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1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 7(6): e2415331, 2024 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38842804

ABSTRACT

Importance: Because unprofessional behaviors are associated with patient complications, malpractice claims, and well-being concerns, monitoring concerns requiring investigation and individuals identified in multiple reports may provide important opportunities for health care leaders to support all team members. Objective: To examine the distribution of physicians by specialty who demonstrate unprofessional behaviors measured through safety reports submitted by coworkers. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study was conducted among physicians who practiced at the 193 hospitals in the Coworker Concern Observation Reporting System (CORS), administered by the Vanderbilt Center for Patient and Professional Advocacy. Data were collected from January 2018 to December 2022. Exposure: Submitted reports concerning communication, professional responsibility, medical care, and professional integrity. Main Outcomes and Measures: Physicians' total number and categories of CORS reports. The proportion of physicians in each specialty (nonsurgeon nonproceduralists, emergency medicine physicians, nonsurgeon proceduralists, and surgeons) who received at least 1 report and who qualified for intervention were calculated; logistic regression was used to calculate the odds of any CORS report. Results: The cohort included 35 120 physicians: 18 288 (52.1%) nonsurgeon nonproceduralists, 1876 (5.3%) emergency medicine physicians, 6743 (19.2%) nonsurgeon proceduralists, and 8213 (23.4%) surgeons. There were 3179 physicians (9.1%) with at least 1 CORS report. Nonsurgeon nonproceduralists had the lowest percentage of physicians with at least 1 report (1032 [5.6%]), followed by emergency medicine (204 [10.9%]), nonsurgeon proceduralists (809 [12.0%]), and surgeons (1134 [13.8%]). Nonsurgeon nonproceduralists were less likely to be named in a CORS report than other specialties (5.6% vs 12.8% for other specialties combined; difference in percentages, -7.1 percentage points; 95% CI, -7.7 to -6.5 percentage points; P < .001). Pediatric-focused nonsurgeon nonproceduralists (2897 physicians) were significantly less likely to be associated with a CORS report than nonpediatric nonsurgeon nonproceduralists (15 391 physicians) (105 [3.6%] vs 927 [6.0%]; difference in percentages, -2.4 percentage points, 95% CI, -3.2 to -1.6 percentage points; P < .001). Pediatric-focused emergency medicine physicians, nonsurgeon proceduralists, and surgeons had no significant differences in reporting compared with nonpediatric-focused physicians. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, less than 10% of physicians ever received a coworker report with a concern about unprofessional behavior. Monitoring reports of unprofessional behaviors provides important opportunities for health care organizations to identify and intervene as needed to support team members.


Subject(s)
Physicians , Humans , Retrospective Studies , Female , Male , Physicians/psychology , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Professional Misconduct/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Middle Aged , Medicine/statistics & numerical data
3.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 601, 2024 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38816875

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Gender discrimination is known to affect societies in many different settings. Medical education is no exception. This study focusses on the consequences, gender discrimination can have on medical students and their choice of (junior) residency specialty. METHODS: An online questionnaire was developed and distributed among the 40 medical faculties in Germany. The study population contained medical students in their fifth and sixth academic year. RESULTS: The survey's participants consisted of 759 students from 31 universities. Female medical students experienced significantly more gender discrimination compared to their male colleagues (f = 487, 87.9% vs. m = 76, 45.8%, p < 0.0001). The specialties with the most reported gender discrimination were family medicine (f = 180, 42.9% vs. m = 15, 23.8%, p < 0.05), followed by surgery (f = 369, 87.4% vs. m = 44, 69.8%, p < 0.05), internal medicine (f = 282, 67.3% vs. m = 37, 58.7%, ns), orthopaedics/casualty surgery (f = 270, 65.1% vs. m = 32, 50.8%, p < 0.05), and gynaecology (women (f = 142, 34.1% vs. m = 34, 54.0%, p < 0.05). Gynaecology was the only specialty, men experienced more discrimination compared to women. Among the students that ever changed their specialty of choice (f = 346 (73.3%) m = 95 (72%)), significantly more women than men claimed gender discrimination to be one of the main three reasons for their specialty choice (f = 42, 12.1% vs. m = 1, 1.1%, p < 0.05). In addition, 53 students (f = 50 (10.6%) m = 3 (2.3%)) stated to rule out a specialty from the beginning due to gender discrimination. CONCLUSION: Gender discrimination is frequently experienced by medical students in Germany. It influences their choice of medical specialty directly. Our data suggest a fundamental problem that proposes and implicates certain specialties to be attractive for only one gender.


Subject(s)
Career Choice , Internship and Residency , Sexism , Students, Medical , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology , Female , Germany , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Young Adult , Specialization/statistics & numerical data , Medicine
5.
JAMA Netw Open ; 7(5): e2410127, 2024 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38713464

ABSTRACT

Importance: Board certification can have broad implications for candidates' career trajectories, and prior research has found sociodemographic disparities in pass rates. Barriers in the format and administration of the oral board examinations may disproportionately affect certain candidates. Objective: To characterize oral certifying examination policies and practices of the 16 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited specialties that require oral examinations. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional study was conducted from March 1 to April 15, 2023, using data on oral examination practices and policies (examination format, dates, and setting; lactation accommodations; and accommodations for military deployment, family emergency, or medical leave) as well as the gender composition of the specialties' boards of directors obtained from websites, telephone calls and email correspondence with certifying specialists. The percentages of female residents and residents of racial and ethnic backgrounds who are historically underrepresented in medicine (URM) in each specialty as of December 31, 2021, were obtained from the Graduate Medical Education 2021 to 2022 report. Main Outcome and Measures: For each specialty, accommodation scores were measured by a modified objective scoring system (score range: 1-13, with higher scores indicating more accommodations). Poisson regression was used to assess the association between accommodation score and the diversity of residents in that specialty, as measured by the percentages of female and URM residents. Linear regression was used to assess whether gender diversity of a specialty's board of directors was associated with accommodation scores. Results: Included in the analysis were 16 specialties with a total of 46 027 residents (26 533 males [57.6%]) and 233 members of boards of directors (152 males [65.2%]). The mean (SD) total accommodation score was 8.28 (3.79), and the median (IQR) score was 9.25 (5.00-12.00). No association was found between test accommodation score and the percentage of female or URM residents. However, for each 1-point increase in the test accommodation score, the relative risk that a resident was female was 1.05 (95% CI, 0.96-1.16), and the relative risk that an individual was a URM resident was 1.04 (95% CI, 1.00-1.07). An association was found between the percentage of female board members and the accommodation score: for each 10% increase in the percentage of board members who were female, the accommodation score increased by 1.20 points (95% CI, 0.23-2.16 points; P = .03). Conclusions and Relevance: This cross-sectional study found considerable variability in oral board examination accommodations among ACGME-accredited specialties, highlighting opportunities for improvement and standardization. Promoting diversity in leadership bodies may lead to greater accommodations for examinees in extenuating circumstances.


Subject(s)
Certification , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Male , Certification/statistics & numerical data , United States , Specialty Boards/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/statistics & numerical data , Educational Measurement/methods , Education, Medical, Graduate/statistics & numerical data , Medicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult
6.
Am J Manag Care ; 30(5): 237-240, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38748931

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess initiatives to manage the cost and outcomes of specialty care in organizations that participate in Medicare accountable care organizations (ACOs). STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of 2023 ACO survey data. METHODS: Analysis of responses to a 12-question web-based survey from 101 respondents representing 174 ACOs participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program or the Realizing Equity, Access, and Community Health ACO model in 2023. RESULTS: Improving specialist alignment was a high priority for 62% of the 101 respondents and a medium priority for 34%. Only 11% reported that employed specialists were highly aligned and 7% reported that contracted specialists were highly aligned. A subset of ACOs reported major efforts to engage specialists in quality improvement projects (38%) and to convene specialists to develop evidence-based care pathways (30%). They also reported supporting primary care physicians through providing specialist directories (44%), specialist e-consults (23%), and sharing specialist cost data (20%). The most common challenges reported were the influence of fee-for-service payment on specialist behavior (58%), lack of data to evaluate specialist performance (53%), and insufficient bandwidth or ACO resources to address specialist alignment (49%). CONCLUSIONS: Engaging specialists in accountable care is an emerging area for ACOs but one with numerous challenges. Making better data on specialist costs and outcomes available to Medicare ACOs is essential for accelerating progress.


Subject(s)
Accountable Care Organizations , Medicare , Accountable Care Organizations/economics , Accountable Care Organizations/statistics & numerical data , Accountable Care Organizations/organization & administration , United States , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Medicare/economics , Quality Improvement , Specialization/economics , Medicine
8.
S Afr Fam Pract (2004) ; 66(1): e1-e6, 2024 Apr 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38708748

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:  To determine the speciality preferences and the gender differences in the choice of speciality among medical students at Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, South Africa. METHODS:  This cross-sectional study was conducted among fourth- to sixth-year medical students. A structured self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. Data analysis was performed using STATA version 16 (StataCorp, College Station, TX, United States). RESULTS:  A total of 174 students participated (response rate of 74%). Their median age was 23 years with interquartile range of 2 years. More than half (57%) were females. About 83% had no previous qualifications. Most (89%) have shown interest in pursuing specialist training. Surgery, obstetrics and gynaecology and internal medicine were the most selected specialities, while family medicine, ophthalmology, forensic medicine, public health medicine, ear, nose and throat, and accident and emergency medicine were the least preferred. Males were more likely interested in surgery and internal medicine, while females preferred obstetrics and gynaecology. CONCLUSION:  The majority of the medical students intends to pursue their postgraduate medical training. Even though the results were not statistically significant, there are gender differences in speciality preferences. There is a need to develop and implement career guidance and recruitment plans to deal with specialities with poor recruitment and gender imbalance.Contribution: To deal with specialties with poor and gender imbalance, career guidance and recruitment plans must be developed and implemented.


Subject(s)
Career Choice , Specialization , Students, Medical , Humans , Students, Medical/psychology , Students, Medical/statistics & numerical data , South Africa , Female , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult , Sex Factors , Specialization/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Medicine/statistics & numerical data
9.
J Neurosurg ; 140(4): 1041-1053, 2024 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38564804

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective was to assess the performance of a context-enriched large language model (LLM) compared with international neurosurgical experts on questions related to the management of vestibular schwannoma. Furthermore, another objective was to develop a chat-based platform incorporating in-text citations, references, and memory to enable accurate, relevant, and reliable information in real time. METHODS: The analysis involved 1) creating a data set through web scraping, 2) developing a chat-based platform called neuroGPT-X, 3) enlisting 8 expert neurosurgeons across international centers to independently create questions (n = 1) and to answer (n = 4) and evaluate responses (n = 3) while blinded, and 4) analyzing the evaluation results on the management of vestibular schwannoma. In the blinded phase, all answers were assessed for accuracy, coherence, relevance, thoroughness, speed, and overall rating. All experts were unblinded and provided their thoughts on the utility and limitations of the tool. In the unblinded phase, all neurosurgeons provided answers to a Likert scale survey and long-answer questions regarding the clinical utility, likelihood of use, and limitations of the tool. The tool was then evaluated on the basis of a set of 103 consensus statements on vestibular schwannoma care from the 8th Quadrennial International Conference on Vestibular Schwannoma. RESULTS: Responses from the naive and context-enriched Generative Pretrained Transformer (GPT) models were consistently rated not significantly different in terms of accuracy, coherence, relevance, thoroughness, and overall performance, and they were often rated significantly higher than expert responses. Both the naive and content-enriched GPT models provided faster responses to the standardized question set than expert neurosurgeon respondents (p < 0.01). The context-enriched GPT model agreed with 98 of the 103 (95%) consensus statements. Of interest, all expert surgeons expressed concerns about the reliability of GPT in accurately addressing the nuances and controversies surrounding the management of vestibular schwannoma. Furthermore, the authors developed neuroGPT-X, a chat-based platform designed to provide point-of-care clinical support and mitigate the limitations of human memory. neuroGPT-X incorporates features such as in-text citations and references to enable accurate, relevant, and reliable information in real time. CONCLUSIONS: The present study, with its subspecialist-level performance in generating written responses to complex neurosurgical problems for which evidence-based consensus for management is lacking, suggests that context-enriched LLMs show promise as a point-of-care medical resource. The authors anticipate that this work will be a springboard for expansion into more medical specialties, incorporating evidence-based clinical information and developing expert-level dialogue surrounding LLMs in healthcare.


Subject(s)
Medicine , Neuroma, Acoustic , Humans , Language , Neuroma, Acoustic/surgery , Neurosurgeons , Reproducibility of Results , Artificial Intelligence
10.
J Epidemiol Community Health ; 78(7): 466-470, 2024 Jun 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38627041

ABSTRACT

A framework is put forward for the proper scope of considerations concerning flourishing within medicine, psychiatry, clinical counselling, public health and public policy. Each of these disciplines and associated institutional practices have distinctive contributions to make in advancing flourishing within society. In each case, there are also various aspects of flourishing that extend beyond each practice's purview; and yet to restrict attention only to health, narrowly conceived, limits what each of these practices can in fact accomplish. A clearer understanding of what aspects of flourishing do, and do not, lie within the bounds of each discipline and practice has the potential to better enable the pursuit of societal well-being.


Subject(s)
Public Health , Humans , Psychiatry , Medicine , Public Policy
11.
JAMA Netw Open ; 7(4): e246040, 2024 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38602674

ABSTRACT

Importance: Despite increasing evidence and recognition of persistent gender disparities in academic medicine, qualitative data detailing the association of gender-based experiences with career progression remain sparse, particularly at the mid- to senior-career stage. Objective: To investigate the role gender has played in everyday professional experiences of mid- to senior-career women clinician-scientists and their perceptions of gender-related barriers experienced across their careers. Design, Setting, and Participants: In this qualitative study, a total of 60 of 159 invited clinician-scientists who received National Institutes of Health K08 or K23 awards between 2006 and 2009 and responded to a survey in 2021 agreed to participate. Invitees were selected using random, purposive sampling to support sample heterogeneity. Semistructured in-depth interviews were conducted January to May 2022. For this study, interviews from 31 women were analyzed using the framework approach to thematic analysis. Data analyses were performed between August and October 2023. Main Outcomes and Measures: Descriptive themes of participant experiences of gender and gender-based barriers in academic medicine. Results: A total of 31 women clinician-scientists (8 identifying as Asian [25.8%], 14 identifying as White [45.2%], and 9 identifying as members of a minority group underrepresented in medicine [29.0%]; 14 aged 40-49 years [45.2%] and 14 aged 50-59 years [45.2%]) were included. Among them, 17 participants (54.8%) had children who required adult supervision or care, 7 participants (22.6%) had children who did not require supervision or care, and 6 participants (19.4%) did not have children. There were 4 dominant themes identified within participant experiences in academic medicine: the mental burden of gendered expectations at work and home, inequitable treatment of women in bureaucratic processes, subtle and less subtle professional exclusion of women, and value of communities built on shared identities, experiences, and solidarity. Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that women perceived the institution of academic medicine as a male-centric system misaligned with the needs of women, with associated feelings of exclusion, disillusionment, and loss of trust in their institutions. Findings suggest that the confluence of domestic obligations and unaccommodating institutional environments may make it difficult for women clinician-scientists to achieve established timelines of career progression and productivity; these findings may have long-term implications for the well-being and retention of women in academic medicine.


Subject(s)
Medicine , Adult , Female , Humans , Asian , Data Accuracy , Data Analysis , Qualitative Research , United States , Middle Aged , White , Minority Groups
12.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 103(15): e37719, 2024 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38608119

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Transverse spinal cord infarction (SCI) is rare but highly disabling. Aortic thrombosis was described as one of the most common etiologies. Thromboembolic complications associated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) have been reported. PATIENT CONCERNS: A previously well, 64-year-old man who was given the treatment of IVIG (0.4 g/kg/d for 5 days) for exfoliative dermatitis 2 weeks before, progressively developed flaccid paraplegia of lower extremities, loss of all sensations below T3 level and urinary incontinence within 50 minutes. DIAGNOSES: A diagnosis of SCI and pulmonary embolism was made. IVIG was considered the possible cause. INTERVENTIONS: Anticoagulation treatment and continuous rehabilitation were administered. OUTCOMES: The neurologic deficiency of the patient was partially improved at the 3-year follow-up. LESSONS: The rapid development of severe deficits within 4 hours mostly contributes to the diagnosis of SCI. Heightened awareness of possible thrombotic events is encouraged for a month-long period following IVIG therapy.


Subject(s)
Dermatitis, Exfoliative , Intracranial Arteriosclerosis , Ischemic Attack, Transient , Medicine , Spinal Cord Ischemia , Male , Humans , Middle Aged , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Infarction/etiology
14.
Med Educ Online ; 29(1): 2341508, 2024 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38608002

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In health education, group work is essential to prepare students for working in health care and medical teams. Following the widespread adoption of online teaching, group work increasingly takes place in online environments. Although successful group work can provide good learning outcomes, it is unclear what facilitates or hinders online group work in health science education, and to what extent this topic has been addressed. Thus, this scoping review aimed to identify the facilitators and barriers to online group work in higher health education, provide an overview of the scientific literature related to the topic, and identify knowledge gaps in the research. METHODS: This scoping review was guided by the methodological framework described by Arksey and O'Malley, and reporting is in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Extension for Scoping Review (PRISMA-ScR). Eight online databases were searched for scientific articles published between 2012 and 2022. At least two researchers independently screened records and full-text articles and charted data including article characteristics and key information related to the research question. Findings were categorized and summarized based on the Community of Inquiry Framework. RESULTS: After screening 3671 records and 466 full-text articles, 39 articles met the inclusion criteria. The review revealed smaller group size, consistency in group composition and joint responsibility to be facilitators. Challenges with group communication, scheduling synchronous meetings and technical issues were identified as barriers. Our findings supported the importance of all three elements of the Community of Inquiry Framework: social, cognitive, and teaching presence. CONCLUSION: This review provides an overview of facilitators and barriers to online group work in health science education. However, there is a need for further investigation of these factors and studies addressing this topic from the teachers' perspective.


Subject(s)
Health Education , Medicine , Humans , Communication , Databases, Factual , Knowledge
15.
Molecules ; 29(7)2024 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38611704

ABSTRACT

Tumors have a huge impact on human life and are now the main cause of disease-related deaths. The main means of treatment are surgery and radiotherapy, but they are more damaging to the organism and have a poor postoperative prognosis. Therefore, we urgently need safe and effective drugs to treat tumors. In recent years, Chinese herbal medicines have been widely used in tumor therapy as complementary and alternative therapies. Medicinal and edible herbs are popular and have become a hot topic of research, which not only have excellent pharmacological effects and activities, but also have almost no side effects. Therefore, as a typical medicine and food homology, some components of Paeoniae Radix Alba (PRA, called Baishao in China) have been shown to have good efficacy and safety against cancer. Numerous studies have also shown that Paeoniae Radix Alba and its active ingredients treat cancer through various pathways and are also one of the important components of many antitumor herbal compound formulas. In this paper, we reviewed the literature on the intervention of Paeoniae Radix Alba in tumors and its mechanism of action in recent years and found that there is a large amount of literature on its effect on total glucosides of paeony (TGP) and paeoniflorin (PF), as well as an in-depth discussion of the mechanism of action of Paeoniae Radix Alba and its main constituents, with a view to promote the clinical development and application of Paeoniae Radix Alba in the field of antitumor management.


Subject(s)
Drugs, Chinese Herbal , Medicine , Neoplasms , Paeonia , Plant Extracts , Humans , China , Neoplasms/drug therapy
16.
Molecules ; 29(7)2024 Mar 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38611804

ABSTRACT

One can foresee a very near future where ionic liquids will be used in applications such as biomolecular chemistry or medicine. The molecular details of their interaction with biological matter, however, are difficult to investigate due to the vast number of combinations of both the biological systems and the variety of possible liquids. Here, we provide a computational study aimed at understanding the interaction of a special class of biocompatible ionic liquids (choline-aminoate) with two model biological systems: an oligopeptide and an oligonucleotide. We employed molecular dynamics with a polarizable force field. Our results are in line with previous experimental and computational evidence on analogous systems and show how these biocompatible ionic liquids, in their pure form, act as gentle solvents for protein structures while simultaneously destabilizing DNA structure.


Subject(s)
Ionic Liquids , Medicine , Computer Simulation , Solvents , Choline
17.
Int J Public Health ; 69: 1606648, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38638129

ABSTRACT

For many, the World Health Organization's (WHO) definition of health does not reflect their own understanding of health, because it lacks aspects such as spiritual wellbeing. Responding to these concerns, the WHO called in 2023 for a vision of health that integrates physical, mental, psychological, emotional, spiritual, and social wellbeing. To date, medical practitioners are often reluctant to consider spiritual aspects, because of a perceived lack of statistical evidence about the strength of relations. Research on this topic is emerging. A recent study among 800 young people living with HIV in Zimbabwe showed how study participants navigated three parallel, at times contradicting health systems (religious, traditional, medical). Conflicting approaches led to multifaceted dilemmas (= spiritual struggles), which were significantly related to poorer mental and physical health. This illustrates the need for inclusion of spiritual aspects for health and wellbeing in research, and of increased collaboration between all stakeholders in healthcare.


Subject(s)
Health , Spirituality , Spiritualism/psychology , Spiritual Therapies/trends , World Health Organization , Medicine, Traditional/trends , Medicine/methods , Medicine/trends , Zimbabwe , HIV Infections/psychology , HIV Infections/therapy , Humans , Young Adult , Holistic Health/trends , Public Health/methods , Public Health/trends , Delivery of Health Care
18.
BMC Med Res Methodol ; 24(1): 91, 2024 Apr 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38641771

ABSTRACT

Observational data provide invaluable real-world information in medicine, but certain methodological considerations are required to derive causal estimates. In this systematic review, we evaluated the methodology and reporting quality of individual-level patient data meta-analyses (IPD-MAs) conducted with non-randomized exposures, published in 2009, 2014, and 2019 that sought to estimate a causal relationship in medicine. We screened over 16,000 titles and abstracts, reviewed 45 full-text articles out of the 167 deemed potentially eligible, and included 29 into the analysis. Unfortunately, we found that causal methodologies were rarely implemented, and reporting was generally poor across studies. Specifically, only three of the 29 articles used quasi-experimental methods, and no study used G-methods to adjust for time-varying confounding. To address these issues, we propose stronger collaborations between physicians and methodologists to ensure that causal methodologies are properly implemented in IPD-MAs. In addition, we put forward a suggested checklist of reporting guidelines for IPD-MAs that utilize causal methods. This checklist could improve reporting thereby potentially enhancing the quality and trustworthiness of IPD-MAs, which can be considered one of the most valuable sources of evidence for health policy.


Subject(s)
Medicine , Research Design , Humans , Checklist
19.
J Nepal Health Res Counc ; 21(4): 642-645, 2024 Mar 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38616596

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Traumatic spinal injury is leading cause of mortality and morbidity among the people of productive age group. This study aim to find the cause of spinal injury, site ,and mode of injury, treatment option given so that a preventive measures and create awareness among people of this region. METHODS: This is a prospective observation study done in Karnali Academy of Health Sciences from December 2021 to January 2023. Performa was filled to collect data. Data were entered in excel sheet and transported to SPSS 16.0 and statistical analysis was done . RESULTS: Out of 117 patients male population had higher incidence of spinal trauma (69.2%) with average age 43.9 years . Fall injury was the commonest mode of injury. 65.8% had injury at the thoracolumbar junction followed by lumbar, thoracic and cervical respectively. Cervical injury patients had higher incidence of neurological deficit. The average duration of trauma to hospital presentation was 10.9±11.2 hours. 19.7 % were operated and 6.8 % of patients were referred to other center. CONCLUSIONS: Fall injury being the commonest mode of injury in this art of world, prevention and awareness should be raised about the spinal trauma and its consequences. Adequate equipment with health facilities to the distant hospital may reduce the referral rate and duration of presentation to the hospital which ultimately prevent the further damage to the cord.


Subject(s)
Medicine , Spinal Injuries , Adult , Humans , Male , Health Facilities , Nepal/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Spinal Injuries/epidemiology , Spinal Injuries/etiology , Female
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