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1.
Acta Neurochir (Wien) ; 166(1): 250, 2024 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38833024

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Systematic reviews (SRs) and meta-analyses (MAs) are methods of data analysis used to synthesize information presented in multiple publications on the same topic. A thorough understanding of the steps involved in conducting this type of research and approaches to data analysis is critical for appropriate understanding, interpretation, and application of the findings of these reviews. METHODS: We reviewed reference texts in clinical neuroepidemiology, neurostatistics and research methods and other previously related articles on meta-analyses (MAs) in surgery. Based on existing theories and models and our cumulative years of expertise in conducting MAs, we have synthesized and presented a detailed pragmatic approach to interpreting MAs in Neurosurgery. RESULTS: Herein we have briefly defined SRs sand MAs and related terminologies, succinctly outlined the essential steps to conduct and critically appraise SRs and MAs. A practical approach to interpreting MAs for neurosurgeons is described in details. Based on summary outcome measures, we have used hypothetical examples to illustrate the Interpretation of the three commonest types of MAs in neurosurgery: MAs of Binary Outcome Measures (Pairwise MAs), MAs of proportions and MAs of Continuous Variables. Furthermore, we have elucidated on the concepts of heterogeneity, modeling, certainty, and bias essential for the robust and transparent interpretation of MAs. The basics for the Interpretation of Forest plots, the preferred graphical display of data in MAs are summarized. Additionally, a condensation of the assessment of the overall quality of methodology and reporting of MA and the applicability of evidence to patient care is presented. CONCLUSION: There is a paucity of pragmatic guides to appraise MAs for surgeons who are non-statisticians. This article serves as a detailed guide for the interpretation of systematic reviews and meta-analyses with examples of applications for clinical neurosurgeons.


Subject(s)
Meta-Analysis as Topic , Neurosurgery , Neurosurgical Procedures , Humans , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Systematic Reviews as Topic/methods , Data Interpretation, Statistical
5.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 13: e54853, 2024 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38833277

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19, an infectious disease pandemic, affected millions of people globally, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Causing further concern, significant proportions of COVID-19 survivors endure the lingering health effects of SARS-CoV-2, the pathogen that causes COVID-19. One of the diseases manifesting as a postacute sequela of COVID-19 (also known as "long COVID") is new-onset diabetes. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to examine the incidence of new-onset diabetes in patients with long COVID and assess the excess risk compared with individuals who tested negative for COVID-19. The study also aims to estimate the population-attributable fraction for COVID-19 as a risk factor for new-onset diabetes in long COVID and investigate the clinical course of new-onset diabetes cases. METHODS: This is a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis. PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus, and Web of Science databases will be systematically searched to identify articles published between December 2019 and July 2024. A comprehensive search strategy for each database will be developed using a combination of Medical Subject Headings terms, subject headings, and text words to identify eligible studies. Cohort studies and randomized controlled trials (only control arms) involving patients with COVID-19 of any age, with follow-up data on new-onset diabetes in long COVID, will be considered for inclusion. Controls will comprise individuals who tested negative for COVID-19, with or without other respiratory tract infections. Three independent reviewers (AST, NB, and TT) will perform article selection, data extraction, and quality assessment of the studies. A fourth reviewer (ST) will review the identified studies for final inclusion in the analysis. The random-effects DerSimonian-Laird models will be used to estimate the pooled incidence proportion (%), incidence rate of diabetes (per 1000 person-years), and risk ratio (with 95% CIs) for diabetes incidence. RESULTS: A total of 1972 articles were identified through the initial search conducted in August 2023. After excluding duplicates, conducting title and abstract screening, and completing full-text reviews, 41 articles were found to be eligible for inclusion. The search will be updated in July 2024. Currently, data extraction is underway, and the meta-analysis is expected to be completed in August 2024. Publication of the study findings is anticipated by the end of 2024. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings should provide valuable insights to inform both clinical practice and public health policies regarding the effective management of new-onset diabetes in patients with long COVID. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): DERR1-10.2196/54853.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Incidence , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 103(23): e38504, 2024 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38847686

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To systematically evaluate the efficacy of Er Chen Tang in the adjuvant treatment of obesity. METHODS: A computerized search of databases such as CNKI, Wanfang, Wipro, EMBase, Web of Science, PubMed, and Cochrane Library was performed to collect randomized controlled trials on the application of Er Cheng Tang for the treatment of obesity and to track the references included in the literature, with a timeframe from the establishment of the library to October 2023 for the searches. After selection of trials, extraction of information and assessment of methodological quality were done independently by 2 evaluators, meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.3 software and the quality of evidence was evaluated using the Cochrane system. RESULTS: Six studies were included, with a total of 438 study participants. They were randomized into trial and control groups. The total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, body mass index, and visceral fat area values before treatment were compared between the 2 groups, and the differences were not statistically significant (all P > .05). After treatment, the indicators of the experimental group were significantly better than those of the control group, and the differences were all statistically significant (P < .05). CONCLUSION: The adjuvant treatment of obesity with Er Chen Tang can improve the symptoms faster and is favorable to the reduction of various risk indicators. However, due to the lack of high-quality literature, the theoretical support of large-sample double-blind randomized trials is still needed in the future.


Subject(s)
Drugs, Chinese Herbal , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Obesity , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Humans , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Research Design , Body Mass Index
7.
Syst Rev ; 13(1): 146, 2024 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38822368

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Atrophic edentulous maxilla is a debilitating condition caused by the progressive and irreversible bone resorption following loss of teeth, that results in bone of inadequate volume and density. This makes conventional implant therapy extremely challenging without complex reconstructive procedures. Several techniques such as sinus augmentation, short implants, and tilted implants have been used for the rehabilitation of the atrophic maxilla. In recent years, zygomatic implants have emerged as a graftless rehabilitation technique. However, few studies compare zygomatic-implant fixed rehabilitation with other fixed rehabilitation techniques. The existing body of evidence on zygomatic implants is largely based on clinical and disease-oriented outcomes. METHODS: A network meta-analysis (NMA) will be conducted in order to compare the effectiveness of zygomatic-implant fixed rehabilitation with the other rehabilitation techniques. Experimental and observational studies comparing different implant-assisted fixed rehabilitation in adults with atrophic maxilla will be included. The primary and secondary outcomes will be patient's satisfaction and quality of life respectively. Additional outcomes include the implant's survival/success, and biological and prosthetic complications. An electronic search will be performed through various databases for articles in English and French, without time limits. Risk of bias will be assessed using the Revised Cochrane Risk-of-Bias tool for randomized controlled trials, and ROBINS-I for non-randomized and observational studies. Two independent reviewers will screen the titles and abstracts and extract data. Any discrepancy between reviewers will be discussed and resolved through consensus or with the help of a third reviewer. Pairwise meta-analyses will be performed using a random effects model. I2, τ2, transitivity, subgroup/meta-regression analyses will assess and explain heterogeneity and distribution of effect modifiers. A network plot will be created to connect the different interventions directly and indirectly. Interventions will be ranked using the surface under cumulative ranking curve. Confidence in the results of the NMA will be assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). DISCUSSION: This study will be the first to assess the effectiveness of zygomatic-implant fixed rehabilitation for the atrophic maxilla using NMA. The evidence obtained will aid clinical decision-making and will advance the knowledge of the rehabilitation techniques for the atrophic maxilla. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42023353303.


Subject(s)
Dental Implants , Jaw, Edentulous , Maxilla , Network Meta-Analysis , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Zygoma , Humans , Zygoma/surgery , Jaw, Edentulous/rehabilitation , Jaw, Edentulous/surgery , Maxilla/surgery , Dental Prosthesis, Implant-Supported , Dental Implantation, Endosseous/methods , Quality of Life , Meta-Analysis as Topic
8.
Front Immunol ; 15: 1397716, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38873605

ABSTRACT

Background: To evaluate the methodological quality, report quality, and evidence quality of meta-analysis (MA) and systematic review (SR) on the efficacy of probiotics in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Databases were used to identify eligible SRs/MAs until February 12, 2024. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using AMSTAR-2 tool, the quality of the literature reports was scored using PRISMA checklists, and the quality of the evidence was graded using GRADE system. Results: Seven reviews including 21 outcomes were included. Methodological quality of the included reviews was of general low, and the entries with poor scores were 2, 4, and 7. By PRISMA checklists, there were some reporting deficiencies, and quality problems were mainly reflected in the reporting registration and protocol, comprehensive search strategy and additional analysis. GRADE results elevated the quality of evidence to be low or very low overall. Conclusions: Probiotics may have a therapeutic effect on RA, based on the evidence provided by the SRs/MAs in this overview. Nevertheless, there is still a lack of conclusive evidence due to methodological limitations in the included research. To make trustworthy judgments regarding the efficacy of probiotics in the treatment of RA, more large-scale, high-quality randomized controlled trials are still required.


Subject(s)
Arthritis, Rheumatoid , Probiotics , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Probiotics/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/therapy , Humans , Treatment Outcome , Meta-Analysis as Topic
10.
Dental Press J Orthod ; 29(2): e242401, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38865517

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This bibliometric study aimed to analyze the citation metrics, journal and author characteristics, and subject domains of the 100 top-cited Systematic Reviews (SR) and Meta-Analysis (MA) in orthodontics. MATERIAL AND METHODS: An electronic database search was conducted for SR and MA in the Web of Science on 16th July 2023, without language and time restrictions. Of the 802 hits returned, the 100 top-cited orthodontic articles were shortlisted. They were analyzed for citation metrics, journal characteristics (journal, year of publication, impact factor-IF), author and affiliation characteristics (number, primary and corresponding author's affiliation, and country), study domain, and keywords. RESULTS: These articles were published from 1996 to 2021 in 20 journals, with an impact factor of 1.9 to 10.5, by 351 researchers affiliated with 104 universities. Their citations ranged from 45 to 344, and 34 poised to be classified as classic (≥ 100 citations). The maximum number of articles was published in the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (n=38), the European Journal of Orthodontics (n=18), and the Angle Orthodontist (n=8). The authors for individual papers ranged from 1 to 10, with 5 being the most common (n=58). Europe had the highest contribution regarding the number of corresponding authors, institutions, and citations. Bone anchorage and orthodontic tooth movement/Biomechanics were the most frequently researched domains (n=11 each). The most common keyword used was Orthodontics (n=19), followed by Systematic Review (n=16) and Meta-analysis (n=9). CONCLUSION: In general, the top cited SR and MA were published in high-impact orthodontic journals, were multi-authored, and reflected the collaborative work from different universities.


Subject(s)
Bibliometrics , Orthodontics , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Periodicals as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Journal Impact Factor
11.
BMC Geriatr ; 24(1): 514, 2024 Jun 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38867191

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Wearing hip protectors is a measure used to prevent hip fractures caused by falls. However, its protective effect has remained controversial in previous studies. This study provides a rationale for the use of hip protectors by pooling all the current meta-analysis evidence. METHODS: We conducted an umbrella review of all the current meta-analysis articles about the efficacy of hip protectors to reduce hip fractures and falls in communities and/or institutions. Major databases including EMBASE, Cochrane Library, PubMed and Web of Science, were searched up to June 2022. Two reviewers screened the studies, extracted the data, and conducted the methodological quality assessment independently. The primary outcome was the association statistic (odds ratio (OR), relative risk (RR), etc.) reported in the meta-analysis that quantified the influence of the intervention on hip fractures and falls compared to that of the control group. Narrative synthesis was also conducted. Forest plots and the AMSTAR score were used to describe the results and quality of the pooled literature, respectively. RESULTS: A total of six meta-analysis articles were included in the study. Hip protectors were effective at reducing hip fractures in older individuals who were in institutions (nursing or residential care settings) but not in communities (RR = 0.70, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.85, I2 = 42%, P < 0.001) (RR = 1.12, 95% CI 0.94 to 1.34, I2 = 0%, P = 0.20), and they did not reduce falls (RR = 1.01, 95% CI 0.90 to 1.13, I2 = 0%, P = 0.89). CONCLUSIONS: Hip protectors are effective at preventing hip fractures in institutionalized older adults but not in community-dwelling older adults. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study has been registered in PROSPERO (PROSPERO ID: CRD42022351773).


Subject(s)
Accidental Falls , Hip Fractures , Protective Devices , Humans , Hip Fractures/prevention & control , Hip Fractures/epidemiology , Accidental Falls/prevention & control , Aged , Meta-Analysis as Topic
12.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 6: CD013557, 2024 06 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38837220

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mental health problems contribute significantly to the overall disease burden worldwide and are major causes of disability, suicide, and ischaemic heart disease. People with bipolar disorder report lower levels of physical activity than the general population, and are at greater risk of chronic health conditions including cardiovascular disease and obesity. These contribute to poor health outcomes. Physical activity has the potential to improve quality of life and physical and mental well-being. OBJECTIVES: To identify the factors that influence participation in physical activity for people diagnosed with bipolar disorder from the perspectives of service users, carers, service providers, and practitioners to help inform the design and implementation of interventions that promote physical activity. SEARCH METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and eight other databases to March 2021. We also contacted experts in the field, searched the grey literature, and carried out reference checking and citation searching to identify additional studies. There were no language restrictions. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included qualitative studies and mixed-methods studies with an identifiable qualitative component. We included studies that focused on the experiences and attitudes of service users, carers, service providers, and healthcare professionals towards physical activity for bipolar disorder. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We extracted data using a data extraction form designed for this review. We assessed methodological limitations using a list of predefined questions. We used the "best fit" framework synthesis based on a revised version of the Health Belief Model to analyse and present the evidence. We assessed methodological limitations using the CASP Qualitative Checklist. We used the GRADE-CERQual (Confidence in the Evidence from Reviews of Qualitative research) guidance to assess our confidence in each finding. We examined each finding to identify factors to inform the practice of health and care professionals and the design and development of physical activity interventions for people with bipolar disorder. MAIN RESULTS: We included 12 studies involving a total of 592 participants (422 participants who contributed qualitative data to an online survey, 170 participants in qualitative research studies). Most studies explored the views and experiences of physical activity of people with experience of bipolar disorder. A number of studies also reported on personal experiences of physical activity components of lifestyle interventions. One study included views from family carers and clinicians. The majority of studies were from high-income countries, with only one study conducted in a middle-income country. Most participants were described as stable and had been living with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder for a number of years. We downgraded our confidence in several of the findings from high confidence to moderate or low confidence, as some findings were based on only small amounts of data, and the findings were based on studies from only a few countries, questioning the relevance of these findings to other settings. We also had very few perspectives of family members, other carers, or health professionals supporting people with bipolar disorder. The studies did not include any findings from service providers about their perspectives on supporting this aspect of care. There were a number of factors that limited people's ability to undertake physical activity. Shame and stigma about one's physical appearance and mental health diagnosis were discussed. Some people felt their sporting skills/competencies had been lost when they left school. Those who had been able to maintain exercise through the transition into adulthood appeared to be more likely to include physical activity in their regular routine. Physical health limits and comorbid health conditions limited activity. This included bipolar medication, being overweight, smoking, alcohol use, poor diet and sleep, and these barriers were linked to negative coping skills. Practical problems included affordability, accessibility, transport links, and the weather. Workplace or health schemes that offered discounts were viewed positively. The lack of opportunity for exercise within inpatient mental health settings was a problem. Facilitating factors included being psychologically stable and ready to adopt new lifestyle behaviours. There were positive benefits of being active outdoors and connecting with nature. Achieving balance, rhythm, and routine helped to support mood management. Fitting physical activity into a regular routine despite fluctuating mood or motivation appeared to be beneficial if practised at the right intensity and pace. Over- or under-exercising could be counterproductive and accelerate depressive or manic moods. Physical activity also helped to provide a structure to people's daily routines and could lead to other positive lifestyle benefits. Monitoring physical or other activities could be an effective way to identify potential triggers or early warning signs. Technology was helpful for some. People who had researched bipolar disorder and had developed a better understanding of the condition showed greater confidence in managing their care or providing care to others. Social support from friends/family or health professionals was an enabling factor, as was finding the right type of exercise, which for many people was walking. Other benefits included making social connections, weight loss, improved quality of life, and better mood regulation. Few people had been told of the benefits of physical activity. Better education and training of health professionals could support a more holistic approach to physical and mental well-being. Involving mental health professionals in the multidisciplinary delivery of physical activity interventions could be beneficial and improve care. Clear guidelines could help people to initiate and incorporate lifestyle changes. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is very little research focusing on factors that influence participation in physical activity in bipolar disorder. The studies we identified suggest that men and women with bipolar disorder face a range of obstacles and challenges to being active. The evidence also suggests that there are effective ways to promote managed physical activity. The research highlighted the important role that health and care settings, and professionals, can play in assessing individuals' physical health needs and how healthy lifestyles may be promoted. Based on these findings, we have provided a summary of key elements to consider for developing physical activity interventions for bipolar disorder.


Subject(s)
Bipolar Disorder , Exercise , Qualitative Research , Humans , Bias , Bipolar Disorder/psychology , Bipolar Disorder/therapy , Caregivers/psychology , Exercise/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Quality of Life , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Meta-Analysis as Topic
13.
BMJ Open ; 14(6): e081281, 2024 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38834328

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with breast cancer often suffer from depressive symptoms throughout various stages of cancer, significantly impacting their quality of life and treatment outcomes. Non-pharmaceutical interventions such as psychotherapy, mind-body therapies and physical exercise have shown effectiveness in addressing cancer-related depression. However, the efficacy and safety of different non-pharmacological interventions remain a topic of debate. Therefore, to provide an objective assessment and comparison of the impact of different non-pharmaceutical interventions on depression, we will conduct a network meta-analysis (NMA) to explore the effects of different non-pharmaceutical interventions on reducing depressive symptoms among patients with breast cancer. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will search nine Chinese and English-language databases, from database inception to 31 July 2023, for randomised controlled trials published in Chinese or English. The English-language databases are PubMed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Chinese databases are CBM, CNKI, VIP and Wanfang. Two independent researchers will perform information extraction from eligible articles. The primary outcome will be the changes in depressive symptoms, while the secondary outcome will include adverse events. STATA V.15.0 will be used to conduct paired meta-analysis and NMA. Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation will be used to assess the quality of evidence, and the Cochrane tool for assessing the risks of bias in randomised trials V.2 will be used for risk of bias assessment. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study does not require ethical approval as it will analyse data from existing studies. It is expected that the results of the study will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at relevant conferences. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42023450494.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Depression , Network Meta-Analysis , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Humans , Breast Neoplasms/complications , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Female , Depression/therapy , Depression/etiology , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Quality of Life , Research Design , Psychotherapy/methods , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
14.
BMJ Open ; 14(6): e082076, 2024 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38834330

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Schizophrenia, a chronic mental problem, significantly impacts cognition, emotion and social functioning. Conventional pharmacotherapy faces challenges including numerous side effects, low adherence to medication and substantial costs. In this context, group arts therapies (GATs) emerge as a promising complementary approach for symptom alleviation in schizophrenia patients. Nonetheless, the effectiveness and safety of GATs are yet to be firmly established. This study aims to systematically assess the therapeutic impact of all group-based artistic interventions as complementary treatments for schizophrenia, focusing on their potential benefits. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study will search four English-language databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library and Embase), two Chinese databases (Wanfang Data and China National Knowledge Infrastructure) and three Korean databases (RISS, Korean Citation Index and DBpia) from their inception until October 2023. It will include all randomised controlled trials that compare GATs for schizophrenia with standard rehabilitation methods. The primary outcome is the improvement in patients' positive and negative symptoms. Methodologies such as bias risk assessment, data synthesis, sensitivity analysis and subgroup analysis will be implemented using Review Manager V.5.4. Study results with high heterogeneity will be merged using a random-effects model (I 2>50% or p<0.1). In cases where meta-analysis is not viable due to significant clinical and methodological heterogeneity, a qualitative summary of the findings will be provided. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The data used in this systematic review are anonymised, devoid of any private information, eliminating the requirement for ethical approval. Dissemination of the research findings will be conducted via peer-reviewed publications. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42023471583.


Subject(s)
Art Therapy , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Schizophrenia , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Humans , Schizophrenia/therapy , Schizophrenia/rehabilitation , Art Therapy/methods , Research Design , Psychotherapy, Group/methods , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
15.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 13: e54089, 2024 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38861712

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the continuous advancement of cancer treatments, a comprehensive analysis of the impact of multivisceral oncological pancreatic resections on morbidity, mortality, and long-term survival is currently lacking. OBJECTIVE: This manuscript presents the protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis designed to summarize the existing evidence concerning the outcomes of multivisceral oncological pancreatic resections across diverse tumor entities. METHODS: We will conduct a systematic search of the PubMed or MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and ClinicalTrials.gov databases in strict accordance with the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. The predefined outcomes encompass postoperative mortality, postoperative morbidity, overall and disease-free survival (1- to 5-year survival rates), the proportion of macroscopically complete (R0) resections (according to the Royal College of Pathologists definition), duration of hospital stay (in days), reoperation rate (%), postoperative complications (covering all complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification), as well as pancreatic fistula, postpancreatectomy hemorrhage, and delayed gastric emptying (all according to the definitions of the International Study Group of Pancreas Surgery). RESULTS: Systematic database searches will begin in July 2024. The completion of the meta-analysis is anticipated by December 2024. Before completion, the literature search will be checked for new publications that must be considered in the context of the work. CONCLUSIONS: The forthcoming findings will provide an up-to-date overview of the feasibility, safety, and oncological efficacy of multivisceral pancreatic resections across diverse tumor entities. This data will serve as a valuable resource for health care professionals and patients to make well-informed clinical decisions. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42023437858; https://tinyurl.com/bde5xmfw. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): PRR1-10.2196/54089.


Subject(s)
Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pancreatectomy , Pancreatic Neoplasms , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Humans , Pancreatic Neoplasms/surgery , Pancreatic Neoplasms/pathology , Pancreatic Neoplasms/mortality , Pancreatectomy/methods , Pancreatectomy/adverse effects , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology
16.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 13: e55948, 2024 Jun 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38865185

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Postinduction hypotension (PIHO) is a hemodynamic abnormality commonly observed during the induction of general anesthesia. Etomidate is considered a safer drug for the induction of anesthesia because it has only minor adverse effects on the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. Recent evidence indicates that the novel benzodiazepine remimazolam has minimal inhibitory effects on the circulation and respiration. However, the efficacy and safety of remimazolam versus etomidate in the induction of anesthesia are unclear. OBJECTIVE: To further understand the potential of remimazolam in anesthesia induction, it is necessary to design a meta-analysis to compare its effects versus the classic safe anesthetic etomidate. The aim of this study is to determine which drug has more stable hemodynamics and a lower incidence of PIHO. Our study will also yield data on sedation efficiency, time to loss of consciousness, time to awakening, incidence of injection pain, and postoperative nausea and vomiting with the two drugs. METHODS: We plan to search the Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Embase, PubMed, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang databases from the date of their creation until March 31, 2025. The language is limited to English and Chinese. The search terms are "randomized controlled trials," "etomidate," and "remimazolam." The incidence of PIHO is the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes include depth of anesthesia after induction, sedation success rate, time to loss of consciousness, hemodynamic profiles, recovery time, incidence of injection pain, and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Reviews, meta-analyses, case studies, abstracts from conferences, and commentaries will not be included. The heterogeneity of the results will be evaluated by sensitivity and subgroup analyses. RevMan software and Stata software will be used for data analysis. We will evaluate the quality of included studies using version 2 of the Cochrane risk-of-bias tool. The confidence of the evidence will be assessed through the Grading of Recommendations, Assessments, Developments, and Evaluations system. RESULTS: The protocol was registered in the international PROSPERO (Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews) registry in November 2023. As of June 2024, we have performed a preliminary article search and retrieval for further review. The review and analyses are expected to be completed in March 2025. We expect to submit manuscripts for peer review by the end of June 2025. CONCLUSIONS: By synthesizing the available evidence and comparing remimazolam and etomidate, we hope to provide valuable insights into the selection of anesthesia-inducing drugs to reduce the incidence of PIHO and improve patient prognosis. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42023463120; https://tinyurl.com/333jb8bm. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): PRR1-10.2196/55948.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, General , Benzodiazepines , Etomidate , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Etomidate/adverse effects , Etomidate/administration & dosage , Humans , Anesthesia, General/adverse effects , Anesthesia, General/methods , Benzodiazepines/adverse effects , Benzodiazepines/therapeutic use , Benzodiazepines/administration & dosage , Anesthetics, Intravenous/adverse effects , Anesthetics, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Anesthetics, Intravenous/therapeutic use
20.
BMJ Open ; 14(6): e086213, 2024 Jun 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38866573

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Sebaceous gland carcinoma (SGC) of the eyelid is an aggressive tumour with the ability to metastasise and an increased morbidity. Controversies regarding the epidemiology of this malignant eyelid tumour is widespread in the scientific literature. Western reports repeatedly describes eyelid SGC as a rare occurring tumour in general, accounting for 1%-3% of all eyelid tumours, however studies from Asia have uncovered a higher frequency of eyelid SGC including 54% of all eyelid tumours in Japan, and 43%-56% in India. We wish to retrieve observational data of eyelid SGC prevalence in proportion to total eyelid tumours, from pathological studies published worldwide to resolve this controversy. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will search Ovid Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Scopus and Google Scholar to identify published reports on eyelid SGC prevalence proportions, aiming to clarify the incidence of the tumour. We will include observational clinicopathological studies reporting prevalence with confirmed histopathology. No limitations on publication date or language will be applied. Data from the individual studies and study quality will be extracted by two individual reviewers. Study quality will be assessed using the JBI Critical Appraisal Instrument for Studies Reporting Prevalence Data. Raw proportions will be transformed and pooled using a random effects model for meta-analysis. And subgroup analysis according to geography will be performed. If data are deemed unsuitable for a meta-analysis, a narrative synthesis will be presented. We will judge the certainty of evidence and present whether this has an overall effect on the results. The results may shed light on a long-standing academic disparity of the scientific literature. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This systematic review does not require ethical approval. The results of this proposed review will be the subject to a publication in an international peer-reviewed journal within the ophthalmic or pathological specialty. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42023487141.


Subject(s)
Eyelid Neoplasms , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Research Design , Sebaceous Gland Neoplasms , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Humans , Eyelid Neoplasms/epidemiology , Eyelid Neoplasms/pathology , Prevalence , Sebaceous Gland Neoplasms/pathology , Sebaceous Gland Neoplasms/epidemiology , Adenocarcinoma, Sebaceous/epidemiology , Adenocarcinoma, Sebaceous/pathology
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