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1.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(2): 71-72, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35060948

ABSTRACT

In this column, Dr J. Margo Brooks Carthon discusses her work to support access to quality healthcare services for patients in minority and less than affluent circumstances. Dr Brooks Carthon has worked in a collaborative known as THRIVE. The program has offered intensive wrap-around clinical and social services and has positively impacted the wellness of chronically ill individuals.


Subject(s)
Poverty , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , Social Determinants of Health , Universal Design , Female , Humans , Pilot Projects
2.
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol ; 128: 105090, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34863907

ABSTRACT

Botanical dietary supplement use is widespread and growing, therefore, ensuring the safety of botanical products is a public health priority. This commentary describes the mission and objectives of the Botanical Safety Consortium (BSC) - a public-private partnership aimed at enhancing the toolkit for conducting the safety evaluation of botanicals. This partnership is the result of a Memorandum of Understanding between the US FDA, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, and the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute. The BSC serves as a global forum for scientists from government, academia, consumer health groups, industry, and non-profit organizations to work collaboratively on adapting and integrating new approach methodologies (NAMs) into routine botanical safety assessments. The objectives of the BSC are to: 1) engage with a group of global stakeholders to leverage scientific safety approaches; 2) establish appropriate levels of chemical characterization for botanicals as complex mixtures; 3) identify pragmatic, fit-for-purpose NAMs to evaluate botanical safety; 4) evaluate the application of these tools via comparison to the currently available safety information on selected botanicals; 5) and integrate these tools into a framework that can facilitate the evaluation of botanicals. Initially, the BSC is focused on oral exposure from dietary supplements, but this scope could be expanded in future phases of work. This commentary provides an overview of the structure, goals, and strategies of this initiative and insights regarding our first objectives, namely the selection and prioritization of botanicals based on putative toxicological properties.


Subject(s)
Biological Products/standards , Consumer Product Safety/standards , Dietary Supplements/standards , Plant Preparations/standards , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , Dietary Supplements/toxicity , Plant Preparations/toxicity , Plants, Medicinal/toxicity , Risk Assessment
3.
World Neurosurg ; 157: 135-142, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34687934

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The provision of equitable and affordable health care has become increasingly challenging as advanced technology is introduced, particularly in developing countries. We explored the hypothesis that focused, small-scale mini-public-private partnerships have a potential role in providing equitable and affordable access to advanced technology for the benefit of all patients in developing nations, particularly middle-income countries. METHODS: A clinician-led financial plan was developed at the University of Malaya to create the Centre for Image Guidance and Minimally Invasive Therapy (CIGMIT) to provide an integrated platform for high-end care for Malaysian patients of all ages, both public and private, requiring complex neurosurgical and spinal procedures and stereotactic and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The challenges faced during development of the plan were documented together with an audit of patient throughput and analyses of financial risk and return. RESULTS: CIGMIT opened in 2015. Patient throughput, both public and private, progressively increased in all facilities. In 2015-2019, 37,724 patients used the Centre's facilities. CIGMIT has become progressively more profitable for the University of Malaya, the public and private hospitals, and the investor. CIGMIT has weathered the challenges posed by coronavirus disease 19. CONCLUSIONS: Focused, small-scale mini-public-private partnerships have a potential role in providing advanced technology for the benefit of patients in developing nations, particularly middle-income countries, subject to an approach that balances equity of access between public and private health care systems with fair reward.


Subject(s)
Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Neurosurgery/organization & administration , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Developing Countries , Humans , Malaysia , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Pan Afr Med J ; 39: 91, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34466193

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Mozambique is one of the poorest nations in the world and its health budget is heavily dependent on external funding. Increasingly, donors prefer to direct their funds through international non-governmental organizations instead of direct donations to the State budget. In the current climate of increased emphasis on health system strengthening, a strong and stable partnership between government and international non-governmental organizations is pivotal for health system strengthening in Mozambique. METHODS: the study evaluates the current partnership through a standardized survey to healthcare workers employed by international non-governmental organizations in health (INGO, private) and the ministry of health (MOH, public). Results of the survey have been analyzed only descriptively and no statistical evaluations have been performed. RESULTS: out of the valid 109 responses obtained 55.1% were from MOH cadres and 45.0% from INGO cadres. Most have been in the health sector for more than 5 years. Most of the respondents recognize that INGOs assist the government in strengthening the health system (71.6%), see the internal brain drain to INGOs and salary scale difference as major problems (70.6% and 78.0%); 87.2% reported that the coordination between INGOs and government needs to be improved. MOH cadres perceived the migration of cadres to INGOs and the need for improving coordination as major issues more acutely than their INGO counterparts (80.0% vs. 59.2% and 88.3% vs. 85.7% respectively). INGOs were perceived to offer better quality health services by 51.4% of respondents (of these 69.4% were INGO respondents). The quality of health services was alike between INGOs and MOH for 33% of the respondents. CONCLUSION: through the various efforts outlined the MOH and INGOs are moving towards an environment of mutual accountability, joint planning and coordination as well as harmonization of activities; but there are still challenges to be addressed. Prioritization and increased funding of the planning unit and planning and cooperation directorate as well as strategies for workforce retention are urgently needed.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Organizations/organization & administration , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , International Agencies , Mozambique , Private Sector , Public Sector , Quality of Health Care , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256304, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34495990

ABSTRACT

Developing countries need a large number of social infrastructure projects (e.g. schools, medical care, nursing homes). But the government's finance to invest in these projects is limited. By using the public-private partnership (PPP) mode to attract social capital to invest in PPP projects, it can relieve the financial pressure and improve the operation efficiency. The cooperation between government and consumer can ensure the sustainable development of the project operation. A system dynamics model of tripartite evolutionary game is developed to analyze the interaction of participant's strategies and simulate the corresponding evolution process. We employ the scenario analysis method to investigate the impact of the key parameters in relation with PPP projects based on realistic scenario assumptions. The results reveal the effect of some policies including reverse effect, blocking effect and over-reliance effect. Specifically, the results show that high penalty can prevent social capital from providing low-quality services, the low cost of government regulation can promote social capital to provide high-quality services, compensation to consumer can increase the enthusiasm of consumer participating in supervision, appropriate difference between price and cost of high-quality service as social capital's profit can encourage social capital to provide high-quality service. These policy suggestions will contribute to the sustainable development of social infrastructures in PPP mode.


Subject(s)
Community Participation , Game Theory , Models, Organizational , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , Sustainable Development/economics , Government , Humans , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/economics , Sustainable Development/trends
6.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(12): 3641-3649, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34476815

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Given the high and growing prevalence of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias, and the intensity of this population's care needs, it is imperative that healthcare systems increase their capacity to effectively serve people living with dementia (PLwD). The Dementia Cal MediConnect (Dementia CMC) project proposes an advocacy model that may foster dementia-capable systems change. METHODS: The Dementia CMC project was a 5-year partnership (2013-2018) between local Alzheimer's organizations and 10 managed care health plans (HPs) in California's duals demonstration. It used an advocacy model with the following steps: (1) Identify dementia-capable best practices to set as systems change indicators; (2) Identify and leverage public policies in support of systems change indicators; (3) Identify and engage champions; (4) Develop and advocate for a business case to improve dementia care; (5) Identify gaps in dementia-capable practices; (6) Provide technical assistance, tools, and staff training to address the gaps in dementia-capable practices; and (7) Track systems change. Systems change data were collected through participant observation with HPs and interviews with key informants representing partnering organizations or government entities. RESULTS: Participating HPs reported making systems changes toward more dementia-capable practices such as: better pathways for detection and diagnosis; better identification, assessment, support, and engagement of caregivers; and improved systems of referral to community-based organizations (CBOs), including Alzheimer's CBOs. Some indicators of systems change were inconclusive due to flawed assumptions around HP's care coordination, and the availability of common electronic health records between HPs and providers. CONCLUSION: The application of this advocacy model in California has led to systems changes that can improve care for PLwD and their caregivers and should be replicated to expand the dementia-capability of other health systems. Continued efforts to refine indicators are needed to capture systems change in complex and changing health systems.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , Capacity Building/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Dementia , Patient Advocacy , California , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , Systems Analysis
7.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 66, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34307069

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Partnerships are essential to creating effective global health leadership training programs. Global pandemics, including the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and more recently the COVID-19 pandemic, have tested the impact and stability of healthcare systems. Partnerships must be fostered to prepare the next generation of leaders to collaborate effectively and improve health globally. Objectives: We provide key matrices that predict success of partnerships in building global health leadership capacity. We highlight opportunities and challenges to building effective partnerships and provide recommendations to promote development of equitable and mutually beneficial partnerships. Findings: Critical elements for effective partnership when building global health leadership capacity include shared strategic vision, transparency and excellent communication, as well as intentional monitoring and evaluation of the partnership, not just the project or program. There must be recognition that partnerships can be unpredictable and unequal, especially if the end is not defined early on. Threats to equitable and effective partnerships include funding and co-funding disparities between partners from high-income and low-income countries, inequalities, unshared vision and priorities, skewed decision-making levels, and limited flexibility to minimize inequalities and make changes. Further, imbalances in power, privilege, position, income levels, and institutional resources create opportunities for exploitation of partners, particularly those in low-income countries, which widens the disparities and limits success and sustainability of partnerships. These challenges to effective partnering create the need for objective documentation of disparities at all stages, with key milestones to assess success and the environment to sustain the partnerships and their respective goals. Conclusions: Developing effective and sustainable partnerships requires a commitment to equality from the start by all partners and an understanding that there will be challenges that could derail otherwise well-intended partnerships. Guidelines and training on evaluation of partnerships exist and should be used, including generic indicators of equity, mutual benefit, and the added value of partnering. Key Takeaways: Effective partnerships in building global health leadership capacity require shared strategic vision and intentional monitoring and evaluation of goalsInequalities in partnerships may arise from disparities in infrastructure, managerial expertise, administrative and leadership capacity, as well as limited mutual benefit and mutual respectTo promote equitable and effective partnerships, it is critical to highlight and monitor key measures for success of partnerships at the beginning of each partnership and regularly through the lifetime of the partnership.We recommend that partnerships should have legal and financial laws through executed memoranda of understanding, to promote accountability and facilitate objective monitoring and evaluation of the partnership itself.More research is needed to understand better the contextual predictors of the broader influence and sustainability of partnership networks in global health leadership training.


Subject(s)
Global Health , International Cooperation , Leadership , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , Communication , Humans , Program Development/methods , Program Evaluation/methods , Stakeholder Participation
10.
Med Care ; 59(Suppl 3): S252-S258, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33976074

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Congress has enacted 2 major pieces of legislation to improve access to care for Veterans within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). As a result, the VA has undergone a major transformation in the way that care is delivered to Veterans with an increased reliance on community-based provider networks. No studies have examined the relationship between VA and contracted community providers. This study examines VA facility directors' perspectives on their successes and challenges building relationships with community providers within the VA Community Care Network (CCN). OBJECTIVES: To understand who VA facilities partner with for community care, highlight areas of greatest need for partnerships in various regions, and identify challenges of working with community providers in the new CCN contract. RESEARCH DESIGN: We conducted a national survey with VA facility directors to explore needs, challenges, and expectations with the CCN. RESULTS: The most common care referred to community providers included physical therapy, chiropractic, orthopedic, ophthalmology, and acupuncture. Open-ended responses focused on 3 topics: (1) Challenges in working with community providers, (2) Strategies to maintain strong relationships with community providers, and (3) Re-engagement with community providers who no longer provide care for Veterans. CONCLUSIONS: VA faces challenges engaging with community providers given problems with timely reimbursement of community providers, low (Medicare) reimbursement rates, and confusing VA rules related to prior authorizations and bundled services. It will be critical to identify strategies to successfully initiate and sustain relationships with community providers.


Subject(s)
Community Health Services/organization & administration , Community Networks/organization & administration , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Policy , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , Community Health Services/legislation & jurisprudence , Community Networks/legislation & jurisprudence , Health Care Surveys , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/legislation & jurisprudence , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Humans , Needs Assessment , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/legislation & jurisprudence , Qualitative Research , United States , United States Department of Veterans Affairs/legislation & jurisprudence , Veterans Health Services/legislation & jurisprudence
12.
Med J (Ft Sam Houst Tex) ; (PB 8-21-01/02/03): 20-21, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33666907

ABSTRACT

The Installation Management Command (IMCOM) delivers quality base support from the strategic support area, enabling readiness for a globally responsive Army. IMCOM has more than 75 installations, covering more than 13 million acres, in 17 time zones, 12 countries and 58 services. In early March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic required IMCOM to shift focus in ensuring health protection measures were implemented early and quickly, which relied on medical expertise. The IMCOM Surgeon and the Deputy Surgeon serve as the command's key advisors for all matters related to health care and medical readiness. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the IMCOM Surgeon and the Deputy Surgeon were critical in the consolidation of various information from multiple organizations. They promoted the integration of force health protection principles during COVID-19 operations. All of the military members at IMCOM headquarters (HQ) were considered mission essential while other personnel were identified on a phasing structure in the early stages of the pandemic, which meant civilian personnel were instructed to telework.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Intersectoral Collaboration , Military Medicine/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Crew Resource Management, Healthcare/organization & administration , Humans , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , United States
13.
Am J Hematol ; 96(2): 174-178, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33576528
14.
Glob Public Health ; 16(8-9): 1482-1498, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33602063

ABSTRACT

Digital technologies harnessed through smartphones have been deployed widely to support the response to Covid-19 internationally, often through partnerships between 'Big tech' and telecoms corporations and public health authorities. This paper provides an overview and critical analysis of the rapid rise of such new forms of public-private cooperation, focusing on their manifestation in the European region in the first phase of the pandemic. Drawing on a review of international media and documents, we discuss three main domains of public health action in which private technology companies and public health authorities have converged: contact-tracing, epidemic modelling and public health communication to manage the 'infodemic' of misinformation about the new coronavirus. Critics have raised concerns about how the digital response to Covid-19 may threaten privacy and enable greater state surveillance and control, and the possibility that semi-automated decision-making may exacerbate existing discrimination and inequalities. Our analysis extends such critiques by considering what the digital response to Covid-19 reveals about tech corporations' growing power to influence public health agendas. We discuss how they promote technical solutions to public health challenges that are politically seductive, but that have uncertain effectiveness and societal implications that warrant critical scrutiny.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Public-Private Sector Partnerships , Smartphone , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Digital Technology , Europe/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Public Health Administration , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration
16.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 212, 2021 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33632137

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are relevant in developing countries where frequencies can be at least 3 times higher than in developed countries. The purpose of this research was to describe the intervention implemented in intensive care units (ICUs) to reduce HAIs through collaborative project and analyze the variation over 18 months in the incidence density (ID) of the three main HAIs: ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP), central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and catheter-related urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) and also the length of stay and mortality in these ICUs. METHODS: A quasi-experimental study in five public adult clinical-surgical ICUs, to reduce HAIs, through interventions using the BTS-IHI "Improvement Model", during 18 months. In the project, promoted by the Ministry of Health, Brazilian philanthropic hospitals certified for excellence (HE), those mostly private, certified as excellence and exempt from security contributions, regularly trained and monitored public hospitals in diagnostics, data collection and in developing cycles to improve quality and to prevent HAIs (bundles). In the analysis regarding the length of stay, mortality, the IDs of VAP, CLABSIs and CAUTIs over time, a Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) model was applied for continuous variables, using the constant correlation (exchangeable) between assessments over time. The model estimated the average difference (ß coefficient of the model) of the measures analyzed during two periods: a period in the year 2017 (prior to implementing the project) and in the years 2018 and 2019 (during the project). RESULT: A mean monthly reduction of 0.427 in VAP ID (p = 0.002) with 33.8% decrease at the end of the period and 0.351 in CAUTI ID (p = 0.009) with 45% final decrease. The mean monthly reduction of 0.252 for CLABSIs was not significant (p = 0.068). Length of stay and mortality rates had no significant variation. CONCLUSIONS: Given the success in reducing VAP and CAUTIs in a few months of interventions, the achievement of the collaborative project is evident. This partnership among public hospitals/HE may be applied to other ICUs including countries with fewer resources.


Subject(s)
Cross Infection/prevention & control , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Brazil/epidemiology , Catheter-Related Infections/epidemiology , Catheter-Related Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Hospitals/standards , Humans , Incidence , Intensive Care Units/standards , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/prevention & control , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/standards
17.
Multimedia | Multimedia Resources | ID: multimedia-8059

ABSTRACT

O Governador João Doria confirmou o envio de insumos da China para a produção de 8,6 milhões de doses da vacina do Butantan até o dia 3 de fevereiro. O anúncio ocorreu em entrevista coletiva realizada na manhã de hoje (26), no Palácio dos Bandeirantes, com a participação online do Embaixador da China no Brasil, Yang Wanming, da sede da Embaixada na Brasília (DF). “Nesses dois anos, nós ampliamos as relações econômicas, comerciais, institucionais, culturais, de cooperação e de solidariedade com a China”, disse o governador João Doria, que lembrou da cooperação da China com São Paulo já no início da pandemia no ano passado. “O governo da China ofereceu gratuitamente equipamentos de proteção individual, máscaras, aventais, insumos e colaborou muito para a destinação de equipamentos respiradores e monitores para uso do sistema hospitalar”, citou. O Diretor do Instituto Butantan, Dimas Covas, confirmou o envio de 5,4 mil litros de insumos para a produção de vacinas que deverão chegar ao Brasil no dia 3 de fevereiro. “Na sequência, há outro volume de 5,6 mil litros que está processo avançado de liberação, totalizando 11 mil litros, para a produção de vacinas”, frisou. Segundo o Diretor do Instituto Butantan, a chegada de 5,4 mil litros de insumos vai originar 8,6 milhões de doses até 20 dias depois que se cumprir o ciclo de controle de qualidade. Covas lembrou, no entanto, que as doses já produzidas com os insumos recebidos anteriormente começarão a ser liberados diariamente ao Ministério da Saúde a partir de sexta-feira, 29. O Embaixador chinês Yang Wanming destacou a parceria que existe entre a China com o Governo de São Paulo no enfrentamento da pandemia do coronavírus. “O Brasil é um país importante e um parceiro de grande significado para a China. Mantemos uma relação amistosa tradicional entre os dois países, incluindo o estado de São Paulo. Os avanços significativos da cooperação da Sinovac e o Instituto Butantan evidencia atitude científica e rigorosa dos pesquisadores de ambos os países, neste momento em que a Coronavac está sendo aplicada em todo o Brasil. Isso demonstra que a nossa cooperação beneficia não só os paulista como o povo brasileiro”, declarou. “A única forma de vencermos essa pandemia é através da cooperação dos povos. E a China tem sido uma grande parceria nossa, do Butantan, de São Paulo e do Brasil, indiscutivelmente”, lembrou Dimas Covas. “Gostaríamos de consolidar as cooperações entre as duas partes, já que a situação da pandemia é incerta e haverá demanda urgente e de longo prazo pelas vacinas. A parte chinesa está disposta a manter e apoiar em conjunto a parceria entre Sinovac e o Butantan, de modo que contribua para o controle da pandemia”, reforçou o Embaixador.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Viral Vaccines/supply & distribution , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pharmaceutical Raw Material , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , China , International Cooperation
19.
Multimedia | Multimedia Resources | ID: multimedia-8009

ABSTRACT

O Governador João Doria anunciou nesta quarta-feira (20) que o escritório de São Paulo na China está em contato direto com as autoridades chinesas realizando esforços para agilizar o envio dos novos insumos da vacina Coronavac para o Brasil. “Temos que estar juntos neste momento e agradecer o apoio da China ao Brasil, especialmente neste momento de dor em que o país já perdeu a vida de 200 mil brasileiros. Quanto mais vacinas tivermos, mais brasileiros serão imunizados mais rapidamente”, afirmou o Governador. O diretor geral do escritório de São Paulo na China, José Mário Antunes, está acompanhando presencialmente todo processo em Pequim, cidade-sede do laboratório Sinovac Biotech, responsável pela produção do imunizante. “Estou em Pequim para ficar mais próximo dos principais interlocutores, da embaixada brasileira e das autoridades chinesas. Mantenho contato diário com as equipes da Sinovac e a parceria entre Butantan e o laboratório é excelente”, disse Antunes. A representação comercial criada em agosto de 2019, seis meses antes do início da pandemia em nosso país, tem se mostrado fundamental no enfrentamento ao coronavírus. Graças à atuação do escritório, foi possível mapear e agilizar todos os trâmites de importação de respiradores que salvaram milhares de vidas, além de facilitar diversas outras negociações bilaterais entre a China e o Governo de São Paulo em relação a produtos essenciais para o combate à pandemia. “A base em Xangai foi fundamental para dar maior celeridade a todo esse esforço para salvar vidas não só no Estado de São Paulo mas em todo o país”, afirmou Wilson Mello Neto, presidente da InvestSP. Desde a instalação de sua base em Xangai, o Governo de São Paulo atua não apenas no fortalecimento e ampliação de relações econômicas com a China, mas também nas relações institucionais e em múltiplos setores. Com a missão de detectar oportunidades de investimentos e seguir no fortalecimento para aproximação do Estado de São Paulo e China, o escritório foi o primeiro escritório comercial do Estado fora do país. A expectativa é que nos próximos anos São Paulo tenha um total de quatro representações em todo o mundo. A InvestSP – Agência Paulista de Promoção de Investimentos e Competitividade é uma organização social (OS) ligada à Secretaria de Fazenda e Planejamento e possui um contrato de gestão com a Secretaria de Desenvolvimento Econômico. A agência tem como missão desenvolver o Estado de São Paulo por meio da promoção de investimentos, aumento das exportações, incentivo à inovação e melhoria do ambiente de negócios.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Viral Vaccines/supply & distribution , Pandemics/prevention & control , Quarantine/organization & administration , Hospital Bed Capacity/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Local Health Systems/organization & administration , Blood Donors/supply & distribution , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency , Pharmaceutical Raw Material , Immunization Programs/organization & administration , Risk Groups , Ethnicity , Health Information Management/organization & administration , Plasma/immunology , International Cooperation
20.
Drug Discov Today ; 26(5): 1275-1283, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33516857

ABSTRACT

A novel framework for a public-private (PP) partnership was established by a national initiative of the Development of a Drug Discovery Informatics System, supported by the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED). This informatics PP partnership consortium comprised private and public sectors. A database of pharmacokinetic (PK) and cardiotoxic properties was developed, with considerable expansion after integrating proprietary data from private-sector members. This database led to robust in silico prediction models with higher performance than those from the original database. This partnership is a unique example worldwide and could substantially strengthen drug discovery capabilities in both sectors.


Subject(s)
Computer Simulation , Drug Discovery/methods , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , Animals , Cardiotoxicity/etiology , Databases, Factual , Humans , Japan , Models, Biological
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