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1.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 12: e50851, 2024 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38743461

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Medication nonadherence remains a significant health and economic burden in many high-income countries. Emerging smartphone interventions have started to use features such as gamification and financial incentives with varying degrees of effectiveness on medication adherence and health outcomes. A more consistent approach to applying these features, informed by patient perspectives, may result in more predictable and beneficial results from this type of intervention. OBJECTIVE: This qualitative study aims to identify patient perspectives on the use of gamification and financial incentives in mobile health (mHealth) apps for medication adherence in Australian patients taking medication for chronic conditions. METHODS: A total of 19 participants were included in iterative semistructured web-based focus groups conducted between May and December 2022. The facilitator used exploratory prompts relating to mHealth apps, gamification, and financial incentives, along with concepts raised from previous focus groups. Transcriptions were independently coded to develop a set of themes. RESULTS: Three themes were identified: purpose-driven design, trust-based standards, and personal choice. All participants acknowledged gamification and financial incentives as potentially effective features in mHealth apps for medication adherence. However, they also indicated that the effectiveness heavily depended on implementation and execution. Major concerns relating to gamification and financial incentives were perceived trivialization and potential for medication abuse, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The study's findings provide a foundation for developers seeking to apply these novel features in an app intervention for a general cohort of patients. However, the study highlights the need for standards for mHealth apps for medication adherence, with particular attention to the use of gamification and financial incentives. Future research with patients and stakeholders across the mHealth app ecosystem should be explored to formalize and validate a set of standards or framework.


Subject(s)
Focus Groups , Medication Adherence , Mobile Applications , Motivation , Qualitative Research , Telemedicine , Humans , Mobile Applications/standards , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Focus Groups/methods , Male , Female , Medication Adherence/psychology , Medication Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Adult , Australia , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards , Aged , Video Games/standards , Video Games/psychology
2.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1196491, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38774052

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Mental health Applications (MH Apps) can potentially improve access to high-quality mental health care. However, the recent rapid expansion of MH Apps has created growing concern regarding their safety and effectiveness, leading to the development of AETs (Assessment and Evaluation Tools) to help guide users. This article provides a critical, mixed methods analysis of existing AETs for MH Apps by reviewing the criteria used to evaluate MH Apps and assessing their effectiveness as evaluation tools. Methods: To identify relevant AETs, gray and scholarly literature were located through stakeholder consultation, Internet searching via Google and a literature search of bibliographic databases Medline, APA PsycInfo, and LISTA. Materials in English that provided a tool or method to evaluate MH Apps and were published from January 1, 2000, to January 26, 2021 were considered for inclusion. Results: Thirteen relevant AETs targeted for MH Apps met the inclusion criteria. The qualitative analysis of AETs and their evaluation criteria revealed that despite purporting to focus on MH Apps, the included AETs did not contain criteria that made them more specific to MH Apps than general health applications. There appeared to be very little agreed-upon terminology in this field, and the focus of selection criteria in AETs is often IT-related, with a lesser focus on clinical issues, equity, and scientific evidence. The quality of AETs was quantitatively assessed using the AGREE II, a standardized tool for evaluating assessment guidelines. Three out of 13 AETs were deemed 'recommended' using the AGREE II. Discussion: There is a need for further improvements to existing AETs. To realize the full potential of MH Apps and reduce stakeholders' concerns, AETs must be developed within the current laws and governmental health policies, be specific to mental health, be feasible to implement and be supported by rigorous research methodology, medical education, and public awareness.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications , Humans , Mobile Applications/standards , Mental Health Services/standards , Mental Health
3.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 12: e53798, 2024 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38696250

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The development of digital applications based on behavioral therapies to support patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) has attracted increasing attention in the field of rehabilitation. This paper presents a systematic review of research on digital applications based on behavioral therapies for people with KOA. OBJECTIVE: This review aims to describe the characteristics of relevant digital applications, with a special focus on the current state of behavioral therapies, digital interaction technologies, and user participation in design. The secondary aim is to summarize intervention outcomes and user evaluations of digital applications. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted using the keywords "Knee Osteoarthritis," "Behavior Therapy," and "Digitization" in the following databases (from January 2013 to July 2023): Web of Science, Embase, Science Direct, Ovid, and PubMed. The Mixed Methods Assessment Tool (MMAT) was used to assess the quality of evidence. Two researchers independently screened and extracted the data. RESULTS: A total of 36 studies met the inclusion criteria and were further analyzed. Behavioral change techniques (BCTs) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) were frequently combined when developing digital applications. The most prevalent areas were goals and planning (n=31) and repetition and substitution (n=27), which were frequently used to develop physical activity (PA) goals and adherence. The most prevalent combination strategy was app/website plus SMS text message/telephone/email (n=12), which has tremendous potential. This area of application design offers notable advantages, primarily manifesting in pain mitigation (n=24), reduction of physical dysfunction (n=21), and augmentation of PA levels (n=12). Additionally, when formulating design strategies, it is imperative to consider the perspectives of stakeholders, especially in response to the identified shortcomings in application design elucidated within the study. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate that "goals and planning" and "repetition and substitution" are frequently used to develop PA goals and PA behavior adherence. The most prevalent combination strategy was app/website plus SMS text message/telephone/email, which has tremendous potential. Moreover, incorporating several stakeholders in the design and development stages might enhance user experience, considering the distinct variations in their requirements. To improve the efficacy and availability of digital applications, we have several proposals. First, comprehensive care for patients should be ensured by integrating multiple behavioral therapies that encompass various aspects of the rehabilitation process, such as rehabilitation exercises and status monitoring. Second, therapists could benefit from more precise recommendations by incorporating additional intelligent algorithms to analyze patient data. Third, the implementation scope should be expanded from the home environment to a broader social community rehabilitation setting.


Subject(s)
Behavior Therapy , Osteoarthritis, Knee , Humans , Osteoarthritis, Knee/therapy , Osteoarthritis, Knee/psychology , Behavior Therapy/methods , Behavior Therapy/instrumentation , Mobile Applications/standards , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data
4.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 12: e54124, 2024 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38696773

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reproductive health literacy and menstrual health awareness play a crucial role in ensuring the health and well-being of women and people who menstruate. Further, awareness of one's own menstrual cycle patterns and associated symptoms can help individuals identify and manage conditions of the menstrual cycle such as premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Digital health products, and specifically menstrual health apps, have the potential to effect positive change due to their scalability and ease of access. OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this study was to measure the efficacy of a menstrual and reproductive health app, Flo, in improving health literacy and health and well-being outcomes in menstruating individuals with and without PMS and PMDD. Further, we explored the possibility that the use of the Flo app could positively influence feelings around reproductive health management and communication about health, menstrual cycle stigma, unplanned pregnancies, quality of life, work productivity, absenteeism, and body image. METHODS: We conducted 2 pilot, 3-month, unblinded, 2-armed, remote randomized controlled trials on the effects of using the Flo app in a sample of US-based (1) individuals who track their cycles (n=321) or (2) individuals who track their cycles and are affected by PMS or PMDD (n=117). RESULTS: The findings revealed significant improvements at the end of the study period compared to baseline for our primary outcomes of health literacy (cycle tracking: D̄=1.11; t311=5.73, P<.001; PMS or PMDD: D̄=1.20; t115=3.76, P<.001) and menstrual health awareness (D̄=3.97; t311=7.71, P<.001), health and well-being (D̄=3.44; t311=5.94, P<.001), and PMS or PMDD symptoms burden (D̄=-7.08; t115=-5.44, P<.001). Improvements were also observed for our secondary outcomes of feelings of control and management over health (D̄=1.01; t311=5.08, P<.001), communication about health (D̄=0.93; t311=2.41, P=.002), menstrual cycle stigma (D̄=-0.61; t311=-2.73, P=.007), and fear of unplanned pregnancies (D̄=-0.22; t311=-2.11, P=.04) for those who track their cycles, as well as absenteeism from work and education due to PMS or PMDD (D̄=-1.67; t144=-2.49, P=.01). CONCLUSIONS: These pilot randomized controlled trials demonstrate that the use of the Flo app improves menstrual health literacy and awareness, general health and well-being, and PMS or PMDD symptom burden. Considering the widespread use and affordability of the Flo app, these findings show promise for filling important gaps in current health care provisioning such as improving menstrual knowledge and health. TRIAL REGISTRATION: OSF Registries osf.io/pcgw7; https://osf.io/pcgw7 ; OSF Registries osf.io/ry8vq; https://osf.io/ry8vq.


Subject(s)
Health Literacy , Mobile Applications , Humans , Female , Health Literacy/statistics & numerical data , Health Literacy/standards , Health Literacy/methods , Adult , Pilot Projects , Mobile Applications/standards , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Quality of Life/psychology , Premenstrual Syndrome/psychology , Premenstrual Syndrome/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder/psychology , Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder/therapy
5.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 12: e51201, 2024 Apr 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38669071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Numerous smartphone apps are targeting physical activity (PA) and healthy eating (HE), but empirical evidence on their effectiveness for the initialization and maintenance of behavior change, especially in children and adolescents, is still limited. Social settings influence individual behavior; therefore, core settings such as the family need to be considered when designing mobile health (mHealth) apps. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a theory- and evidence-based mHealth intervention (called SMARTFAMILY [SF]) targeting PA and HE in a collective family-based setting. METHODS: A smartphone app based on behavior change theories and techniques was developed, implemented, and evaluated with a cluster randomized controlled trial in a collective family setting. Baseline (t0) and postintervention (t1) measurements included PA (self-reported and accelerometry) and HE measurements (self-reported fruit and vegetable intake) as primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes (self-reported) were intrinsic motivation, behavior-specific self-efficacy, and the family health climate. Between t0 and t1, families of the intervention group (IG) used the SF app individually and collaboratively for 3 consecutive weeks, whereas families in the control group (CG) received no treatment. Four weeks following t1, a follow-up assessment (t2) was completed by participants, consisting of all questionnaire items to assess the stability of the intervention effects. Multilevel analyses were implemented in R (R Foundation for Statistical Computing) to acknowledge the hierarchical structure of persons (level 1) clustered in families (level 2). RESULTS: Overall, 48 families (CG: n=22, 46%, with 68 participants and IG: n=26, 54%, with 88 participants) were recruited for the study. Two families (CG: n=1, 2%, with 4 participants and IG: n=1, 2%, with 4 participants) chose to drop out of the study owing to personal reasons before t0. Overall, no evidence for meaningful and statistically significant increases in PA and HE levels of the intervention were observed in our physically active study participants (all P>.30). CONCLUSIONS: Despite incorporating behavior change techniques rooted in family life and psychological theories, the SF intervention did not yield significant increases in PA and HE levels among the participants. The results of the study were mainly limited by the physically active participants and the large age range of children and adolescents. Enhancing intervention effectiveness may involve incorporating health literacy, just-in-time adaptive interventions, and more advanced features in future app development. Further research is needed to better understand intervention engagement and tailor mHealth interventions to individuals for enhanced effectiveness in primary prevention efforts. TRIAL REGISTRATION: German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00010415; https://drks.de/search/en/trial/DRKS00010415. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.2196/20534.


Subject(s)
Diet, Healthy , Exercise , Health Promotion , Mobile Applications , Telemedicine , Humans , Male , Female , Exercise/psychology , Exercise/physiology , Diet, Healthy/methods , Diet, Healthy/psychology , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/instrumentation , Adolescent , Child , Mobile Applications/standards , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Health Promotion/methods , Health Promotion/standards , Adult , Family/psychology , Middle Aged
6.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 12: e51478, 2024 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38687568

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly reduced physical activity (PA) levels and increased sedentary behavior (SB), which can lead to worsening physical fitness (PF). Children and adolescents may benefit from mobile health (mHealth) apps to increase PA and improve PF. However, the effectiveness of mHealth app-based interventions and potential moderators in this population are not yet fully understood. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to review and analyze the effectiveness of mHealth app-based interventions in promoting PA and improving PF and identify potential moderators of the efficacy of mHealth app-based interventions in children and adolescents. METHODS: We searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO, and Cochrane Library databases until December 25, 2023, to conduct this meta-analysis. We included articles with intervention groups that investigated the effects of mHealth-based apps on PA and PF among children and adolescents. Due to high heterogeneity, a meta-analysis was conducted using a random effects model. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment Tool was used to evaluate the risk of bias. Subgroup analysis and meta-regression analyses were performed to identify potential influences impacting effect sizes. RESULTS: We included 28 RCTs with a total of 5643 participants. In general, the risk of bias of included studies was low. Our findings showed that mHealth app-based interventions significantly increased total PA (TPA; standardized mean difference [SMD] 0.29, 95% CI 0.13-0.45; P<.001), reduced SB (SMD -0.97, 95% CI -1.67 to -0.28; P=.006) and BMI (weighted mean difference -0.31 kg/m2, 95% CI -0.60 to -0.01 kg/m2; P=.12), and improved muscle strength (SMD 1.97, 95% CI 0.09-3.86; P=.04) and agility (SMD -0.35, 95% CI -0.61 to -0.10; P=.006). However, mHealth app-based interventions insignificantly affected moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA; SMD 0.11, 95% CI -0.04 to 0.25; P<.001), waist circumference (weighted mean difference 0.38 cm, 95% CI -1.28 to 2.04 cm; P=.65), muscular power (SMD 0.01, 95% CI -0.08 to 0.10; P=.81), cardiorespiratory fitness (SMD -0.20, 95% CI -0.45 to 0.05; P=.11), muscular endurance (SMD 0.47, 95% CI -0.08 to 1.02; P=.10), and flexibility (SMD 0.09, 95% CI -0.23 to 0.41; P=.58). Subgroup analyses and meta-regression showed that intervention duration was associated with TPA and MVPA, and age and types of intervention was associated with BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Our meta-analysis suggests that mHealth app-based interventions may yield small-to-large beneficial effects on TPA, SB, BMI, agility, and muscle strength in children and adolescents. Furthermore, age and intervention duration may correlate with the higher effectiveness of mHealth app-based interventions. However, due to the limited number and quality of included studies, the aforementioned conclusions require validation through additional high-quality research. TRIAL REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42023426532; https://tinyurl.com/25jm4kmf.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Exercise , Mobile Applications , Physical Fitness , Telemedicine , Humans , Adolescent , Child , Mobile Applications/standards , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Exercise/physiology , Physical Fitness/physiology , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Promotion/methods , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Pandemics/prevention & control
7.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 12: e48756, 2024 Apr 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38648103

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronary heart disease is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Secondary prevention is essential, as it reduces the risk of further coronary events. Mobile health (mHealth) technology could become a useful tool to improve lifestyles. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an mHealth intervention on people with coronary heart disease who received percutaneous coronary intervention. Improvements in lifestyle regarding diet, physical activity, and smoking; level of knowledge of a healthy lifestyle and the control of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs); and therapeutic adherence and quality of life were analyzed. METHODS: This was a randomized controlled trial with a parallel group design assigned 1:1 to either an intervention involving a smartphone app (mHealth group) or to standard health care (control group). The app was used for setting aims, the self-monitoring of lifestyle and CVRFs using measurements and records, educating people with access to information on their screens about healthy lifestyles and adhering to treatment, and giving motivation through feedback about achievements and aspects to improve. Both groups were assessed after 9 months. The primary outcome variables were adherence to the Mediterranean diet, frequency of food consumed, patient-reported physical activity, smoking, knowledge of healthy lifestyles and the control of CVRFs, adherence to treatment, quality of life, well-being, and satisfaction. RESULTS: The study analyzed 128 patients, 67 in the mHealth group and 61 in the control group; most were male (92/128, 71.9%), with a mean age of 59.49 (SD 8.97) years. Significant improvements were observed in the mHealth group compared with the control group regarding adherence to the Mediterranean diet (mean 11.83, SD 1.74 points vs mean 10.14, SD 2.02 points; P<.001), frequency of food consumption, patient-reported physical activity (mean 619.14, SD 318.21 min/week vs mean 471.70, SD 261.43 min/week; P=.007), giving up smoking (25/67, 75% vs 11/61, 42%; P=.01), level of knowledge of healthy lifestyles and the control of CVRFs (mean 118.70, SD 2.65 points vs mean 111.25, SD 9.05 points; P<.001), and the physical component of the quality of life 12-item Short Form survey (SF-12; mean 45.80, SD 10.79 points vs mean 41.40, SD 10.78 points; P=.02). Overall satisfaction was higher in the mHealth group (mean 48.22, SD 3.89 vs mean 46.00, SD 4.82 points; P=.002) and app satisfaction and usability were high (mean 44.38, SD 6.18 out of 50 points and mean 95.22, SD 7.37 out of 100). CONCLUSIONS: The EVITE app was effective in improving the lifestyle of patients in terms of adherence to the Mediterranean diet, frequency of healthy food consumption, physical activity, giving up smoking, knowledge of healthy lifestyles and controlling CVRFs, quality of life, and overall satisfaction. The app satisfaction and usability were excellent. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT04118504; https://clinicaltrials.gov/study/NCT04118504.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications , Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications/standards , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Quality of Life/psychology , Coronary Disease/psychology , Coronary Disease/prevention & control , Life Style , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
8.
Auris Nasus Larynx ; 51(3): 460-464, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38520978

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: While subjective methods like the Yanagihara system and the House-Brackmann system are standard in evaluating facial paralysis, they are limited by intra- and inter-observer variability. Meanwhile, quantitative objective methods such as electroneurography and electromyography are time-consuming. Our aim was to introduce a swift, objective, and quantitative method for evaluating facial movements. METHODS: We developed an application software (app) that utilizes the facial recognition functionality of the iPhone (Apple Inc., Cupertino, USA) for facial movement evaluation. This app leverages the phone's front camera, infrared radiation, and infrared camera to provide detailed three-dimensional facial topology. It quantitatively compares left and right facial movements by region and displays the movement ratio of the affected side to the opposite side. Evaluations using the app were conducted on both normal and facial palsy subjects and were compared with conventional methods. RESULTS: Our app provided an intuitive user experience, completing evaluations in under a minute, and thus proving practical for regular use. Its evaluation scores correlated highly with the Yanagihara system, the House-Brackmann system, and electromyography. Furthermore, the app outperformed conventional methods in assessing detailed facial movements. CONCLUSION: Our novel iPhone app offers a valuable tool for the comprehensive and efficient evaluation of facial palsy.


Subject(s)
Automated Facial Recognition , Facial Nerve Diseases , Mobile Applications , Paralysis , Mobile Applications/standards , Facial Nerve Diseases/diagnosis , Paralysis/diagnosis , Automated Facial Recognition/instrumentation , Time Factors , Reproducibility of Results , Humans
9.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1220160, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37780445

ABSTRACT

Background: In recent years, mobile health (mHealth) has gradually developed in China, and intelligent medicine has become an important research topic. However, there are still significant problems in mHealth applications (apps). Although healthcare professionals and patients are the main users, few studies have focused on their perceptions of the quality of mHealth apps. Objective: This study aimed to (1) understand the respective perceptions of healthcare professionals and patients regarding mHealth apps, (2) assess what barriers exist that influence the user experience, and (3) explore how to improve the quality of mHealth apps and the development of the mHealth market in China. The study aims to promote the standardization of mHealth apps and provide effective information for the improvement and development of mHealth apps in the future. Methods: Semistructured interviews with 9 patients and 14 healthcare professionals were conducted from January 2022 to April 2022 in the Affiliated Hospital of Xuzhou Medical University. The participants used mHealth apps for more than 3 months, including the "Good Mood" and "Peace and Safe Doctors" apps and apps developed by the hospital that were popular in China. Interview transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: The following five themes were extracted: different concerns, hidden medical dangers, distance and insecurity, barriers for older people, and having positive perceptions of mHealth apps. Healthcare professionals prioritized simplicity in regard to mHealth apps, whereas patients rated effectiveness as the most crucial factor. The study also revealed several problems with mHealth apps, including insufficient information about physician qualifications, inaccurate medical content, nonstandard treatment processes, and unclear accountability, which led to a sense of distance and insecurity among participants. Older individuals faced additional obstacles when using mHealth apps. Despite these issues, the participants remained optimistic about the future of mHealth app development. Conclusion: The utilization, advantages, and obstacles of mHealth applications for healthcare professionals and patients were explored through semistructured interviews. Despite the promising prospects for mHealth apps in China, numerous issues still need to be addressed. Enhancing the safety monitoring system and developing user-friendly mHealth apps for older adult patients are essential steps to bridge the gap between healthcare providers and patients.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Attitude to Health , Health Personnel , Mobile Applications , Telemedicine , Aged , Humans , China , Mobile Applications/standards , Qualitative Research , Telemedicine/standards , Quality of Health Care
10.
Am J Audiol ; 32(3): 665-670, 2023 Sep 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37566885

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Hearing aid use can be variable for young children, and inconsistent wear time can undermine spoken language development. This study explored the effectiveness of hearing aid data logging (DL) awareness and coaching sessions on increasing hours of hearing aid use. We also collected qualitative data on challenges participants experienced managing hearing aid use. METHOD: We used a single-subject design that included three conditions, during a 6-week period, in the same order for each participant. Condition A was baseline, Condition B was DL monitoring alone, and Condition C was remote coaching calls plus DL monitoring. RESULTS: Hours of hearing aid use increased for each child from baseline to the end of the study, ranging from 1.19 to 4.4 hr. Mothers reported that the coaching calls were beneficial and helped them identify and problem-solve issues. CONCLUSIONS: Parents were able to increase hours of hearing aid use with DL awareness and coaching support. Tele-audiology offers an opportunity to provide parents with more frequent support that can be individualized based on their situation, challenges, and family needs.


Subject(s)
Hearing Aids , Hearing Loss , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Hearing Aids/statistics & numerical data , Hearing Loss/rehabilitation , Time , Mobile Applications/standards , Patient Compliance , Remote Consultation/standards
11.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 293: 234-241, 2022 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35592988

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Todays, smartphone technologies and applications are used in the medical and nursing fields. Medical and nursing students are among the groups in which the use of these tools is observed. OBJECTIVES: To investigate their views on the barriers and facilitators of the use of these technologies. METHODS: Four hundred people (200 people from each group) were invited randomly. A questionnaire was used to collect data. To collect data, hospitals were referred and the questionnaires were provided to students and after completion, they were collected. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software and descriptive and inferential statistics. RESULTS: The most important barriers from the students' view included internet problems in the university or hospital, lack of technical support for this technology in the hospital or university, the quality of existing applications, lack of appropriate Apps in the local language, non-introduction of appropriate Apps and not knowing the right Apps. The most important facilitators were the appropriate support services in the university or hospital, placing the appropriate Apps on the department or university website, designing native Apps with the participation of experts, and introducing the appropriate Apps by professors or universities. CONCLUSION: The use of Apps is increasing among medical and nursing students. In this regard, attention to the existing barriers and their elimination and strengthening the facilitators, and providing the necessary technical and educational infrastructure to facilitate the useful applications should be considered by decision-makers.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Education, Nursing , Mobile Applications , Smartphone , Students, Medical , Students, Nursing , Attitude of Health Personnel , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/methods , Education, Medical, Undergraduate/standards , Education, Nursing/methods , Education, Nursing/standards , Hospitals , Humans , Internet Access , Mobile Applications/standards , Random Allocation , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities
12.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 292: 75-78, 2022 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35575852

ABSTRACT

Although there are hundreds of mobile yoga apps in the app market space, the quality and usefulness of these apps have not been systematically tested. We conducted a structured quality evaluation of apps from the Google Play store, applying the validated Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS) by two independent raters. 18 out of 250 apps were identified for evaluation after applying inclusion/exclusion criteria. The mean MARS score is 4.11 (out of 5) with SD = 0.38. There was high interrater reliability (ICC = .88; 95% CI 0.85-0.91). Apps performed well on functionality and aesthetics. However, there is much room for improvement in information and engagement. Designers and researchers should focus on improving user engagement and building the evidence base for informational content provided in apps.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications , Yoga , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Mobile Applications/standards , Reproducibility of Results
13.
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab ; 47(2): 173-182, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35057638

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to validate an automated self-administered 24-hour dietary recall web application (R24W) against recovery biomarkers for sodium, potassium and protein intakes and to identify individual characteristics associated with misreporting in a sample of 61 men and 69 women aged 20-65 years from Québec City, Canada. Each participant completed 3 dietary recalls using the R24W, provided two 24-hour urinary samples and completed questionnaires to document psychosocial factors. Mean reported intakes were 2.2%, 2.1% and 5.0% lower than the urinary reference values, respectively, for sodium, potassium and proteins (significant difference for proteins only (p = 0.04)). Deattenuated correlations between the self-reported intake and biomarkers were significant for sodium (r = 0.48), potassium (r = 0.56) and proteins (r = 0.68). Cross-classification showed that 39.7% (sodium), 42.9% (potassium) and 42.1% (proteins) of participants were ranked into the same quartile with both methods and only 4.8% (sodium), 3.2% (potassium) and 0.8% (proteins) were ranked in opposite quartiles. Lower body esteem related to appearance was associated with sodium underreporting in women (r = 0.33, p = 0.006). No other individual factor was found to be associated with misreporting. These results suggest that the R24W has a good validity for the assessment of sodium, potassium and protein intakes in a sample of French-speaking adults. Novelty: The validity of an automated self-administered 24-hour dietary recall web application named the R24W was tested using urinary biomarkers. According to 7 criteria, the R24W was found to have a good validity to assess self-reported intakes of sodium, potassium and proteins.


Subject(s)
Diet Surveys/standards , Dietary Proteins/urine , Mobile Applications/standards , Potassium, Dietary/urine , Sodium, Dietary/urine , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/urine , Diet Surveys/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Recall , Middle Aged , Quebec , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Young Adult
15.
Sleep Breath ; 26(1): 81-87, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33811634

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Snoring is closely related to obstructive sleep apnea in adults. The increasing abundance and availability of smartphone technology has facilitated the examination and monitoring of snoring at home through snoring apps. However, the accuracy of snoring detection by snoring apps is unclear. This study explored the snoring detection accuracy of Snore Clock-a paid snoring detection app for smartphones. METHODS: Snoring rates were detected by smartphones that had been installed with the paid app Snore Clock. The app provides information on the following variables: sleep duration, snoring duration, snoring loudness (in dB), maximum snoring loudness (in dB), and snoring duration rate (%). In brief, we first reviewed the snoring rates detected by Snore Clock; thereafter, an ear, nose, and throat specialist reviewed the actual snoring rates by using the playback of the app recordings. RESULTS: In total, the 201 snoring records of 11 patients were analyzed. Snoring rates measured by Snore Clock and those measured manually were closely correlated (r = 0.907). The mean snoring detection accuracy rate of Snore Clock was 95%, with a positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity, and specificity of 65% ± 35%, 97% ± 4%, 78% ± 25%, and 97% ± 4%, respectively. However, the higher the snoring rates, the higher were the false-negative rates for the app. CONCLUSION: Snore Clock is compatible with various brands of smartphones and has a high predictive value for snoring. Based on the strong correlation between Snore Clock and manual approaches for snoring detection, these findings have validated that Snore Clock has the capacity for at-home snoring detection.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Mobile Applications/standards , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/diagnosis , Snoring/diagnosis , Adult , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Reproducibility of Results , Smartphone
16.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 41(1): 31-36, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34524234

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Establishing the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children at admission is challenging. Most of the admitted children with CAP receive antibiotics. We aimed to build and validate a diagnostic tool combining clinical, analytical and radiographic features to differentiate viral from bacterial CAP, and among bacterial CAP, typical from atypical bacteria. METHODS: Design-observational, multi-center, prospective cohort study was conducted in 2 phases. Settings: 24 secondary and tertiary hospitals in Spain. Patients-A total of 495 consecutive hospitalized children between 1 month and 16 years of age with CAP were enrolled. Interventions-A score with 2 sequential steps was built (training set, 70% patients, and validation set 30%). Step 1 differentiates between viral and bacterial CAP and step 2 between typical and atypical bacterial CAP. Optimal cutoff points were selected to maximize specificity setting a high sensitivity (80%). Weights of each variable were calculated with a multivariable logistic regression. Main outcome measures-Viral or bacterial etiology. RESULTS: In total, 262 (53%) children (median age: 2 years, 52.3% male) had an etiologic diagnosis. In step 1, bacterial CAPs were classified with a sensitivity = 97%, a specificity = 48%, and a ROC's area under the curve = 0.81. If a patient with CAP was classified as bacterial, he/she was assessed with step 2. Typical bacteria were classified with a sensitivity = 100%, a specificity = 64% and area under the curve = 0.90. We implemented the score into a mobile app named Pneumonia Etiology Predictor, freely available at usual app stores, that provides the probability of each etiology. CONCLUSIONS: This 2-steps tool can facilitate the physician's decision to prescribe antibiotics without compromising patient safety.


Subject(s)
Community-Acquired Infections/diagnosis , Community-Acquired Infections/etiology , Mobile Applications/standards , Pneumonia, Bacterial/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Community-Acquired Infections/microbiology , Community-Acquired Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Infant , Logistic Models , Male , Pneumonia, Bacterial/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Prospective Studies , Radiography/methods , Radiography/standards
18.
Acta Paul. Enferm. (Online) ; 35: eAPE03161, 2022. tab, graf
Article in Portuguese | LILACS, BDENF - Nursing | ID: biblio-1364241

ABSTRACT

Resumo Objetivo Desenvolver e avaliar aplicativo móvel para gerenciamento do processo de captação domiciliar de leite humano. Métodos Estudo de natureza aplicada realizado em três etapas: 1) definição de requisitos e elaboração do mapa conceitual; 2) geração das alternativas de implementação e prototipagem; 3) testes. O aplicativo foi avaliado por oito profissionais de Banco de Leite Humano quanto aos objetivos, estrutura e relevância, e três doadoras quanto à funcionalidade, usabilidade e eficiência. Resultados O aplicativo possui cinco módulos: Perfil, Minhas doações, Coleta domiciliar, Informações para doação de leite humano e Fale com o Banco de Leite Humano. A avaliação dos especialistas e doadoras considerou o conteúdo adequado e de fácil usabilidade. Conclusão O aplicativo CuidarTech Doe Leite colabora, de forma inovadora, com a gestão da captação do leite humano, por meio do gerenciamento da comunicação e interação entre a equipe do banco de leite e as doadoras.


Resumen Objetivo Desarrollar y evaluar una aplicación móvil para la gestión del proceso de captación domiciliaria de leche humana. Métodos Estudio de naturaleza aplicada realizado en tres etapas: 1) definición de requisitos y elaboración del mapa conceptual; 2) generación de alternativas de implementación y prototipo, 3) pruebas. La aplicación fue evaluada por ocho profesionales de un banco de leche humana con relación a los objetivos, estructura y relevancia, y por tres donantes en cuanto a la funcionalidad, usabilidad y eficiencia. Resultados La aplicación posee cinco módulos: Perfil, Mis donaciones, Recolección domiciliaria, Información para donación de leche humana y Contacto con el banco de leche humana. La evaluación de los especialistas y donantes consideró el contenido adecuado y de fácil usabilidad. Conclusión La aplicación CuidarTech Done Leche colabora, de forma innovadora, con la gestión de la captación de la leche humana, mediante el manejo de la comunicación e interacción entre el equipo del banco de leche y las donantes.


Abstract Objective To develop and evaluate an app designed to manage human milk home collection. Methods This applied study was carried out in three steps: 1) definition of requirements and formulation of conceptual map; 2) proposition of alternatives of implementation and prototyping; and 3) execution of tests. The app, named CuidarTech Doe Leite, was evaluated by eight professionals who worked at a Human Milk Bank regarding objectives, structure, and relevance and by three milk donors regarding functionality, usability, and effectiveness. Results The app had five modules: Profile, My donations, Home collection, Information to donate human milk, and Contact the Human Milk Bank. The evaluation carried out by experts and donors considered the content adequate and easy to use. Conclusion The app CuidarTech Doe Leite contributes, in an innovative way, to the management of human milk collection by helping handling communication and interaction between the human milk bank team and donors.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Gift Giving , Mobile Applications/standards , Smartphone , User-Centered Design , House Calls , Milk, Human , Milk Banks , Applied Research
19.
CMAJ ; 193(24): E921-E930, 2021 06 14.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34860693

ABSTRACT

CONTEXTE: Les interventions non pharmacologiques demeurent le principal moyen de maîtriser le coronavirus du syndrome respiratoire aigu sévère 2 (SRAS-CoV-2) d'ici à ce que la couverture vaccinale soit suffisante pour donner lieu à une immunité collective. Nous avons utilisé des données de mobilité anonymisées de téléphones intelligents afin de quantifier le niveau de mobilité requis pour maîtriser le SRAS-CoV-2 (c.-à-d., seuil de mobilité), et la différence par rapport au niveau de mobilité observé (c.-à-d., écart de mobilité). MÉTHODES: Nous avons procédé à une analyse de séries chronologiques sur l'incidence hebdomadaire du SRAS-CoV-2 au Canada entre le 15 mars 2020 et le 6 mars 2021. Le paramètre mesuré était le taux de croissance hebdomadaire, défini comme le rapport entre les cas d'une semaine donnée et ceux de la semaine précédente. Nous avons mesuré les effets du temps moyen passé hors domicile au cours des 3 semaines précédentes à l'aide d'un modèle de régression log-normal, en tenant compte de la province, de la semaine et de la température moyenne. Nous avons calculé le seuil de mobilité et l'écart de mobilité pour le SRAS-CoV-2. RÉSULTATS: Au cours des 51 semaines de l'étude, en tout, 888 751 personnes ont contracté le SRAS-CoV-2. Chaque augmentation de 10 % de l'écart de mobilité a été associée à une augmentation de 25 % du taux de croissance des cas hebdomadaires de SRAS-CoV-2 (rapport 1,25, intervalle de confiance à 95 % 1,20­1,29). Comparativement à la mobilité prépandémique de référence de 100 %, le seuil de mobilité a été plus élevé au cours de l'été (69 %, écart interquartile [EI] 67 %­70 %), et a chuté à 54 % pendant l'hiver 2021 (EI 52 %­55 %); un écart de mobilité a été observé au Canada entre juillet 2020 et la dernière semaine de décembre 2020. INTERPRÉTATION: La mobilité permet de prédire avec fiabilité et constance la croissance des cas hebdomadaires et il faut maintenir des niveaux faibles de mobilité pour maîtriser le SRAS-CoV-2 jusqu'à la fin du printemps 2021. Les données de mobilité anonymisées des téléphones intelligents peuvent servir à guider le relâchement ou le resserrement des mesures de distanciation physique provinciales et régionales.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Geographic Mapping , Mobile Applications/standards , Patient Identification Systems/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Canada/epidemiology , Humans , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Patient Identification Systems/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/methods , Quarantine/standards , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Regression Analysis , Time Factors
20.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(10): e2127008, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34652447

ABSTRACT

Importance: It is unclear whether mobile technology hypertension self-management programs are associated with blood pressure (BP) control. Objective: To examine whether engagement with a hypertension self-management program with a BP monitor and connected smartphone application with clinically based digital coaching was associated with BP control during a follow-up period of as long as 3 years. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study enrolled US adults with elevated BP or hypertension between January 1, 2015, and July 1, 2020. The hypertension self-management program was provided through the participant's (or their spouse's) employer health plan. Exposures: Program engagement, defined by average number of application sessions. Main Outcomes and Measures: Systolic and diastolic BP measured by a US Food and Drug Administration-cleared BP monitor, with categories defined as normal (systolic BP, <120 mm Hg), elevated (systolic BP, 120-129 mm Hg), stage 1 hypertension (systolic BP, 130-139 mm Hg), and stage 2 hypertension (systolic BP ≥140 mm Hg). Other measures included age, gender, depression, anxiety, diabetes, high cholesterol, smoking, geographic region, area deprivation index, self-reported weight, and device-measured physical activity (steps per day). Results: Among 28 189 participants (median [IQR] age, 51 [43-58] years; 9424 women [40.4%]; 13 902 men [59.6%]), median (IQR) baseline systolic BP was 129.5 mm Hg (120.5-139.6 mm Hg) and diastolic BP was 81.7 mm Hg (75.7-88.4 mm Hg). Median systolic BP at 1 year improved at least 1 category for 495 of 934 participants (53.0%) with baseline elevated BP, 673 of 966 (69.7%) with baseline stage 1 hypertension, and 920 of 1075 (85.7%) with baseline stage 2 hypertension. Participants in the program for 3 years had a mean (SEM) systolic BP reduction of 7.2 (0.4), 12.2 (0.7), and 20.9 (1.7) mm Hg compared with baseline for those starting with elevated, stage 1 hypertension, and stage 2 hypertension, respectively. Greater engagement was associated with lower systolic BP over time (high-engagement group: 131.2 mm Hg; 95% CI, 115.5-155.8 mm Hg; medium-engagement group: 133.4 mm Hg; 95% CI 116.3-159.5 mm Hg; low-engagement group: 135.5 mm Hg; 95% CI, 117.3-164.8 mm Hg; P < .001); these results persisted after adjusting for age, gender, depression, anxiety, diabetes, high cholesterol, smoking, area deprivation index rank, and US region, which was partially mediated by greater physical activity. A very high BP (systolic BP >180 mm Hg) was observed 11 637 times from 3778 participants. Greater engagement was associated with lower risk of very high BP; the estimated probability of a very high BP was greater in the low-engagement group (1.42%; 95% CI, 1.26%-1.59%) compared with the medium-engagement group (0.79%; 95% CI, 0.71%-0.87%; P < .001) and the high-engagement group (0.53%; 95% CI, 0.45%-0.60%; P < .001 for comparison with both groups). Conclusions and Relevance: The findings of this study suggest that a mobile technology hypertension self-management program can support long-term BP control and very high BP detection. Such programs may improve real-world BP monitoring and control.


Subject(s)
Hypertension/therapy , Mobile Applications/standards , Self-Management/methods , Adult , Blood Pressure Determination/instrumentation , Blood Pressure Determination/methods , Blood Pressure Determination/statistics & numerical data , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Hypertension/psychology , Male , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Patient Participation/methods , Patient Participation/psychology , Patient Participation/statistics & numerical data , Program Evaluation/methods , Program Evaluation/statistics & numerical data , Self-Management/psychology , Self-Management/statistics & numerical data
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