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1.
Health Res Policy Syst ; 22(1): 44, 2024 Apr 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38576035

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Guidelines depend on effect estimates, usually derived from randomised controlled trials, to inform their decisions. Qualitative research evidence may improve decisions made but where in the process and the methods to do this have not been so clearly established. We sought to describe and appraise how qualitative research has been used to inform World Heath Organization guidance since 2020. METHODS: We conducted a document analysis of WHO guidelines from 2020 to 2022. We purposely sampled guidelines on the topics of maternal and newborn health (MANH) and infectious diseases, as most of the qualitative synthesis to date has been conducted on these topics, likely representing the 'best case' scenario. We searched the in-built repository feature of the WHO website and used standardised search terms to identify qualitative reporting. Using deductive frameworks, we described how qualitative evidence was used to inform guidelines and appraised the standards of this use. RESULTS: Of the 29 guidelines, over half used qualitative research to help guide decisions (18/29). A total of 8 of these used qualitative research to inform the guideline scope, all 18 to inform recommendations, and 1 to inform implementation considerations. All guidelines drew on qualitative evidence syntheses (QES), and five further supplemented this with primary qualitative research. Qualitative findings reported in guidelines were typically descriptive, identifying people's perception of the benefits and harms of interventions or logistical barriers and facilitators to programme success. No guideline provided transparent reporting of how qualitative research was interpreted and weighed used alongside other evidence when informing decisions, and only one guideline reported the inclusion of qualitative methods experts on the panel. Only a few guidelines contextualised their recommendations by indicating which populations and settings qualitative findings could be applied. CONCLUSIONS: Qualitative research frequently informed WHO guideline decisions particularly in the field of MANH. However, the process often lacked transparency. We identified unmet potential in informing implementation considerations and contextualisation of the recommendations. Use in these areas needs further methods development.


Subject(s)
Document Analysis , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Qualitative Research , World Health Organization , Maternal Health , Female , Infant Health
3.
PLoS One ; 19(4): e0296173, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38598508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite the many supply- and demand-side interventions aimed at increasing uptake of maternal health service utilizations, the maternal and new-born health service utilizations remains low. Religious leaders have the power to inhibit or facilitate effective adoption of maternal health service utilizations to promote maternal health. However, evidence on the roles of religious leaders in promoting maternal health in developing world is not fully known. Therefore this cluster-randomized trial is designed to evaluate the effects of trained religious leaders' engagement in maternal health education in improving maternal health service utilization and knowledge of obstetric danger signs. METHODS: A community based cluster randomized control trial in which the study kebeles are randomly assigned into intervention and control groups will be conducted. The sample size is calculated using stata software. Three hundred six pregnant mothers will be enrolled in each group. A baseline study will be conducted before the intervention and post-intervention evaluation will be conducted after four months of intervention. Religious leaders will be selected and trained to lead participatory sessions on maternal health. Data on maternal health service utilizations, knowledge about obstetric danger signs, attitude towards skilled delivery service utilization and perception of pregnancy risk will be collected from a repeated cross sectional household survey. Effect of intervention will be assessed using multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equation model. Data will be analyzed using STATA software. For qualitative study, coded transcripts will be further analyzed and summarized in narratives for each theme and sub-themes. DISCUSSION: This is one of the first trials to evaluate the effectiveness of trained religious leaders' engagement in maternal health education and will provide much needed evidence to policy makers about aspects of functionality and the religious leaders engagement required as they scale-up this programme in Ethiopia.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health Services , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Maternal Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia , Health Education , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
4.
BMJ Open ; 14(4): e076744, 2024 Apr 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38580359

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Providing comprehensible information is essential to the process of valid informed consent. Recruitment materials designed by sponsoring institutions in English-speaking, high-income countries are commonly translated for use in global health studies in other countries; however, key concepts are often missed, misunderstood or 'lost in translation'. The aim of this study was to explore the language barriers to informed consent, focusing on the challenges of translating recruitment materials for maternal health studies into Zambian languages. DESIGN: We used a qualitative approach, which incorporated a multistakeholder workshop (11 participants), in-depth interviews with researchers and translators (8 participants) and two community-based focus groups with volunteers from community advisory boards (20 participants). Content analysis was used to identify terms commonly occurring in recruitment materials prior to the workshop. The framework analysis approach was used to analyse interview data, and a simple inductive thematic analysis approach was used to analyse focus group data. SETTING: The study was based in Lusaka, Zambia. RESULTS: The workshop highlighted difficulties in translating research terms and pregnancy-specific terms, as well as widespread concern that current templates are too long, use overly formal language and are designed with little input from local teams. Framework analysis of in-depth interviews identified barriers to participant understanding relating to design and development of recruitment materials, language, local context and communication styles. Focus group participants confirmed these findings and suggested potential solutions to ensure the language and content of recruitment materials can be better understood. CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate that the way in which recruitment materials are currently designed, translated and disseminated may not enable potential trial participants to fully understand the information provided. Instead of using overly complex institutional templates, recruitment materials should be created through an iterative and interactive process that provides truly comprehensible information in a format appropriate for its intended participants.


Subject(s)
Consent Forms , Maternal Health , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Zambia , Informed Consent , Communication Barriers , Translating
5.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 24(1): 267, 2024 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38431588

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has been noted to decrease access to maternal health and family planning services globally. However, evidence from the Middle East and North Africa region is very scarce and limited. We qualitatively explored women's experiences in accessing maternal health and family planning services during the COVID-19 lockdown months in the two Egyptian governorates of Port Said and Souhag. METHODS: Using a case study design, semi-structured phone interviews were conducted with a total of 40 women aged 18-35 years from Port Said and Souhag governorates in Egypt. Interviews explored women's experiences in accessing maternal health and family planning services during COVID-19 lockdown months, their coping strategies, and impact of challenges and/or coping strategies on participants and their families. The collected data was analyzed manually using qualitative thematic analysis. RESULTS: Many participants were unable to access maternal health and family planning services during COVID-19 lockdown due to fear of contracting the virus, closure of health facilities, changing service hours, family planning method or drug stock-outs, and/or financial constraints. The above challenges in accessing services along with coping strategies that some women and their families used exposed women to additional health risks, including unintended pregnancies, and posed several social, emotional, and financial burdens to many. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic and associated lockdown measures undermined women's access to maternal and family planning services and interfered with their ability to achieve their reproductive goals. The paper concludes with a number of recommendations to ensure access to maternal and family planning services at times of crisis. Those recommendations include: (1) adapting reliable guidelines from humanitarian settings, (2) providing adequate guidance to healthcare providers and the public to tackle fears and misinformation, (3) making self-care products available such as oral contraceptive pills, vaginal rings and self- administered injectables, (4) involving other health professionals in the provision of maternal and family planning services through task-sharing/shifting, (5) expanding the use of telemedicine and/or digital health services especially to those living in remote areas and (6) raising policymakers' awareness of the centrality of reproductive rights and the importance of protecting them at all times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Maternal Health Services , Pregnancy , Humans , Female , Family Planning Services , Egypt/epidemiology , Maternal Health , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control
6.
BMC Womens Health ; 24(1): 181, 2024 Mar 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38504293

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Maternal and neonatal outcomes in, Kakamega County is characterized by a maternal mortality rate of 316 per 100,000 live births and a neonatal mortality rate of 19 per 1,000 live births. In 2018, approximately 70,000 births occurred in the county, with 35% at home, 28% in primary care facilities, and 37% in hospitals. A maternal and child health service delivery redesign (SDR) that aims to reorganize maternal and newborn health services is being implemented in Kakamega County in Kenya to improve the progress of these indicators. Research has shown that women's ability to make decisions (voice, agency, and autonomy) is critical for gender equality, empowerment and an important determinant of access and utilization. As part of the Kakamega SDR process evaluation, this study sought to understand women's processes of decision-making in seeking maternal health care and how these affect women's ability to access and use antenatal, delivery, and post-natal services. METHODS: We adapted the International Centre for Research on Women (ICRW) conceptual framework for reproductive empowerment to focus on the interrelated concepts of "female autonomy", and "women's agency" with the latter incorporating 'voice', 'choice' and 'power'. Our adaptation did not consider the influence of sexual relationships and leadership on SRH decision-making. We conducted key informant interviews, in-depth interviews, small group interviews and focus group discussions with pregnant women attending Antenatal clinics, women who had delivered, women attending post-natal clinics, and men in Kakamega County. A thematic analysis approach was used to analyze the data in NVivo 12. RESULTS: The results revealed notable findings across three dimensions of agency. Women with previous birthing experiences, high self-esteem, and support from their social networks exhibited greater agency. Additionally, positive previous birthing experiences were associated with increased confidence in making reproductive health choices. Women who had control over financial resources and experienced respectful communication with their partners exhibited higher levels of agency within their households. Distance relational agency demonstrated the impact of health system factors and socio-cultural norms on women's agency and autonomy. Finally, women who faced barriers such as long waiting times or limited staff availability experienced reduced agency in seeking healthcare. CONCLUSIONS: Individual agency, immediate relational agency, and distance relational agency all play crucial roles in shaping women's decision-making power and control over their utilization of maternal health services. This study offers valuable insights that can guide the ongoing implementation of an innovative service delivery redesign model, emphasizing the critical need for developing context-specific strategies to promote women's voices for sustained use.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health Services , Maternal Health , Male , Child , Infant, Newborn , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Kenya , Qualitative Research , Decision Making
7.
Am J Nurs ; 124(4): 19-20, 2024 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38511701

ABSTRACT

Actionable strategies nurses can implement at the bedside.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health Services , Maternal Health , Female , Pregnancy , Humans
8.
PLoS One ; 19(3): e0295295, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38457392

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The first five years of life is an important developmental period that establishes the foundation for future health and well-being. Mothers play a primary role in providing emotional and physical nourishment during early childhood. This systematic review aims to explore the association between maternal health and child health in the first five years of the child's life. MATERIALS AND METHODS: As primary aims, we systematically synthesised published evidence relating to the first five years of life for associations between maternal health exposures (mental, physical and Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) and child health outcomes (physical health, mental health, HRQoL and Health Service Use (HSU) /cost). As a secondary aim, we explored how the above associations vary between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged populations. The search was limited to studies that published and collected data from 2010 to 2022. The systematic review was specific to countries with similar health systems to Australia. The search was conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, APA PsycINFO, GLOBAL HEALTH, and EMBASE databases. The quality of the included studies was assessed by The Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) tool. RESULTS: Thirteen articles were included in the final synthesis from the identified 9439 articles in the primary search. Six (46%) explored the association between maternal mental health and child's physical health, two (15%) explored maternal and child's physical health, one (8%) explored maternal and child's mental health, one (8%) explored maternal physical health and child's HRQoL, and three (23%) explored maternal mental health and child's HSU. We found an association between maternal health and child health (physical and mental) and HSU outcomes but no association between maternal health and child's overall HRQoL. The results for disadvantaged communities did not show any difference from the general population. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Our review findings show that maternal health influences the child's health in the first five years. However, the current evidence is limited, and the findings were primarily related to a specific maternal or child's health condition. There was no evidence of associations of child health outcomes in healthy mothers. There is an extensive research gap investigating maternal health exposures and child outcomes in quality of life and overall health.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health , Quality of Life , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Australia , Mothers/psychology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Infant, Newborn , Infant
10.
Reprod Health ; 21(1): 34, 2024 Mar 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38468301

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) remains a significant public health concern worldwide. Women living with HIV/AIDS (WLHA) have the additional and unique need to seek sexual and reproductive health services. WLHA's maternal health journeys can be shaped by the cultural norms and resources that exist in their society. This study sought to understand if and how WLHA's family planning, pregnancy, and motherhood experiences could be influenced by the patriarchal culture, gender roles, and HIV stigma in Vietnam, specifically. METHODS: Between December 2021 and March 2022, 30 WLHA with diverse socioeconomic backgrounds and childbirth experiences were interviewed in Hanoi, Vietnam. These semi-structured interviews covered topics including HIV stigma, gender norms, pregnancy experiences, and child-rearing challenges. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and analysed using ATLAS.ti. RESULTS: Qualitative analyses of participant quotes revealed how limited information on one's health prospects and reproductive options posed a significant challenge to family planning. Societal and familial expectations as well as economic circumstances also influenced reproductive decision-making. WLHA often encountered substandard healthcare during pregnancy, labor, and delivery. Stigma and lack of provider attentiveness resulted in cases where women were denied pain relief and other medical services. Communication breakdowns resulted in failure to administer antiretroviral therapy for newborns. Motherhood for WLHA was shadowed by concerns for not only their own health, but also the wellbeing of their children, as HIV stigma affected their children at school and in society as well. Many WLHA highlighted the constructive or destructive role that family members could play in their childbirth decision-making and care-giving experiences. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this study underscores the complex ways that cultural expectations, family support, and stigma in healthcare impact WLHA. Efforts to educate and engage families and healthcare providers are warranted to better understand and address the needs of WLHA, ultimately improving their reproductive and maternal health.


HIV-related stigma and discrimination have consequential impacts on health and quality of life for women living with HIV (WLHA). WLHA in Vietnam must navigate the additional challenges of a traditionally patriarchal and hierarchical society. Women typically face less educational and occupational opportunities and are often expected to defer to expectations of family and virtue. Stigma among family members, friends, employers, and healthcare providers poses a significant challenge to WLHA autonomy, especially as it relates to their reproductive health decision-making and maternal health experiences. This study aims to better understand the experiences of WLHA throughout family planning, pregnancy, and motherhood. The findings will hopefully shed light on strategies to empower WLHA and to combat HIV- and gender-based stigma not only in Vietnam, but also globally.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome , HIV Infections , Pregnancy , Humans , Female , Infant, Newborn , HIV , Maternal Health , Vietnam/epidemiology , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Qualitative Research
11.
BMJ Open ; 14(3): e075681, 2024 Mar 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38521527

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This is a study protocol that tests and refines realist theories regarding the uptake and scale-up of the linked maternity waiting home (hereafter MWH) and facility birth intervention in the Mozambican context. The theories were developed through a realist review of MWH-facility birth literature from low-income and middle-income countries. The aim of the proposed study is to contribute to a contextually refined understanding of the causal chains underlying MWH-facility birth adoption by pregnant women and their families, communities, the health system and donors. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The overarching methodology is mixed-methods realist evaluation. The study will adopt a comparative embedded case study design comparing three new masonry MWHs built by the Mozambique-Canada Maternal Health Project in Inhambane province with three older MWHs selected based on variation in the built environment. Baseline data on participating MWH-facility birth interventions will be collected through observations, reviews of routine data and analysis of statistics and reports from provincial and district health authorities and the Mozambique-Canada Maternal Health project. Realist interviews will be conducted with MWH users and non-users, companions of MWH users and non-users, partners of MWH users and non-users, and stakeholders within the health system and the non-governmental organisation sector. Realist focus groups will be used to collect data from community-level implementers. The analysis will be retroductive and use the context-mechanism-outcome configuration heuristic tool to represent generative causation. We will analyse data from intervention and comparator MWHs independently and compare the resulting refined programme theories. Data analysis will be done in NVivo 12. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval for the project has been obtained from the Mozambique National Bioethics Committee (CNBS-Comité Nacional de Bioética para a Saúde) and the University of Saskatchewan Bioethical Research Ethics Board. The evaluation will adhere to the International Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research Involving Human Subjects and the African adaptation of evaluation ethics and principles. Evaluation results will be disseminated to stakeholders' practice audiences through peer-reviewed publications, plain-language briefs, theory validation/feedback meetings and conference presentations.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health Services , Maternal Health , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Mozambique , Health Services Accessibility , Pregnant Women
12.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 16(1): e1-e8, 2024 Feb 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38426780

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Maternal health information handouts are used by midwives to facilitate health education of pregnant women during their antenatal care (ANC) period. South Africa's Saving Mothers Report 2014 showed that delay in accessing medical help, as a patient-related avoidable factor, accounted for 27% of maternal and neonatal mortality. AIM: To ascertain the perceptions of pregnant women attending ANC in the Msunduzi sub-district in uMgungundlovu District, towards the maternal health information handouts. SETTING: The study was conducted at three primary health care (PHC) clinics (two PHC and one CHC [Community Health Care]) that provided ANC in the Msunduzi sub-district KwaZulu-Natal, in 2019. METHODS: Using a qualitative approach, focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with 10 participants from each clinic. Data were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: The themes explored included: availability and access of handouts, usefulness, review of handouts, alternative methods available, and family involvement. CONCLUSION: The authors concluded that although the maternal information handouts were given to the mothers during their maternal health visits, few of them were aware of these handouts. New strategies should be employed to deliver this vital information, as suggested by mothers.Contribution: The awareness of pregnant mothers about the information handouts contributes to the positive perinatal outcomes at clinic levels.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health , Pregnant Women , Infant, Newborn , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , South Africa , Prenatal Care/methods , Mothers
13.
PLoS One ; 19(3): e0299249, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38478543

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The concept of universal health coverage (UHC) encompasses both access to essential health services and freedom from financial harm. The World Health Organization's Maternal Newborn Child and Adolescent Health (MNCAH) Policy Survey collects data on policies that have the potential to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality. The indicator, "Are the following health services provided free of charge at point-of-use in the public sector for women of reproductive age?", captures the free provision of 13 key categories of maternal health-related services, to measure the success of UHC implementation with respect to maternal health. However, it is unknown whether it provides a valid measure of the provision of free care. Therefore, this study compared free maternal healthcare laws and policies against actual practice in three countries. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in four districts/provinces in Argentina, Ghana, and India. We performed desk reviews to identify free care laws and policies at the country level and compared those with reports at the global level. We conducted exit interviews with women aged 15-49 years who used a component service or their accompanying persons, as well as with facility chief financial officers or billing administrators, to determine if women had out-of-pocket expenditures associated with accessing services. For designated free services, prevalence of expenditures at the service level for women and reports by financial officers of women ever having expenditures associated with services designated as free were computed. These three sources of data (desk review, surveys of women and administrators) were triangulated, and chi-square analysis was conducted to determine if charges were levied differentially by standard equity stratifiers. Designation of services as free matched what was reported in the MNCAH Policy Survey for Argentina and Ghana. In India, insecticide-treated bed nets and testing and treatment for syphilis were only designated as free for selected populations, differing from the WHO MNCAH Policy Survey. Among 1046, 923, and 1102 women and accompanying persons who were interviewed in Argentina, Ghana, and India, respectively, the highest prevalence of associated expenditures among women who received a component service in each setting was for cesarean section in Argentina (26%, 24/92); family planning in Ghana (78.4%, 69/88); and postnatal maternal care in India (94.4%, 85/90). The highest prevalence of women ever having out of pocket expenditures associated with accessing any free service reported by financial officers was 9.1% (2/22) in Argentina, 64.1% (93/145) in Ghana, and 29.7% (47/158) in India. Across the three countries, self-reports of out of pocket expenditures were significantly associated with district/province and educational status of women. Additionally, wealth quintile in Argentina and age in India were significantly associated with women reporting out of pocket expenditures. CONCLUSIONS: Free care laws were largely accurately reported in the global MNCAH policy database. Notably, we found that women absorbed both direct and indirect costs and made both formal and informal payments for services designated as free. Therefore, the policy indicator does not provide a valid reflection of UHC in the three settings.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health Services , Universal Health Insurance , Adolescent , Infant, Newborn , Humans , Female , Pregnancy , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , Cesarean Section , Maternal Health
14.
Washington, D.C.; OPS; 2024-03-12.
in Spanish | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr-59375

ABSTRACT

Esta edición de Recomendaciones para la atención de las principales emergencias obstétricas incluye la actualización de los capítulos Estados hipertensivos del embarazo, Hemorragia postparto, Reanimación cardiovascular en el embarazo, Sistema de alerta temprano y equipos de respuesta rápida en Obstetricia. Siguiendo el sistema GRADE para definir la calidad de la evidencia y la fortaleza de la recomendación se plantean recomendaciones para el abordaje del tromboembolismo pulmonar y embarazo, embolismo de líquido amniótico, Covid-19 y embarazo, influenza y embarazo y sepsis materna. Con esta publicación se busca apoyar los esfuerzos para lograr la concretización de la meta 3.1 de los ODS de reducir la tasa mundial de mortalidad materna a menos de 70 por cada 100.00 nacidos vivos hasta el 2030.


Subject(s)
Reproductive Health , Perinatal Care , Obstetrics , Maternal Health , Emergency Medicine
15.
Bull World Health Organ ; 102(2): 105-116, 2024 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38313151

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine inequalities in the coverage of reproductive and maternal health interventions in low- and middle-income countries and territories using a composite index of socioeconomic deprivation status. Methods: We obtained data on education and living standards from national household surveys conducted between 2015 and 2019 to calculate socioeconomic deprivation status. We assessed the coverage of reproductive and maternal health interventions, using three indicators: (i) demand for family planning satisfied with modern methods; (ii) women who received antenatal care in at least four visits; and (iii) the presence of a skilled attendant at delivery. Absolute and relative inequalities were evaluated both directly and using the slope index of inequality and the concentration index. Findings: In the 73 countries and territories with available data, the median proportions of deprivation were 41% in the low-income category, 11% in the lower-middle-income category and less than 1% in the upper-middle-income category. The coverage analysis, conducted for 48 countries with sufficient data, showed consistently lower median coverage among deprived households across all health indicators. The coverage of skilled attendant at delivery showed the largest inequalities, where coverage among the socioeconomically deprived was substantially lower in almost all countries. Antenatal care visits and demand for family planning satisfied with modern methods also showed significant disparities, favouring the less deprived population. Conclusion: The findings highlight persistent disparities in the coverage of reproductive and maternal health interventions, requiring efforts to reduce those disparities and improve coverage, particularly for skilled attendant at delivery.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health Services , Maternal Health , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Healthcare Disparities , Prenatal Care , Socioeconomic Factors
16.
NEJM Evid ; 3(2): EVIDra2300273, 2024 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38320493

ABSTRACT

Maternal Cardiovascular Health Post-DobbsPregnancy is associated with increasing morbidity and mortality in the United States. In the post-Dobbs era, many pregnant patients at highest risk no longer have access to abortion, which has been a crucial component of standard medical care.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Induced , Cardiovascular System , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Maternal Health
17.
PLoS One ; 19(2): e0296762, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38335177

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: High maternal mortality rates still today remain a significant public health concern in South Asian countries. The majority of maternal deaths occur during pregnancy, and these deaths may typically be avoided by ensuring that women have access to reliable maternity care such as antenatal care (ANC) and facility delivery. The objectives of this research were to assess socioeconomic disparities in the utilization of health care services by mothers and to determine the factors influencing this utilization among women aged 15 to 49 in five South Asian countries. METHODS: For this study, nationally representative data from the Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) were analyzed. This research included a total of 262,531 women between the ages of 15 and 49. To determine the likely causes of maternal health care utilization, simple bivariate statistics and binary logistic regression were applied, and decomposition analysis and the concentration curve were used to quantify disparity (Lorenz curve). RESULTS: ANC and institutional delivery were both prevalent in 59.27% and 86.52% of cases, respectively. Among the five nations, Maldives has the greatest ANC (96.83%) and institutional delivery (99.39%), while Bangladesh has the lowest ANC (47.01%) and institutional delivery (49.81%). Women's and husbands' education, household wealth status, BMI, and urban residents are the most important factors influencing maternal health service utilization, whereas higher education level, affluent wealth quintiles, and place of residence are the major contributors to socioeconomic inequalities in access to maternal health care that favor the wealthy. CONCLUSION: Maternal health care services must be utilized properly in order to promote optimal health and prevent maternal mortality. Several socioeconomic and sociodemographic variables of the individual population, as well as policy issues, all have an impact on maternal mortality. This research recommends for concerted action to enhance how successfully women use maternity care services.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health Services , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Maternal Health , Prenatal Care , Socioeconomic Factors , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Mothers
18.
Nutrients ; 16(3)2024 Jan 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38337660

ABSTRACT

The early life theory states that the first 1000 days of a person's life are highly influential, as lasting health impacts can be attained during this period [...].


Subject(s)
Fetal Development , Maternal Health , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Nutritional Status
19.
PLoS One ; 19(2): e0292802, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38329972

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Women in South Asia often return to their natal home during pregnancy, for childbirth, and stay through the postpartum period-potentially impacting access to health care and health outcomes in this important period. However, this phenomenon is understudied (and not even named) in the demographic or health literature, nor do we know how it impacts health. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to measure the magnitude, timing, duration, risk factors and impact on care of this phenomenon, which we name Temporary Childbirth Migration. METHODS: Using data from 9,033 pregnant and postpartum women collected in 2019 in two large states of India (Madhya Pradesh and Bihar) we achieve these aims using descriptive statistics and logistic regression models, combined with qualitative data from community health workers about this practice. RESULTS: We find that about one third of women return to their natal home at some point in pregnancy or postpartum, mostly clustered close to the time of delivery. Younger, primiparous, and non-Hindu women were more likely to return to their natal home. Women reported that they went to their natal home because they believed that they would receive better care; this was born out by our analysis in Bihar, but not Madhya Pradesh, for prenatal care. CONCLUSIONS: Temporary childbirth migration is common, and, contrary to expectations, did not lead to disruptions in care, but rather led to more access to care. CONTRIBUTION: We describe a hitherto un-named, underexplored yet common phenomenon that has implications for health care use and potentially health outcomes.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health Services , Maternal Health , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Parturition , Prenatal Care , India
20.
J Natl Med Assoc ; 116(1): 3-4, 2024 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38403387
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