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1.
Internet resource in Spanish | LIS -Health Information Locator | ID: lis-49584

ABSTRACT

Universidad Nacional Experimental especializada, con personalidad jurídica y patrimonio propio, como parte del Sistema Público Nacional de Salud (SPNS), sujeta a las políticas y lineamientos del Ministerio del Poder Popular para la Salud (MPPS) y del Ministerio del Poder Popular para Educación Universitaria, Ciencia y Tecnología (MPPEUCT), siendo su naturaleza la formación de profesionales y técnicos en el área de la salud, cuya preparación científico-técnica, capacidades y actitudes permitan potenciar la atención integral de la salud, orientados a la promoción de la salud, protección de la vida y la prevención, diagnóstico, tratamiento y rehabilitación de la enfermedad, contribuyendo al desarrollo integral y sustentable de las comunidades para la construcción del Socialismo Bolivariano del siglo XXI.


Subject(s)
Universities , Public Health/education , Internship and Residency , Professional Training , Education, Graduate , Education, Medical , Education, Medical, Continuing
2.
Internet resource in Spanish | LIS -Health Information Locator | ID: lis-49581

ABSTRACT

Ente adscrito al Ministerio del Poder Popular para la Salud que ofrece programas de formación de posgrado, formación permanente y de interacción social para dar respuesta a las necesidades del Sistema Público Nacional de Salud, eventos edición de publicaciones, incluyendo el Boletin de Malariología y Salud Ambiental.


Subject(s)
Epidemiology/education , Occupational Health/education , Public Health/education , Scientific and Technical Publications , Schools, Health Occupations
3.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1332412, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38500736

ABSTRACT

Effective and precise public health practice relies on a skilled and interdisciplinary workforce equipped with integrated knowledge, values, skills, and behaviors as defined by competency frameworks. Competency frameworks inform academic and professional development training, support performance evaluation, and identify professional development needs. The aim of this research was to systematically identify and examine trends in the extent, nature, and range of the literature related to developing competencies in public health. This includes developing public health competency frameworks, and how competencies are developed and maintained in students and practitioners. We used a scoping review methodology to systematically identify and report on trends in the literature. Two independent reviewers conducted title and abstract and full-text screening to assess the literature for relevance. Articles were included if they were original primary research or gray literature and published in English. No date or geographic restrictions were applied. Articles were included if they focused on developing competency statements or frameworks for public health and/or training public health students or practitioners to develop competencies. The review encompassed a range of methods and target populations, with an emphasis on building competencies through student and professional development. Foundational competency development was a primary focus, and we found a gap in discipline-specific competency research, especially within developing discipline-specific competency statements and frameworks. Several evidence-based practices for competency development were highlighted, including the importance of governance and resources to oversee competency framework development and implementation, and workforce planning. Experiential learning and competency-based training were commonly identified as best practices for building competencies. A comprehensive understanding of public health competency development-through developing and incorporating foundational and discipline-specific competencies, mapping student and practitioner training to competency frameworks, and incorporating best practices-will enable public health to create skills and an adaptable workforce capable of addressing complex public health issues.


Subject(s)
Public Health Practice , Public Health , Humans , Public Health/education , Professional Competence , Workforce , Students
4.
Int J Public Health ; 69: 1606684, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38528851

ABSTRACT

Objectives: As there is no ranking designed for schools of Public Health, the aim of this project was to create one. Methods: To design the Public Health Academic Ranking (PHAR), we used the InCites Benchmarking and Analytics™ software and the Web Of Science™ Core Collection database. We collected bibliometric data on 26 schools of Public Health from each continent, between August and September 2022. We included 11 research indicators/scores, covering four criteria (productivity, quality, accessibility for readers, international collaboration), for the period 2017-2021. For the Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), a network gathering faculties across different universities, a specific methodology was used, with member-specific research queries. Results: The five top schools of the PHAR were: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Public Health Foundation of India, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, SSPH+, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Conclusion: The PHAR allows worldwide bibliometric ordering of schools of Public Health. As this is a pilot project, the results must be taken with caution. This article aims to critically discuss its methodology and future improvements.


Subject(s)
Public Health , Schools , Humans , Public Health/education , Pilot Projects , Universities , Hygiene
5.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1354787, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38406499

ABSTRACT

This paper examines the current state of social innovation and entrepreneurship programming, courses, and centers within schools of public health through a survey data analysis. This report presents a cross-sectional survey conducted among faculty members of public health schools in the United States. The survey aims to determine the availability and current state of student-centered programs and courses centered around social innovation and entrepreneurship within schools of public health. Insights were drawn from 19 professionals across 15 schools of public health. Uncertainties surround the sustainability of current programs, with insufficient funding, human resources, and the need to teach more pressing topics identified as the most significant obstacles. Key areas identified as opportunities for growth were faculty engagement, expertise, and funding to expand more structured programming.


Subject(s)
Entrepreneurship , Public Health , United States , Humans , Public Health/education , Cross-Sectional Studies , Curriculum , Schools
6.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1300084, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38356953

ABSTRACT

Background: On April 15, 2023, the armed conflict between the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) and the Rapid Support Forces (RSF) started in Khartoum state, Sudan. This conflict was complicated by the preexisting complicated epidemiological situation and fragile health system in Sudan. This study endeavors to illuminate the pivotal role essayed by the Sudan FETP (SFETP) in enhancing the nation's public health response, particularly amidst the tumultuous backdrop of armed conflicts that have left their indelible mark on the region. Methods: Employing a blend of quantitative and qualitative methodologies, we investigated the SFETP's contributions to the public health response during the initial 4 months of the conflict (April-July 2023). Sixty-four SFETP residents and graduates were invited to participate, and data were gathered through semi-structured questionnaires. Results: A total of 44 (69%) SFETP residents and graduates were included in this study. Out of 38 SFETPs present in the states, 32 have considerably contributed to the crisis response at state and locality levels. Three-quarters of them have played key leadership, planning, and management roles. In essence, 38% (n = 12) of them have contributed to public health surveillance, particularly in data management, reports, Early Warning Alert and Response System (EWAR) establishment, and epidemic investigation. SFETPs have made special contributions to crisis response at the community level. The involved SFETPs supported WASH interventions (n = 4), and almost one-third of them strengthened risk communication and community engagement (n = 9). Despite their physical presence at the subnational level, 27% of graduates were not deployed to the crisis emergency response. Notably, throughout this time, half of the total SFETPs were formally retained during this response. Conclusion: The study highlighted the importance of FETP engagement and support during public health crises. SFETP residents and graduates played diverse roles in the various levels of public health emergency response to the crisis. However. Strategies to improve the deployment and retention of FETP residents are necessary to ensure their availability during crises. Overall, FETP has proven to be an asset in public health crisis management in Sudan.


Subject(s)
Epidemics , Public Health , Public Health/education , Sudan/epidemiology , Armed Conflicts
7.
BMC Med Educ ; 24(1): 1, 2024 Jan 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38172860

ABSTRACT

Research ethics education is critical to developing a culture of responsible conduct of research. Many countries in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) have a high burden of infectious diseases like HIV and malaria; some, like Uganda, have recurring outbreaks. Coupled with the increase in non-communicable diseases, researchers have access to large populations to test new medications and vaccines. The need to develop multi-level capacity in research ethics in Uganda is still huge, being compounded by the high burden of disease and challenging public health issues. Only a few institutions in the SSA offer graduate training in research ethics, implying that the proposed ideal of each high-volume research ethics committee having at least one member with in-depth training in ethics is far from reality. Finding best practices for comparable situations and training requirements is challenging because there is currently no "gold standard" for teaching research ethics and little published information on curriculum and implementation strategies. The purpose of this paper is to describe a model of research ethics (RE) education as a track in an existing 2-year Master of Public Health (MPH) to provide training for developing specific applied learning skills to address contemporary and emerging needs for biomedical and public health research in a highly disease-burdened country. We describe our five-year experience in successful implementation of the MPH-RE program by the Mbarara University Research Ethics Education Program at Mbarara University of Science and Technology in southwestern Uganda. We used curriculum materials, applications to the program, post-training and external evaluations, and annual reports for this work. This model can be adapted and used elsewhere in developing countries with similar contexts. Establishing an interface between public health and research ethics requires integration of the two early in the delivery of the MPH-RE program to prevent a disconnect in knowledge between research methods provided by the MPH component of the MPH-RE program and for research in ethics that MPH-RE students are expected to perform for their dissertation. Promoting bioethics education, which is multi-disciplinary, in institutions where it is still "foreign" is challenging and necessitates supportive leadership at all institutional levels.


Subject(s)
Ethicists , Public Health , Humans , Public Health/education , Uganda , Curriculum , Ethics, Research
8.
BMJ Open ; 14(1): e077690, 2024 01 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38238062

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 underscored the importance of field epidemiology training programmes (FETPs) as countries struggled with overwhelming demands. Experts are calling for more field epidemiologists with better training. Since 1951, FETPs have been building public health capacities across the globe, yet explorations of learning in these programmes are lacking. This qualitative study will (1) describe approaches to training field epidemiologists in FETP; (2) describe strategies for learning field epidemiology among FETP trainees and (3) explain the principles and practices aligning training approaches with learning strategies in FETP. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The research design, implementation and interpretation are collaborative efforts with FETP trainers. Data collection will include interviews with FETP trainers and trainees and participant observations of FETP training and learning events in four FETP in the Western Pacific Region. Data analysis will occur in three phases: (1) we will use the constant comparison method of Charmaz's grounded theory during open coding to identify and prioritise categories and properties in the data; (2) during focused coding, we will use constant comparison and Polkinghorne's analysis of narratives, comparing stories of prioritised categories, to fill out properties of those categories and (3) we will use Polkinghorne's narrative analysis to construct narratives that reflect domains of interest, identifying correspondence among Carr and Kemmis's practices, understandings and situations to explain principles and processes of learning in FETP. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: We have obtained the required ethics approvals to conduct this research at The Australian National University (2021/771) and Taiwan's Ministry of Health and Welfare (112206). Data will not be available publicly, but anonymised findings will be shared with FETP for collaborative interpretation. Ultimately, findings and interpretations will appear in peer-reviewed journals and conferences.


Subject(s)
Epidemiologists , Population Surveillance , Humans , Australia , Public Health/education , Qualitative Research
9.
Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 58(1): 92-97, 2024 Jan 06.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38228555

ABSTRACT

At present, the research on Global Health Competencies is mainly conducted in the field of the establishment of competency models and application of indicators. This review summarizes the research progress of the Global Health Competency and its models, and focuses on cutting-edge research from the aspects of target audience, purpose, content, classical model, methods and future development. The competency model is suggested to be adjusted and updated according to the practices of different countries and regions. The research and funding of the competency model in the field of public health is suggested to be strengthened, and the global health and diplomacy are suggested to be combined to enrich and improve the competency model. Finally, this review aims to promote Global Health Competencies research in China, especially to improve the global health talent training system and relevant policies in further research.


Subject(s)
Global Health , Public Health , Humans , Public Health/education , China
10.
Public Health Rep ; 139(1): 129-137, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37057393

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Program evaluation is an essential function for public health professionals that is necessary to acquire funding for public health programs and support evidenced-based practice, but coverage of program evaluation principles and methodology within the master of public health (MPH) curriculum is inconsistent and may not adequately prepare students to conduct program evaluation activities postgraduation, especially on culturally responsive program evaluation. We examined the effectiveness of an online training course on program evaluation topics. METHODS: In July 2021, we recruited current and recently graduated MPH students from accredited US universities to measure the effectiveness of a 1-hour online training course in program evaluation. We distributed pre- and postsurveys to eligible participants. We assessed program evaluation skills on a 4-point Likert scale to determine improvements in knowledge (from 4 = extremely knowledgeable to 1 = not knowledgeable), attitudes (from 4 = strongly agree to 1 = strongly disagree), and self-efficacy (from 4 = strongly agree to 1 = strongly disagree). RESULTS: Among 80 MPH students who completed the survey, respondents indicated mean (SD) increases from presurvey to postsurvey in knowledge (from 2.13 [0.66] to 3.24 [0.54]) and attitudes (from 3.61 [0.51] to 3.84 [0.30]) toward program evaluation and in self-efficacy in conducting program evaluation (from 2.92 [0.71] to 3.44 [0.52]). CONCLUSION: The course may be an effective approach for training public health professionals about program evaluation. Our results provide a basis for revising the way program evaluation is taught and practical recommendations for integrating program evaluation competencies within public health curricula, such as by incorporating a self-paced training course for continuing education.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Public Health , Humans , Public Health/education , Program Evaluation , Students , Universities , Schools, Public Health
11.
J Public Health Manag Pract ; 30(1): 56-65, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37643075

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: The COVID-19 pandemic spurred significant government investments for hiring public health workers. There are clear opportunities to help build capacities among both current and incoming public health workers, closing well-elucidated skill gaps. OBJECTIVE: To report on the development process, methods used, and outcomes seen from a point-in-time public health workforce capacity-building initiative, Public Health Essentials (PHE) . DESIGN: Capacity-building outcomes evaluation using pre/postintervention measures. SETTING: The United States. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 512 learners working in roles (government or adjacent to) that support public health. INTERVENTION: PHE, a cohort-based facilitated asynchronous online course comprising 5 units, 18 modules, 54 learning outcomes, and 266 teaching and applied assessment elements designed to build public health strategic skills. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Two outputs and 3 outcomes were used to assess and improve progress in achieving our goal of building generalizable and transferrable public health ability and confidence among diverse public health workers: Use of PHE , PHE completion rate , Learner competence , Change in self-assessed ability , and Benefits of PHE. RESULTS: From September 2021 to December 2022, 4 agencies used PHE for fellowship training or employee capacity building. Some 79% (n = 512) of learners completed the training, demonstrating competence in all 54 areas assessed by expert course facilitators. Of those, 79% (n = 321) completed both optional pre- and post-PHE surveys, reporting statistically significant gains in all strategic skill domains assessed (n = 9), regardless of demographics and public health experience. Learners gained new skills and knowledge (92%), developed a better understanding of public health (86%), and broadened their public health skill base (84%). A majority can apply the knowledge and skills gained directly to their work (94%), which benefits their team (92%), and have increased their confidence as public health practitioners (49%). CONCLUSIONS: PHE can significantly improve learners' ability across 9 strategic skill areas in as few as 15 weeks, regardless of their demographics, training, or experience.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Public Health , Humans , Public Health/education , Pandemics/prevention & control , Clinical Competence , Workforce
12.
J Public Health Manag Pract ; 30(1): 46-55, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37966951

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: The COVID-19 pandemic underscored the importance of a strong public health infrastructure for protecting and supporting the health of communities. This includes ensuring an adaptive workforce capable of leading through rapidly changing circumstances, communicating effectively, and applying systems thinking to leverage cross-sector partnerships that help promote health equity. The 10 Regional Public Health Training Centers (PHTCs) advance the capacity of the current and future public health workforce through skill development and technical assistance in these and other strategic areas. PROGRAM: This study examines activities through which the Regional PHTCs and their partners supported the public health workforce during the pandemic. Representatives of the 10 Regional PHTCs completed a survey in the spring of 2022. The survey included (1) pulling trends in training usage from 2018-2021 annual performance reports and (2) questions assessing the type, content, and reach of training needs assessments, training and technical assistance, student placements, and PHTC Network collaborative activities that occurred from January 1, 2020, to December 31, 2021. Respondents also reflected on trends in use, challenges, lessons learned, stories of impact, and future PHTC practice. EVALUATION: During the pandemic, the Regional PHTCs engaged in numerous efforts to assess needs, provide training and technical assistance to the practice community, facilitate projects that built student competency to support public health agency efforts, and collaborate as the PHTC Network on national-level initiatives. Across these activities, the Regional PHTCs adjusted their approaches and learned from each other in order to meet regional needs. DISCUSSION: The Regional PHTCs provided student and professional development in foundational public health knowledge and skills within their regions and nationally while being flexible and responsive to the changing needs of the field during the pandemic. Our study highlights opportunities for collaboration and adaptive approaches to public health workforce development in a postpandemic environment.


Subject(s)
Pandemics , Public Health , Humans , Public Health/education , Pandemics/prevention & control , Health Promotion , Workforce , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Arq. ciências saúde UNIPAR ; 27(2): 640-652, Maio-Ago. 2023.
Article in Portuguese | LILACS | ID: biblio-1424870

ABSTRACT

A Residência Multiprofissional é uma importante estratégia de Educação Permanente (EPS) no Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS), sendo a primeira oportunidade para muitos recém-graduados de exercer sua profissão e adquirir experiência. O objetivo do presente estudo foi conhecer o perfil de profissionais egressos de um programa de Residência Multiprofissional em Cardiopneumologia no Ceará e sua inserção no mercado de trabalho. No estudo, transversal e quantitativo, coletaram-se dados socioeconômicos, sociodemográficos e sobre histórico no mercado de trabalho, entre junho e outubro de 2022, via formulário eletrônico enviado aos egressos. A grande maioria estava empregada, atuando no SUS como terceirizados, vinculados como celetistas ou cooperados, em áreas de atuação diversas, destacando o potencial de contribuição na saúde, na educação e na gestão pública. Estudos com profissionais egressos de outros programas hospitalares são necessários para melhor elucidar as potencialidades, contribuições e lacunas do processo formativo à inserção dos profissionais no mercado de trabalho.


Multiprofessional Residency is an important strategy for Continuing Education (PDE) in the Unified Health System (SUS), being the first opportunity for many recent graduates to exercise their profession and acquire experience. The aim of this study was to know the profile of professionals graduating from a Multiprofessional Residency in Cardiopneumology program in Ceará and their insertion in the labor market. In this cross-sectional and quantitative study, socioeconomic, sociodemographic and labor market history data were collected between June and October 2022, via an electronic form sent to the graduates. The vast majority were employed, working in the SUS as outsourced, contracted, or cooperative workers, in diverse areas, highlighting the potential to contribute to health, education, and public management. Studies with professionals graduating from other hospital programs are necessary to better elucidate the potentialities, contributions, and gaps of the formative process to the insertion of the professionals in the labor market.


La Residencia Multiprofesional es una importante estrategia de Educación Continuada (PDE) en el Sistema Único de Salud (SUS), siendo la primera oportunidad para muchos recién graduados de ejercer su profesión y adquirir experiencia. El objetivo de este estudio fue conocer el perfil de los profesionales egresados de un programa de Residencia Multiprofesional en Cardoneumología en Ceará y su inserción en el mercado de trabajo. En este estudio transversal y cuantitativo, se recogieron datos socioeconómicos, sociodemográficos y de historia laboral entre junio y octubre de 2022, a través de un formulario electrónico enviado a los graduados. La gran mayoría estaba empleada, trabajando en el SUS como tercerizados, contratados o cooperativistas, en diversas áreas, destacando el potencial de contribución a la salud, educación y gestión pública. Estudios con profesionales egresados de otros programas hospitalarios son necesarios para dilucidar mejor las potencialidades, contribuciones y lagunas del proceso formativo para la inserción de los profesionales en el mercado de trabajo.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Students , Education, Medical , Job Market , Internship and Residency , Public Health/education , Education, Continuing/organization & administration , Professional Training , Hospitals , Job Description , Job Satisfaction
16.
Asclepio ; 75(2): e23, Juli-Dic. 2023. ilus, graf, tab
Article in Spanish | IBECS | ID: ibc-228670

ABSTRACT

El artículo tiene como objetivo demostrar como la institucionalización de la especialización en salud pública en Brasil abrió oportunidades para la capacitación y la profesionalización de mujeres a partir de los años 1920. El análisis busca avanzar en la historiografía en lo que toca al desempeño y especialización de las mujeres en el campo de la salud pública en un periodo, hasta entonces, poco estudiado, sobrepasando la Primera República brasileña (1889-1930), hasta 1960. La delimitación del marco temporal se realizó en función de las fuentes, es decir, la documentación de los cursos del Instituto Oswaldo Cruz y los formularios de registro e inscripción de las alumnas, que se encuentran bajo la tutela de la Casa de Oswaldo Cruz, Fundación Oswaldo Cruz.(AU)


The article aims at demonstrating how the institutionalisation of specialisation in public health in Brazil opened up opportunities for the training and professionalisation of women from the 1920s onwards. The analysis seeks to advance the historiography regarding the performance and specialisation of women in the field of public health during a period until then little studied, extending beyond the First Brazilian Republic (1889-1930), until 1960. The delimitation of the time frame was based on the arquives, i.e. the documentation of the courses of the Oswaldo Cruz Institute and the registration and enrolment forms of the students, which are under the care of the House of Oswaldo Cruz, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation.(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Public Health/education , History, 20th Century , Women's Rights , Gender Identity , Institutionalization , Specialization , Brazil , Women/education , Women, Working
17.
Asclepio ; 75(2): e24, Juli-Dic. 2023.
Article in Spanish | IBECS | ID: ibc-228671

ABSTRACT

El artículo se explaya sobre el proceso de reclutamiento de profesoras de enseñanza primaria, popularmente llamadas normalistas, en la evolución de la formación en Brasil de las profesiones de salud (educadoras, visitadoras sanitarias y enfermeras). Las características socioculturales de las normalistas las convirtieron en el tipo ideal de mujeres para servir a las nuevas profesiones de salud. Además de la similitud de género (profesiones femeninas), las profesiones docentes primarias y de la salud compartían saberes y prácticas de matriz biomédica e higienista y un mismo campo profesional (escuelas, centros de salud y hogares), lo que determinó afinidades entre las políticas públicas de educación y de salud.(AU)


The article discusses the mobilization of primary teachers, popularly called normalists in the process of constitution, in Brazil, of the sanitary professions (educators or health visiters and nurses). The sociocultural characteristics of normalists made them the ideal type of women recruited to the new health professions. The sociocultural characteristics of normalists made them the ideal type of women recruited to the new health professions. In addition to the similarity of gender (female professions), the primary teaching and health professions shared knowledge and practices of biomedical and hygienist matrix and the same field of professional activity (schools, health posts and households), which translated the affinities between public policies for education and heal.(AU)


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Public Health/education , Health Personnel/education , Faculty/education , Women/education , Cultural Characteristics , School Teachers , Brazil , Schools, Nursing , Students, Nursing , Education, Nursing
18.
BMC Med Educ ; 23(1): 888, 2023 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37990221

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Midwives' contribution to improving outcomes for women and newborns depends on factors such as quality of pre-service training, access to continuing professional development, and the presence of an enabling work environment. The absence of opportunities for career development increases the likelihood that health professionals, including midwives, will consider leaving the profession due to a lack of incentives to sustain and increase motivation to remain in the field. It also limits the opportunities to better contribute to policy, training, and research. This study aimed to assess the influence of a Master in Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) at the INFSS on midwives' career progression in Mali. METHODS: This mixed methods study was conducted using an online questionnaire, semi-structured interviews, and a document review. The study participants included graduates from two cohorts (N = 22) as well as employers, managers, and teachers of the graduates (N = 20). Data were analysed according to research questions, comparing, and contrasting answers between different groups of respondents. RESULTS: The study revealed that graduates enrolled in the programme primarily to improve their knowledge and skills in management and public health. The graduates' expected roles are those of programme and health project manager and participation in planning and monitoring activities at national or sub-national level. The managers expected the programme to reflect the needs of the health system and equip midwives with skills in management and planning. The Master enhanced opportunities for graduates to advance their career in fields they are not usually working in such as management, research, and supervision. However, the recognition of the master's degree and of the graduates' profile is not yet fully effective. CONCLUSION: The master's degree in SRH is a capacity building programme. Graduates developed skills and acquired advanced knowledge in research and management, as well as a postgraduate degree. However, the master programme needs to be better aligned with health system needs to increase the recognition of graduates' skills and have a more positive impact on graduates' careers.


Subject(s)
Midwifery , Infant, Newborn , Humans , Female , Pregnancy , Mali , Reproductive Health , Education, Graduate , Public Health/education
19.
Public Health ; 225: 353-359, 2023 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37979312

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Weak surveillance systems have limited countries' ability to adequately respond to public health emergencies. Strengthening the human workforce in this field is considered an important opportunity to ensure the future response to infectious diseases outbreaks globally. A scoping review of the academic literature and relevant documents was conducted to identify approaches, challenges, and opportunities to strengthen the epidemic intelligence (EI) workforce. METHODS: Five peer-reviewed databases were systematically searched, as well as Google as a grey literature source. English language articles and documents published between 2014 and 2022 were included. No geographical restrictions were set. RESULTS: 37 articles and 20 documents were included in the review. Professional training, the acknowledgement of including a broad variety of disciplines into the workforce, the inclusion of communities, the pursuit of a One Health approach and the use of digital tools were identified as impeding and/or facilitating the EI workforce. The review shows that the field epidemiology training programme is a prominent approach for strengthening the EI workforce and that little evidence exists on how non-traditional disciplines (e.g., disciplines besides medicine, laboratory science, or epidemiology) contributing to surveillance may support the future EI workforce. CONCLUSION: The identification of approaches, challenges, and opportunities of EI can inform future policy and practice on strengthening the EI workforce. The conduct of more high-quality studies is needed to guide this process. The potential benefits of integrating a wider range of disciplines than currently found in the surveillance workforce and of involving communities in disease surveillance needs to be further researched.


Subject(s)
Epidemics , Humans , Epidemics/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Public Health/education , Workforce
20.
Rural Remote Health ; 23(4): 8275, 2023 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38031243

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Health workers in rural and remote areas shoulder heavy responsibilities for rural residents. This systematic review aims to assess the effectiveness of continuing education programs for health workers in rural and remote areas. METHODS: Eight electronic databases were searched on 28 November 2021. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-experimental studies evaluating the effectiveness of continuing education for health workers in rural and remote areas were included. The quality of the studies was assessed using the risk of bias tool provided by Effective Practice and Organization of Care. A meta-analysis was performed for eligible trials, and the other findings were presented as a narrative review because of inconsistent study types and outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 17 studies were included, four of which were RCTs. The results of the meta-analysis showed that compared to no intervention, continuing education programs significantly improved the knowledge awareness rate of participants (odds ratio=4.09, 95% confidence interval 2.51-6.67, p<0.05). Qualitative analysis showed that 12 studies reported on the level of knowledge of participants, with all showing positive changes. Eight studies measured the performance of health workers in rural and remote areas, with 87.50% (n=7) finding improved performance. Two studies reported on the impact of continuing education programs for health workers in rural and remote areas on patient health, with only one showing a positive change. One study from India measured the health of communities, which showed a positive change. CONCLUSION: The results of this study showed that continuing education programs are an effective way to address the lack of knowledge and skills among health workers in rural and remote areas. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of education programs for health workers in rural and remote areas in improving patient health outcomes. It is not yet known whether the delivery of continuing education programs to health workers in rural areas has a positive impact on patient and community health. Future attention should continue to be paid to the impact on these outcomes.


Subject(s)
Education, Continuing , Health Personnel , Humans , Health Personnel/education , Educational Status , Public Health/education , India
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