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1.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 95(5): 447-455, 2024 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38489493

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pregnant and postpartum women in Sub-Saharan Africa are at high risk of HIV acquisition. We evaluated a person-centered dynamic choice intervention for HIV prevention (DCP) among women attending antenatal and postnatal care. SETTING: Rural Kenya and Uganda. METHODS: Women (aged 15 years or older) at risk of HIV acquisition seen at antenatal and postnatal care clinics were individually randomized to DCP vs. standard of care (SEARCH; NCT04810650). The DCP intervention included structured client choice of product (daily oral pre-exposure prophylaxis or postexposure prophylaxis), service location (clinic or out of facility), and HIV testing modality (self-test or provider-administered), with option to switch over time and person-centered care (phone access to clinician, structured barrier assessment and counseling, and provider training). The primary outcome was biomedical prevention coverage-proportion of 48-week follow-up with self-reported pre-exposure prophylaxis or postexposure prophylaxis use, compared between arms using targeted maximum likelihood estimation. RESULTS: Between April and July 2021, we enrolled 400 women (203 intervention and 197 control); 38% were pregnant, 52% were aged 15-24 years, and 94% reported no pre-exposure prophylaxis or postexposure prophylaxis use for ≥6 months before baseline. Among 384/400 participants (96%) with outcome ascertained, DCP increased biomedical prevention coverage 40% (95% CI: 34% to 47%; P < 0.001); the coverage was 70% in intervention vs. 29% in control. DCP also increased coverage during months at risk of HIV (81% in intervention, 43% in control; 38% absolute increase; 95% CI: 31% to 45%; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: A person-centered dynamic choice intervention that provided flexibility in product, testing, and service location more than doubled biomedical HIV prevention coverage in a high-risk population already routinely offered access to biomedical prevention options.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Kenya/epidemiology , Postnatal Care , Postpartum Period , Uganda/epidemiology , Adolescent , Young Adult
2.
BMC Pediatr ; 24(1): 187, 2024 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38493088

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Preterm birth (birth before 37 completed weeks of pregnancy) is the leading cause of neonatal and child under-five mortality globally, both of which are highest regionally in sub-Saharan Africa. The skin barrier plays a critical role in neonatal health and increasing evidence supports the use of topical emollient therapy to promote postnatal growth and reduce hospital-acquired infections in preterm infants. The World Health Organization (WHO) currently recommends emollient therapy in preterm or low birthweight infants globally but calls for further research on impacts of emollient use, especially in Africa. Little is known about postnatal skincare practices and the tradition of oil massage across sub-Saharan Africa. Further documentation is necessary to understand the context for future emollient intervention trials. METHODS: 61 semi-structured interviews with mothers who just delivered preterm or term infants and 4 focus group discussions (32 participants) with physician and nurse providers of newborn care were conducted at Sally Mugabe Central Hospital (SMCH), in Harare, Zimbabwe. SMCH is the principal public-sector tertiary care hospital for newborn infants in the northern part of the country. Mothers and healthcare professionals were questioned about newborn care at the hospital, current neonatal skincare and bathing practices, and the community's receptivity to a future emollient therapy clinical trial. RESULTS: Postnatal skincare is centrally important to Zimbabwean communities and petroleum jelly application is nearly universal. The use of cooking oil and other natural oils on infants is also part of traditional customs. The primary needs and desires of mothers who have just given birth to preterm infants are having greater agency in their children's care and financial support in purchasing prescribed medications while at the hospital. Community receptivity to emollient therapy as a cost-effective treatment is high, particularly if mothers are trained to assist with the intervention. CONCLUSION: Emollient therapy will likely be well-received by communities in and around Harare because of its accordance with current skincare practices and perceptions; however, cultural norms and the experiences of new mothers who have given birth at a facility highlight challenges and considerations for future clinical trial execution. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT05461404.


Subject(s)
Infant, Premature , Premature Birth , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Emollients/therapeutic use , Infant, Very Low Birth Weight , Postnatal Care , Zimbabwe
3.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38541358

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Bangladesh has achieved remarkable progress in reducing maternal mortality, yet postpartum deaths remain a significant issue. Emphasis on quality postnatal care (qPNC) is crucial, as increased coverage alone has not sufficiently reduced maternal morbidity and mortality. METHODS: This study included data from the Bangladesh Maternal Mortality Survey of 32,106 mothers who delivered within three years prior to the survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report coverage and components of postnatal care stratified by covariates. Log-linear regression models were used to assess the determinants of quality postnatal care among facility and home births. RESULTS: From 2010 to 2016, postnatal care coverage within 48 h of delivery by a qualified provider rose from 23% to 47%. Of the births, 94% were facility births that received timely PNC, contrasted with only 6% for home births. Despite the increased coverage, quality of care remained as low as 1% for home births and 13% for facility births. Key factors affecting qPNC utilization included socio-demographic factors, pregnancy complications, type of birth attendant, delivery method, and financial readiness. CONCLUSION: Importantly, deliveries assisted by skilled birth attendants correlated with higher quality postnatal care. This study reveals a significant gap between the coverage and quality of postnatal care in rural Bangladesh, especially for home births. It underscores the need for targeted interventions to enhance qPNC.


Subject(s)
Home Childbirth , Maternal Health Services , Pregnancy Complications , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Postnatal Care , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Mothers
4.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 24(1): 316, 2024 Mar 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38459509

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Aligning delivery and financing systems across sectors to create broader systems of care can improve the health and well-being of families experiencing adversities. We aimed to identify structural and relational factors for best practices to achieve successful cross-sector collaboration among home visiting programs in the United States. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used a multiple case study approach to identify best practices for successful cross-sector collaboration between home visitors and other community service providers. We selected five diverse exemplary cases with cross-sector collaboration with variation in implementing agency type and geographic location. Cases were selected using a positive deviance approach based on strong coordination and integration with different community service provider types identified from previous survey data. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with home visiting staff, community providers, and clients with a total of 76 interviews conducted from 2021 to 2022. We wrote memos to synthesize themes within each case through data triangulation using interview data, documents, and site visit observations. We compared themes across the five cases to create a cross-case synthesis of best practices for successful cross-sector collaboration. RESULTS: Across the five cases, relational factors including leadership from all levels, champions across sectors, and shared goals between community providers were key factors for successful collaboration. Interpersonal relationships, coupled with the desire and capacity to engage, facilitated effective coordination to address families' needs. At the structural level, shared data systems, written agreements, and co-location enabled care coordination activities. Community Advisory Boards provided a venue for developing partnerships, relationship-building, resource-sharing, and increasing awareness of home visiting. CONCLUSIONS: We identified key elements of successful cross-sector collaboration across five case studies where home visitors coordinate care frequently and/or are structurally integrated with a range of providers. These learnings will inform future interventions to improve home visiting collaboration with other community providers to create a system of care to enhance family well-being.


Subject(s)
Postnatal Care , Social Welfare , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , United States , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
BMJ Glob Health ; 8(Suppl 2)2024 02 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38351019

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Uptake of postnatal care (PNC) is low and inequitable in many countries, and immigrant women may experience additional challenges to access and effective use. As part of a larger study examining the views of women, partners, and families on routine PNC, we analysed a subset of data on the specific experiences of immigrant women and families. METHODS: This is a subanalysis of a larger qualitative evidence synthesis. We searched MEDLINE, PUBMED, CINAHL, EMBASE, EBM-Reviews and grey literature for studies published until December 2019 with extractable qualitative data with no language restrictions. For this analysis, we focused on papers related to immigrant women and families. Two reviewers screened each study independently; inclusion was agreed by consensus. Data abstraction and quality assessment were carried out using a study-specific extraction form and established quality assessment tools. Study findings were identified using thematic analysis. Findings are presented by confidence in the finding, applying the GRADE-CERQual approach. FINDINGS: We included 44 papers, out of 602 full-texts, representing 11 countries where women and families sought PNC after immigrating. All but one included immigrants to high-income countries. Four themes were identified: resources and access, differences from home country, support needs, and experiences of care. High confidence study findings included: language and communication challenges; uncertainty about navigating system supports including transportation; high mental health, emotional, and informational needs; the impact of personal resources and social support; and the quality of interaction with healthcare providers. These findings highlight the importance of care experiences beyond clinical care. More research is also needed on the experiences of families migrating between low-income countries. CONCLUSIONS: Immigrant families experience many challenges in getting routine PNC, especially related to language, culture, and communication. Some challenges may be mitigated by improving comprehensive and accessible information on available services, as well as holistic social support. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42019139183.


Subject(s)
Emigrants and Immigrants , Postnatal Care , Pregnancy , Humans , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Social Support , Health Personnel
6.
Midwifery ; 131: 103948, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38335692

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We sought to explore and describe midwives' attitudes and practices relating to their provision of postpartum contraception counselling. DESIGN: We used an exploratory cross-sectional design. Recruitment used an anonymous online survey using electronic communication platforms of professional, and special-interest organisations, over six months . Descriptive and quantitative analysis was used. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Australian Midwives who provide postpartum care. MEANING AND FINDINGS: A total of 289 complete responses were included. Findings from this national survey of midwives showed that almost 75% of Australian midwives reported providing some contraceptive advice to women. Those working in continuity of care models were significantly more likely to fulfil this responsibility. More than half (67%) indicated they had not received any formal contraception education or training. Those working in private obstetric-led settings were significantly less likely to have received education compared to midwives in community settings. Systems barriers preventing the provision of contraceptive counselling included: clinical workload; lack of management support; lack of education; and models of care. KEY CONCLUSIONS: Most midwives (82%) wanted to provide postpartum contraception counselling as part of their role. They cited barriers from within the health system, ambiguity about roles and responsibilities and offered solutions to improve the provision of postnatal contraception counselling. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Recommendations include the development of education programs for midwives. Continuity of care models provided the time, autonomy and opportunity for midwives to undertake contraceptive counselling and fulfil this part of their professional scope. Consideration should be given to expanding access and provision of continuity of midwifery care. An urgent investment in the education and skills of midwives is recommended to ensure all women across acute and community services benefit from improved outcomes associated with pregnancy spacing.


Subject(s)
Midwifery , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Postnatal Care , Australia , Contraceptive Agents , Counseling
7.
BMJ Open ; 14(2): e070798, 2024 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38326267

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of an integrated intervention package compared with routine government health services on the frequency of health facility births. SETTING: Three subcounties of Lira district in Northern Uganda. DESIGN: A cluster randomised controlled trial where a total of 30 clusters were randomised in a ratio of 1:1 to intervention or standard of care. PARTICIPANTS: Pregnant women at ≥28 weeks of gestation. INTERVENTIONS: Participants in the intervention arm received an integrated intervention package of peer support, mobile phone messaging and birthing kits during pregnancy while those in the control arm received routine government health services ('standard of care'). PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was the proportion of women giving birth at a health facility in the intervention arm compared with the control arm. Secondary outcomes were perinatal and neonatal deaths. RESULTS: In 2018-2019, 995 pregnant women were included in 15 intervention clusters and 882 in 15 control clusters. The primary outcome was ascertained for all except one participant who died before childbirth. In the intervention arm, 754/994 participants (76%) gave birth at a health facility compared with 500/882 (57%) in the control arm. Participants in the intervention arm were 35% more likely to give birth at a health facility compared with participants in the control arm, (risk ratio 1.35 (95% CI 1.20 to 1.51)) and (risk difference 0.20 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.27)). Adjusting for baseline differences generated similar results. There was no difference in secondary outcomes (perinatal or neonatal mortality or number of postnatal visits) between arms. CONCLUSION: The intervention was successful in increasing the proportion of facility-based births but did not reduce perinatal or neonatal mortality. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02605369.


Subject(s)
Infant Mortality , Parturition , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Humans , Female , Uganda , Postnatal Care , Health Facilities
8.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 24(1): 121, 2024 Feb 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38336632

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is no single national guideline in Australia on the provision of postnatal care, which means there is potential for significant variation in the standard and quality of care. This review aimed to systematically identify, synthesise, and assess the quality of postnatal care guidelines produced for use in Australia. A second aim was to compare postnatal care recommendations in Australian guidelines to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence's (NICE) and the World Health Organization's (WHO) postnatal care recommendations, to identify gaps and areas of disagreement. We focussed on recommendations regarding postnatal assessment of the woman or newborn, infant feeding, discharge planning, or community-based care. METHODS: A scoping review was undertaken informed by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for scoping reviews. A database search and a manual search of state and national government health departments, professional associations and research institute websites was performed to identify relevant guidelines and recommendations. Guideline quality was assessed using the AGREE II tool. Guideline recommendations from Australia were mapped to 67 NICE/WHO recommendations. Recommendations that partially agreed, were modified, or in disagreement underwent further analysis. RESULTS: A total of 31 Australian postnatal guidelines were identified and overall, these were of moderate- to high-quality. Of the 67 NICE/WHO recommendations, most agreed with the recommendations contained in Australian guidelines. There were five NICE/WHO recommendations with which corresponding Australian recommendations disagreed. There were 12 NICE/WHO recommendations that were commonly modified within Australia's guidelines. There were three NICE/WHO recommendations that did not appear in any Australian guideline. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations from postnatal guidelines in Australia have a high level of agreement with corresponding NICE/WHO recommendations. The few disagreements and modifications found in guideline recommendations - both across Australia's guidelines and between Australia's and the NICE/WHO guidelines - are worrying and warrant further examination, as they may result in different standards of care across Australia. Identified gaps in guidance should be prioritised for inclusion in new or updated guidelines where appropriate.


Subject(s)
Postnatal Care , Infant, Newborn , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Australia
9.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 24(1): 185, 2024 Feb 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38336733

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Over time, Uganda has experienced high levels of maternal mortality (435 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2006 to 336 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2016). The persistence of high levels of maternal mortality jeopardizes the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 3.1, which calls for reducing maternal mortality to 70 deaths per 100,000 live births by 2030. Conversely, the utilization of postnatal care (PNC) services in Uganda remained very low and has varied across regions. This study examined the individual and community-level factors influencing women's utilization of postnatal care services in Uganda. METHODS: Secondary data from the 2016 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey (UDHS) were used in this study. The study population consisted of women aged 15 to 49 who reported giving birth in the five years preceding the 2016 UDHS survey. The factors associated with postnatal care services were identified using multilevel binary logistic regression and spatial analysis. RESULTS: The result shows that the prevalence of postnatal care service utilization in Uganda was low (58.3%) compared to the World Health Organization (WHO) target of 100%. The univariate analysis shows that 13.7% of women were adolescents, 79% were of higher parity, and 70.4% had primary/no formal education, of which 76.6% resided in rural areas. On the other hand, the multilevel analysis results showed that women aged 20-29 years and 30-39 years were also found to be more likely to use PNC services (AOR = 1.2, 95% CI: 1.01-1.47). Women who received quality ANC (AOR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.78-2.36) were more likely to use postnatal care services than their counterparts. At the community level, women who lived in media-saturated communities were more likely to use postnatal care services (AOR = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.01-1.65). The spatial analysis found that the Central, Eastern, and Northern regions were the areas of hotspots in the utilization of postnatal care services. CONCLUSION: This study found that age, parity, level of education, place of residence, employment status, quality of the content of antenatal care, and community media saturation were the predictors of postnatal care service utilization. The spatial analysis showed that the spatial distributions of postnatal care service utilization were significantly varied across Uganda. The government must expand access to various forms of media throughout the country to increase PNC utilization.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health Services , Postnatal Care , Adolescent , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Uganda/epidemiology , Prenatal Care , Educational Status , Multilevel Analysis , Spatial Analysis , Patient Acceptance of Health Care
10.
J Health Popul Nutr ; 43(1): 26, 2024 Feb 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38355683

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Postnatal care is care that is provided to mothers and newborn baby after delivery. The care given after childbirth is the most critical time because most maternal and neonatal mortality occurs during this period. Utilization of this service is low in Ethiopia, and no evidence exists to describe the status of early postnatal care service utilization among women in the study area. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the utilization of early postnatal care services and associated factors among mothers who gave birth in the last 12 months in the South Gondar Zone District, Amhara Region, Ethiopia, in 2021. METHOD: This study was conducted in South Gondar Zone Districts from October 1 to 30, 2021. A total of 761 participants were included in this study using a simple random sampling method. The study participants were mothers who gave birth in the last 12 months. The data were collected via interview-guided semistructured questionnaires. The collected data were coded and entered into EPI Info version 7.2 and exported into SPSS version 23 for analysis. Both binary and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to identify factors affecting the outcome variables. The results of the final model are presented as the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). A P value less than 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. RESULTS: In this study, 761 mothers participated, for a response rate of 100%. The overall prevalence of early utilization of postnatal care services was 20.6%. Mothers who live in urban areas were five times more likely to have early visits than those living in rural areas with adjusted odds ratio [AOR (95% CI) = 5.2 (3.19, 8.54)], a mothers who had a history of more than four parity had more likely to visit than the others at [AOR (95% CI) = 2.25 (1.18, 4.29)], mothers who had a history of pregnancy had two times more likely to visit than the other [AOR (95% CI) = 2.06 (1.05, 4.05)], and mothers who had delivered by instrumental vaginal delivery or cesarean section delivery and those mothers who had mass media exposure were two and five times more likely to visit, respectively [AOR (95% CI) = 2.62 (1.40, 4.91)] and [AOR (95% CI) = 5.18 (2.55, 10.52)]. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATION: Compared with those of other studies, the overall prevalence of early utilization of postnatal care services was low. Improving mothers' knowledge of early postnatal care visits is very important for enhancing quality of life and minimizing neonatal and maternal morbidity and mortality.


Subject(s)
Cesarean Section , Postnatal Care , Infant, Newborn , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Mothers , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Obstet Gynecol Surv ; 79(2): 105-121, 2024 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38377454

ABSTRACT

Importance: Postnatal care refers to the ongoing health care provision of both the mother and her offspring and contributes to the timely identification and effective management of complications in the postpartum period, to secure maternal and infant short- and long-term well-being. Objective: The aim of this study was to review and compare the most recently published influential guidelines on postnatal care practices. Evidence Acquisition: A comparative review of guidelines from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the World Health Organization, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and the Public Health Agency of Canada regarding postnatal care was conducted. Results: There is a consensus among the reviewed guidelines regarding the importance of health care provision in the postpartum period, including home visits and midwifery services, the use of telemedicine for the facilitation of communication with the patient, and the appropriate preparation for discharge, as well as the discharge criteria. All medical societies also agree on the clinical aspects that should be evaluated at each postnatal visit, although discrepancies exist with regard to the contact schedule. In addition, there is consistency regarding the management of postpartum infections, perineal pain, fecal and urinary incontinence, and physical activity guidance. Mental health issues should be addressed at each postnatal visit, according to all guidelines, but there is disagreement regarding routine screening for depression. As for the optimal interpregnancy interval, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends avoiding pregnancy for at least 6 months postpartum, whereas the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommends a 12-month interval. There is no common pathway regarding the recommended contraceptive methods, the nutrition guidance, and the postpartum management of pregnancy complications. Of note, the World Health Organization alone provides recommendations concerning the prevention of specific infections during the postnatal period. Conclusions: Postnatal care remains a relatively underserved aspect of maternity care, although the puerperium is a critical period for the establishment of motherhood and the transition to primary care. Thus, the development of consistent international protocols for the optimal care and support of women during the postnatal period seems of insurmountable importance to safely guide clinical practice and subsequently reduce maternal and neonatal morbidity.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health Services , Obstetrics , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Postnatal Care/methods , Postpartum Period , Contraception/methods
12.
PLoS One ; 19(2): e0298459, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38359030

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: No doubt providing optimal postnatal care (PNC) prevents both maternal and neonatal deaths, in addition to the prevention of long-term complications. Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) had the highest neonatal mortality rate, despite this adequate content of PNC for the newborn is not explored in SSA, therefore, it is important to identify the factors affecting adequate content of PNC for the newborn in the region. This may assist the program and policymakers to give an intervention based on the findings of the study. METHODS: A secondary data analysis was performed using 21 SSA countries' Demographic and Health Surveys. A total weighted sample of 105,904 respondents were included in this study. A multilevel binary logistic regression model was fitted. The odds ratios along with the 95% confidence interval were generated to determine the individual and community-level factors of adequate PNC for the newborn. A p-value less than 0.05 was declared as statistical significance. RESULTS: Adequate PNC for newborns in sub-Saharan Africa was 23.51% (95% CI: 23.26, 23.77). Mothers age ≥ 35(AOR = 1.21,95% CI: 1.06,1.16), mothers' primary education (AOR = 1.18, 95% CI: 1.13, 1.23), secondary education (AOR = 1.58, 95% CI:1.51,1.66), higher education (AOR = 1.61,95% CI:1.49,1.75), rich wealth status (AOR = 1.05,95% CI = 1.01,1.10), ANC visits 1-7 (AOR = 1.61,95% CI:1.51, 1.73), antenatal care (ANC) visit 8 and above (AOR = 2.54,95% CI: 2.32, 2.77), health facility delivery (AOR = 4.37, 95% CI:4.16,4.58), lived in east (AOR = 0.23,95% CI = (0.20,0.26), central(AOR = 0.21,95% CI = 0.19,0.24), west African sub-regions (AOR = 0.23,95% CI = 0.21, 0.27), Urban dwellers (AOR = 1.22,95% CI: 1.17,1.27), and low community poverty (AOR = 1.21 (95% CI = 1.11,1.31) were associated with adequate content of PNC for the newborn. CONCLUSION: The finding of this study showed that the overall prevalence of adequate content of PNC for a newborn in SSA countries was low. The low prevalence of adequate content of postnatal care for newborns in SSA countries is a concerning issue that requires immediate attention. Age of the respondents, level of education, wealth status, ANC visits, place of delivery, residence, community-level poverty, and sub-region of SSA were the individual-level and the community-level variables significantly associated with adequate PNC for the newborn. Strategies should focus on increasing access to antenatal care services, particularly for vulnerable populations, such as younger mothers, those with lower education levels, and individuals residing in impoverished communities to improve PNC for the newborn.


Subject(s)
Postnatal Care , Prenatal Care , Female , Pregnancy , Infant, Newborn , Humans , Mothers , Educational Status , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , Multilevel Analysis , Health Surveys
13.
BMJ Glob Health ; 8(Suppl 2)2024 01 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38267069

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: International legal and political documents can assist policy-makers and programme managers in countries to create an enabling environment to promote maternal and newborn health. This review aimed to map and summarise international legal and political documents relevant to the implementation of the WHO recommendations on maternal and newborn care for a positive postnatal experience. METHODS: Rapid review of relevant international legal and political documents, including legal and political commitments (declarations, resolutions and treaties) and interpretations (general comments, recommendations from United Nations human rights treaty bodies, joint United Nations statements). Documents were mapped to the domains presented in the WHO postnatal care (PNC) recommendations; relating to maternal care, newborn care, and health systems and health promotion interventions, and by type of human right implied and/or stated in the documents. RESULTS: Twenty-nine documents describing international legal and political commitments and interpretations were mapped, out of 45 documents captured. These 29 documents, published or entered into force between 1944 and 2020, contained content relevant to most of the domains of the PNC recommendations, most prominently the domains of breastfeeding and health systems interventions and service delivery arrangements. The most frequently mapped human rights were the right to health and the right to social security. CONCLUSION: Existing international legal and political documents can inform and encourage policy and programme development at the country level, to create an enabling environment during the postnatal period and thereby support the provision and uptake of PNC and improve health outcomes for women, newborns, children and families. Governments and civil society organisations should be aware of these documents to support efforts to protect and promote maternal and newborn health.


Subject(s)
Postnatal Care , Public Policy , Infant, Newborn , Child , Pregnancy , Humans , Female , Breast Feeding , Family , Government
14.
Nutrients ; 16(2)2024 Jan 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38257120

ABSTRACT

Postpartum depression is a significant health issue affecting both mothers and newborns during the postpartum period. Group support interventions during this period have proven effective in helping women cope with depression and improving breastfeeding rates. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of a midwife-led breastfeeding support group intervention on breastfeeding rates, postpartum depression and general self-efficacy. This was a multicentric cluster randomised controlled trial with control and intervention groups and was not blinded. It was conducted in Andalusia (southern Spain) from October 2021 to May 2023. A total of 382 women participated in the study. The results showed a significant difference in exclusive breastfeeding rates at 4 months postpartum between the groups (control 50% vs. intervention 69.9%; p < 0.001). Additionally, there was a lower mean score on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in the intervention group (12.49 ± 3.6 vs. 13.39 ± 4.0; p = 0.044). Similarly, higher scores of general self-efficacy were observed among breastfeeding women at 2 and 4 months postpartum (77.73 ± 14.81; p = 0.002 and 76.46 ± 15.26; p < 0.001, respectively). In conclusion, midwife-led breastfeeding support groups enhanced self-efficacy, prolonged breastfeeding and reduced postpartum depression 4 months after giving birth.


Subject(s)
Depression, Postpartum , Midwifery , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , Depression, Postpartum/prevention & control , Breast Feeding , Postpartum Period , Postnatal Care
15.
PLoS One ; 19(1): e0297038, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38265994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Home delivery is a nonclinical childbirth practice that takes place in one's home with or without traditional birth attendants and postnatal care is the care given to the mother and her newborn baby; according to world health organization (WHO), the postnatal phase, begins one hour after birth and lasts six weeks (42 days). This paper aimed to study the spatial pattern and determinant factors of low utilization of delivery care (DC) services and postnatal check-up (PNC) after live births in Ethiopia. METHODS: This study used the 2016 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey data as a source. A total weighted samples of 11023 women-children pairs were included. The bivariate binary logistic regression analyses with spatial effect were modeled using SAS version 9.4 and ArcGIS version 10.8 was used for mapping. RESULTS: The spatial distribution of low utilization of delivery care service and postnatal check-up were significantly clustered in Ethiopia (Moran's I statistic 0.378, P-value < 0.001 and 0.177, P-value < 0.001 respectively). Among 11023 children-women pair, the prevalence of home delivery and no postnatal check-up within two months following birth were 72.6% and 91.4% respectively. The Liben, Borena, Guji, Bale, Dolo and Zone 2 were predicted to have high prevalence of home delivery and part of Afder, Shabelle, Korahe, Dolo and Zone 2 were high risk areas of no postnatal checkup. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS: Lack of occupation, region, large family size, higher birth order, low utilization of antenatal care visit, unable to access mass media, big problem of health facility distance and the spatial variable were found to be jointly significant predictors of low utilization of DC and PNC in Ethiopia. Whereas older age, being reside in rural area and low wealth status affects delivery care service utilization. We suggest health providers, policy makers and stakeholders consider those variables with priority given to Liben, Borena, Guji, Bale, Dolo, Zone 2, Afder, Shabelle and Korahe, where home delivery and no PNC were predicted relatively high. We also recommend researchers to conduct further studies using latest survey data set.


Subject(s)
Birth Order , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Postnatal Care , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Black People , Correlation of Data , Ethiopia
16.
Int Breastfeed J ; 19(1): 6, 2024 Jan 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38238818

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization states that women and their families need breastfeeding support from the healthcare system. However, knowledge about the most effective way to involve the partner in breastfeeding is lacking. A qualitative evaluation can provide insight and knowledge about the partner's experiences towards a breastfeeding support intervention and thus contribute to how forthcoming breastfeeding support policies are designed. The aim of this study was to explore partners' experiences regarding breastfeeding while participating in The Breastfeeding Study. METHODS: An exploratory, longitudinal and qualitative design was used. This study was part of The Breastfeeding Study, which took place in Sweden. The intervention was performed in line with the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. Partners in the in the intervention group (IG) were part of a structured breastfeeding support programme. An individual breastfeeding plan was established in cooperation with the parents-to-be during pregnancy, and the plan was followed up at the child healthcare centre. A purposive sample was recruited from March to December 2021. Interviews and diary entries from IG (n = 8) and control group (CG) (n = 8) during pregnancy and 2 months after birth were analysed by content analysis, in accordance with the COREQ guidelines. RESULTS: Partners' experiences can be summarised under the main category of 'Striving to be part of the family and important that the family's everyday life was well-functioning'. IG partners experienced that both parents were involved and cooperated in the breastfeeding process and that guidance from healthcare professionals (HCPs) helped them to feel secure. CG partners experienced feeling excluded and not receiving support from HCPs. CONCLUSION: Both parents need to be targeted in breastfeeding support policies to meet the support needs. Midwives at antenatal care and child healthcare nurses at the child healthcare centre have important roles to play in providing structured breastfeeding support and a breastfeeding plan. Both IG and CG partners strived to become a part of the infant's life and to make family life work. Midwives should involve both parents in a reflective dialogue on how the partner can be involved, apart from just feeding the infant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Retrospectively registered in ACTRN12623000648628.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding , Parents , Infant , Child , Humans , Female , Pregnancy , Sweden , Prenatal Care , Postnatal Care
18.
Ital J Pediatr ; 50(1): 3, 2024 Jan 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38191497

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In 2021, the Task Force on Breastfeeding of the Italian Ministry of Health released a document calling for the provision of breastfeeding support in case of re-hospitalization of the child after birth. Since type and quality of breastfeeding support during re-hospitalization in Italian Pediatric Units (PUs) is largely unknown, the Breastfeeding Section of the Italian Society of Pediatrics (TASIP) conducted an ad hoc national survey. METHODS: In March 2023, a specifically designed electronic questionnaire was sent to the Directors of 328 PUs, who were requested to fill it online. RESULTS: Data from 161 PUs were received, with a response rate of 48.7%. Our results highlighted that 18.6% of units do not provide training on breastfeeding for healthcare professionals and 46% of PUs lack of an ad hoc policy on breastfeeding support in case of re-hospitalization of the child. Although 88.2% of PUs provide breast pumps to the mothers of the re-hospitalized young children, 34.8% lack of a protocol on the storage of expressed breast milk. CONCLUSIONS: Breastfeeding support for the mothers of hospitalized breastfed young children appears to be suboptimal in Italian PUs. Interventions aimed to structure and improve the quality of breastfeeding support for the mother-child dyad are needed, particularly developing protocols and providing a training on breastfeeding to the majority of healthcare professionals.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding , Postnatal Care , Female , Pregnancy , Humans , Child , Child, Preschool , Italy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Suppuration
20.
Matern Child Health J ; 28(1): 93-103, 2024 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37902919

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Postpartum care is an opportunity to provide essential follow-up care to people who have given birth, but inequalities in access by race and socioeconomic status (SES) are well-documented. The purpose of this study is to provide an in-depth description of the barriers to postpartum care using a mixed-methods design. METHODS: Mixed method analyses using convergent design with three stages including (1) bivariate logistic regression of survey data representative of postpartum women in Kalamazoo County, Michigan, (2) thematic qualitative analyses of focus group interviews of survey participants, and (3) bivariate logistic regression and logistic regression meditation analyses using themes operationalized with survey data measures. RESULTS: In Kalamazoo county, 82.0% of women attended their postpartum visit. White women and women with higher SES were 2.84 (SE = 1.35, p < .001) and 5.73 (SE = 3.10, p < .001) times more likely to attend postpartum visits than women of color and those with lower SES. Qualitative analyses identified four common barriers: (1) misaligned goals for appointments, (2) time and scheduling of appointments, (3) prioritization of children, and (4) material resources and health insurance coverage. The quantitative analyses found mixed support for these barriers and found limited evidence that these barriers mediated the relationship between race or SES and postpartum attendance. CONCLUSIONS FOR PRACTICE: The qualitative findings identify barriers that are amenable to practice-level interventions including changes to scheduling procedures and employing patient-centered care. The quantitative findings further suggest that although inequalities in postpartum care are present, interventions on these barriers may benefit women regardless of race and SES.


SIGNIFICANCE: What is Already Known on this Subject? Attendance at postpartum visits is lower for women of color and women with lower SES. Investigation of barriers to postpartum care is nascent, but prior research has shown common barriers include cost, transportation, scheduling, lack of provider continuity, and the fragmented nature of postpartum care in the U.S. Previous studies have tended to use only quantitative or qualitative data. What this Study adds? This mixed-methods study combines quantitative analyses of a county-level representative survey with qualitative focus group data to identify and statistically test for barriers to attendance and engagement at postpartum visits.


Subject(s)
Postnatal Care , Postpartum Period , Pregnancy , Child , Female , Humans , Focus Groups , Surveys and Questionnaires , Logistic Models
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