIONS: PAEs increase the risk of subfecundity in preconception couples. Our research reinforced the need of monitoring PAE exposure for the purpose of improving human reproductive health.


Subject(s)
Endocrine Disruptors , Environmental Exposure , Environmental Pollutants , Phthalic Acids , Humans , Phthalic Acids/urine , Case-Control Studies , Female , Male , Adult , Endocrine Disruptors/urine , Environmental Pollutants/urine , Environmental Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Environmental Exposure/analysis , Pregnancy , Infertility/chemically induced , Bayes Theorem , Time-to-Pregnancy/drug effects
14.
Natl Health Stat Report ; (202): 1-19, 2024 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38722687

ABSTRACT

Objectives-Using National Survey of Family Growth data from 2015-2019, this report presents updated national estimates of infertility in U.S. women and men and estimates of impaired fecundity (physical ability to have children) in U.S. women. Detailed demographic breakdowns are also presented, and overall estimates for 2015-2019 are compared with those for 2011-2015. Methods-Data for this report come primarily from the 2015-2019 National Survey of Family Growth, which consisted of 21,441 interviews with men and women ages 15-49, conducted from September 2015 through September 2019. The response rate was 65.9% for women and 62.4% for men. Results-The percentage of women ages 15-44 who had impaired fecundity did not change between 2011-2015 and 2015-2019. The percentage of married women with impaired fecundity also remained stable over this time period. Among all women, 13.4% of women ages 15-49 and 15.4% of women ages 25-49 had impaired fecundity in 2015-2019. The percentage of married women ages 15-44 who were infertile rose from 2011-2015 (6.7%) to 2015-2019 (8.7%). Among married and cohabiting women ages 15-49 in 2015-2019, 7.8% had infertility. Both infertility and impaired fecundity were associated with age for nulliparous (never had a live birth) women after adjusting for other factors. Some form of infertility (either subfertility or nonsurgical sterility) was seen in 11.4% of men ages 15-49 and 12.8% of men ages 25-49 in 2015-2019. . Conclusion-Although these findings are not nationally representative, this report illustrates how linked NHCS-HUD data may provide insight into maternal health outcomes of patients who received housing assistance compared with those who did not.


Subject(s)
Infertility , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Adult , Female , Adolescent , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Infertility/epidemiology , Infertility, Female/epidemiology , Infertility, Male/epidemiology , Fertility
15.
J Surg Educ ; 81(7): 947-959, 2024 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38749812

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Compared to the general population, physicians tend to have children later in life, increasing rates of infertility, obstetrical complications, and the need for assisted reproductive technology (ART). The aim of this study is to systematically review the literature to determine the level of fertility and ART knowledge amongst United States surgeons and surgical trainees, and analyze the impact of the medical career on family planning goals and outcomes. DESIGN: A systematic literature search of articles published between 2014 to 2022 in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases was performed in January 2023 according to, Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines. The primary outcome measures included fertility and ART knowledge, childbearing decision-making factors, and current education. Secondary outcomes included evaluation of institutional support, postpartum, and infertility. PARTICIPANTS: Sixteen studies with a total of 6983 partici- pants (908 men and 5162 women) were included in this systematic review. RESULTS: Sixteen studies with a total of 6983 participants (908 men and 5162 women) were included in this systematic review. Though most participants were aware of the presence of age-related fertility decline, most were lacking in fertility and ART knowledge, and most likely did not receive formal education in these topics. The vast majority elected to delay childbearing due to career aspirations, with many facing subsequent pregnancy complications, infertility challenges, and a lack of institutional support in the postpartum period. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that medical students, trainees, and physicians overall are lacking in knowledge and awareness regarding age-related fertility decline and ART, indicating the necessity for a formal educational curriculum. Additionally, female physicians opt to delay childbearing longer than their male counterparts, while also experiencing increased complications and institutional challenges. This study clearly demonstrates a need for parental leave policy expansion, transparency of the policies in place, and financial and time allowance support for elective oocyte cryopreservation in the medical community.


Subject(s)
Surgeons , Humans , Surgeons/education , Female , Male , Fertility , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Infertility , United States , Adult , Internship and Residency
16.
Prev Vet Med ; 228: 106227, 2024 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38772120

ABSTRACT

Leptospirosis, caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira spp., is a globally significant zoonotic disease that affects humans and animals. In cattle, leptospirosis is associated not only with overt clinical manifestations but also with reproductive diseases, including infertility. This study assesses the potential correlation between leptospirosis and infertility in Uruguayan beef cattle. A case-control study involved 31 beef herds with no prior history of Leptospira vaccination. In each herd, veterinarians identified 10 non-pregnant (cases) and 25 pregnant cows (controls) using ultrasound, and blood and urine samples were collected from each cow. Serological diagnosis was performed using the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT), and quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to assess Leptospira excretion. Additionally, antibodies against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) were tested. The results demonstrated an association between seropositivity to the Sejroe serogroup (cut-off 1:200) and infertility in cattle (OR=1.31; p-value=0.06). Furthermore, the level of Leptospira excretion (qPCR) in urine was associated with increased infertility risk, with cows excreting over 100 copies per mL of urine having the highest odds of infertility (OR=2.34; p-value<0.01). This study suggests a potential association between leptospirosis and infertility in Uruguayan beef cattle, emphasizing the importance of both serological and molecular diagnostics for assessing reproductive health in cattle herds. Future research should explore the impact of Leptospira serogroups on other reproductive disorders in cattle.


Subject(s)
Cattle Diseases , Leptospira , Leptospirosis , Animals , Leptospirosis/veterinary , Leptospirosis/epidemiology , Cattle , Cattle Diseases/microbiology , Cattle Diseases/epidemiology , Cattle Diseases/virology , Female , Case-Control Studies , Uruguay/epidemiology , Leptospira/isolation & purification , Pregnancy , Infertility/veterinary , Infertility/etiology
17.
Obstet Gynecol ; 143(6): 839-848, 2024 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38696814

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of demographic shifts, changes in contemporaneous clinical practices, and technologic innovation on assisted reproductive technology (ART) success rates by conducting an analysis of cumulative live-birth rates across different time periods, age groups, and infertility diagnoses. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of autologous linked cycles comparing cumulative live-birth rates over successive cycles from patients undergoing their first retrieval between 2014 and 2019 in the SART CORS (Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System) database. All cycles reported for these individuals up to 2020 were included for analysis. We compared cumulative live-birth rates stratified by age and infertility cause with published data from the 2004-2009 SART CORS database. RESULTS: From 2014 to 2019, 447,042 patients underwent their first autologous index retrieval, resulting in 1,007,374 cycles and 252,215 live births over the period of 2014 to 2020. In contrast, between 2004 and 2008, 246,740 patients underwent 471,208 cycles, resulting in 140,859 births by 2009. Noteworthy shifts in demographics were observed, with an increase in people of color seeking reproductive technology (57.9% vs 51.7%, P <.001). There was also an increase in patients with diminished ovarian reserve and ovulatory disorders and a decrease in endometriosis, tubal, and male factor infertility ( P <.001). Previously associated with decreased odds of live birth, frozen embryo transfer and preimplantation genetic testing showed increased odds in 2014-2020. Preimplantation genetic testing rose from 3.4% to 36.0% and was associated with a lower cumulative live-birth rate for those younger than age 35 years ( P <.001) but a higher cumulative live-birth rate for those aged 35 years or older ( P <.001). Comparing 2014-2020 with 2004-2009 shows that the overall cumulative live-birth rate improved for patients aged 35 years or older and for all infertility diagnoses except ovulatory disorders ( P <.001). CONCLUSION: This analysis provides insights into the changing landscape of ART treatments in the United States over the past two decades. The observed shifts in demographics, clinical practices, and technology highlight the dynamic nature of an evolving field of reproductive medicine. These findings may offer insight for clinicians to consider in counseling patients and to inform future research endeavors in the field of ART.


Subject(s)
Live Birth , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted , Humans , Female , Adult , Retrospective Studies , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/statistics & numerical data , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/trends , United States/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Live Birth/epidemiology , Infertility/therapy , Infertility/epidemiology , Male , Birth Rate/trends
18.
Reprod Biol Endocrinol ; 22(1): 61, 2024 May 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38783347

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prospective observational studies have demonstrated that the machine learning (ML) -guided noninvasive chromosome screening (NICS) grading system, which we called the noninvasive chromosome screening-artificial intelligence (NICS-AI) grading system, can be used embryo selection. The current prospective interventional clinical study was conducted to investigate whether this NICS-AI grading system can be used as a powerful tool for embryo selection. METHODS: Patients who visited our centre between October 2018 and December 2021 were recruited. Grade A and B embryos with a high probability of euploidy were transferred in the NICS group. The patients in the control group selected the embryos according to the traditional morphological grading. Finally, 90 patients in the NICS group and 161 patients in the control group were compared statistically for their clinical outcomes. RESULTS: In the NICS group, the clinical pregnancy rate (70.0% vs. 54.0%, p < 0.001), the ongoing pregnancy rate (58.9% vs. 44.7%, p = 0.001), and the live birth rate (56.7% vs. 42.9%, p = 0.001) were significantly higher than those of the control group. When the female was ≥ 35 years old, the clinical pregnancy rate (67.7% vs. 32.1%, p < 0.001), ongoing pregnancy rate (56.5% vs. 25.0%, p = 0.001), and live birth rate (54.8% vs. 25.0%, p = 0.001) in the NICS group were significantly higher than those of the control group. Regardless of whether the patients had a previous record of early spontaneous abortion or not, the live birth rate of the NICS group was higher than that of the control group (61.0% vs. 46.9%; 57.9% vs. 34.8%; 33.3% vs. 0%) but the differences were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: NICS-AI was able to improve embryo utilisation rate, and the live birth rate, especially for those ≥ 35 years old, with transfer of Grade A embryos being preferred, followed by Grade B embryos. NICS-AI can be used as an effective tool for embryo selection in the future.


Subject(s)
Machine Learning , Pregnancy Rate , Humans , Female , Pregnancy , Adult , Prospective Studies , Single Embryo Transfer/methods , Preimplantation Diagnosis/methods , Embryo Transfer/methods , Infertility, Female/therapy , Infertility, Female/genetics , Infertility, Female/diagnosis , Treatment Outcome , Infertility/therapy , Infertility/diagnosis , Infertility/genetics
19.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 10804, 2024 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38734723

ABSTRACT

Evaluating couples' coping with infertility and its impact on their mental health is valuable in designing supportive programs. Since infertility is a shared problem in married life, coping with it requires collaborative coping strategies. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to design and psychometrically evaluate the collaborative coping with infertility questionnaire (CCIQ) in candidates of assisted reproductive techniques (ART). The exploratory factor analysis of a 27-item questionnaire designed based on the Likert scale in the Persian language was evaluated through the principal component analysis method in a cross-sectional study conducted on 200 couples who volunteered for ART. The cut-off point of factor loadings was considered 0.4. Furthermore, the criterion validity of the questionnaire was evaluated using a 12-item revised Fertility Adjustment Scale (R-FAS) and its relationship with the score of the CCIQ. Moreover, the internal consistency of the questionnaire was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha correlation coefficient. In the exploratory factor analysis, 20 items with a factor loading above 0.4 were extracted under three factors. The three extracted factors with a value above one explained 43.78% of the variance of CCIQ. The factor loading of the accepted items ranged between 0.402 and 0.691. External reliability was confirmed with Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.98. The relationship between CCIQ and R-FAS score was significant (p < 0.0001). The results of the study showed that the 20-item CCIQ enjoyed acceptable validity and reliability in the three dimensions of 'dynamic interaction,' 'reorganizing married life goals,' and 'perception about infertility,' which can be used to evaluate collaborative coping with infertility questionnaire in ART candidates.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Infertility , Psychometrics , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Reproductive Techniques, Assisted/psychology , Psychometrics/methods , Male , Infertility/psychology , Female , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Reproducibility of Results , Factor Analysis, Statistical
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