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1.
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh ; 22(1)2025 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38459787

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This systematic review of qualitative studies explored interventions to improve student nurses' knowledge, attitudes or willingness to work with older people. Student nurses are likely to encounter older people in all health and aged care settings, however, research demonstrates that few have career aspirations in gerontological nursing. METHODS: Qualitative systematic review method based on the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. RESULTS: Search of Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, EBSCOhost and Scopus yielded 1841 articles which were screened to include primary research about educational interventions to improve student nurses' knowledge, attitudes and/or willingness to work with older people. Data extraction was performed on the 14 included studies, and data were analysed using directed content analysis. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT) was used the assess the quality of the studies. CONCLUSIONS: Educational interventions included theory or practice courses, or a combination of theory and practice. While most interventions changed nursing students' negative attitudes towards older people, few increased their willingness to work with them. Practice courses had the most significant impact on willingness to work with older people. Quality assessment revealed methodical limitations. More research is needed to better understand the elements of practice interventions that enhance student nurses' knowledge, attitudes, and willingness to work with older people, so that they can be replicated.


Subject(s)
Geriatrics , Nurses , Students, Nursing , Aged , Humans , Attitude of Health Personnel , Clinical Competence
2.
Nurs Open ; 11(7): e2233, 2024 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38961662

ABSTRACT

AIM: To examine the relationship between general self-efficacy and nursing practice competence for nurses in the second year of employment. DESIGN: A cross-sectional design was used. DATA SOURCES: The study included 596 nurses in their second year of employment at 75 medical facilities across Japan and used an online questionnaire survey for data collection. RESULTS: The covariance structure analysis showed the path from general self-efficacy (latent variable) to nursing practice competence. Positive correlations were found between all factors on both scales. Multiple regression analysis results showed that the general self-efficacy factors of 'positivity in behavior' and 'confidence in social competence' affect nursing practice competence. CONCLUSION: This study emphasizes the importance of enhancing the general self-efficacy of second-year nurses to improve their nursing practice competence. To achieve this, it suggests developing strategies from the perspective of the factors that comprise general self-efficacy. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PROFESSION AND PATIENT CARE: The findings suggest that improving general self-efficacy can enhance nursing practice competence, which could inform the development of interventions to support nurses in improving their competence. The study provides basic data for improving nurses' practice competence. IMPACT: This study is the first to establish a relationship between general self-efficacy and nursing practice competence among second-year nurses. It demonstrates the significance of general self-efficacy in enhancing nursing practice competence, particularly for second-year nurses worldwide who may be struggling with their nursing practice competence and considering leaving the profession. The findings offer practical implications for stakeholders involved in nursing education and training programs, with potential applications in professional development. REPORTING METHOD: This manuscript adheres to the STROBE guidelines for the reporting of cross-sectional studies. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: There was no patient or public contribution.


Subject(s)
Clinical Competence , Self Efficacy , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Clinical Competence/standards , Female , Adult , Japan , Male , Nurses/psychology
3.
Nurs Open ; 11(7): e2237, 2024 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38957916

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore the assumptions and values that influence nursing health assessment practices among registered general nurses in general medical and surgical wards. DESIGN: The study was designed as a focused ethnography. METHODS: A semi-structured interview guide was used to explore prevailing nursing health assessment practices of 13 registered general nurses in an attempt to explore the assumptions and values influencing health assessment practices in the study setting. Data were analysed inductively using an interpretive qualitative content analysis method. RESULTS: Nursing health assessment practices, and underlying assumptions and values were underpinned by a central theme of a culture of low expectation relating to nursing health assessment. The culture of low expectation was highlighted in five themes: (1) Unsystematic Assessment of Health Status, (2) Purpose of Nursing Health Assessment, (3) The Role of Nursing Educational and Regulatory Institutions, (4) Ward Ethos and (5) The Role of Organizational and Ward Leadership. IMPLICATION: The adoption of a holistic nursing health assessment framework with a clearly defined purpose of aiding nursing diagnoses can guide patient-centred care delivery and facilitate early recognition of physiological deterioration. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Thirteen registered general nurses were interviewed, and the initial findings returned to them for validation. CONCLUSION: The potential contribution of nursing health assessment to nursing practice and patient outcomes may not be fully realized if nursing health assessment is not situated within a holistic health assessment model with a clearly defined purpose for nursing practice.


Subject(s)
Anthropology, Cultural , Qualitative Research , Tertiary Care Centers , Humans , Nursing Assessment/methods , Female , Adult , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Male , Interviews as Topic/methods , Nurses/psychology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Middle Aged
4.
Nurs Open ; 11(7): e2235, 2024 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38958036

ABSTRACT

AIM: To determine how nurses' experiences with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic affected their knowledge, awareness, and compliance related to the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) during the COVID-19 pandemic in South Korea. DESIGN: A descriptive cross-sectional study. METHODS: A total of 247 nurses in South Korea participated in this study between May 10 and 19, 2023. An online self-report questionnaire was used to collect data on demographic and occupational characteristics, COVID-19 experience, knowledge, awareness, and compliance related to the use of PPE. Factors affecting compliance were analysed using hierarchical multiple linear regression. RESULTS: Mean age of the nurses was 31.92, and 94.3% were women. Most had a bachelor's degree or higher and the mean clinical experience as a nurse was 6.45 years. Knowledge of the use of PPE was 8.45 out of 10, awareness was 3.52 out of 5, and compliance was 4.28 out of 5. Knowledge and awareness were correlated with compliance related to PPE use. Awareness (ß = 0.234, p < 0.001), knowledge (ß = 0.218, p < 0.001), experience caring for COVID-19 patients (ß = 0.234, p = 0.004), optional fourth dose vaccine (ß = 0.150, p = 0.017), clinical experience (ß = 0.140, p = 0.022), and COVID-19 infection control education (ß = 0.115, p = 0.037) were found to have a significant impact on compliance. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, nurses' knowledge and awareness of PPE use was a crucial factor in compliance. factors such as clinical experience, experience in caring for COVID-19 patients, optional vaccination, and completion of COVID-19 education also influenced compliance. We hope that these factors can provide a basis for developing training programs for nurses to respond to future emerging infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personal Protective Equipment , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Adult , Male , Republic of Korea , Surveys and Questionnaires , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Pandemics/prevention & control , Nurses/psychology , Guideline Adherence
5.
Nurs Open ; 11(7): e2210, 2024 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38958174

ABSTRACT

AIM: To investigate nursing/midwifery students, Clinical Mentors, Link Teachers and Head Nurses experiences within "Dedicated Education Unit" model in 6 European clinical placements and analyse the necessary elements for a powerful clinical learning environment. DESIGN: A multi-country, phenomenological, qualitative study. METHODS: Focus group interviews were performed to identify the personal and organizational factors of importance for students and nurses/midwives. RESULTS: Data analysis produced 4 main themes (1) Clinical placement organization, (2) students' clinical knowledge and skill acquisition, (3) students, and nurses/midwives' experiences within the DEU model and (4) factors for creating an effective learning environment. CONCLUSIONS: A close educational-service collaboration, a realistic clinical placement planning, a focus on student learning process and an investment in professionals' education and development among others, are elements to set up a powerful clinical learning environment. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PROFESSION: It is considered advisable and urgent to improve the working conditions of nurses/midwives and the learning environments of students as a strategy to alleviate the global shortage of nurses and respond to the increasingly demanding health needs of the population. IMPACT: Due to the close relationship between students' learning and features of the clinical environment nurse educators seek innovative models which allow students to manage patient care and their transition to professional practice. To implement new learning strategies, identifying students, nurses and midwives perceptions and suggestions is a powerful information to evaluate implementation process and outcomes. PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Our findings could help academic and clinical managers to meet the human and organizational requirements to create a successful learning environment in every student placement.


Subject(s)
Focus Groups , Qualitative Research , Students, Nursing , Humans , Students, Nursing/psychology , Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Europe , Midwifery/education , Female , Clinical Competence/standards , Nurses/psychology , Adult , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Nurse Midwives/education , Nurse Midwives/psychology
6.
Braz J Med Biol Res ; 57: e13408, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38958366

ABSTRACT

This study explored the association between loneliness and mental health among nurses in China during the COVID-19 pandemic. This cross-sectional study was conducted from March to April 2022. We enrolled 2,811 nurses from a tertiary hospital in China. Demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, work-related factors, and psychological characteristics were collected from participants via a self-reported questionnaire. Loneliness was measured with the three-item short form of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale, and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the General Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scale were used to measure mental health. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were determined using binary logistic regression. Among participants in this study, 12.0% (337) experienced loneliness, and 7.8% (219) and 6.7% (189) reported depression and anxiety, respectively. The loneliness scores were categorized into three levels (3, 4-6, and 7-9). For depression, compared with the lowest reference, the ORs and 95% CI across the tertile were 1.31 (0.69-1.84) and 2.53 (1.11-5.76) after adjustment, respectively, and the P-value for trend was 0.045. For anxiety, compared with the lowest reference, the ORs and 95%CI across the tertile were 1.84 (1.28-2.63) and 2.52 (1.57-4.10) after adjustment, respectively; the P-value for trend was 0.004. This study showed that loneliness was significantly associated with poor mental health among nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. These findings suggested that medical establishments should offer interventions for nurses to prevent mental health problems by targeting this modifiable risk factor.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression , Loneliness , Mental Health , Nurses , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , China/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Adult , Male , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Nurses/psychology , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Risk Factors , Pandemics
7.
Wound Manag Prev ; 70(2)2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38959350

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of intensive care nurses concerning the prevention of pressure injury (PI) may be positively affected by education. PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of web-based training given to nurses on their knowledge of, attitudes about, and behaviors in the prevention of PI. METHODS: This study was conducted between May 2019 and December 2019 with a pre-test and post-test design. The study sample consisted of 22 nurses and 80 patients. A link to the educational video prepared for the prevention of PIs was sent to the nurses' mobile phones. RESULTS: The training had a significant positive effect on nurses' level of knowledge of and attitudes toward PI prevention (P < .001 and P = .042, respectively). In group 1, comprising 40 patients who received treatment before nurses' training, 2.5% of patients had stage 1 PI on day 1 and 7.5% had stage 1 PI on day 7, and 2.5% had stage 4 PI on day 7. In group 2, comprising 40 patients who received treatment after nurses' training, 2.5% of patients had stage 1 PI on day 1 and 2.5% had stage 1 PI on day 7. CONCLUSION: Nurses' knowledge of and attitudes and behaviors toward PI prevention were improved following the web-based training, and the stage and rate of PI were lower in patients who received care after nurses received the training.


Subject(s)
Intensive Care Units , Pressure Ulcer , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Female , Male , Adult , Middle Aged , Pressure Ulcer/prevention & control , Pressure Ulcer/nursing , Internet , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Aged
8.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1363450, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38952734

ABSTRACT

Background: The number of clinical nurses in China experiencing professional burnout is increasing yearly, posing a serious challenge to the public health sector. Implementing effective intervention strategies is key to reducing the level of occupational burnout. At present, training aimed at alleviating occupational burnout among clinical nurses is very limited, with common training programs focusing on addressing external factors of occupational burnout rather than the internal cognitive issues of clinical nurses. Self-efficacy and future time perspective are both aspects of an individual's internal self-cognition. Meanwhile, the relationship between clinical nurses' self-efficacy, future time perspective, and occupational burnout is not clear, and further research is needed to verify this. Objective: This study aims to reveal the relationship between clinical nurses' self-efficacy, future time perspective, and occupational burnout, and to explore the mediating role of future time perspective between self-efficacy and occupational burnout among clinical nurses, providing a scientific reference for training directions to improve occupational burnout. Methods: This study used a cross-sectional design, conducting a questionnaire survey with 529 practicing clinical nurses using the General Demographics Questionnaire (GDQ), the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI), and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS). SPSS software version 26.0 was used to analyze the correlation between variables, and AMOS 26.0 was used to test the mediation effect. Results: Clinical nurses' self-efficacy had a negative predictive effect on occupational burnout (r = -0.503, p < 0.001). Future time perspective showed significant differences in regression coefficients on both the paths of self-efficacy (r = 0.615, p < 0.001) and occupational burnout (r = -0.374, p < 0.001). Future time perspective played a partial mediating role between self-efficacy and occupational burnout, accounting for 33.8% of the total effect. Conclusion: This study suggests a significant correlation between clinical nurses' self-efficacy, future time perspective, and occupational burnout. Self-efficacy can directly affect occupational burnout in clinical nurses and can also indirectly affect occupational burnout through the future time perspective.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Self Efficacy , Humans , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Adult , Female , Surveys and Questionnaires , Male , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Nurses/psychology , Middle Aged
9.
S Afr Fam Pract (2004) ; 66(1): e1-e9, 2024 Jun 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38949452

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:  The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most important biological occupational hazards for healthcare workers. A high percentage of HBV infections are attributable to percutaneous occupational exposure. This study aimed to describe the HBV immunisation and current immune status of all the nurses employed in a regional hospital in central South Africa. METHODS:  A descriptive record review included all the nurses (N = 388) employed in a regional hospital in central South Africa from 01 January 2018 to 31 January 2020. A total of 289 health records were included in the study. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Logistic regression analysis was used to establish factors associated with full immunisation. RESULTS:  Most nurses were females (87.9%), working in medical (27.0%) wards. Only 20.4% of nurses received one dose of vaccine, while 51.2% received the three prescribed doses. However, 91.2% of nurses did not receive the vaccine at the correct intervals. Most of the tested nurses (71.0%) were immune. Immunisation status was significantly associated with religion (p  0.001) and schedule (p = 0.003). Nurses who were non-Christians were 35.9% less likely to be fully vaccinated compared to Christians. CONCLUSION:  Half of the nursing staff received three doses as prescribed. All nurses should receive the vaccine against HBV and their immune status monitored to minimise the risk of an infection. It is therefore recommended that proof of immunity should be a requirement.Contribution: This study found a high percentage of nurses with HBV antibodies, which will ensure workplace safety.


Subject(s)
Hepatitis B Vaccines , Hepatitis B , Humans , Female , South Africa , Male , Hepatitis B/prevention & control , Hepatitis B/immunology , Hepatitis B/epidemiology , Hepatitis B Vaccines/administration & dosage , Hepatitis B Vaccines/immunology , Adult , Middle Aged , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Nurses/statistics & numerical data
10.
S Afr Fam Pract (2004) ; 66(1): e1-e10, 2024 Jun 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38949451

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:  Diabetic foot is a dangerous complication of diabetes and can lead to high morbidity and mortality. As essential team members of the healthcare system, nurses play an important role in diabetic foot management and are indispensable in patients' education to prevent diabetic foot. The study assessed nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding diabetic foot care in Sol Plaatje primary health care centres in the Northern Cape: Sol Plaatje's 14 district municipality clinics, Kimberley, Northern Cape. METHODS:  This was a descriptive cross-sectional analytical study. A questionnaire assessed nurses' knowledge, practices and attitudes towards diabetic foot care in the above setting. RESULTS:  A total of 128 professionals, enrolled and auxiliary nurses who are providing primary care to patients within the 14 clinics in the Sol-Plaatje sub-district were recruited for the study. Hundred and five participants completed the self-administered questionnaires. The majority (95%) were females and 58.1% knew that South African Diabetic Foot Guidelines existed, while 57.7% had read them. About 57% did not know about the 60-s diabetic foot screening tool, and 67% did not know the 10 g monofilament test. Approximately 29.8% had never attended a class on diabetic foot care and 85.6% required training on diabetic foot care. CONCLUSION:  This study revealed that the majority of nurses working in the Sol-Plaatje sub-district primary health care centres are knowledgeable of the diabetic foot guidelines for primary care. However, there is a need for ongoing education on diabetic foot care.Contribution: The study results will help improve nurses' awareness of the importance of diabetic foot care.


Subject(s)
Diabetic Foot , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , South Africa , Female , Diabetic Foot/nursing , Diabetic Foot/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Male , Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Middle Aged , Primary Health Care , Attitude of Health Personnel , Nurses/psychology
11.
PLoS One ; 19(7): e0304700, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38954688

ABSTRACT

AIM AND OBJECTIVES: This research protocol presents an action research project with the aim to demonstrate the value of person-centred fundamental care to nurses and nurse managers in surgical care units to encourage a far-reaching change in this direction. The objectives are to describe this process and to evaluate the effects on missed nursing care and person-centred fundamental care. METHODS: In a novel collaboration between nursing science and medical humanities the action research design will be used to interact with nursing staff and leaders in three surgical care units and design interventions with the purpose to affect the direction of nursing. Initially, the care units will be presented with interactive workshops including evidence-based education on person-centered fundamental care, person-centredness, nurse role responsibility and leadership. This will be followed by cocreation of interventions to stimulate person-centered fundamental care. The Fundamentals of Care framework will be used as the overarching theoretical framework. Data on missed nursing care, person-centred climate and person-centered fundamental care will be collected repeatedly from patient- and nursing stakeholders through interviews and validated questionnaires. Additionally, data from written reflections following clinical observations and focus group interviews will be included. The duration of the study will be approximately five years from ethical approval. DISCUSSION: It has been previously reported that the current working environments of registered nurses are forcing them to ration their caring responsibilities, leading to a lack of fulfillment of patients' fundamental care needs, with possible severe consequences for patients. The action research design helps researchers gain an understanding of the contextual factors important for forthcoming interventions, enabling reflective processes and cocreation of interventions with stakeholders. This may lead to feasible interventions and strengthen nursing leadership in the involved units.


Subject(s)
Patient-Centered Care , Humans , Health Services Research , Clinical Competence , Leadership , Nurses , Surveys and Questionnaires , Research Design
12.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 77Suppl 1(Suppl 1): e20230142, 2024.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38958352

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the uncertainties experienced by nursing professionals who contracted COVID-19. METHODS: This qualitative research was conducted with 20 nursing professionals who fell ill from COVID-19. Data collection was carried out through semi-structured interviews; the data were then organized using thematic analysis and discussed in the context of Merle Mishel's Reconceptualized of Uncertainty in Illness Theory. RESULTS: The antecedents of the disease had a strong influence on how nursing professionals who contracted COVID-19 perceived uncertainty. The media coverage of the increasing number of cases, the collapse of the healthcare system, and the high mortality rate contributed to associating the disease with fear and panic. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: Viewing it from the perspective of the disease's antecedents, the illness of a nursing professional from COVID-19 underscores that before being professionals, they are human beings just like anyone else, undergoing adversities and facing the possibilities associated with being ill.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/psychology , Uncertainty , Female , Male , Adult , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Interviews as Topic/methods , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Attitude of Health Personnel , Brazil/epidemiology
13.
BMJ Open ; 14(7): e080058, 2024 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38969387

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore the effects of occupational stress and resilience on insomnia among Chinese nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN, SETTINGS AND PARTICIPANTS: A quantitative description study. The data were collected via a cross-sectional survey. A total of 725 front-line nurses at three tertiary hospitals in western China were included from December 2022 to January 2023. The Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, Job Content Questionnaire, and Athens Insomnia Scale were used to collect data from a self-reported online questionnaire. OUTCOME MEASURES: The outcome variable was insomnia, and structural equation modelling was used to assess the associations among resilience, occupational stress and insomnia. RESULTS: The prevalence of insomnia among the participants was 58.76%. The structural equation model showed that resilience had a negative direct effect on insomnia and occupational stress, and occupational stress had a positive direct effect on insomnia. Involvement in COVID-19-related work has a positive effect on insomnia through occupational stress. In contrast, higher education levels improved insomnia through increased resilience. CONCLUSION: A significantly higher prevalence of insomnia has been observed among Chinese nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our study suggests that better resilience may improve insomnia by relieving occupational stress, and implementing measures to promote resilience is essential to reduce occupational stress in nurses and improve their sleep quality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Resilience, Psychological , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , China/epidemiology , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adult , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Latent Class Analysis , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Middle Aged , Pandemics
14.
BMC Palliat Care ; 23(1): 166, 2024 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38970100

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The countries of the world are becoming increasingly multicultural and diverse, both as a result of growing migration, of people fleeing countries at war but also due to increased mobility related to labour immigration. Culture is a broad concept where the definitions focus on learned and shared values, traditions, and beliefs of a group of individuals. People's culture affects health and perceptions of illness as well as treatment, symptoms, and care. Moreover, people who are at the end of life, live and exist within all levels and contexts of care. Specialized palliative care requires that the nurse has sufficient knowledge and skills to be responsible for meeting the patient's nursing needs also on a cultural level, regardless of cultural affiliation. The aim of the study was to highlight nurses' experiences of the meaning of culture when caring for patients at the end of life in specialized palliative care. METHODS: The study was conducted with a qualitative design and inductive approach. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve nurses in western Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. RESULTS: The nurses had an awareness of culture as a phenomenon and how it affected palliative care at the end of life. The results showed two categories, Awareness of the impact of culture on nursing and Culture's impact and influence on the nurse's mindset and approach, consisting of seven subcategories that highlight the nurse's experience. It emerged that there are differences between cultures regarding notions of dying and death, who should be informed, and treatments. There were also challenges and emotions that arose when cultural preferences differed among everyone involved. A person-centred approach allowed for recognition of the dying person's culture, to meet diverse cultural needs and wishes. CONCLUSION: Providing culturally competent care is a major challenge. There are often no routines or methods prescribed for how nurses should relate to and handle the diversity of cultural notions that may differ from the values and cornerstones of palliative care. Having a person-centred approach as strategy can help to better manage the situation and provide equitable care on terms that respect cultural diversity.


Subject(s)
Palliative Care , Qualitative Research , Terminal Care , Humans , Female , Sweden , Adult , Male , Middle Aged , Palliative Care/methods , Palliative Care/psychology , Palliative Care/standards , Terminal Care/psychology , Terminal Care/methods , Nurses/psychology , Interviews as Topic/methods , Attitude of Health Personnel
15.
Nurs Philos ; 25(3): e12491, 2024 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38973119

ABSTRACT

In this article, I try to document the lived experiences of nurses who were sent to Wuhan to work in the COVID-19 wards and consider the impact of such experiences on their psychological well-being. I show the contextual factors in Wuhan, the inherent nature of nursing during the pandemic and the transition from the immediate reactions of nurses to long-term impacts on their personalities, formed through the whole process of abjection. Therefore, I argue that we need to consider how nursing experiences, before, during and after their professional work in the wards, would instigate abjection within nurses. The abjection of nurses does not start only from the ward, nor does it not end in the ward. Rather, the abjection of nurses, as a reaction to lived experiences, is nuanced and the study of it can reveal rich details of nurses' life both inside and outside of the ward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/psychology , China , Nurses/psychology , Pandemics , Attitude of Health Personnel , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Support Care Cancer ; 32(8): 499, 2024 Jul 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38985361

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: People with primary malignant brain tumors experience serious health-related suffering caused by limited prognosis and high symptom burden. Consequently, neuro-oncological healthcare workers can be affected emotionally in a negative way. The aim of this study was to analyze the attitudes and behavior of nurses and physicians when confronted with spiritual distress in these patients. METHODS: Neurospirit-DE is a qualitative vignette-based, multicenter, cross-sectional online survey that was conducted in Bavaria, Germany. Reflexive thematic analysis was used for data analysis. RESULTS: A total of 143 nurses and physicians working in neurological and neurosurgical wards in 46 hospitals participated in the survey. The participants questioned if the ability to provide spiritual care can be learned or is a natural skill. Spiritual care as a responsibility of the whole team was highlighted, and the staff reflected on the appropriate way of involving spiritual care experts. The main limitations to spiritual care were a lack of time and not viewing spiritual engagement as part of the professional role. Some were able to personally benefit from spiritual conversations with patients, but many participants criticized the perceived emotional burden while expressing the imminent need for specific training and team reflection. CONCLUSIONS: Most neuro-oncological nurses and physicians perceive spiritual care as part of their duty and know how to alleviate the patient's spiritual distress. Nonetheless, validation of spiritual assessment tools for neuro-oncology and standardized documentation of patients' distress, shared interprofessional training, and reflection on the professional and personal challenges faced when confronted with spiritual care in neuro-oncology require further improvement and training.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Qualitative Research , Spirituality , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Male , Middle Aged , Adult , Germany , Brain Neoplasms/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Nurses/psychology , Stress, Psychological/etiology
17.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 15913, 2024 Jul 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38987325

ABSTRACT

Occupational stress is a complex concept resulting from interaction among personnel, work environment, and cultural contexts. It can cause mental health issues, including clinical mental disorders, as well as emotional challenges like depression, anxiety, cognitive difficulties, and feeling sad. As a vulnerable group, healthcare professionals, especially nurses, experience a high rate of occupational stress. Therefore, we aimed to study the relationship between occupational stress, mental health problems, and self-efficacy among the nursing population. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 365 nurses selected through a two-stage sampling process from tertiary hospitals in Qazvin, Iran, between July and September 2022. Study variables included occupational stress measured by the persian version of the health and safety executive management standards revised indicator tool (MS-RIT), the general health questionnaire containing 28 questions measuring psychological distress in four primary areas of somatic and anxiety symptoms, sleep disorders, social dysfunction, and depression [GHQ-28], and general self-efficacy [GSE-10]. The mentioned variables and some of the nurses' demographic characteristics, including age, gender, education, and work experience, were analyzed using moderated multiple regression, descriptive statistics, and the Pearson correlation coefficient.The Pearson correlation analysis revealed a statistically significant association between self-efficacy and occupational stress (r = 0.62, P = 0.000) and self-efficacy and mental health (r = 0.67, P = 0.01). Regression analysis demonstrated that occupational stress accounted for 42% of the variation in mental health (R2 = 0.42, P < 0.01). The results also showed that self-efficacy moderates the relationship between occupational stress and mental health, with a significant effect (P < 0.01). The elevated prevalence of occupational stress and the concerning state of mental health among nurses highlight the need for the implementation of intervention programs, including stress prevention strategies at the workplace through organizing better working shifts, as well as increasing nurses' self-efficacy and their effective participation in work-related tasks aiming to enhance working conditions for nurses.


Subject(s)
Mental Health , Nurses , Occupational Stress , Self Efficacy , Humans , Female , Occupational Stress/psychology , Male , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Nurses/psychology , Iran/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Middle Aged , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Young Adult , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Workplace/psychology
19.
Womens Health Nurs ; 30(2): 107-116, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38987915

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study was conducted to develop a cultural competence scale for nurses regarding the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community and to test its validity and reliability. METHODS: The study adhered to the 8-step process outlined by DeVellis, with an initial set of 25 items derived through a literature review and individual interviews. Following an expert validity assessment, 24 items were validated. Subsequently, a preliminary survey was conducted among 23 nurses with experience caring for LGBT patients. Data were then collected from a final sample of 322 nurses using the 24 items. Item analysis, item-total score correlation, examination of construct and convergent validity, and reliability testing were performed. RESULTS: The item-level content validity index exceeded .80, and the explanatory power of the construct validity was 63.63%. The factor loadings varied between 0.57 and 0.80. The scale comprised five factors: cultural skills, with seven items; cultural awareness, with five items; cultural encounters, with three items; cultural pursuit, with three items; and cultural knowledge, with three items; totaling 21 items. Convergent validity demonstrated a high correlation, affirming the scale's validity. Internal consistency analysis yielded an overall reliability coefficient of 0.97, signifying very high reliability. Each item is scored from 1 to 6 (total score range, 21-126), with higher scores reflecting greater cultural competence in LGBT care. CONCLUSION: This scale facilitates the measurement of LGBT cultural competence among nurses. Therefore, its use should provide foundational data to support LGBT-focused nursing education programs.


Subject(s)
Cultural Competency , Nurses , Psychometrics , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Humans , Female , Male , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires , Republic of Korea , Adult , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Psychometrics/methods , Middle Aged , Transgender Persons/psychology
20.
Hum Resour Health ; 22(1): 49, 2024 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38978050

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the rapid increase in chronic diseases in South Korea, the Korean government has expanded chronic disease management to primary care. Thus, the role of primary care nurses is critical. However, the fee for chronic disease management services provided by primary care nurses has not been set, and few studies have evaluated the value of nursing services. This study aimed to estimate the willingness to pay (WTP) for chronic disease management services provided by primary care nurses and to identify the factors that affect WTP. METHODS: This study adopted a descriptive research design and conducted a cross-sectional online survey from January 16 to 18, 2023. The inclusion criteria were community residents aged ≥ 20 years living in South Korea and capable of participating in online surveys. A total of 520 people participated in this study. A contingent valuation method (CVM) was used with double-bound dichotomous choice questions along with open-ended questions. The mean WTP was calculated using a Tobit model. RESULTS: The mean WTP of the 520 study participants for one chronic disease management service provided by primary care nurses was 15,390.71 Korean won ($11.90). Factors affecting WTP were having a chronic disease, recognition of primary care nurses, and the first-bid price. Community residents with fewer chronic diseases, high awareness of primary care nurses, and a higher first-bid price showed higher WTP for chronic disease management services provided by primary care nurses. CONCLUSIONS: Primary care is important worldwide due to the increasing number of chronic diseases, and Korea is no exception. However, payment for services by primary care nurses is undervalued compared to their critical role and skills. This has led to problems such as a primary care nurse shortage and burnout. This study estimated individuals' WTP for chronic disease management services provided by primary care nurses. The results can be used as a basic resource for setting the fee for services provided by primary care nurses. It is also a good starting point to understand the benefits of primary care nurse services.


Subject(s)
Disease Management , Primary Health Care , Humans , Republic of Korea , Chronic Disease/therapy , Female , Male , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Middle Aged , Primary Health Care/economics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Primary Care Nursing/economics , Aged , Young Adult , Nurses , Financing, Personal
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