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1.
Clin Psychol Psychother ; 31(3): e3003, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38855846

ABSTRACT

Effective training of mental health professionals is crucial for bridging the gap between research and practice when delivering cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and motivational interviewing (MI) within community settings. However, previous research has provided inconclusive evidence regarding the impact of training efforts. The current study aimed to systematically search, review and synthesize the literature on CBT and MI training to assess its effect on practitioner behavioural outcomes. Following prospective registration, a literature search was conducted for studies where mental health practitioners were exposed to training in face-to-face CBT or MI, reporting on at least one quantitative practitioner behavioural outcome. A total of 116 studies were eligible for the systematic review, and 20 studies were included in four meta-analyses. The systematic review highlights the need to establish psychometrically valid outcome measures for practitioner behaviour. Results of the meta-analyses suggest that training has a greater effect on practitioner behaviour change compared to receiving no training or reading a treatment manual. Training combined with consultation/supervision was found to be more effective than training alone, and no differences were found between face-to-face and online training. Results should be interpreted with caution due to methodological limitations in the primary studies, large heterogeneity, and small samples in the meta-analyses. Future directions are discussed.


Subject(s)
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Motivational Interviewing , Humans , Motivational Interviewing/methods , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Health Personnel/education , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Disorders/psychology
4.
Turk Psikiyatri Derg ; 35(2): 95-101, 2024.
Article in English, Turkish | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38842151

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Access to psychiatry services in Kashmir is challenging because of active enduring conflict, insecurity and a fundamental role played by the traditional health workers. We aimed to assess the main pathways to mental health services in Kashmir, India. METHODS: This cross-sectional hospital-based study was performed from March 2012 to June 2017 in the outpatient psychiatry department at a psychiatric disease hospital in Kashmir. A convenience sampling method was used to select newly referred patients to the services. A survey was developed to collect information on demographic data and the main pathways for patients when seeking care for mental disorders. RESULTS: A total of 518 patients were interviewed. About half of the respondents (48.8 %) attended clinical consultation from a general pathway like a physician or a neurologist, while 31.8% were visiting a psychiatrist for a significant psychiatric disorder. For some patients (17.8%), their initial pathway to mental health services is traditional healers. CONCLUSION: The current study revealed different pathways to seeking psychiatric care in Kashmir India. Further studies are needed to address the treatment gap and ways to improve access to mental health services for the Kashmir population.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Mental Health Services , Referral and Consultation , Humans , India , Mental Disorders/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Male , Adult , Middle Aged , Adolescent , Young Adult , Health Services Accessibility , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Turk Psikiyatri Derg ; 35(2): 87-94, 2024.
Article in English, Turkish | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38842150

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Although Syrian refugees have high rates of mental health problems due to war trauma, little is known on their degree of need for and contact with mental health services. Using a population sample of Syrian refugees living in Ankara, we assessed the perceived need for and contact with mental health services, as well as the barriers to access these services. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional mixed-method study of 420 Syrian refugees living in Ankara city center, using face to face interviews administered at the respondents' home by trained, Arabic-speaking interviewers. PTSD and depression were assessed using Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and Beck Depression Inventory, respectively. RESULTS: Of all the refugees in our sample, 14,8% (N=62) stated that they felt the need for mental healthcare since arriving in Turkey. The actual number contacting any mental health service was very low (1,4%, N=6). The most important barriers to accessing mental health services were reported by the respondents to be language problems and lack of information on available mental health services. Service providers and policymakers also reported similar topics as the most important barriers: low awareness about mental health problems, daily living difficulties, and language and cultural barriers. Multivariate analyses revealed that presence of medical or mental disorders and female gender predicted the perceived need for contacting services. CONCLUSION: Our results show that, although refugees report high rates of mental health problems, the perceived need for and actual contact with services are very low. To address this treatment gap, and to provide adequate care for refugees with mental health problems, common barriers (language and awareness) should be identified and dealt with.


Subject(s)
Health Services Accessibility , Mental Health Services , Refugees , Humans , Refugees/psychology , Syria/ethnology , Female , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adult , Turkey , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adolescent , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy
6.
JMIR Ment Health ; 11: e56529, 2024 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38861302

ABSTRACT

Recent breakthroughs in artificial intelligence (AI) language models have elevated the vision of using conversational AI support for mental health, with a growing body of literature indicating varying degrees of efficacy. In this paper, we ask when, in therapy, it will be easier to replace humans and, conversely, in what instances, human connection will still be more valued. We suggest that empathy lies at the heart of the answer to this question. First, we define different aspects of empathy and outline the potential empathic capabilities of humans versus AI. Next, we consider what determines when these aspects are needed most in therapy, both from the perspective of therapeutic methodology and from the perspective of patient objectives. Ultimately, our goal is to prompt further investigation and dialogue, urging both practitioners and scholars engaged in AI-mediated therapy to keep these questions and considerations in mind when investigating AI implementation in mental health.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Empathy , Humans , Psychotherapy/methods , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Disorders/psychology
7.
BMC Prim Care ; 25(1): 211, 2024 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38862874

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Ethiopian Primary Healthcare Clinical Guidelines (EPHCG) seek to improve quality of primary health care, while also expanding access to care for people with Non-Communicable Diseases and Mental Health Conditions (NCDs/MHCs). The aim of this study was to identify barriers and enablers to implementation of the EPHCG with a particular focus on NCDs/MHCs. METHODS: A mixed-methods convergent-parallel design was employed after EPHCG implementation in 18 health facilities in southern Ethiopia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 primary healthcare clinicians and one healthcare administrator. Organisational Readiness for Implementing Change (ORIC) questionnaire was self-completed by 124 health workers and analysed using Kruskal Wallis ranked test to investigate median score differences. Qualitative data were mapped to the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Science (CFIR) and the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF). Expert Recommendations for Implementing Change (ERIC) were employed to select implementation strategies to address barriers. RESULTS: Four domains were identified: EPHCG training and implementation, awareness and meeting patient needs (demand side), resource constraints/barriers (supply side) and care pathway bottlenecks. The innovative facility-based training to implement EPHCG had a mixed response, especially in busy facilities where teams reported struggling to find protected time to meet. Key barriers to implementation of EPHCG were non-availability of resources (CFIR inner setting), such as laboratory reagents and medications that undermined efforts to follow guideline-based care, the way care was structured and lack of familiarity with providing care for people with NCDs-MHCs. Substantial barriers arose because of socio-economic problems that were interlinked with health but not addressable within the health system (CFIR outer setting). Other factors influencing effective implementation of EPHCG (TDF) included low population awareness about NCDs/MHCs and unaffordable diagnostic and treatment services (TDF). Implementation strategies were identified. ORIC findings indicated high scores of organisational readiness to implement the desired change with likely social desirability bias. CONCLUSION: Although perceived as necessary, practical implementation of EPHCG was constrained by challenges across domains of internal/external determinants. This was especially marked in relation to expansion of care responsibilities to include NCDs/MHCs. Attention to social determinants of health outcomes, community engagement and awareness-raising are needed to maximize population impact.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Mental Disorders , Noncommunicable Diseases , Primary Health Care , Humans , Ethiopia , Noncommunicable Diseases/therapy , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Mental Disorders/therapy , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Female , Male , Qualitative Research , Quality Improvement , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Personnel/psychology , Practice Guidelines as Topic
8.
Psychother Psychosom Med Psychol ; 74(6): 205-213, 2024 Jun.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38865996

ABSTRACT

Although mental health is a human right, even in a country with a well-developed healthcare system like Germany, it is not possible to ensure non-discriminatory access to mental health care for all people, regardless of their origin. For individuals with a history of flight or migration it is particularly difficult to gain access to adequate psychotherapeutic care. This review addresses key barriers contributing to the lack of outpatient care for people with a history of flight or migration. Lack of knowledge about the treatment system, fear of stigma, structural barriers, language barriers, lack of networking of healthcare providers, lack of knowledge of mental health practitioners, as well as stereotypes, discrimination, and racism towards people with a refugee or migration history were identified as the most important barriers with sufficient evidence. Innovative concepts such as peer support can enable non-discriminatory treatment access. In addition, there is an urgent need to train the profession of psychotherapists in racism- and discrimination-sensitive work and to integrate these aspects into psychotherapeutic education and training.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , Health Services Accessibility , Psychotherapy , Refugees , Humans , Germany , Refugees/psychology , Social Stigma , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Disorders/psychology , Emigrants and Immigrants/psychology , Racism/psychology
9.
BMC Med ; 22(1): 241, 2024 Jun 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38867231

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Home treatment in child and adolescent psychiatry offers an alternative to conventional inpatient treatment by involving the patient's family, school, and peers more directly in therapy. Although several reviews have summarised existing home treatment programmes, evidence of their effectiveness remains limited and data synthesis is lacking. METHODS: We conducted a meta-analysis on the effectiveness of home treatment compared with inpatient treatment in child and adolescent psychiatry, based on a systematic search of four databases (PubMed, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Embase). Primary outcomes were psychosocial functioning and psychopathology. Additional outcomes included treatment satisfaction, duration, costs, and readmission rates. Group differences were expressed as standardised mean differences (SMD) in change scores. We used three-level random-effects meta-analysis and meta-regression and conducted both superiority and non-inferiority testing. RESULTS: We included 30 studies from 13 non-overlapping samples, providing data from 1795 individuals (mean age: 11.95 ± 2.33 years; 42.5% female). We found no significant differences between home and inpatient treatment for postline psychosocial functioning (SMD = 0.05 [- 0.18; 0.30], p = 0.68, I2 = 98.0%) and psychopathology (SMD = 0.10 [- 0.17; 0.37], p = 0.44, I2 = 98.3%). Similar results were observed from follow-up data and non-inferiority testing. Meta-regression showed better outcomes for patient groups with higher levels of psychopathology at baseline and favoured home treatment over inpatient treatment when only randomised controlled trials were considered. CONCLUSIONS: This meta-analysis found no evidence that home treatment is less effective than conventional inpatient treatment, highlighting its potential as an effective alternative in child and adolescent psychiatry. The generalisability of these findings is reduced by limitations in the existing literature, and further research is needed to better understand which patients benefit most from home treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Registered at PROSPERO (CRD42020177558), July 5, 2020.


Subject(s)
Home Care Services , Mental Disorders , Humans , Mental Disorders/therapy , Adolescent , Child , Treatment Outcome , Female , Male
10.
Zhongguo Zhen Jiu ; 44(6): 703-14, 2024 Jun 12.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38867635

ABSTRACT

In this study, based on the neuroimaging literature Meta analysis retrieved from Neurosynth platform, the scalp stimulation targets for common psychiatric diseases are developed, which provided the stimulation target protocols of scalp acupuncture for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia. The paper introduces the functions of the brain areas that are involved in each target and closely related to the diseases, and lists the therapeutic methods of common acupuncture/scalp acupuncture and common neuromodulation methods for each disease so as to provide the references for clinical practice. Based on the study results above, the paper further summarizes the overlapped stimulation targets undergoing the intervention with scalp acupuncture for common psychiatric diseases, and the potential relationship between these stimulation targets and treatments with acupuncture and moxibustion.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Points , Acupuncture Therapy , Mental Disorders , Neuroimaging , Scalp , Humans , Acupuncture Therapy/methods , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Disorders/diagnostic imaging , Neuroimaging/methods , Brain/diagnostic imaging , Brain/physiopathology
11.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0303893, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38870198

ABSTRACT

This research involved an evaluation of the Nutrition and Body Mass Index Clinical Link Pathway (NBMI CLiP) implemented in practice across Severe Mental Illness and/or learning disabilities ward in Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust (TEWV), to understand how the NBMI CLiP is used, inpatient staff feedback on the CLiP for supporting service users to manage their weight, and whether using the NBMI CLiP impacted on staffs' own weight management. To account for the uneven distribution of the secondary data, descriptive statistics such as medians and the inter-quartile range were conducted to assess anychanges in recording of Body Mass Index, nutrition screening (SANSI) and intervention planss. Staff survey data investigated barriers and facilitators to using the NBMI CLiP in practice and the impact on their own weight management. Secondary data analysis found most wards improved recording of BMI, SANSI and Intervention Planning. Forensic Learning Disabilities, Adult Learning Disabilities, mixed gender wards and North Yorkshire and York Operational Directorate indicated the greatest improvement. Survey results (n = 55) found three times as many participants (n = 12, 75%) found the NBMI CLiP easy or very easy to use; most fully understood it (n = 13, 81.20%) and were confident or very confident to carry out a SANSI Screen (n = 14, 87.50%) or a recovery focused intervention plan (n = 9, 56.20%). Open-text responses, analysed using content analysis, indicated a need for further training of staff on the NBMI CLiP. It is recommended that to support weight management across these wards, that a nudge or choice architecture approach to weight management is adopted, supported by training delivered by a dietitian.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Learning Disabilities , Humans , Female , Male , Adult , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Nutritional Status , Surveys and Questionnaires , Mental Health
12.
BMC Prim Care ; 25(1): 215, 2024 Jun 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38872128

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Given that mental health problems in adolescence may have lifelong impacts, the role of primary care physicians (PCPs) in identifying and managing these issues is important. Artificial Intelligence (AI) may offer solutions to the current challenges involved in mental health care. We therefore explored PCPs' challenges in addressing adolescents' mental health, along with their attitudes towards using AI to assist them in their tasks. METHODS: We used purposeful sampling to recruit PCPs for a virtual Focus Group (FG). The virtual FG lasted 75 minutes and was moderated by two facilitators. A life transcription was produced by an online meeting software. Transcribed data was cleaned, followed by a priori and inductive coding and thematic analysis. RESULTS: We reached out to 35 potential participants via email. Seven agreed to participate, and ultimately four took part in the FG. PCPs perceived that AI systems have the potential to be cost-effective, credible, and useful in collecting large amounts of patients' data, and relatively credible. They envisioned AI assisting with tasks such as diagnoses and establishing treatment plans. However, they feared that reliance on AI might result in a loss of clinical competency. PCPs wanted AI systems to be user-friendly, and they were willing to assist in achieving this goal if it was within their scope of practice and they were compensated for their contribution. They stressed a need for regulatory bodies to deal with medicolegal and ethical aspects of AI and clear guidelines to reduce or eliminate the potential of patient harm. CONCLUSION: This study provides the groundwork for assessing PCPs' perceptions of AI systems' features and characteristics, potential applications, possible negative aspects, and requirements for using them. A future study of adolescents' perspectives on integrating AI into mental healthcare might contribute a fuller understanding of the potential of AI for this population.


Subject(s)
Artificial Intelligence , Attitude of Health Personnel , Focus Groups , Physicians, Primary Care , Humans , Adolescent , Physicians, Primary Care/psychology , Female , Male , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Health , Adult , Mental Health Services
13.
J Dev Behav Pediatr ; 45(3): e195-e202, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38896565

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Monolingual Spanish speakers-many of whom identify as Hispanic/Latine-often experience barriers to accessing psychology services, including language access. Integrated primary care (IPC) clinics, where individuals receive psychological services within primary care, aim to improve service accessibility. However, minoritized populations are less likely to engage with these services than non-Hispanic/Latine White individuals. Few studies examine psychology treatment engagement within pediatric integrated clinics for Spanish-speaking families. This study investigated differences in psychology treatment engagement for Spanish-speaking families and the role of patient-provider language concordance within pediatric IPC. METHODS: A retrospective chart review examined data from a multiethnic sample of 887 patients (M age = 8.97 yrs, 55.69% male, 64.83% Hispanic/Latine, 6.99% non-Hispanic/Latine White, 41.71% Spanish-preferring) from an urban pediatric IPC clinic serving a high proportion of Hispanic/Latine, Spanish-speaking families. We examined the association between language preference and patient-provider language concordance on service engagement using hierarchical linear regression. RESULTS: Spanish-preferring families were more likely than English-preferring families to engage in psychology services. Working with a Spanish-speaking provider during an initial psychology visit was unrelated to psychology treatment engagement for Spanish-preferring families. CONCLUSION: Higher engagement for Spanish-preferring families seems to reflect the clinic's reputation as a center for linguistically accessible services. While linguistic accessibility remains important, our study did not detect an effect of language concordance during the initial psychology visit and subsequent treatment engagement. The findings highlight the importance of providing culturally responsive and linguistically accessible mental health services for Spanish-speaking families.


Subject(s)
Hispanic or Latino , Multilingualism , Humans , Male , Hispanic or Latino/statistics & numerical data , Female , Child , Retrospective Studies , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/ethnology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility , Communication Barriers , Language , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Disorders/ethnology
14.
J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol ; 53(3): 503-522, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38830059

ABSTRACT

Despite advances in clinical science, the burden of mental health problems among youth is not improving. To tackle this burden, clinical science with youth needs methods that include youth and family perspectives on context and public health. In this paper, we illustrate how community-engaged research (CEnR) methods center these perspectives. Although CEnR methods are well-established in other disciplines (e.g. social work, community psychology), they are underutilized in clinical science with youth. This is due in part to misperceptions of CEnR as resource-intensive, overly contextualized, incompatible with experimentally controlled modes of inquiry, or irrelevant to understanding youth mental health. By contrast, CEnR methods can provide real-world impact, contextualized clinical solutions, and sustainable outcomes. A key advantage of CEnR strategies is their flexibility-they fall across a continuum that centers community engagement as a core principle, and thus can be infused in a variety of research efforts, even those that center experimental control (e.g. randomized controlled trials). This paper provides a brief overview of this continuum of strategies and its application to youth-focused clinical science. We then discuss future directions of CEnR in clinical science with youth, as well as structural changes needed to advance this work. The goals of this paper are to help demystify CEnR and encourage clinical scientists to consider adopting methods that better consider context and intentionally engage the communities that our work seeks to serve.


Subject(s)
Community-Based Participatory Research , Humans , Adolescent , Child , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health
15.
JMIR Hum Factors ; 11: e53406, 2024 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38837191

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Given the physical health disparities associated with mental illness, targeted lifestyle interventions are required to reduce the risk of cardiometabolic disease. Integrating physical health early in mental health treatment among young people is essential for preventing physical comorbidities, reducing health disparities, managing medication side effects, and improving overall health outcomes. Digital technology is increasingly used to promote fitness, lifestyle, and physical health among the general population. However, using these interventions to promote physical health within mental health care requires a nuanced understanding of the factors that affect their adoption and implementation. OBJECTIVE: Using a qualitative design, we explored the attitudes of mental health care professionals (MHCPs) toward digital technologies for physical health with the goal of illuminating the opportunities, development, and implementation of the effective use of digital tools for promoting healthier lifestyles in mental health care. METHODS: Semistructured interviews were conducted with MHCPs (N=13) using reflexive thematic analysis to explore their experiences and perspectives on using digital health to promote physical health in youth mental health care settings. RESULTS: Three overarching themes from the qualitative analysis are reported: (1) motivation will affect implementation, (2) patients' readiness and capability, and (3) reallocation of staff roles and responsibilities. The subthemes within, and supporting quotes, are described. CONCLUSIONS: The use of digital means presents many opportunities for improving the provision of physical health interventions in mental health care settings. However, given the limited experience of many MHCPs with these technologies, formal training and additional support may improve the likelihood of implementation. Factors such as patient symptomatology, safety, and access to technology, as well as the readiness, acceptability, and capability of both MHCPs and patients to engage with digital tools, must also be considered. In addition, the potential benefits of data integration must be carefully weighed against the associated risks.


Subject(s)
Health Personnel , Mental Disorders , Qualitative Research , Humans , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Disorders/psychology , Female , Male , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/education , Adult , Adolescent , Attitude of Health Personnel , Health Promotion/methods , Life Style , Young Adult
16.
Health Expect ; 27(3): e14122, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38898606

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Medical interventions have a place in crisis support; however, narrow biomedical and risk-driven responses negatively impact people seeking crisis care. With increasing shifts towards involving people with lived experience (service users) in designing services, foregrounding people's desired responses is critical. Accordingly, the aim of the study was to explore the wished-for crisis responses from the perspective of people who have experienced crisis and accessed crisis care. METHOD: Using a hermeneutical phenomenological approach, in-depth interviews were conducted to determine the desired crisis responses of 31 people who self-reported experiencing mental health crises and accessed crisis services at ED, phone lines and/or crisis alternatives. RESULTS: The findings identified wished-for responses that gave a felt and embodied sense of their own safety influenced by a human-to-human response, emotional holding, a place of safety and choice within holistic care. For such responses to be possible, participants identified organising principles, including recognising crisis as meaningful and part of our shared human experience, understanding risk as fluid and a whole-of-community responsibility for responding to crises. CONCLUSION: This paper proposes how insights from people who have experienced crises can be translated into more beneficial crisis care. PATIENT OR CONSUMER CONTRIBUTION: Most authors are in identified lived experience roles. The first author engaged with participants during the recruitment and interviews and was explicit regarding their lived experience. Service users were involved as advisors, providing input throughout the study.


Subject(s)
Crisis Intervention , Interviews as Topic , Mental Disorders , Humans , Female , Male , Adult , Middle Aged , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Disorders/psychology , Qualitative Research , Mental Health Services
17.
BMC Psychiatry ; 24(1): 430, 2024 Jun 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38858711

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In a growing list of countries, patients are granted access to their clinical notes ("open notes") as part of their online record access. Especially in the field of mental health, open notes remain controversial with some clinicians perceiving open notes as a tool for improving therapeutic outcomes by increasing patient involvement, while others fear that patients might experience psychological distress and perceived stigmatization, particularly when reading clinicians' notes. More research is needed to optimize the benefits and mitigate the risks. METHODS: Using a qualitative research design, we conducted semi-structured interviews with psychiatrists practicing in Germany, to explore what conditions they believe need to be in place to ensure successful implementation of open notes in psychiatric practice as well as expected subsequent changes to their workload and treatment outcomes. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: We interviewed 18 psychiatrists; interviewees believed four key conditions needed to be in place prior to implementation of open notes including careful consideration of (1) diagnoses and symptom severity, (2) the availability of additional time for writing clinical notes and discussing them with patients, (3) available resources and system compatibility, and (4) legal and data protection aspects. As a result of introducing open notes, interviewees expected changes in documentation, treatment processes, and doctor-physician interaction. While open notes were expected to improve transparency and trust, participants anticipated negative unintended consequences including the risk of deteriorating therapeutic relationships due to note access-related misunderstandings and conflicts. CONCLUSION: Psychiatrists practiced in Germany where open notes have not yet been established as part of the healthcare data infrastructure. Interviewees were supportive of open notes but had some reservations. They found open notes to be generally beneficial but anticipated effects to vary depending on patient characteristics. Clear guidelines for managing access, time constraints, usability, and privacy are crucial. Open notes were perceived to increase transparency and patient involvement but were also believed to raise issues of stigmatization and conflicts.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Psychiatry , Qualitative Research , Humans , Male , Female , Germany , Adult , Middle Aged , Physician-Patient Relations , Electronic Health Records , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Psychiatrists
18.
Inquiry ; 61: 469580241256822, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38842194

ABSTRACT

Behavioral health crisis care (BHCC) is a care delivery model for individuals experiencing acute distress related to a mental health or substance use disorder. We examined market factors associated with comprehensive BHCC availability using 2022 data on mental health treatment facilities (n = 9385) obtained from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. We aggregated facility-level data by county (n = 3142) and merged with county-level market factors. Logistic regression models were used to examine the adjusted associations between market factors and BHCC availability. We found that 468 (14.9%) counties had at least one mental health treatment facility offering comprehensive BHCC services. Specifically, counties with more mental health providers (Adjusted Odds Ratio = 2.26, Confidence Interval = 1.32-3.86) and metropolitan counties (AOR = 3.26, CI = 1.95-5.43) had higher odds of having a comprehensive BHCC facility. Our findings highlight the importance of developing the mental health workforce to increase BHCC availability and a need to address disparities in rural counties.


Subject(s)
Health Services Accessibility , Mental Disorders , Mental Health Services , Humans , United States , Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/therapy , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Crisis Intervention/statistics & numerical data , United States Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
19.
Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am ; 33(3): 355-367, 2024 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38823809

ABSTRACT

Effective partnerships can profoundly impact outcomes for youth with behavioral health concerns. Partnerships occur at multiple levels - at the individual, organizational, state, and national levels. The Systems of Care (SOC) framework helps to conceptualize and articulate the skills necessary for forming partnerships in youth's mental health. This article explores values in the SOC framework and makes the case that the framework can help develop a "road map" to develop the skills needed to achieve successful partnerships. Impediments to effective partnerships are also discussed. Several case examples are given to illustrate the principles and impediments to partnership formation.


Subject(s)
Community Mental Health Services , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Community Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Cooperative Behavior , Mental Disorders/therapy
20.
Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am ; 33(3): 381-395, 2024 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38823811

ABSTRACT

This article highlights the key role of schools in addressing rising mental health disorders among youth. It champions collaboration between health and educational sectors, emphasizing child and adolescent psychiatrists' significant contribution to school-based mental health literacy and interventions. This article encourages for child and adolescent psychiatrists' involvement in policy advocacy for accessible and inclusive mental health care, championing sustainable mental health services through advocating for funding, training, and policy support.


Subject(s)
Health Services Accessibility , Mental Disorders , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Adolescent Psychiatry , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Disorders/prevention & control , Mental Health Services , School Health Services , School Mental Health Services
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