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1.
Internet resource in English, Spanish, Portuguese | LIS -Health Information Locator | ID: lis-48229

ABSTRACT

Campanha mundial da OPAS sobre o Dia Mundial Sem Tabaco de 31 de maio de 2021 O tabaco mata mais de 8 milhões de pessoas por ano. Estudos científicos publicados este ano mostram que os fumantes têm maior risco de desenvolver doença grave e morte por COVID-19 do que não-fumantes. A pandemia de COVID-19 levou milhões de usuários de tabaco a quererem largar o cigarro. Veja mais informações acessando o site


Subject(s)
Smoking Prevention , Tobacco Use Cessation , Tobacco Use Disorder/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pandemics
2.
BMC Res Notes ; 14(1): 219, 2021 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34078443

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate sleep quality and psychological effects on pediatric healthcare workers during the first wave of COVID-19 epidemic in Italy and to evaluate differences between primary and secondary care operators. Pediatric healthcare workers were involved in an online survey to assess sleep quality, stress and anxiety level, self-efficacy and social support in Italian pediatric healthcare workers during COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: We found that 67.4% of our sample suffered from sleep disturbance and 19.4% of subjects suffered from anxiety. Lower values of anxiety and social support were found in primary care staff compared to secondary care one. The associations between healthcare professional figures (being primary or secondary care operators) and mental health outcomes were not statistically significant. However, sex, age and having a SARS-CoV-2 infected relative/friend had an independent effect on mental health outcomes. It is crucial to provide social and psychological support to pediatric healthcare workers. A tailored psychological screening would be desirable for female healthcare workers and for those who have a SARS-CoV-2 infected relative/friend.


Subject(s)
Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Sleep
3.
BMC Psychol ; 9(1): 90, 2021 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34078469

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The WHO has raised concerns about the psychological consequences of the current COVID-19 pandemic, negatively affecting health across societies, cultures and age-groups. METHODS: This online survey study investigated mental health, subjective experience, and behaviour (health, learning/teaching) among university students studying in Egypt or Germany shortly after the first pandemic lockdown in May 2020. Psychological assessment included stable personality traits, self-concept and state-like psychological variables related to (a) mental health (depression, anxiety), (b) pandemic threat perception (feelings during the pandemic, perceived difficulties in describing, identifying, expressing emotions), (c) health (e.g., worries about health, bodily symptoms) and behaviour including perceived difficulties in learning. Assessment methods comprised self-report questions, standardized psychological scales, psychological questionnaires, and linguistic self-report measures. Data analysis comprised descriptive analysis of mental health, linguistic analysis of self-concept, personality and feelings, as well as correlational analysis and machine learning. N = 220 (107 women, 112 men, 1 = other) studying in Egypt or Germany provided answers to all psychological questionnaires and survey items. RESULTS: Mean state and trait anxiety scores were significantly above the cut off scores that distinguish between high versus low anxious subjects. Depressive symptoms were reported by 51.82% of the student sample, the mean score was significantly above the screening cut off score for risk of depression. Worries about health (mental and physical health) and perceived difficulties in identifying feelings, and difficulties in learning behaviour relative to before the pandemic were also significant. No negative self-concept was found in the linguistic descriptions of the participants, whereas linguistic descriptions of feelings during the pandemic revealed a negativity bias in emotion perception. Machine learning (exploratory) predicted personality from the self-report data suggesting relations between personality and subjective experience that were not captured by descriptive or correlative data analytics alone. CONCLUSION: Despite small sample sizes, this multimethod survey provides important insight into mental health of university students studying in Egypt or Germany and how they perceived the first COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in May 2020. The results should be continued with larger samples to help develop psychological interventions that support university students across countries and cultures to stay psychologically resilient during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Diagnostic Self Evaluation , Egypt/epidemiology , Emotions , Female , Germany , Humans , Linguistics , Machine Learning , Male , Mental Health , Self Report , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities
4.
Nutrients ; 13(6)2021 May 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34064053

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had significant morbidity, mortality, social and financial implications for the global population. Despite this knowledge, we still know very little about how COVID-19 infection affects quality of life resulting from changes in nutritional behaviour and, conversely, how nutrition could modulate the epidemiology of COVID-19. In addition, the social isolation most have experienced due to the regulations imposed by governments during the COVID-19 pandemic may have also had effects on our nutritional behaviour. It is possible that nutritional interventions may have effects on the incidence of COVID-19 infection and mortality rates. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current status of research on the topic of nutrition as it relates to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
59585 , Feeding Behavior , Health Behavior , Nutritional Status , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quality of Life , 59565 , 59585/mortality , 59585/prevention & control , Humans
5.
Nutrients ; 13(5)2021 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34064715

ABSTRACT

Lockdowns to contain the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 have disrupted routines and behaviors, which could lead to a worsening of lifestyle and an increase in the burden of non-communicable diseases. This study aimed to describe the changes in physical activity, diet, alcohol drinking, and cigarette smoking during lockdown. A self-administered online survey addressing adults living in a province in northern Italy was advertised through websites and social media. Citizens could access the survey in anonymity from 4 May until 15 June 2020. A total of 1826 adults completed the survey, with a worsening of physical activity (35.1%), diet (17.6%), alcohol drinking (12.5%), and cigarette smoking (7.7%) reported. In contrast, 33.5% reported an improvement in diet, 12.6% in alcohol drinking, 5.3% in physical activity and 4.1% in cigarette smoking. Female sex, young adult age, suspension of work activity, and symptoms of psychological distress were the factors associated with a greater likelihood of change, which was frequently for the worse. Lockdown had an impact on lifestyle, with some net beneficial effects on diet and mostly negative effects on physical activity. Public health measures should be implemented to avoid long-term negative effects of the lockdown, supporting individuals more prone to change for the worse.


Subject(s)
Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology , 59585 , Cigarette Smoking/epidemiology , Exercise , Feeding Behavior , Pandemics , Quarantine , 59565 , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , 59585/epidemiology , 59585/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Public Health , Sex Factors
6.
Nutrients ; 13(5)2021 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34064833

ABSTRACT

As a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic-related restrictions, food systems have undergone unprecedented changes, with the potential to affect dietary behavior. We aimed to investigate workers' dietary changes resulting from the introduction of regulations to combat COVID-19 in a Japanese factory cafeteria. Objective data on daytime dietary intake were automatically collected from electronic purchase system records. The dataset included the weekly data of 890 men from 1 July 2019 to 30 September 2020. The cafeteria regulations came into effect on 10 April 2020; in this context, the purchase of dishes and estimated dietary intake were monitored. The number of cafeteria visits decreased slightly after the introduction of the regulations. The purchase of main and side dishes also decreased, but the purchase of grain dishes was less affected. When compared with summer 2019 (pre-pandemic, no regulations: 1 July to 29 September 2019), in summer 2020 (during the pandemic and with regulations: 29 June to 30 September 2020), the estimated mean grain, meat, fish, and total energy intake was stable; however, vegetable intake decreased by 11%. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, workplace cafeteria regulations need to be monitored to avoid unfavorable dietary changes in employees.


Subject(s)
59585/epidemiology , Consumer Behavior , Diet Records , Eating , Feeding Behavior , Pandemics , 59565 , Adult , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Male
7.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34064920

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to determine whether risk awareness of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) affects visits to national parks. We analyzed the tourist decision-making process during the current pandemic using the theory of planned behavior as a framework, adding variables relevant to the pandemic, such as risk perception and risk reduction behavior, to the model. Based on a literature review, we developed a research model describing the impact relationship between risk perception, the theory of planned behavior, and risk reduction behavior and tested nine hypotheses. Results of a survey of 555 visitors to two national parks supported eight of the nine hypotheses. Although the results are limited, they reaffirm the usefulness of the theory of planned behavior in explaining tourism behavior. This work is significant in that we would be able to extend the scope of subsequent research beyond a discussion of the direct effects on optimistic perceptions (bias) and risk reduction behavior as well as visit intention, by explaining the probability even in unprecedented crises such as COVID-19. Humans may be negotiating the constraints (COVID-19) or embodied tourism need through the personal bias. Furthermore, we discuss the theoretical implications of the results for tourism behavior research.


Subject(s)
59585 , Parks, Recreational , Humans , Intention , Pandemics , Risk , 59565
8.
Nutrients ; 13(5)2021 May 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34065154

ABSTRACT

Since the end of 2019, the world has been facing an unpredicted COVID-19 pandemic with consequences for the economy, environment, society, and health. The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the risk of death, bringing unbearable psychological pressure upon people worldwide. For celiac patients, the pandemic may represent an additional burden concerning the inherent aspects of celiac disease (CD) that compromise these individuals' quality of life (QoL). Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate Brazilian celiac patients' QoL during the course of the COVID-19 pandemic caused by its outbreak and rapid spread and subsequent restrictive measures in addition to the dietary restrictions and other burdens caused by CD. This country-wide cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered instrument previously validated in Brazilian-Portuguese to investigate the QoL of individuals with CD. Data collected through the online self-administration of the Brazilian version of the celiac disease quality of life questionnaire (CDQ) comprised 674 CD individuals' responses. Although pandemics have historically posed a challenge for Brazilian population, this period was not associated with a negative impact on Brazilian CD individuals' QoL. During the pandemic, the QoL of Brazilian's with CD was more affected by gastrointestinal aspects than emotions and social aspects and worries. Gender, age, marital status, having (or not) children, occupation, and a positive test for COVID-19 did not affect CD individuals' QoL. However, the study revealed a larger burden and diminished QoL for individuals not following a gluten-free diet and those using antidepressants. Additional research is necessary to verify how the length of the pandemic will affect celiac individuals and then compare those outcomes compare to the COVID-19 period and after.


Subject(s)
59585/epidemiology , Celiac Disease , Diet, Gluten-Free , Emotions , Pandemics , Quality of Life , 59565 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Adult , Brazil/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male
9.
Nutrients ; 13(5)2021 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34065655

ABSTRACT

During the so-called "second wave of the pandemic" in Europe, the authors conducted a cross-sectional online survey that aimed to examine changes in dietary habits and associated practices, as well as physical activity during the COVID-19 pandemic and before the onset of lockdowns in three European countries: Poland, Austria and the United Kingdom. METHODS: The online observational study, both prospective and retrospective, conducted with the use of social media for the distribution of an anonymous online questionnaire, was completed from 1 October to 30 October 2020, during the second wave of the pandemic in Europe. The study encompassed a total of 1071 adults from Poland (n = 407), Austria (n = 353) and the United Kingdom (n = 311). RESULTS: The results of this study indicate that the COVID-19 confinement period influenced eating behavior and the level of physical activity in a group of adult residents of Poland, Austria and the United Kingdom. The general shopping frequency decreased, regardless of the place and manner. However, there was an increased interest in online grocery shopping. The resulting data revealed an increased frequency of the daily consumption of food products such as dairy, grains, fats, vegetables and sweets (p < 0.05). A rise in the frequency of purchasing frozen goods and food with long shelf life has also been observed. The changed workplace and working conditions or unemployment probably affected a perceptible rise in alcohol consumption (p = 0.02). In turn, physical activity levels markedly decreased, which reflected the body mass changes. CONCLUSION: The dietary habits in the studied countries have changed as a result of the pandemic situation. They contribute to the aggravation of the problem of excess body weight and its health consequences.


Subject(s)
59585/epidemiology , Feeding Behavior , Health Behavior , Pandemics , 59565 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cross-Sectional Studies , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
10.
Nutrients ; 13(5)2021 May 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34065864

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 (Coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic is posing a threat to communities and healthcare systems worldwide. Malnutrition, in all its forms, may negatively impact the susceptibility and severity of SARS-CoV-2 (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) infection in both children and older adults. Both undernutrition and obesity have been evoked as conditions associated with a higher susceptibility to the infection and poor prognosis. In turn, the COVID-19 infection may worsen the nutritional status through highly catabolic conditions, exposing individuals to the risk of malnutrition, muscle wasting, and nutritional deficiencies. Accordingly, the relationship between malnutrition and COVID-19 is likely to be bidirectional. Furthermore, the modification of nutritional behaviors and physical activity, required to limit the spread of the virus, are posing a challenge to health at both the extremes of life. Thus far, even the most advanced healthcare systems have failed to address the alarming consequences of malnutrition posed by this pandemic. If not properly addressed, we may run the risk that new and old generations will experience the consequences of COVID-19 related malnutrition.


Subject(s)
59585/epidemiology , 59570 , Malnutrition , Nutritional Status , Pandemics , 59565 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Malnutrition/prevention & control , Middle Aged
11.
Cells ; 10(5)2021 05 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34066434

ABSTRACT

Viral pathogens often exploit host cell regulatory and signaling pathways to ensure an optimal environment for growth and survival. Several studies have suggested that 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an intracellular serine/threonine kinase, plays a significant role in the modulation of infection. Traditionally, AMPK is a key energy regulator of cell growth and proliferation, host autophagy, stress responses, metabolic reprogramming, mitochondrial homeostasis, fatty acid ß-oxidation and host immune function. In this review, we highlight the modulation of host AMPK by various viruses under physiological conditions. These intracellular pathogens trigger metabolic changes altering AMPK signaling activity that then facilitates or inhibits viral replication. Considering the COVID-19 pandemic, understanding the regulation of AMPK signaling following infection can shed light on the development of more effective therapeutic strategies against viral infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
AMP-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Signal Transduction/immunology , Virus Diseases/immunology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Autophagy/drug effects , Autophagy/immunology , 59585/drug therapy , 59585/epidemiology , 59585/immunology , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Drug Development , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , 59565/immunology , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Virus Replication/drug effects , Virus Replication/immunology
12.
Cells ; 10(5)2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34067054

ABSTRACT

The flavonoid naringenin (Nar), present in citrus fruits and tomatoes, has been identified as a blocker of an emerging class of human intracellular channels, namely the two-pore channel (TPC) family, whose role has been established in several diseases. Indeed, Nar was shown to be effective against neoangiogenesis, a process essential for solid tumor progression, by specifically impairing TPC activity. The goal of the present review is to illustrate the rationale that links TPC channels to the mechanism of coronavirus infection, and how their inhibition by Nar could be an efficient pharmacological strategy to fight the current pandemic plague COVID-19.


Subject(s)
59585/drug therapy , Calcium Channel Blockers/pharmacology , Calcium Channels/metabolism , Flavanones/pharmacology , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Arabidopsis/metabolism , 59585/epidemiology , 59585/pathology , 59585/virology , Calcium Channel Blockers/therapeutic use , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical , Endosomes/drug effects , Endosomes/metabolism , Endosomes/virology , Flavanones/therapeutic use , Humans , Lysosomes/drug effects , Lysosomes/metabolism , Lysosomes/virology , Neoplasms/blood supply , Neoplasms/pathology , Neovascularization, Pathologic/drug therapy , Neovascularization, Pathologic/pathology , Pandemics/prevention & control , 59565/pathogenicity , Vacuoles/metabolism , Virus Internalization/drug effects
13.
Nutrients ; 13(5)2021 May 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34068354

ABSTRACT

Lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic imposed changes in children's daily routine that could lead to changes in behavior patterns. Using a survey targeted at children under 17 years of age, we described dietary (adherence to Mediterranean diet, AMD) and sleeping habits (disorders of initiating and maintaining sleep) after the implementation of lockdown, and examined the probability of the inadequate frequency of physical activity (PA) and use of TV and electronic devices (TV-ED) before and after lockdown through generalized estimating equation models, accounting for age and gender differences. From 3464 children included, 53.2% showed optimal AMD; 79.2% referred to delayed bedtime; and 16.3% were suspected of sleeping disorders after the implementation of lockdown. Delay in bedtime was more frequent among children older than 6 years, and inadequate sleeping hours among those younger than 11 years. There were no gender differences in AMD or sleeping habits. The odds of inadequate frequency of PA and TV-ED use were greater after lockdown, with a greater risk for TV-ED use. Boys were at greater risk of inadequate PA frequency and TV-ED use. Odds ratio of inadequate PA was greater at older ages. Lockdown could influence changes in children's habits that could lead to risk factors for non-communicable diseases during adulthood if such behaviors are sustained over time.


Subject(s)
59585/epidemiology , Child Health , Habits , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology , 59565 , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Exercise , Female , Humans , Male , Spain/epidemiology
14.
Curr Oncol ; 28(3): 1867-1878, 2021 05 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34068441

ABSTRACT

Cancer causes substantial emotional and psychosocial distress, which may be exacerbated by delays in treatment. The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in increased wait times for many patients with cancer. In this study, the psychosocial distress associated with waiting for cancer surgery during the pandemic was investigated. This cross-sectional, convergent mixed-methods study included patients with lower priority disease during the first wave of COVID-19 at an academic, tertiary care hospital in eastern Canada. Participants underwent semi-structured interviews and completed two questionnaires: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Qualitative analysis was completed through a thematic analysis approach, with integration achieved through triangulation. Fourteen participants were recruited, with cancer sites including thyroid, kidney, breast, prostate, and a gynecological disorder. Increased anxiety symptoms were found in 36% of patients and depressive symptoms in 14%. Similarly, 64% of patients experienced moderate or high stress. Six key themes were identified, including uncertainty, life changes, coping strategies, communication, experience, and health services. Participants discussed substantial distress associated with lifestyle changes and uncertain treatment timelines. Participants identified quality communication with their healthcare team and individualized coping strategies as being partially protective against such symptoms. Delays in surgery for patients with cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in extensive psychosocial distress. Patients may be able to mitigate these symptoms partially through various coping mechanisms and improved communication with their healthcare teams.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , 59585/prevention & control , Depression/epidemiology , Neoplasms/surgery , Time-to-Treatment , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , 59585/epidemiology , 59585/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/standards , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/psychology , Nova Scotia/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Psychological Distress , Psychometrics/statistics & numerical data , Qualitative Research , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Triage/standards , Uncertainty
15.
Nutrients ; 13(5)2021 May 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34068446

ABSTRACT

We hypothesised that the higher levels of emotion-related predictors (eating motive in the form of affect regulation and COVID-19-related stress) would be associated with higher emotional overeating, after accounting for the effects of demographic variables (gender and BMI) and other eating motives (visual- and attitude-related predictors: liking, pleasure, visual appeal; body- and health-related predictors: need and hunger, health, weight control). Participants (N = 868; Mage = 33.53 years, SD = 11.98) completed: the Eating Motivation Survey, the Emotional Overeating Questionnaire, a COVID-19-related stress measure and a socio-demographic survey. The final step of the regression with emotional overeating was significant; affect regulation and COVID-19-related stress were significantly related to emotional overeating (ΔF p < 0.001, Adj. ΔR2 = 0.13). During the COVID-19 pandemic, eating can, on the one hand, help to cope with the current difficult situation and the negative emotions associated with it; on the other hand, frequent use of this tendency can lead to rigid regulation of affect and use of this mechanism as the dominant mechanism. Therefore, limited social contact, related disruptions in daily activities and stress resulting from COVID-19 should generate appropriate interventions, not necessarily focusing only on emotional eating, but also on the resources of the individual. It is worth encouraging specialists to implement alternative methods of contact with their patients, e.g., online.


Subject(s)
59585/epidemiology , Feeding Behavior , Hyperphagia/epidemiology , Pandemics , 59565 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Poland/epidemiology , Risk Factors
16.
Nutrients ; 13(5)2021 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34068876

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is known to influence the dietary habits of adults, but results for adolescents in studies are ambiguous. The present work aimed to analyze the differences in the scores of the Adolescents' Food Habits Checklist (AFHC) before and during the pandemic in the Polish Adolescents' COVID-19 Experience (PLACE-19) Study population. The PLACE-19 Study was conducted during the pandemic among a population of 2448 students recruited from secondary schools in all regions of Poland using a random quota sampling. The participants were required to complete an AFHC consisting of 23 items pertaining to food purchase, preparation, and consumption habits. Current habits (during the pandemic) and previous habits were assessed and scored separately. The total (p = 0.001), purchase (p < 0.001), and consumption scores (p = 0.014) indicated that the AFHC scores during the pandemic were higher than before. For questions on purchase habits, a lower number of respondents reported eating in a restaurant, eating takeaway meals, having lunch away from home, or buying pastries, cakes or crisps. For questions on preparation habits, an greater number of respondents reported that they usually avoided eating fried food and tried to keep their overall sugar intake down, but fewer respondents said they tried to have low-fat desserts. For questions on consumption habits, a lower number of respondents reported that they usually ate a dessert or pudding if one were available and a larger number said they made sure to eat at least one serving of vegetables or salad a day and at least three servings of fruit most days. Based on the obtained results, it may be stated that although there was an increase in the AFHC scores during the pandemic, a similar share of respondents showed improved or worsened food habits, and a similar share changed their food habits from healthy to unhealthy and from unhealthy to healthy. At the same time, a majority of changes were associated with purchase habits, which were probably forced by lockdowns and the resultant restrictions in eating out or grocery shopping.


Subject(s)
59585/epidemiology , Checklist , Feeding Behavior , Pandemics , 59565 , Adolescent , Female , Humans , Male , Poland/epidemiology
17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34071610

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study examined the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting decrease in the incidence of various categories of injuries, with the main focus on fractures and mild traumatic brain injuries in a paediatric population. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study evaluated all children from 0 to 18 years of age presenting with an injury at the level 1 trauma centre of the University Clinic of Orthopaedics and Trauma Surgery in Vienna during the lockdown from 16 March to 29 May 2020 compared to records over the same timeframe from 2015 to 2019. RESULTS: In total, 14,707 patients with injuries were included. The lockdown did not lead to a significant decrease in fractures but, instead, yielded a highly significant increase in mild traumatic brain injuries when compared to all injuries that occurred (p = 0.082 and p = 0.0001) as well as acute injuries (excluding contusions, distortions and miscellaneous non-acute injuries) (p = 0.309 and p = 0.034). CONCLUSIONS: The percentage of paediatric fractures did not decrease at the level 1 trauma centre, and a highly significant proportional increase in paediatric patients with mild traumatic brain injuries was observed during the COVID-19 lockdown. Therefore, medical resources should be maintained to treat paediatric trauma patients and provide neurological monitoring during pandemic lockdowns.


Subject(s)
59585 , Trauma Centers , Wounds and Injuries , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Europe , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , 59565
18.
Curr Oncol ; 28(3): 2007-2013, 2021 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34073214

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 situation is a worldwide health emergency with strong implications in clinical oncology. In this viewpoint, we address two crucial dilemmas from the ethical dimension: (1) Is it ethical to postpone or suspend cancer treatments which offer a statistically significant benefit in quality of life and survival in cancer patients during this time of pandemic?; (2) Should we vaccinate cancer patients against COVID-19 if scientific studies have not included this subgroup of patients? Regarding the first question, the best available evidence applied to the ethical principles of Beauchamp and Childress shows that treatments (such as chemotherapy) with clinical benefit are fair and beneficial. Indeed, the suspension or delay of such treatments should be considered malefic. Regarding the second question, applying the doctrine of double-effect, we show that the potential beneficial effect of vaccines in the population with cancer (or those one that has had cancer) is much higher than the potential adverse effects of these vaccines. In addition, there is no better and less harmful known solution.


Subject(s)
59585/prevention & control , Clinical Decision-Making/ethics , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Patient Selection/ethics , Time-to-Treatment/ethics , Antineoplastic Agents/administration & dosage , 59585/epidemiology , 59585/immunology , 59585/virology , 59530/administration & dosage , 59530/adverse effects , Humans , Medical Oncology/ethics , Neoplasms/immunology , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quality of Life , Risk Factors , 59565/immunology , Time Factors , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccination/ethics
19.
J Orthop Surg Res ; 16(1): 356, 2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34074300

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has had a massive impact on individuals globally. The Chinese government has formulated effective response measures, and medical personnel have been actively responding to challenges associated with the epidemic prevention and control strategies. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the implementation of a care transition pathway on patients that underwent joint replacement during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A quasi-experimental study was designed to evaluate the effect of implementing a care transition pathway for patients who underwent joint replacement during the COVID-19 pandemic in the orthopedic department of a tertiary care hospital in Beijing, China. Using a convenient sampling method, a total of 96 patients were selected. Of these, 51 patients who had undergone joint replacement in 2019 and received treatment via the routine nursing path were included in the control group. The remaining 45 patients who underwent joint replacement during the COVID-19 epidemic in 2020 and received therapy via the care transition pathway due to the implementation of epidemic prevention and control measures were included in the observation group. The quality of care transition was assessed by the Care Transition Measure (CTM), and patients were followed up 1 week after discharge. RESULTS: The observation group was determined to have better general self-care preparation, written planning materials, doctor-patient communication, health monitoring, and quality of care transition than the control group. CONCLUSIONS: A care transition pathway was developed to provide patients with care while transitioning through periods of treatment. It improved the patient perceptions of nursing quality. The COVID-19 pandemic is a huge challenge for health professionals, but we have the ability to improve features of workflows to provide the best possible patient care.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement/trends , 59585/epidemiology , Non-Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/trends , Orthopedic Procedures/trends , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Transitional Care/trends , Aged , Arthroplasty, Replacement/methods , Arthroplasty, Replacement/rehabilitation , Beijing/epidemiology , 59585/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Non-Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/methods , Orthopedic Procedures/rehabilitation , Pandemics , Treatment Outcome
20.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 11485, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34075094

ABSTRACT

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, it has been mandated to keep enlarged distances from others. We interviewed 136 German subjects over five weeks from the end of March to the end of April 2020 during the first wave of infections about their preferred interpersonal distance (IPD) before, during, and after the COVID-19 pandemic. In response to the pandemic, subjects adapted to distance requirements and preferred a larger IPD. This enlarged IPD was judged to partially persist after the pandemic crisis. People anticipated keeping more IPD to others even if there was no longer any risk of a SARS-CoV-2 infection. We also sampled two follow-up measurements, one in August, after the first wave of infections had been flattened, and one in October 2020, at the beginning of the second wave. Here, we observed that IPD varied with the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 within Germany. Overall, our data indicated that adaptation to distance requirements might happen asymmetrically. Preferred IPD rapidly adapted in response to distance requirements, but an enlargement of IPD may partially linger after the COVID-19 pandemic-crisis. We discuss our findings in light of proxemic theory and as an indicator for socio-cultural adaptation beyond the course of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , 59585/psychology , 59487 , Social Isolation/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Bayes Theorem , 59585/epidemiology , 59585/prevention & control , 59585/transmission , Fear , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Male , Models, Psychological , Pandemics/prevention & control , Social Stigma , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Time Factors , Young Adult
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