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1.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 10: e2300462, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38723217

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Radiation oncology in the Philippines, a large lower- and middle-income country in Southeast Asia, is facing a critical shortage in manpower, with only 113 radiation oncologists (ROs) over 55 radiotherapy (RT) centers serving 100 million population. Paramount to workforce expansion is ensuring that training programs can produce adequately trained specialists. In this study, we describe the current state of radiation oncology training programs in the Philippines. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional observational analysis of the nine radiation oncology residency training programs in the Philippines. Data were collected from a survey of the program directors, the Philippine Radiation Oncology Society database, and a PubMed literature search. RESULTS: Eight of the nine programs are in the National Capital Region. Since program standardization in 2005, there have been 82 four-year residency graduates, with up to 18 new graduates annually. Faculty-to-trainee ratio ranges from 0.5 to 2.67. In terms of technology, all programs have intensity-modulated RT and high-dose-rate brachytherapy, but only six are equipped with computed tomography-based image guidance and stereotactic capabilities. Clinical education schemes vary per institution regarding curriculum implementation, resident activities, and methods of evaluation. Required resident case logs are not met for lung, GI, genitourinary, bone and soft tissue, and hematologic malignancies. In total, there are only 22 resident-led publications from 10 unique individuals in two training programs. CONCLUSION: Program expansions are warranted to meet the projected demand for ROs in the Philippines, but training programs must first improve key aspects of staffing, technology, clinical education, and research. Addressing training challenges related to resource limitations necessitates local and international collaborations with higher-capacity centers to bridge gaps for continued quality improvement with the aim of ultimately delivering better overall cancer care.


Subject(s)
Developing Countries , Radiation Oncology , Philippines , Humans , Radiation Oncology/education , Cross-Sectional Studies , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data
2.
Acad Radiol ; 31(5): 1968-1975, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38724131

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Radiology is a rapidly evolving field that benefits from continuous innovation and research participation among trainees. Traditional methods for involving residents in research are often inefficient and limited, usually due to the absence of a standardized approach to identifying available research projects. A centralized online platform can enhance networking and offer equal opportunities for all residents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Research Connect is an online platform built with PHP, SQL, and JavaScript. Features include project and collaboration listing as well as advertisement of project openings to medical/undergraduate students, residents, and fellows. The automated system maintains project data and sends notifications for new research opportunities when they meet user preference criteria. Both pre- and post-launch surveys were used to assess the platform's efficacy. RESULTS: Before the introduction of Research Connect, 69% of respondents used informal conversations as their primary method of discovering research opportunities. One year after its launch, Research Connect had 141 active users, comprising 63 residents and 41 faculty members, along with 85 projects encompassing various radiology subspecialties. The platform received a median satisfaction rating of 4 on a 1-5 scale, with 54% of users successfully locating projects of interest through the platform. CONCLUSION: Research Connect addresses the need for a standardized method and centralized platform with active research projects and is designed for scalability. Feedback suggests it has increased the visibility and accessibility of radiology research, promoting greater trainee involvement and academic collaboration.


Subject(s)
Internet , Radiology , Humans , Radiology/education , Cooperative Behavior , Biomedical Research , Internship and Residency , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Tunis Med ; 102(4): 189-193, 2024 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38746956

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Ethical reasoning is an important skill for all physicians who often face complex ethical dilemmas in their daily practice. Therefore, medical training should include methods for learning ethical theories and concepts, as well as how to apply them in practical situations. AIM: Assess the contribution of an Ethical Reasoning Learning session to fifth medical students' training through a comparison of results of the same objective and structured clinical examination (OSCE) in the form of simulated interview before and after sessions. METHODS: Four 45- minutes' sessions of Ethical Reasoning Learning (ERL) were implemented during a psychiatry internship for four groups of 5th-year students of the faculty of medicine of Monastir (Tunisia). Each session was divided into 7 parts: introduction, reading of a clinical vignette, brainstorming concerning the problems posed by this clinical situation, classification of the problems, identification of the principles of medical ethics, construction of the ethical matrix, and a conclusion. RESULTS: Fifty-seven students participated in the study divided into 4 groups. We found a significant difference in the means of the OSCE scores before and after the ERL session and a significant difference between the probability of respecting medical secrecy during pre and post-ethical reasoning learning sessions (p <0.001). We have found an effect of ERL sessions on the acquisition of this ethical competence by medical students. CONCLUSION: We learned that an ERL session has improved medical training in ethics applied to psychiatry. Other sessions dealing with other ethical skills are necessary to confirm these results.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Ethics, Medical , Students, Medical , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology , Ethics, Medical/education , Tunisia , Education, Medical/methods , Education, Medical/ethics , Learning , Internship and Residency/ethics , Psychiatry/education , Psychiatry/ethics , Female , Male , Educational Measurement , Clinical Reasoning
5.
BMC Prim Care ; 25(1): 160, 2024 May 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38730345

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The advanced access (AA) model is among the most recommended innovations for improving timely access in primary care (PC). AA is based on core pillars such as comprehensive planning for care needs and supply, regularly adjusting supply to demand, optimizing appointment systems, and interprofessional collaborative practices. Exposure of family medicine residents to AA within university-affiliated family medicine groups (U-FMGs) is a promising strategy to widen its dissemination and improve access. Using four AA pillars as a conceptual model, this study aimed to determine the theoretical compatibility of Quebec's university-affiliated clinics' residency programs with the key principles of AA. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was sent to the chief resident and academic director at each participating clinic. An overall response rate of 96% (44/46 U-FMGs) was obtained. RESULTS: No local residency program was deemed compatible with all four considered pillars. On planning for needs and supply, only one quarter of the programs were compatible with the principles of AA, owing to residents in out-of-clinic rotations often being unavailable for extended periods. On regularly adjusting supply to demand, 54% of the programs were compatible. Most (82%) programs' appointment systems were not very compatible with the AA principles, mostly because the proportion of the schedule reserved for urgent appointments was insufficient. Interprofessional collaboration opportunities in the first year of residency allowed 60% of the programs to be compatible with this pillar. CONCLUSIONS: Our study highlights the heterogeneity among local residency programs with respect to their theoretical compatibility with the key principles of AA. Future research to empirically test the hypotheses raised by this study is warranted.


Subject(s)
Health Services Accessibility , Internship and Residency , Quebec , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Family Practice/education , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Arch Dermatol Res ; 316(5): 159, 2024 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38734865

ABSTRACT

As an increasing number of women pursue careers in dermatology, the structure and culture of training must reflect the evolving needs of dermatology residents. To examine perceived barriers to and perceptions of family planning amongst dermatology residents capable of becoming pregnant, evidence-based principles were employed to develop a 40-question survey for dermatology residents in ACGME-accredited training programs. A pilot study was conducted with the Harvard Combined Dermatology Residency Training Program residents before full-scale national electronic survey distribution from April to June 2023. Information was collected regarding factors influencing attitudes towards becoming pregnant during residency, as well as information regarding residency program family leave, fertility preservation, and lactation policies. Ultimately, 95 dermatology residents capable of becoming pregnant completed the survey. The majority (77.9%) of respondents reported intentionally delaying having children because of their careers, and 73.7% believed there is a negative stigma attached to being pregnant or having children during dermatology residency. Of respondents who had not yet attempted to become pregnant, 75.3% were concerned about the possibility of future infertility. Of the 60% of respondents considering fertility preservation options, 84.6% noted concerns about these procedures being cost-prohibitive on a resident salary. Only 2% of respondents reported that cryopreservation was fully covered through their residency benefits, while 20% reported partial coverage. Reported program parental leave policies varied considerably with 54.9%, 25.4%, 1.4%, and 18.3% of residents reporting 4-6 weeks, 7-8 weeks, 9-10 weeks, and 11 + weeks of available leave, respectively. Notably, 53.5% of respondents reported that vacation or sick days must be used for parental leave. Respondents reported lactation policies and on-site childcare at 49.5% and 8.4% of residency programs, respectively. The trends noted in the survey responses signal concerning aspects of family planning and fertility for dermatology residents capable of becoming pregnant. Residency family planning policies, benefits, and resources should evolve and homogenize across programs to fully support trainees.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Dermatology , Family Planning Services , Internship and Residency , Humans , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Female , Dermatology/education , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy , Family Planning Services/statistics & numerical data , Male , Adult , Pilot Projects , Fertility Preservation/psychology , Fertility Preservation/statistics & numerical data , Parental Leave/statistics & numerical data , Cryopreservation
8.
World Neurosurg ; 185: e16-e29, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38741324

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: There has been a modest but progressive increase in the neurosurgical workforce, training, and service delivery in Nigeria in the last 2 decades. However, these resources are unevenly distributed. This study aimed to quantitatively assess the availability and distribution of neurosurgical resources in Nigeria while projecting the needed workforce capacity up to 2050. METHODS: An online survey of Nigerian neurosurgeons and residents assessed the country's neurosurgical infrastructure, workforce, and resources. The results were analyzed descriptively, and geospatial analysis was used to map their distribution. A projection model was fitted to predict workforce targets for 2022-2050. RESULTS: Out of 86 neurosurgery-capable health facilities, 65.1% were public hospitals, with only 17.4% accredited for residency training. Dedicated hospital beds and operating rooms for neurosurgery make up only 4.0% and 15.4% of the total, respectively. The population disease burden is estimated at 50.2 per 100,000, while the operative coverage was 153.2 cases per neurosurgeon. There are currently 132 neurosurgeons and 114 neurosurgery residents for a population of 218 million (ratio 1:1.65 million). There is an annual growth rate of 8.3%, resulting in a projected deficit of 1113 neurosurgeons by 2030 and 1104 by 2050. Timely access to neurosurgical care ranges from 21.6% to 86.7% of the population within different timeframes. CONCLUSIONS: Collaborative interventions are needed to address gaps in Nigeria's neurosurgical capacity. Investments in training, infrastructure, and funding are necessary for sustainable development and optimized outcomes.


Subject(s)
Health Services Accessibility , Neurosurgeons , Neurosurgery , Nigeria , Humans , Neurosurgery/trends , Neurosurgery/education , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgeons/supply & distribution , Neurosurgeons/trends , Health Workforce/trends , Health Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgical Procedures/trends , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Workforce/trends , Internship and Residency/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires , Forecasting
9.
World Neurosurg ; 185: e75-e85, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38741331

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although women have made remarkable strides in several medical specialties in Sub-Saharan Africa, their presence and contribution to the development of neurosurgery remain limited. We sought to study the gender differences within Nigerian neurosurgery, identify challenges resulting from these differences, and recommend how African female neurosurgeons can maximize their effects in neurosurgery. METHODS: A structured online survey captured data on neurosurgical infrastructural capacity, workforce, and training from neurosurgical consultants and residents in neurosurgical centers in Nigeria. All the collected data were coded and analyzed. RESULTS: Altogether, 82 neurosurgical consultants and 67 neurosurgical residents from 50 primary medical institutions in Nigeria completed the online survey. Only 8 of the respondents (5.4%) were women, comprising 3 consultants, 2 senior residents, and 3 junior residents. Although 40.2% of the respondents did not believe that being female affected the decision of whether to specialize in neurosurgery, 46.3% believed that being female was a disadvantage. Most did not believe that being female affected admission (57.8%), completion of a neurosurgery residency (58.5%), or life working as a neurosurgeon after graduation (63.4%). The most common challenges women face while navigating through neurosurgery training and practice are erosion of family and social life, lack of female mentors, and lack of a work-life balance. CONCLUSIONS: There is a deficit of both female consultants and trainees among Nigerian neurosurgeons. Identifying female medical students with a strong interest in neurosurgery and providing early mentorship might increase the number of female neurosurgeons.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Neurosurgeons , Neurosurgery , Physicians, Women , Humans , Nigeria , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Physicians, Women/statistics & numerical data , Neurosurgery/education , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Career Choice , Work-Life Balance , Mentors
10.
World Neurosurg ; 185: e4-e15, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38741329

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: There has been a progressive growth of neurosurgery in Nigeria over the past 6 nulldecades. This study aims to comprehensively evaluate the state of neurosurgical practice, training, and research in the country. METHODS: We used a mixed-methods approach that combined a survey of neurosurgery providers and a systematic review of the neurosurgical literature in Nigeria. The 83-question online survey had 3 core sections for assessing capacity, training, and gender issues. The systematic review involved a search of 4 global databases and gray literature over a 60-year period. RESULTS: One hundred and forty-nine respondents (95% male) completed the survey (65.4%). Their age ranged from 20 to 68 years, with a mean of 41.8 (±6.9) years. Majority were from institutions in the nation's South-West region; 82 (55.0%) had completed neurosurgery residency training, with 76 (51%) employed as consultants; 64 (43%) identified as residents in training, 56 (37.6%) being senior residents, and 15 (10.1%) each held academic appointments as lecturers or senior lecturers. The literature review involved 1,023 peer-reviewed journal publications: 254 articles yielding data on 45,763 neurotrauma patients, 196 on 12,295 pediatric neurosurgery patients, and 127 on 8,425 spinal neurosurgery patients. Additionally, 147 papers provided data on 5,760 neuro-oncology patients, and 56 on 3,203 patients with neuro-vascular lesions. CONCLUSIONS: Our mixed-methods approach provided significant insights into the historical, contemporary, and future trends of neurosurgery in Nigeria. The results could form the foundation for policy improvement; health-system strengthening; better resource-planning, prioritization, and allocation; and more purposive collaborative engagement in Nigeria and other low- and middle-income countries.


Subject(s)
Neurosurgery , Nigeria , Humans , Neurosurgery/education , Female , Adult , Male , Middle Aged , Aged , Young Adult , Neurosurgical Procedures/education , Internship and Residency , Biomedical Research , Surveys and Questionnaires , Neurosurgeons
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 551, 2024 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38760807

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Accurate self-assessment is crucial for the professional development of physicians. There has been sparse data on the accuracy of self-assessments on Anesthesiology Milestones. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences between resident self-assessments and faculty-assessments on Anesthesiology Milestones and the associated factors. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in a general tertiary university-affiliated hospital. We included anesthesia residents who were enrolled in the standardized residency training program in postgraduate year two and three at the time of the Milestone evaluation. We requested evaluations of competencies from both the Clinical Competency Committee faculty and the anesthesia residents themselves, utilizing the Chinese version of Anesthesiology Milestones in January 2023 and January 2024. The primary outcome was the differences between self- and faculty-assessments, calculated by subtracting the faculty-rated score from the self-rated score on each subcompetency. RESULTS: A total of 46 and 42 residents were evaluated in year 2023 and 2024, respectively. The self-rated sum score was significantly higher than that rated by faculty [mean (standardized deviation): 120.39 (32.41) vs. 114.44 (23.71), P = 0.008 in paired t test] with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.55 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.31 to 0.70]. The Bland-Altman plots revealed significant overestimation in patient care (bias 0.32, 95% CI: 0.05 to 0.60), practice-based learning and improvement (bias 0.45, 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.84), and professionalism (bias 0.37, 95% CI: 0.02 to 0.72). Ratings from residents with master's degrees (mean difference: -1.06, 95% CI: -1.80 to -0.32, P = 0.005) and doctorate degrees (mean difference: -1.14, 95% CI: -1.91 to -0.38, P = 0.003) were closer to the faculty-assessments than residents with bachelor's degrees. Compared with patient care, the differences between self- and faculty- rated scores were smaller in medical knowledge (mean difference: -0.18, 95% CI: -0.35 to -0.02, P = 0.031) and interpersonal and communication skills (mean difference: -0.41, 95% CI: -0.64 to -0.19, P < 0.001) in the generalized estimating equation logistic regression model. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed that residents tended to overestimate themselves, emphasizing the need to improve the accuracy of Milestones self-assessment. The differences between self- and faculty-assessments were associated with residents' degrees and domains of competency.


Subject(s)
Anesthesiology , Clinical Competence , Faculty, Medical , Internship and Residency , Self-Assessment , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Anesthesiology/education , Clinical Competence/standards , Male , Female , Adult , Educational Measurement
15.
Australas Psychiatry ; 32(3): 266, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38766723
16.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0301603, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38768242

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Transgender people encounter significant barriers when seeking timely, high-quality healthcare, resulting in unmet medical needs with increased rates of diabetes, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and HIV. The paucity of postgraduate medical education to invest in standardization of transgender health training sustains these barriers, leaving physicians feeling unprepared and averse to provide transgender health care. Closing this education gap and improving transgender healthcare necessitates the development of consensus-built transgender health objectives of training (THOOT), particularly in Adult Endocrinology and Metabolism Residency programs. METHODS: We conducted a two-round modified-Delphi process involving a nationally representative panel of experts, including Adult Endocrinology and Metabolism program directors, physician content experts, residents, and transgender community members, to identify THOOT for inclusion in Canadian Endocrinology and Metabolism Residency programs. Participants used a 5-point Likert scale to assess THOOT importance for curricular inclusion, with opportunities for written feedback. Data was collected through Qualtrics and analyzed after each round. FINDINGS: In the first Delphi round, panelists reviewed and rated 81 literature extracted THOOT, achieving consensus on all objectives. Following panelists' feedback, 5 THOOT were added, 9 removed, 34 consolidated into 12 objectives, and 47 were rephrased or retained. In the second Delphi round, panelists assessed 55 THOOT. Consensus was established for 8 THOOT. Program directors' post-Delphi feedback further consolidated objectives to arrive at 4 THOOT for curriculum inclusion. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the first time a consensus-based approach has been used to establish THOOT for any subspecialty postgraduate medicine program across Canada or the United States. Our results lay the foundation towards health equity and social justice in transgender health medical education, offering a blueprint for future innovations.


Subject(s)
Delphi Technique , Endocrinology , Internship and Residency , Transgender Persons , Humans , Endocrinology/education , Female , Male , Adult , Canada , Curriculum , Metabolism
17.
Harefuah ; 163(5): 323-326, 2024 May.
Article in Hebrew | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38734948

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Two Jewish medical students who were forced to discontinue their study upon the raise of the Nazi regime, returned/ immigrated to Palestine and did their internship in Palestine. A third student, although faced with many procedural limitations, was able to continue most of his studies in Berlin including passing the MD examination. The first two students returned, after some years, to Berlin to sit for the Doctor examination which enabled them to gain a permanent medical license in Palestine. We describe the different backgrounds of the 3 students which enabled them to do the examination at Berlin's medical faculty during the Nazi regime. The follow up of the three, revealed glorious medical career during the British mandate and during the first years of the new state of Israel. The Dissertations were signed and supported by three leading Professors of the Berlin's Faculty. Two of them were found to have a National-Socialistic background.


Subject(s)
Jews , National Socialism , Students, Medical , Humans , Arabs , Berlin , Education, Medical/history , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Internship and Residency , Israel , Licensure, Medical/history , National Socialism/history , History, 20th Century
18.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 483, 2024 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38693491

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Medical simulation is essential for surgical training yet is often too expensive and inaccessible in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Furthermore, in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS), while simulation training is often focused on senior residents and specialists, there is a critical need to target general practitioners who carry a significant load of OHNS care in countries with limited OHNS providers. This scoping review aims to describe affordable, effective OHNS simulation models for early-stage trainees and non-OHNS specialists in resource-limited settings and discuss gaps in the literature. METHODS: This scoping review followed the five stages of Arksey and O'Malley's Scoping Review Methodology. Seven databases were used to search for articles. Included articles discussed physical models of the ear, nose, or throat described as "low-cost," "cost-effective," or defined as <$150 if explicitly stated; related to the management of common and emergent OHNS conditions; and geared towards undergraduate students, medical, dental, or nursing students, and/or early-level residents. RESULTS: Of the 1706 studies screened, 17 met inclusion criteria. Most studies were conducted in HICs. Most models were low-fidelity (less anatomically realistic) models. The most common simulated skills were peritonsillar abscess aspiration and cricothyrotomy. Information on cost was limited, and locally sourced materials were infrequently mentioned. Simulations were evaluated using questionnaires and direct observation. CONCLUSION: Low-cost simulation models can be beneficial for early medical trainees and students in LMICs, addressing resource constraints and improving skill acquisition. However, there is a notable lack of contextually relevant, locally developed, and cost-effective models. This study summarizes existing low-cost OHNS simulation models for early-stage trainees and highlights the need for additional locally sourced models. Further research is needed to assess the effectiveness and sustainability of these models.


Subject(s)
Otolaryngology , Simulation Training , Humans , Otolaryngology/education , Simulation Training/economics , Clinical Competence , Internship and Residency , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Developing Countries
19.
J Robot Surg ; 18(1): 208, 2024 May 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38727857

ABSTRACT

It is unknown whether the July Effect (a theory that medical errors and organizational inefficiencies increase during the influx of new surgical residents) exists in urologic robotic-assisted surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of urology resident training on robotic operative times at the beginning of the academic year. A retrospective chart review was conducted for urologic robotic surgeries performed at a single institution between 2008 and 2019. Univariate and multivariate mix model analyses were performed to determine the association between operative time and patient age, estimated blood loss, case complexity, robotic surgical system (Si or Xi), and time of the academic year. Differences in surgery time and non-surgery time were assessed with/without resident presence. Operative time intervals were included in the analysis. Resident presence correlated with increased surgery time (38.6 min (p < 0.001)) and decreased non-surgery time (4.6 min (p < 0.001)). Surgery time involving residents decreased by 8.7 min after 4 months into the academic year (July-October), and by an additional 5.1 min after the next 4 months (p = 0.027, < 0.001). When compared across case types stratified by complexity, surgery time for cases with residents significantly varied. Cases without residents did not demonstrate such variability. Resident presence was associated with prolonged surgery time, with the largest effect occurring in the first 4 months and shortening later in the year. However, resident presence was associated with significantly reduced non-surgery time. These results help to understand how new trainees impact operating room times.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency , Operative Time , Robotic Surgical Procedures , Urologic Surgical Procedures , Urology , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Internship and Residency/methods , Robotic Surgical Procedures/education , Robotic Surgical Procedures/methods , Robotic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Urologic Surgical Procedures/education , Urology/education , Female , Male , Middle Aged , Medical Errors/prevention & control , Medical Errors/statistics & numerical data , Time Factors
20.
J Robot Surg ; 18(1): 211, 2024 May 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38727932

ABSTRACT

Lack of formal national robotic curriculum results in a void of knowledge regarding appropriate progression of autonomy in robotic general surgery training. One midwestern academic surgical training program has demonstrated that residents expect to independently operate more on the robotic console than they perceive themselves to do. As such, our study sought to evaluate expectations of residents and faculty regarding resident participation versus actual console participation time (CPT) at a community general surgery training program. We surveyed residents and faculty in two phases. Initially, participants were asked to reflect on their perceptions and expectations from the previous six months. The second phase included surveys (collected over six months) after individual cases with subjective estimation of participation versus CPT calculated by the Intuitive Surgical, Inc. MyIntuitive application. Using Mann-Whitney U-Test, we compared resident perceptions of CPT to actual CPT by case complexity and post-graduate year (PGY). Faculty (n = 7) estimated they allowed residents to complete a median of 26-50% of simple and 0-25% of complex cases in the six months prior to the study. They expected senior residents (PGY-4 and PGY-5) to complete more: 51-75% of simple and 26-50% of complex cases. Residents (n = 13), PGY-2-PGY-5, estimated they completed less than faculty perceived (0-25% of simple and 0-25% of complex cases). Sixty-six post-case (after partial colectomy, abdominoperoneal resection, low anterior resection, cholecystectomy, inguinal/ventral hernia repair, and others) surveys were completed. Residents estimated after any case that they had completed 26-50% of the case. However, once examining their MyIntuitive report, they actually completed 51-75% of the case (median). Residents, especially PGY-4 and 5, completed a higher percentage than estimated of robotic cases. Our study confirms that residents can and should complete more of (and increasingly complex) robotic cases throughout training, like the transition of autonomy in open and laparoscopic surgery.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , General Surgery , Internship and Residency , Robotic Surgical Procedures , Robotic Surgical Procedures/education , Humans , General Surgery/education , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors
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