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1.
Biomed Environ Sci ; 37(5): 557, 2024 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38843932
3.
Int J Rheum Dis ; 27(6): e15214, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38831532

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have partly discussed the roles of inflammatory cytokines in obesity and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but the causal relationship among inflammatory cytokines, obesity, and SLE is unclear. It is challenging to comprehensively evaluate the causal relationship between these variables. This study aimed to investigate the role of cytokines as intermediates between obesity and SLE. METHODS: The inverse-variance weighted method (IVW) of mendelian randomization (MR) is mainly used to explore the causal relationship between exposure and outcome by using the genetic variation of the open large genome-wide association studies (GWAS), namely single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to obesity (more than 600 000 participants), inflammatory cytokines (8293 healthy participants) and SLE (7219 cases). Methods such as weighted median, MR-Egger are used to evaluate the reliability of causality. Reverse analysis is performed for each MR analysis to avoid reverse causality. Cochran's Q statistic and funnel chart are used to detect heterogeneity, MR-Egger intercept test and leave-one-out sensitivity analyses evaluated pleiotropy. RESULTS: Obesity was associated with 25 cytokines, and 3 cytokines were associated with SLE, including CTACK (OR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.33, p = .002), IL-18 (OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.26, p = .027), SCGFb (OR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.79, 0.99, p = .044). In the opposite direction, SLE was associated with 18 cytokines, and 2 cytokines were associated with obesity, including IP-10 (ßIVW = -.03, 95% CI: -0.05, -0.01, p = .002), MIP-1B (ßIVW = -.03, 95% CI: -0.05, -0.01, p = .004). CONCLUSION: Our MR study suggested that CTACK, IL-18 and SCGFb may play an intermediary role in obesity to SLE, while IP-10 and MIP-1B may play an intermediary role in SLE to obesity.


Subject(s)
Cytokines , Genome-Wide Association Study , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic , Mendelian Randomization Analysis , Obesity , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Humans , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/genetics , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/diagnosis , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/blood , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/epidemiology , Obesity/genetics , Obesity/diagnosis , Obesity/epidemiology , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/blood , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Risk Factors , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Interleukin-18/genetics , Phenotype
4.
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak ; 34(6): 737-739, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38840362

ABSTRACT

This cross-sectional study investigated health-related behaviours in Korean cancer survivors by time after cancer diagnosis. The data of 50,532 subjects (aged 40 to 79 years) who participated in the 2007-2019 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES) were subjected to analysis. Health-related behaviours included obesity, current smoking, frequent drinking, influenza vaccination, health screening, and cancer screening. The odds for these behaviours were estimated by multivariate logistic regression models with adjustment for potential covariates. Approximately 5% of subjects were cancer survivors, and among these three-fifths were long-term (≥5 years) survivors. Cancer survivors had healthier behaviours than non-survivors for almost all behaviours. However, these trends were attenuated in long-term survivors. In conclusion, healthy behaviour should be emphasised for long-term cancer survivors. Key Words: Cancer survivors, Cross-sectional studies, Health-related behaviours.


Subject(s)
Cancer Survivors , Health Behavior , Neoplasms , Nutrition Surveys , Humans , Middle Aged , Male , Female , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Cancer Survivors/statistics & numerical data , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adult , Aged , Neoplasms/psychology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Smoking/epidemiology , Smoking/psychology , Early Detection of Cancer , Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/psychology
5.
BMC Womens Health ; 24(1): 315, 2024 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38824522

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sleep health and obesity may affect the risk of female infertility. However, few studies focused on the interaction of obesity and sleep health on the female infertility risk. This study aimed to evaluate the combined impact of trouble sleeping / sleep duration and overweight/obesity/ abdominal obesity on the risk of female infertility. METHODS: The data for this cross-sectional study was obtained from National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey, which provided information on trouble sleeping, sleep duration, overweight/obesity, abdominal obesity, and confounding factors. Adopted weighted univariate and multivariate logistic regression models to explore the relationship between trouble sleeping, sleep duration, overweight/obesity, abdominal obesity, and the risk of infertility, respectively, and the combined effect of trouble sleeping and overweight/obesity, trouble sleeping and abdominal obesity, sleep duration and overweight/obesity, sleep duration and abdominal obesity, on the female infertility risk. RESULTS: This study included a total of 1,577 women, and 191 were diagnosed with infertility. Women with infertility had a higher proportion of people with overweight/obesity, abdominal obesity, sleep duration ≤ 7 h and trouble sleeping than those with non-infertility. The result indicated that trouble sleeping [odds ratio (OR) = 2.25, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.49-3.39], sleep duration ≤ 7 h (OR = 1.59, 95% CI: 1.03-2.48), and the combined impact of abdominal obesity and trouble sleeping (OR = 2.18, 95% CI: 1.28-3.72), abdominal obesity and sleep duration ≤ 7 h (OR = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.17-3.40), overweight/obesity and trouble sleeping (OR = 2.29, 95% CI: 1.24-4.26), and overweight/obesity and sleep duration ≤ 7 h (OR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.01-3.49) were associated with increased odds of infertility, respectively. CONCLUSION: There was combined effects of trouble sleeping/sleep duration ≤ 7 h and overweight/obesity/ abdominal obesity on increased odds of female infertility.


Subject(s)
Infertility, Female , Nutrition Surveys , Obesity, Abdominal , Obesity , Sleep Wake Disorders , Humans , Female , Adult , Infertility, Female/epidemiology , Infertility, Female/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/complications , Obesity, Abdominal/epidemiology , Obesity, Abdominal/complications , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/complications , Sleep/physiology , Overweight/epidemiology , Overweight/complications , Risk Factors , Young Adult , United States/epidemiology
6.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 23(1): 192, 2024 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38844974

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is closely associated with the triglyceride glucose (TyG) index and its related indicators, particularly its combination with obesity indices. However, there is limited research on the relationship between changes in TyG-related indices and CVD, as most studies have focused on baseline TyG-related indices. METHODS: The data for this prospective cohort study were obtained from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. The exposures were changes in TyG-related indices and cumulative TyG-related indices from 2012 to 2015. The K-means algorithm was used to classify changes in each TyG-related index into four classes (Class 1 to Class 4). Multivariate logistic regressions were used to evaluate the associations between the changes in TyG-related indices and the incidence of CVD. RESULTS: In total, 3243 participants were included in this study, of whom 1761 (54.4%) were female, with a mean age of 57.62 years at baseline. Over a 5-year follow-up, 637 (19.6%) participants developed CVD. Fully adjusted logistic regression analyses revealed significant positive associations between changes in TyG-related indices, cumulative TyG-related indices and the incidence of CVD. Among these changes in TyG-related indices, changes in TyG-waist circumference (WC) showed the strongest association with incident CVD. Compared to the participants in Class 1 of changes in TyG-WC, the odds ratio (OR) for participants in Class 2 was 1.41 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.84), the OR for participants in Class 3 was 1.54 (95% CI 1.15-2.07), and the OR for participants in Class 4 was 1.94 (95% CI 1.34-2.80). Moreover, cumulative TyG-WC exhibited the strongest association with incident CVD among cumulative TyG-related indices. Compared to the participants in Quartile 1 of cumulative TyG-WC, the OR for participants in Quartile 2 was 1.33 (95% CI 1.00-1.76), the OR for participants in Quartile 3 was 1.46 (95% CI 1.09-1.96), and the OR for participants in Quartile 4 was 1.79 (95% CI 1.30-2.47). CONCLUSIONS: Changes in TyG-related indices are independently associated with the risk of CVD. Changes in TyG-WC are expected to become more effective indicators for identifying individuals at a heightened risk of CVD.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers , Blood Glucose , Cardiovascular Diseases , Obesity , Triglycerides , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Male , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/blood , Prospective Studies , Triglycerides/blood , Incidence , Risk Assessment , China/epidemiology , Blood Glucose/metabolism , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/diagnosis , Obesity/blood , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Longitudinal Studies , Time Factors , Prognosis , Heart Disease Risk Factors , Predictive Value of Tests , Risk Factors
7.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0300566, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38829842

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many studies have demonstrated the beneficial health effects of caffeine. However, its association with obesity prevalence and caffeine intake remains controversial. Notably, the impact of caffeine on children and adolescents needs to be more adequately represented in large-scale epidemiological investigations. OBJECTIVE: This study examines the association between caffeine intake and obesity prevalence in children and adolescents aged 2 to 19. METHODS: This study used the database from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, 2011-2020 March) to perform a cross-sectional study. A total of 10,001 classified children and adolescents were included in this analysis. All data were survey-weighted, and corresponding logistic regression models were performed to examine the associations between caffeine intake and the prevalence of obesity. RESULTS: In a fully adjusted model, a per-quartile increase in caffeine intake was associated with a 0.05% increased prevalence of obesity. In the subgroup analysis, the multivariate-adjusted ORs (95% CIs) of the prevalence of obesity for per-quartile 1.3497 (1.2014, 1.5163) increments in caffeine intake were 1.5961 (1.3127, 1.9406) for boys and 1.4418 (1.1861, 1.7525) for girls, 1.5807 (1.3131, 1.9027) for white race and 1.3181 (1.0613, 1.6370), 1.0500 (0.6676, 1.6515) for the age of 2-5, 1.4996 (1.1997, 1.8745) for the age of 6-12, and 1.2321 (0.9924, 1597) for the age of 13-19. CONCLUSION: The study suggested that higher caffeine intake may have a protective effect against obesity in specific subgroups, particularly among no overweight individuals. However, the association was not significant in other groups, indicating the need for a nuanced understanding of caffeine's impact on obesity in diverse populations.


Subject(s)
Caffeine , Nutrition Surveys , Humans , Caffeine/administration & dosage , Child , Female , Male , Adolescent , Cross-Sectional Studies , Prevalence , Child, Preschool , Young Adult , Obesity/epidemiology , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
8.
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 36(7): 961-969, 2024 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38829946

ABSTRACT

Fatty liver disease (FLD) affects approximately 25% of global adult population. Metabolic-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) is a term used to emphasize components of metabolic syndrome in FLD. MAFLD does not exclude coexistence of other liver disease, but impact of coexisting MAFLD is unclear. We investigated prevalence and characteristics of MAFLD in patients with biopsy-proven autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), or toxic liver disease. Liver histopathology and clinical data from Helsinki University Hospital district (1.7 million inhabitants) between 2009 and 2019 were collected from patients with AIH, PBC, PSC, or toxic liver disease at the time of diagnosis. MAFLD was diagnosed as macrovesicular steatosis ≥5% together with obesity, type-2 diabetes, or signs of metabolic dysregulation. Of 648 patients included, steatosis was observed in 15.6% (n = 101), of which 94.1% (n = 95) was due to MAFLD. Prevalence of coexisting MAFLD in the four liver diseases varied between 12.4 and 18.2% (P = 0.483). Fibrosis was more severe in MAFLD among patients with toxic liver disease (P = 0.01). Histopathological characteristics otherwise showed similar distribution among MAFLD and non-FLD controls. Alcohol consumption was higher in MAFLD group among patients with AIH or PBC (P < 0.05 for both). In AIH, smoking was more common in patients with coexisting MAFLD (P = 0.034). Prevalence of coexisting MAFLD in other primary liver diseases is lower than reported in general population. Histopathology of MAFLD patients did not clearly differ from non-FLD ones. Alcohol and smoking were associated with MAFLD in AIH.


Subject(s)
Cholangitis, Sclerosing , Hepatitis, Autoimmune , Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary , Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Hepatitis, Autoimmune/complications , Hepatitis, Autoimmune/epidemiology , Prevalence , Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary/epidemiology , Liver Cirrhosis, Biliary/complications , Cholangitis, Sclerosing/complications , Cholangitis, Sclerosing/epidemiology , Adult , Finland/epidemiology , Aged , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/etiology , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/epidemiology , Fatty Liver/epidemiology , Fatty Liver/pathology , Fatty Liver/complications , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/epidemiology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/complications , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology , Metabolic Syndrome/complications , Biopsy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
9.
Sci Rep ; 14(1): 12727, 2024 06 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38830947

ABSTRACT

Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It occurs due to a combination of genetics, lifestyle, and environmental factors. Premature coronary artery disease (PCAD) is a neglected clinical entity despite the rising number of cases worldwide. This study aimed to investigate the risk factors of premature coronary artery disease. In this study, we searched articles that had studied the risk factors of premature coronary artery diseases from January 2000 to July 2022 in Saudi Arabia in Web of Science, Pub Med, Scopus, Springer, and Wiley databases. The final analysis is based on seven articles. The smoking prevalence was 39%, diabetes mellitus 41%, hypertension 33%, overweight and obesity 18%, family history of coronary artery disease (CAD) 19%, dyslipidemia 37%, and the prevalence range of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was 33.8-55.0%. The results revealed a mortality prevalence of 4% ranging from 2 to 8% which is similar to the prevalence in older patients which was 2-10%. Smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, family history of CAD, dyslipidemia, and overweight/obesity are significantly and positively associated with premature coronary artery diseases. The health authorities should design and implement an intensive and effective prophylactic plan to minimize the subsequent impact of PCAD on the young population. In addition, early diagnosis of PCAD has great value in providing timely treatment, managing the patients, and minimizing the burden of the disease.


Subject(s)
Coronary Artery Disease , Humans , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Disease/mortality , Coronary Artery Disease/genetics , Risk Factors , Male , Prevalence , Female , Adult , Smoking/adverse effects , Smoking/epidemiology , Hypertension/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/complications , Dyslipidemias/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Middle Aged
10.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0304844, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38833493

ABSTRACT

Socioeconomic status and smoking are reportedly associated with underweight and obesity; however, their associations among pregnant women are unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether socioeconomic factors, namely educational attainment, household income, marital status, and employment status, were associated with pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) categories, including severe-moderate underweight (BMI ≤ 16.9 kg/m2), mild underweight (BMI, 17.0-18.4 kg/m2), overweight (BMI, 25.0-29.9 kg/m2), and obese (BMI ≥ 30.0 kg/m2) among Japanese pregnant women using data from the Japan Environment and Children's Study (JECS). In total, pregnant women were included 96,751. Age- and parity-adjusted multivariable multinomial logistic regression analyses assessed socioeconomic factors and smoking associations with falling within abnormal BMI categories (normal BMI as the reference group). Lower education and lower household were associated with overweight and obesity, and, especially, lowest education and household income had relatively higher point estimate relative ratios (RRs) of 3.97 and 2.84, respectively. Regarding the risks for underweight, however, only junior high school education had a significantly higher RR for severely to moderately underweight. Regarding occupational status, homemakers or the unemployed had a higher RR for severe-moderate underweight, overweight, and obesity. Unmarried, divorced, or bereaved women had significantly higher RRs for mildly underweight status. Quitting smoking early in pregnancy/still smoking had higher RRs for all four not having normal BMI outcomes; however, quitting smoking before pregnancy had a higher RR only for obese individuals. Lower educational attainment and smoking are essential intervention targets for obesity and severe-moderate underweight prevention in younger women. Lower household income is also a necessary target for obesity.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Thinness , Humans , Female , Pregnancy , Japan/epidemiology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Thinness/epidemiology , Socioeconomic Factors , Obesity/epidemiology , Smoking/epidemiology , Overweight/epidemiology , Young Adult , Risk Factors
11.
JAMA Netw Open ; 7(6): e2415051, 2024 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38837158

ABSTRACT

Importance: Obesity, especially visceral obesity, is an established risk factor associated with all-cause mortality. However, the inadequacy of conventional anthropometric measures in assessing fat distribution necessitates a more comprehensive indicator, body roundness index (BRI), to decipher its population-based characteristics and potential association with mortality risk. Objective: To evaluate the temporal trends of BRI among US noninstitutionalized civilian residents and explore its association with all-cause mortality. Design, Setting, and Participants: For this cohort study, information on a nationally representative cohort of 32 995 US adults (age ≥20 years) was extracted from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1999 to 2018 and NHANES Linked Mortality File, with mortality ascertained through December 31, 2019. Data were analyzed between April 1 and September 30, 2023. Exposures: Biennial weighted percentage changes in BRI were calculated. Restricted cubic spline curve was used to determine optimal cutoff points for BRI. Main Outcome and Measures: The survival outcome was all-cause mortality. Mortality data were obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website and linked to the NHANES database using the unique subject identifier. Weibull regression model was adopted to quantify the association between BRI and all-cause mortality. Results: Among 32 995 US adults, the mean (SD) age was 46.74 (16.92) years, and 16 529 (50.10%) were women. Mean BRI increased gradually from 4.80 (95% CI, 4.62-4.97) to 5.62 (95% CI, 5.37-5.86) from 1999 through 2018, with a biennial change of 0.95% (95% CI, 0.80%-1.09%; P < .001), and this increasing trend was more obvious among women, elderly individuals, and individuals who identified as Mexican American. After a median (IQR) follow-up of 9.98 (5.33-14.33) years, 3452 deaths (10.46% of participants) from all causes occurred. There was a U-shaped association between BRI and all-cause mortality, with the risk increased by 25% (hazard ratio, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.05-1.47) for adults with BRI less than 3.4 and by 49% (hazard ratio, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.31-1.70) for those with BRI of 6.9 or greater compared with the middle quintile of BRI of 4.5 to 5.5 after full adjustment. Conclusions and Relevance: This national cohort study found an increasing trend of BRI during nearly 20-year period among US adults, and importantly, a U-shaped association between BRI and all-cause mortality. These findings provide evidence for proposing BRI as a noninvasive screening tool for mortality risk estimation, an innovative concept that could be incorporated into public health practice pending consistent validation in other independent cohorts.


Subject(s)
Nutrition Surveys , Humans , Female , Male , Adult , United States/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Cohort Studies , Aged , Cause of Death/trends , Risk Factors , Body Mass Index , Obesity/mortality , Obesity/epidemiology , Young Adult
12.
BMC Gastroenterol ; 24(1): 192, 2024 Jun 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38840060

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Gallstones are associated with obesity, and the BRI is a new obesity index that more accurately reflects body fat and visceral fat levels. The relationship between BRI and gallstone risk is currently unknown, and we aimed to explore the relationship between BRI and gallstone prevalence. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted utilizing data from the 2017-2020 NHANES involving a total of 5297 participants. To assess the association between BRI and gallstones, we used logistic regression analysis, subgroup analysis, and interaction terms. In addition, we performed restricted cubic spline (RCS) analysis and threshold effects analysis to characterize nonlinear relationships. We assessed the ability of BRI and Body mass index (BMI) to identify gallstones using receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis and area under the curve (AUC), and compared them using the Delong test. RESULTS: Of the 5297 participants aged 20 years and older included in the study, 575 had gallstones. In fully adjusted models, a positive association between BRI and gallstone prevalence was observed (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.12-1.20, P < 0.0001). Individuals in the highest quartile of BRI had a 204% increased risk of gallstones compared with those in the lowest quartile (OR = 3.04, 95% CI: 2.19-4.22, P < 0.0001). The correlation between BRI and gallstones persisted in subgroup analyses. RCS analyses showed a nonlinear relationship between BRI and gallstones. The inflection point was further found to be 3.96, and the correlation between BRI and gallstones was found both before and after the inflection point. ROC analysis showed that BRI (AUC = 0.667) was a stronger predictor of gallstones than BMI (AUC = 0.634). CONCLUSIONS: Elevated BRI is associated with an increased risk of gallstones in the U.S. population, and BRI is a stronger predictor of gallstones than BMI. Maintaining an appropriate BRI is recommended to reduce the incidence of gallstones.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Gallstones , Nutrition Surveys , Obesity , Humans , Gallstones/epidemiology , Female , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adult , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Obesity/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Young Adult , ROC Curve , Aged , Intra-Abdominal Fat , United States/epidemiology
13.
JAMA Netw Open ; 7(6): e2417115, 2024 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38874924

ABSTRACT

Importance: The European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism (ESPEN) and the European Association for the Study of Obesity (EASO) have recently proposed a consensus definition and diagnostic criteria for sarcopenic obesity (SO). Objective: To implement the ESPEN-EASO diagnostic algorithm to investigate the prevalence of SO and its association with outcomes in patients with solid tumor cancers, with particular regard to associations among SO, overall survival (OS), and patient quality of life (QoL). Design, Setting, and Participants: This prospective cohort study included patients diagnosed with solid tumor starting in May 7, 2013, with the last follow-up on June 30, 2022. Patients with solid tumors were categorized into SO and non-SO groups according to ESPEN-EASO criteria. The primary outcome was OS and the secondary outcomes included patient QoL and risk of intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Data were analyzed from June to December 2023. Results: A total of 6790 patients were included in the study (mean [SD] age, 59.64 [10.77] years; 3489 were female [51.4%]). The prevalence of SO was 4.36% (296 of 6790) in the whole cohort and 14.98% (296 of 1976) in the subgroup with obesity. SO prevalence increased with age. During a median (IQR) follow-up period of 6.83 (5.67-7.04) years, 2103 patients died. Cox regression analysis indicated that SO was independently associated with lower OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.54; 95% CI, 1.23-1.92), which was observed in both men (HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.09-2.10) and women (HR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.12-2.07). SO was also associated with poorer QoL and higher risk of ICU admission (odds ratio, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.06-5.29). Among the diagnostic components of SO, low hand grip strength (HGS) was the only SO component associated with poor OS (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.04-1.28). Conclusions and Relevance: This cohort study of SO found that SO was significantly associated with lower OS, poorer QoL, and higher risk of ICU admission. Weak HGS, 1 of the diagnostic conditions, was the only component of SO associated with OS. The ESPEN-EASO algorithm appears to be an applicable tool to identify cancer-associated SO, which represents a major clinical complication and factor associated with risk for poor outcomes in these patients.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Obesity , Quality of Life , Sarcopenia , Humans , Male , Female , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/complications , Middle Aged , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/complications , Sarcopenia/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , Aged , Prevalence
14.
J Clin Psychiatry ; 85(2)2024 Jun 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38836859

ABSTRACT

Objective: We explored depressive symptom trajectories and their associations with underweight and obesity in Korean women.Methods: This prospective cohort study involved 7,691 women enrolled in the Korean Longitudinal Survey of Women and Families, with a follow-up period spanning from 2014 to 2020. Depressive symptoms were evaluated through the 10-item version of the Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Growth mixture modeling was employed to identify trajectories of depressive symptoms. Multinomial logistic regressions were conducted to investigate the correlation between depression trajectories and the evolving risks of underweight and obesity over the study period.Results: Five distinct trajectory classes were observed ("persistent low symptoms": N = 5,236, 68.1%; "decreasing symptoms": N = 930, 12.1%; "transient high symptoms": N = 421, 5.5%; "increasing symptoms" N = 825, 10.7%; and "persistent high symptoms": N = 279, 3.6%). Those with a low socioeconomic status, comorbidity, and who were divorced or widowed were more likely to follow the persistent high symptom trajectory. Among the 5 trajectories, the risks of underweight and obesity steadily increased in women following the trajectory with persistent high symptoms. For these women, the odds ratio (OR) of underweight increased from 2.27 (95% CI, 1.32-3.92) in 2014 to 3.39 (1.91-6.05) in 2020. They were not associated with obesity in 2014 (OR [95% CI]: 1.38 [0.61-3.11]) but exhibited an elevated risk of obesity in 2020 (3.76 [1.97-7.17]).Conclusion: We observed considerable heterogeneity in the trajectories of depressive symptoms among women, and individuals with persistent high depressive symptoms face an escalating risk of both underweight and obesity.


Subject(s)
Depression , Obesity , Thinness , Humans , Female , Thinness/epidemiology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Adult , Longitudinal Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Comorbidity
15.
Lipids Health Dis ; 23(1): 184, 2024 Jun 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38867211

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: An increasing amount of research has indicated obesity greatly affects individuals with overactive bladder (OAB). However, traditional anthropometric methods present challenges in accurately assessing the likelihood of OAB. Hence, this study's objective was to identify the correlation between the body roundness index (BRI) and OAB. METHODS: The research included 12,401 individuals who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey spanning 2005-2018. The correlation between BRI and OAB was explored by using weighted multiple logistic regression and weighted restricted cubic spline (RCS). Subgroup analyses showed the associations based on different population types. The study also analyzed the predictive capability of various anthropometric indices, including BRI, body mass index, waist circumference, and weight, in assessing the likelihood of OAB through Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. RESULTS: An independent positive correlation between OAB and BRI was identified after adjusting for potential confounders in weighted multivariate logistic models[odds ratio (OR) = 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-1.17]. Weighted RCS analysis found a positive dose-response correlation between OAB and BRI. The effect size of BRI on OAB remained stable across all prespecified subgroups (all P for interactions > 0.05). In ROC analysis, BRI showed better discriminatory ability for OAB compared with other anthropometric measures for both genders (all P < 0.01). The best BRI cutoff for predicting OAB was lower for men (5.151) than for women (5.383), suggesting that men were more susceptible to changes in BRI than women. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that a raised BRI is correlated with a higher likelihood of OAB. Due to the effectiveness and non-invasiveness of BRI in predicting OAB, it is expected to become the preferred method for early detection and management strategies.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Nutrition Surveys , ROC Curve , Urinary Bladder, Overactive , Humans , Urinary Bladder, Overactive/epidemiology , Urinary Bladder, Overactive/diagnosis , Urinary Bladder, Overactive/physiopathology , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Adult , Waist Circumference , Obesity/epidemiology , Logistic Models , Aged , Body Weight , Odds Ratio
16.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 15: 1280692, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38894748

ABSTRACT

Background: The prevalence of obesity among women of reproductive age is increasing worldwide, with implications for serious pregnancy complications. Methods: Following PRISMA guidelines, a systematic search was conducted in both Chinese and English databases up to December 30, 2020. Pregnancy complications and outcomes including gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), gestational hypertension (GHTN), pre-eclampsia, cesarean section (CS), induction of labor (IOL), and postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) were analyzed. Random-effects or fixed-effects models were utilized to calculate the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Women with overweight and obesity issues exhibited significantly higher risks of GDM (OR, 2.92, 95%CI, 2.18-2.40 and 3.46, 95%CI, 3.05-3.94, respectively) and GHTN (OR, 2.08, 95%CI, 1.72-2.53 and 3.36, 95%CI, 2.81-4.00, respectively) compared to women of normal weight. Pre-eclampsia was also significantly higher in women with overweight or obesity, with ORs of 1.70 (95%CI, 1.44-2.01) and 2.82 (95%CI, 2.66-3.00), respectively. Additionally, mothers with overweight or obesity issues had significantly higher risks of CS (OR, 1.44, 95%CI, 1.41-1.47, and 2.23, 95%CI, 2.08-2.40), IOL (OR, 1.33, 95%CI, 1.30-1.35 and 1.96, 95%CI, 1.85-2.07), and PPH (OR, 1.67, 95%CI, 1.42-1.96 and 1.88, 95%CI, 1.55-2.29). Conclusion: Women with overweight or obesity issues face increased risks of pregnancy complications and adverse outcomes, indicating dose-dependent effects.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Pregnancy Complications , Pregnancy Outcome , Humans , Pregnancy , Female , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnancy Outcome/epidemiology , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Diabetes, Gestational/epidemiology , Pre-Eclampsia/epidemiology , Cesarean Section/statistics & numerical data , Overweight/complications , Overweight/epidemiology , Postpartum Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Postpartum Hemorrhage/etiology
17.
Cad Saude Publica ; 40(5): e00109823, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38896593

ABSTRACT

We aimed to verify the prevalence of body composition phenotypes and the association of glycemic, lipidic, and inflammatory biomarkers with such phenotypes. This is a cross-sectional, population-based study, with 720 participants aged 20 to 59 years. Body composition was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Obesity was defined as body fat percentage ≥ 25% in males and ≥ 32% in females and sarcopenia by appendicular muscle mass index < 7.0kg/m2 in males and < 5.5kg/m2 in females. Sarcopenic obesity (SO) was defined as the presence of both sarcopenia and obesity. The prevalence of obesity, sarcopenia, and SO were 62.5%, 4.5%, and 6.2%, respectively. The association between biomarkers and phenotypes was verified using multinomial logistic regression models adjusted for confounding factors. The models showed that increased glycemia (OR = 3.39; 95%CI: 1.83-6.27), total cholesterol (TC) (OR = 2.24; 95%CI: 1.35-3.70), LDL-c (OR = 1.01; 95%CI: 1.00-1.02), VLDL-c (OR = 1.04; 95%CI: 1.02-1.06), non-HDL-c (OR = 1.02; 95%CI: 1.01-1.03), triglycerides (Tg) (OR = 3.66; 95%CI: 2.20-6.06), and decreased HDL-c (OR = 0.97; 95%CI: 0.95-0.98) were significantly associated with the obesity phenotype. Increased HOMA-IR (OR = 3.94; 95%CI: 1.69-9.21), LDL-c (OR = 1.01; 95%CI: 1.00-1.02), non-HDL-c (OR = 1.01; 95%CI: 1.00-1.02), and hs-CRP (OR = 2.42; 95%CI: 1.04-5.66) were independently associated with SO phenotype. Our findings indicate that increased glycemia, TC, Tg, LDL-c, VLDL-c, non-HDL-c, and decreased HDL-c may be indicators of the obesity phenotype and that increased hs-CRP, HOMA-IR, LDL-c, and non-HDL-c appear to be indicators of the SO phenotype. Those parameters may be used as additional markers for screening.


Subject(s)
Biomarkers , Blood Glucose , Body Composition , Lipids , Obesity , Phenotype , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Biomarkers/blood , Obesity/blood , Obesity/epidemiology , Prevalence , Young Adult , Blood Glucose/analysis , Lipids/blood , Absorptiometry, Photon , Sarcopenia/blood , Sarcopenia/epidemiology , Brazil/epidemiology , Body Mass Index , Inflammation/blood
18.
Environ Health Perspect ; 132(6): 67007, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38889167

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Overweight and obesity impose a considerable individual and social burden, and the urban environments might encompass factors that contribute to obesity. Nevertheless, there is a scarcity of research that takes into account the simultaneous interaction of multiple environmental factors. OBJECTIVES: Our objective was to perform an exposome-wide association study of body mass index (BMI) in a multicohort setting of 15 studies. METHODS: Studies were affiliated with the Dutch Geoscience and Health Cohort Consortium (GECCO), had different population sizes (688-141,825), and covered the entire Netherlands. Ten studies contained general population samples, others focused on specific populations including people with diabetes or impaired hearing. BMI was calculated from self-reported or measured height and weight. Associations with 69 residential neighborhood environmental factors (air pollution, noise, temperature, neighborhood socioeconomic and demographic factors, food environment, drivability, and walkability) were explored. Random forest (RF) regression addressed potential nonlinear and nonadditive associations. In the absence of formal methods for multimodel inference for RF, a rank aggregation-based meta-analytic strategy was used to summarize the results across the studies. RESULTS: Six exposures were associated with BMI: five indicating neighborhood economic or social environments (average home values, percentage of high-income residents, average income, livability score, share of single residents) and one indicating the physical activity environment (walkability in 5-km buffer area). Living in high-income neighborhoods and neighborhoods with higher livability scores was associated with lower BMI. Nonlinear associations were observed with neighborhood home values in all studies. Lower neighborhood home values were associated with higher BMI scores but only for values up to €300,000. The directions of associations were less consistent for walkability and share of single residents. DISCUSSION: Rank aggregation made it possible to flexibly combine the results from various studies, although between-study heterogeneity could not be estimated quantitatively based on RF models. Neighborhood social, economic, and physical environments had the strongest associations with BMI. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP13393.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Environmental Exposure , Exposome , Humans , Netherlands , Environmental Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Residence Characteristics/statistics & numerical data , Male , Female , Obesity/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Random Forest
19.
PLoS One ; 19(6): e0304776, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38870186

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Double burden of malnutrition (DBM) has been recognized by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as an emerging Global Syndemic characterized by the simultaneous occurrence of both undernutrition and overnutrition. Women of the reproductive age group (15 to 49 years) are disproportionately affected by DBM and are at high risk of continuing the intergenerational cycle of malnutrition. This study aims to assess the changing trends and determinants of DBM among women of the reproductive age group in India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used data from three rounds of National Family Health Surveys (NFHS-3,4,5) conducted in years 2005-06, 2015-16, and 2019-2021. Descriptive statistics and Poisson regression analysis were done using weights with log link function. RESULTS: The prevalence of anaemia, underweight and overweight/obesity was 57.2%, 18.6% and 24% respectively. The combined burden of underweight and anaemia has declined by 46% (21.6% to 11.7%), whereas the combined burden of overweight/obesity and anaemia has increased by 130% (5.4% to 12.4%) in the past 15 years. The prevalence of DBM, which includes both underweight and overweight/obesity with anaemia was 24.1% in 2021, a decline of 11% in 15 years. Women who were younger, rural, less educated, poor and middle class, and women living in the eastern, western and southern regions of India had higher risk for being underweight with anaemia and lower risk for developing overweight/obesity with anaemia. CONCLUSION: The significant decrease in underweight yet enormous increase in overweight/obesity over the past 15 years with the persistence of anaemia in both ends of the nutritional spectrum is characteristic of the new nutritional reality emphasizing the need to address malnutrition in all its forms. It is critical to consider geography and a population specific, double-duty targeted intervention to holistically address the risk factors associated with DBM and accomplish India's commitment to the global agenda of Sustainable Development Goals-2030.


Subject(s)
Anemia , Malnutrition , Thinness , Humans , Female , India/epidemiology , Adult , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Adolescent , Thinness/epidemiology , Young Adult , Prevalence , Anemia/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Overweight/epidemiology , Health Surveys , Risk Factors
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