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1.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0298727, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38768104

ABSTRACT

Cardiac output (CO) is one of the primary prognostic factors evaluated during the follow-up of patients treated for pulmonary hypertension (PH). It is recommended that it be measured using the thermodilution technique during right heart catheterization. The difficulty to perform iterative invasive measurements on the same individual led us to consider a non-invasive option. The aims of the present study were to assess the agreement between CO values obtained using bioreactance (Starling™ SV) and thermodilution, and to evaluate the ability of the bioreactance monitor to detect patients whose CO decreased by more than 15% during follow-up and, accordingly, its usefulness for patient monitoring. A prospective cohort study evaluating the performance of the Starling™ SV monitor was conducted in patients with clinically stable PH. Sixty patients referred for hemodynamic assessment were included. CO was measured using both the thermodilution technique and bioreactance during two follow-up visits. A total of 60 PH patients were included. All datasets were available at the baseline visit (V0) and 50 of them were usable during the follow-up visit (V1). Median [IQR] CO was 4.20 l/min [3.60-4.70] when assessed by bioreactance, and 5.30 l/min [4.57-6.20] by thermodilution (p<0.001). The Spearman correlation coefficient was 0.51 [0.36-0.64], and the average deviation on Bland-Altman plot was -1.25 l/min (95% CI [-1.48-1.01], p<0.001). The ability of the monitor to detect a variation in CO of more than 15% between two follow-up measurements, when such variation existed using thermodilution, was insufficient for clinical practice (AUC = 0.54, 95% CI [0.33-0.75]).


Subject(s)
Cardiac Output , Hypertension, Pulmonary , Thermodilution , Humans , Cardiac Output/physiology , Female , Male , Hypertension, Pulmonary/physiopathology , Hypertension, Pulmonary/diagnosis , Middle Aged , Thermodilution/methods , Follow-Up Studies , Prospective Studies , Aged , Reproducibility of Results , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Cardiac Catheterization , Adult
2.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303689, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38768169

ABSTRACT

An observational methodology system has been designed which allows the observation and analysis of the technical-tactical behaviour and interaction of judokas during competition. The observation instrument (JUTACTIC) is composed of 8 fixed criteria that provide information related to the competition and the competitors and 13 variable criteria that, throughout the intrasessional monitoring of each combat, allow the behaviour displayed by both judokas and their interaction to be recorded. From an observational sample consisting of matches from the Rio 2016 Olympic champions and the corresponding samples made using the LINCE PLUS software, evidence of validity, reliability, generalizability and applicability of the observation system is provided. The content validity of the observation instrument has been endorsed by a panel of experts (n = 11). Intra and inter-observer reliability has been guaranteed from the results obtained in the Fleiss Kappa and the Krippendorff Alpha. The generalizability analysis with the design structure [Category] [Participants] / [Matches] has confirmed that around seven matches are needed to accurately analyse the behaviour of the competitor under study. The practical application possibilities of the observation instrument has been shown with an example of the results obtained and the regular behaviour structures detected (T-patterns) using the THEME software.


Subject(s)
Martial Arts , Humans , Brazil , Athletic Performance/physiology , Reproducibility of Results , Athletes , Competitive Behavior , Software , Male , Female
3.
Hum Genomics ; 18(1): 48, 2024 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38769549

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: After the occurrence of the COVID-19 pandemic, detection of other disseminated respiratory viruses using highly sensitive molecular methods was declared essential for monitoring the spread of health-threatening viruses in communities. The development of multiplex molecular assays are essential for the simultaneous detection of such viruses even at low concentrations. In the present study, a highly sensitive and specific multiplex one-step droplet digital PCR (RT-ddPCR) assay was developed for the simultaneous detection and absolute quantification of influenza A (IAV), influenza B (IBV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and beta-2-microglobulin transcript as an endogenous internal control (IC B2M). RESULTS: The assay was first evaluated for analytical sensitivity and specificity, linearity, reproducibility, and recovery rates with excellent performance characteristics and then applied to 37 wastewater samples previously evaluated with commercially available and in-house quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) assays. IAV was detected in 16/37 (43%), IBV in 19/37 (51%), and RSV in 10/37 (27%) of the wastewater samples. Direct comparison of the developed assay with real-time RT-qPCR assays showed statistically significant high agreement in the detection of IAV (kappa Cohen's correlation coefficient: 0.834, p = 0.001) and RSV (kappa: 0.773, p = 0.001) viruses between the two assays, while the results for the detection of IBV (kappa: 0.355, p = 0.27) showed good agreement without statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the developed one-step multiplex ddPCR assay is cost-effective, highly sensitive and specific, and can simultaneously detect three common respiratory viruses in the complex matrix of wastewater samples even at low concentrations. Due to its high sensitivity and resistance to PCR inhibitors, the developed assay could be further used as an early warning system for wastewater monitoring.


Subject(s)
Influenza A virus , Influenza B virus , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction , Wastewater , Wastewater/virology , Influenza A virus/genetics , Influenza A virus/isolation & purification , Humans , Influenza B virus/genetics , Influenza B virus/isolation & purification , Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Sensitivity and Specificity , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/genetics , Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/isolation & purification , Reproducibility of Results , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/virology , Influenza, Human/genetics , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/genetics , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/isolation & purification , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
4.
PeerJ ; 12: e17387, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38770095

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the reliability and validity of the My Jump 2® app in measuring jump height, flight time, and peak power among elite women beach volleyball players on sand surfaces. Methods: Eleven elite female beach volleyball players (aged 23.6 ± 6.2 years; weight 66.3 ± 5.8 kg; height 174.4 ± 5.8 cm; with 8.4 ± 4.8 years of professional experience) participated in this study. Each player performed six countermovement jumps in a wooden box filled with sand on a force platform while simultaneously recording a video for subsequent analysis using the My Jump 2® app. Results: We found excellent agreement for flight time, jump height and peak power between observers (ICC = 0.92, 0.91 and 0.97, respectively). No significant differences between force platform and My Jump 2® app were detected in the values obtained for the three variables (P > 0.05). For the force platform and the My Jump 2® app, we found a good agreement measuring jump height and flight time (ICC = 0.85 and 0.85, respectively). However, we only found a moderate agreement for peak power (ICC = 0.64). The difference in jump height showed a limit of agreement between -4.10 and 4.74 cm in Bland-Altman, indicating a high level of agreement between the two measurement tools. Conclusion: Based on our findings, the My Jump 2® app reveals a valid tool for measuring jump height and flight time of CMJ on sand surfaces. However, more caution is needed when measuring peak power.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications , Volleyball , Humans , Female , Volleyball/physiology , Reproducibility of Results , Young Adult , Adult , Athletic Performance/physiology , Exercise Test/methods , Exercise Test/instrumentation , Athletes
5.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1372821, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38770361

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to the expanding coverage of medical insurance and the growth of medical expenses, the ability to assess the performance of designated medical institutions (DMIs) in supporting the delivery of high-quality patient care and the standardized use of funds represents a priority in China. Despite such interest, there has yet to be an operable standard and labor-saving method for assessing DMIs in China. Objective: The main objectives include two aspects: (1) establishing an evaluation index system for DMIs based on contracts; (2) designing and developing an online evaluation platform. Methods: A group of 20 experts with theoretical and practical expertise in medical insurance regulation and performance evaluation were invited to select available indicators. A combination weighting method based on analytic hierarchy process and entropy method was used to determine the weight coefficient. Shanghai was taken as the sample area, and 760 DMIs were included in the empirical research. The test-retest reliability method and criterion-related validity method was used to test the reliability and the validity of the evaluation result. Results: An assessment index system that included 6 domains and 56 indicators was established in this study. Furthermore, we developed an online platform to assist in the implementation of the assessment. The results showed that the average score of assessment was 94.39, the median was 96.92. The test-retest reliability value was 0.96 (P ≤ 0.01), which indicated high stability of the assessment. In addition, there was a significant negative relationship between assessment score and the penalty amount of DMIs (R = -0.133, P < 0.001). After adjusting for the basic characteristics of medical institutions, the number of visits and revenue, the negative relationship was still significant (B = -0.080, P < 0.05). These results are consistent with expectations, indicating that the assessment had good criterion-related validity. Conclusions: This study established an operable assessment measure and developed an online platform to assess the performance of DMIs. The results showed good feasibility and reliability in empirical research. Our research findings provided an operable Chinese solution for DMI assessment that saves manpower and time, which would have good enlightening significance in other regions of China and in low-income and middle-income countries internationally.


Subject(s)
Insurance, Health , China , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , Internet
6.
Circ Cardiovasc Interv ; 17(5): e013844, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38771911

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Murray law-based quantitative flow ratio (µFR) is an emerging technique that requires only 1 projection of coronary angiography with similar accuracy to quantitative flow ratio (QFR). However, it has not been validated for the evaluation of noninfarct-related artery (non-IRA) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) settings. Therefore, our study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of µFR and the safety of deferring non-IRA lesions with µFR >0.80 in the setting of AMI. METHODS: µFR and QFR were analyzed for non-IRA lesions of patients with AMI enrolled in the FRAME-AMI trial (Fractional Flow Reserve Versus Angiography-Guided Strategy for Management of Non-Infarction Related Artery Stenosis in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction), consisting of fractional flow reserve (FFR)-guided percutaneous coronary intervention and angiography-guided percutaneous coronary intervention groups. The diagnostic accuracy of µFR was compared with QFR and FFR. Patients were classified by the non-IRA µFR value of 0.80 as a cutoff value. The primary outcome was a vessel-oriented composite outcome, a composite of cardiac death, non-IRA-related myocardial infarction, and non-IRA-related repeat revascularization. RESULTS: µFR and QFR analyses were feasible in 443 patients (552 lesions). µFR showed acceptable correlation with FFR (R=0.777; P<0.001), comparable C-index with QFR to predict FFR ≤0.80 (µFR versus QFR: 0.926 versus 0.961, P=0.070), and shorter total analysis time (mean, 32.7 versus 186.9 s; P<0.001). Non-IRA with µFR >0.80 and deferred percutaneous coronary intervention had a significantly lower risk of vessel-oriented composite outcome than non-IRA with performed percutaneous coronary intervention (3.4% versus 10.5%; hazard ratio, 0.37 [95% CI, 0.14-0.99]; P=0.048). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with multivessel AMI, µFR of non-IRA showed acceptable diagnostic accuracy comparable to that of QFR to predict FFR ≤0.80. Deferred non-IRA with µFR >0.80 showed a lower risk of vessel-oriented composite outcome than revascularized non-IRA. REGISTRATION: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov; Unique identifier: NCT02715518.


Subject(s)
Coronary Angiography , Coronary Artery Disease , Coronary Vessels , Fractional Flow Reserve, Myocardial , Myocardial Infarction , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Predictive Value of Tests , Humans , Male , Female , Aged , Middle Aged , Treatment Outcome , Myocardial Infarction/physiopathology , Myocardial Infarction/diagnostic imaging , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Coronary Vessels/diagnostic imaging , Coronary Vessels/physiopathology , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/adverse effects , Reproducibility of Results , Coronary Artery Disease/therapy , Coronary Artery Disease/diagnostic imaging , Coronary Artery Disease/physiopathology , Risk Factors , Coronary Stenosis/physiopathology , Coronary Stenosis/therapy , Coronary Stenosis/diagnostic imaging , Coronary Stenosis/diagnosis , Cardiac Catheterization , Prospective Studies
7.
Rapid Commun Mass Spectrom ; 38(15): e9770, 2024 Aug 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38773864

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Chlorothalonil (CHT), a broad-spectrum fungicide, has been employed widely to control foliar diseases, whereas with a major metabolite of polar 4-hydroxychlorothalonil (CHT-4-OH), only an acceptable nonpolar CHT residue is allowed by most countries. This study involves the method development for CHT residue in vegetables/fruits using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with a novel modified discharge-adaptor (DA) interface. METHODS: CHT residue was analyzed using LC-MS/MS with DA interface (LC-DA-MS/MS), developed in our previous works. A DA was placed on the electrospray tip to switch the ionization modes. A modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) method was applied to extract CHT residue of vegetables/fruits efficiently with less sample preparation time and analysis cost. RESULTS: CHT and CHT-4-OH spiked in four different vegetables/fruits were extracted using the modified QuEChERS method. After LC with isocratic elution, CHT and CHT-4-OH were separated within 3 min. Using LC-DA-MS/MS, the ion signals of CHT were improved two to three times, and the limit of quantification of 5 ng/g and linearity (r2 > 0.99) in the range of 5-200 ng/g were achieved using 10 g of vegetables/fruits. The precision and accuracy were within 15% each. The modified QuEChERS and LC-DA-MS/MS were applied to examine eight field-grown vegetables/fruits; 9.5 and 2588.9 ng/g of CHT were detected in two vegetables/fruits. CONCLUSION: LC-DA-MS/MS combined with modified QuEChERS was successfully applied to determine CHT residue <10 ng/g in vegetables/fruits and with satisfied validation results. The developed method could reduce both analysis cost and time, attributing to simplifications in modified QuEChERS, isocratic elution, and DA interface in LC-DA-MS/MS.


Subject(s)
Fruit , Fungicides, Industrial , Nitriles , Pesticide Residues , Tandem Mass Spectrometry , Vegetables , Tandem Mass Spectrometry/methods , Vegetables/chemistry , Nitriles/analysis , Nitriles/chemistry , Chromatography, Liquid/methods , Pesticide Residues/analysis , Fruit/chemistry , Fungicides, Industrial/analysis , Limit of Detection , Reproducibility of Results , Food Contamination/analysis
9.
Codas ; 36(4): e20230233, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38775527

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Prospective memory (PM) questionnaires are frequently used to evaluate perceptions of PM skills in daily life. This study aimed to systematically investigate communication-specific attributes using pre-existing PM self-rating questionnaires to inform clinicians and researchers about the role of PM in cognitive communicative evaluations. METHODS: PM-related items from three questionnaires (i.e., Prospective Memory Questionnaire, Comprehensive Assessment of Prospective Memory, and Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire) were compiled and embedded in Google Forms and distributed to 70 Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) with expertise in Cognitive Communicative Disorders across India. Participants first identified items related to communication, and were then contacted to rate the communication-related PM items using a Likert scale for their degree of appropriateness. Responses from 40 SLPs were obtained and subjected to item-content validity index (i-CVI) and exploratory factor analysis (EFA). RESULTS: Of the 114 PM items, 28 received ratings over 50% for their relevance to communication. Of the 28 items, 21 had an i-CVI score greater than 0.8. After the removal of overlapping content, 14 items were finalized and subjected to EFA, which resulted in four factors: PM failure due to loss of communicative content, PM failure due to loss of communicative intent, PM cost due to ongoing interference, and PM failure linked to the priority of communicative intent. CONCLUSION: This study highlights communication-related aspects of PM that can be used as a framework for SLPs to assess and research PM skills.


Subject(s)
Communication , Memory, Episodic , Speech-Language Pathology , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Factor Analysis, Statistical , India , Female , Male , Reproducibility of Results , Adult , Psychometrics , Communication Disorders
10.
J Appl Oral Sci ; 32: e20230440, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38775557

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to compare the quality of root canal obturation (ratio of area occupied by gutta-percha (G), sealer (S), and presence of voids (V)) in different anatomical irregularities (intercanal communications, lateral irregularities, and accessory canals) located at different thirds of the root canal system of mandibular molar replicas. Sixty-seven 3D printed replicas of an accessed mandibular molar were prepared using ProGlider and ProTaper Gold rotatory systems. Three specimens were randomly selected to be used as controls and did not receive further treatment. The rest were randomly distributed in 4 experimental groups to be obturated using either cold lateral compaction (LC), continuous wave of condensation (CW), and core-carrier obturation (ThermafilPlus (TH) or GuttaCore (GC)) (n=16 per group). AHPlus® sealer was used in all groups. The three controls and a specimen from each experimental group were scanned using micro-computed tomography. The rest of the replicas were sectioned at the sites of anatomical irregularities and examined at 30× magnification. The G, S, and V ratios were calculated dividing the area occupied with each element by the total root canal area and then compared among groups using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Voids were present in all obturation techniques with ratios from 0.01 to 0.15. CW obtained a significantly higher G ratio in the irregularity located in the coronal third (0.882) than LC (0.681), TH (0.773), and GC (0.801) (p<0.05). TH and GC achieved significantly higher G ratios in those located in the apical third (p<0.05). The worst quality of obturation was observed in the loop accessory canal with all obturation techniques. Whitin the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that CW and core-carrier obturation are respectively the most effective techniques for obturating anatomical irregularities located in the coronal and the apical third.


Subject(s)
Dental Pulp Cavity , Gutta-Percha , Materials Testing , Root Canal Filling Materials , Root Canal Obturation , X-Ray Microtomography , Root Canal Obturation/methods , Root Canal Filling Materials/chemistry , X-Ray Microtomography/methods , Gutta-Percha/chemistry , Dental Pulp Cavity/anatomy & histology , Dental Pulp Cavity/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , Reference Values , Molar/anatomy & histology , Epoxy Resins/chemistry , Printing, Three-Dimensional , Surface Properties , Statistics, Nonparametric , Random Allocation
11.
J Appl Oral Sci ; 32: e20240017, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38775598

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of submucosal cryotherapy using cold saline to dexamethasone sodium phosphate and diclofenac sodium injections on substance P and interleukin 6 release in experimentally induced pulpal inflammation in rabbits' molar teeth. METHODOLOGY: Fifteen rabbits were randomly classified into 3 groups according to the submucosal injection given: cold saline, dexamethasone sodium phosphate, and diclofenac sodium. A split-mouth design was adopted, the right mandibular molars were experimental, and the left molars served as the control without injections. Intentional pulp exposures were created and left for 6 hours to induce pulpitis. Pulpal tissue was extracted and examined for SP and IL-6 levels using ELISA. Within each group, the level of cytokines released was measured for both control and experimental groups for intragroup comparison to determine the effect of injection. The percentage reduction of each mediator was calculated compared with the control side for intergroup comparison then the correlation between SP and IL-6 levels was analyzed using Spearman's rank order correlation coefficient. Statistical analysis was performed, and the significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: Submucosal cryotherapy, dexamethasone sodium phosphate, and diclofenac sodium significantly reduced SP and IL-6 pulpal release. Submucosal cryotherapy significantly reduced SP more than and IL-6 more than dexamethasone sodium phosphate and diclofenac sodium. Pulpal reduction of SP and IL-6 showed a strong positive significant correlation. CONCLUSIONS: Submucosal cryotherapy reduces the pulpal release of SP and IL-6 and could be tested as an alternative to premedication to potentiate the effect of anesthesia and control postoperative endodontic pain.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal , Cryotherapy , Dental Pulp , Dexamethasone , Diclofenac , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Interleukin-6 , Pulpitis , Random Allocation , Substance P , Animals , Rabbits , Pulpitis/therapy , Diclofenac/pharmacology , Dexamethasone/pharmacology , Dexamethasone/analogs & derivatives , Interleukin-6/analysis , Cryotherapy/methods , Substance P/analysis , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/pharmacology , Dental Pulp/drug effects , Time Factors , Reproducibility of Results , Treatment Outcome , Male , Statistics, Nonparametric , Disease Models, Animal , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Saline Solution , Reference Values
12.
Skin Res Technol ; 30(5): e13690, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38716749

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The response of AI in situations that mimic real life scenarios is poorly explored in populations of high diversity. OBJECTIVE: To assess the accuracy and validate the relevance of an automated, algorithm-based analysis geared toward facial attributes devoted to the adornment routines of women. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, two diversified groups presenting similar distributions such as age, ancestry, skin phototype, and geographical location was created from the selfie images of 1041 female in a US population. 521 images were analyzed as part of a new training dataset aimed to improve the original algorithm and 520 were aimed to validate the performance of the AI. From a total 23 facial attributes (16 continuous and 7 categorical), all images were analyzed by 24 make-up experts and by the automated descriptor tool. RESULTS: For all facial attributes, the new and the original automated tool both surpassed the grading of the experts on a diverse population of women. For the 16 continuous attributes, the gradings obtained by the new system strongly correlated with the assessment made by make-up experts (r ≥ 0.80; p < 0.0001) and supported by a low error rate. For the seven categorical attributes, the overall accuracy of the AI-facial descriptor was improved via enrichment of the training dataset. However, some weaker performance in spotting specific facial attributes were noted. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the AI-automatic facial descriptor tool was deemed accurate for analysis of facial attributes for diverse women although some skin complexion, eye color, and hair features required some further finetuning.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , Face , Humans , Female , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adult , Face/anatomy & histology , Face/diagnostic imaging , United States , Middle Aged , Young Adult , Photography , Reproducibility of Results , Artificial Intelligence , Adolescent , Aged , Skin Pigmentation/physiology
13.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0303102, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38718000

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Disability is an important multifaceted construct. A brief, generic self-reported disability questionnaire that promises a broader and more comparable measure of disability than disease-specific instruments does not currently exist. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate such a questionnaire: the Universal Disability Index (UDI). METHODS: An online survey was used to collect general population data. Data were randomly divided into training and validation subsets. The dimensionality and structure of eight UDI questionnaire items were evaluated using exploratory factor analysis (EFA, training subset) followed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA, validation subset). To assess concurrent validity, the UDI summed score from the full dataset was compared to the Groningen Activity Restriction Scale (GARS) and the Graded Chronic Pain Scale (GCPS) disability scores. Internal consistency and discriminant validity were also assessed. Bootstrapping was used to evaluate model stability and generalisability. RESULTS: 403 participants enrolled; 364 completed at least one UDI item. Three single-factor versions of the UDI were assessed (8-item, 7-item, and 6-item). All versions performed well during EFA and CFA (182 cases assigned to each), but none met the RMSEA (Root Mean Square Error of Approximation) criterion (≤ 0.08). All versions of the UDI had high internal consistency (Cronbach's α > 0.90), were strongly correlated (Pearson's r > 0.7) with both GARS and GCPS disability scores, indicating concurrent validity, and could accurately discriminate between upper and lower quartiles of these comparators. Confidence intervals of estimates were narrow, suggesting model stability and generalisability. CONCLUSIONS: A brief, generic self-reported disability questionnaire was found to be valid and to possess good psychometric properties. The UDI has a single factor structure and either a 6-item, 7-item or 8-item version can be used to measure disability. For brevity and parsimony, the 6-item UDI is recommended, but further testing of all versions is warranted.


Subject(s)
Disability Evaluation , Disabled Persons , Self Report , Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Factor Analysis, Statistical , Aged , Psychometrics/methods , Reproducibility of Results , Young Adult
14.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0298872, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38718011

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Effectively managing their athletic and academic projects is a major challenge for student-athletes. The salience of the identity they develop in each of these contexts can affect their well-being and is therefore an important variable to consider. Examining these mechanisms in countries and student-athlete support systems other than the United States is also important. AIM: This study aims to both translate and evaluate the psychometric properties of a French version of the Academic and Athletic Identity Scale, the AAIS-FR, and to examine the additive and interactive relationships of the two identities with sport burnout and engagement. METHODS: Participants were 359 French student-athletes (50.42% female) who were competing at various levels (ranging from regional to international). RESULTS: Results from analyses using a slightly modified version of the original scale provided evidence of construct (i.e., factor structure) and concurrent (i.e., expected relationships between both identities and several correlates identified in previous work) validity, as well as reliability (i.e., internal consistency) and invariance across gender and sport competition levels of the AAIS-FR. In addition, regression analyses revealed a favourable relationship between athletic identity and sport well-being (i.e., positive with engagement and negative with burnout), no relationship between academic identity and sport well-being, and no interaction between the two identities. CONCLUSION: While further research is needed to provide additional evidence for the validity of the AAIS-FR, researchers can still use this tool to measure the salience of the two identities of French-speaking student-athletes.


Subject(s)
Athletes , Psychometrics , Sports , Humans , Female , Male , Athletes/psychology , Psychometrics/methods , Sports/psychology , Young Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Reproducibility of Results , France , Students/psychology , Adolescent , Adult
15.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0302787, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38718077

ABSTRACT

To monitor the sharing of research data through repositories is increasingly of interest to institutions and funders, as well as from a meta-research perspective. Automated screening tools exist, but they are based on either narrow or vague definitions of open data. Where manual validation has been performed, it was based on a small article sample. At our biomedical research institution, we developed detailed criteria for such a screening, as well as a workflow which combines an automated and a manual step, and considers both fully open and restricted-access data. We use the results for an internal incentivization scheme, as well as for a monitoring in a dashboard. Here, we describe in detail our screening procedure and its validation, based on automated screening of 11035 biomedical research articles, of which 1381 articles with potential data sharing were subsequently screened manually. The screening results were highly reliable, as witnessed by inter-rater reliability values of ≥0.8 (Krippendorff's alpha) in two different validation samples. We also report the results of the screening, both for our institution and an independent sample from a meta-research study. In the largest of the three samples, the 2021 institutional sample, underlying data had been openly shared for 7.8% of research articles. For an additional 1.0% of articles, restricted-access data had been shared, resulting in 8.3% of articles overall having open and/or restricted-access data. The extraction workflow is then discussed with regard to its applicability in different contexts, limitations, possible variations, and future developments. In summary, we present a comprehensive, validated, semi-automated workflow for the detection of shared research data underlying biomedical article publications.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , Workflow , Biomedical Research/methods , Humans , Information Dissemination/methods , Access to Information , Reproducibility of Results
16.
Child Care Health Dev ; 50(3): e13267, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38722088

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Maternal parenting self-efficacy plays a critical role in facilitating positive parenting practices and successful adaption to motherhood. The Perceived Maternal Parenting Self-Efficacy Scale (PMPS-E), as a task-specific measure, confirms its psychometric properties in cultural contexts. Compared with other tools, the advantages of the PMPS-E are as follows: (i) specific context or time period during the lifespan of a child, (ii) explicitly assess parenting self-efficacy across a diverse enough range of parenting tasks or activities during the perinatal/postnatal period and (iii) having robust psychometric properties. The aim of this study was to translate and determine the psychometric properties of the PMPS-E among Chinese postpartum women (C-PMPS-E). METHOD: The cross-cultural adaptation process followed Beaton et al.'s intercultural debugging guidelines. A total of 471 women were included to establish the psychometric properties of the C-PMPS-E. Mothers were asked to complete the C-PMPS-E, Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) and several demographic questions. The psychometric testing of the C-PMPS-E was established through item analysis, construct validity and internal consistency reliability. RESULTS: Item analysis showed that the critical ratios of all items were greater than 3 between the low-score group and high-score group, and all item-total correlation coefficients were greater than 0.4. The fit indices showed that the original correlated four-factor model of C-PMPS-E was observed to be an excellent fit to the data. The PMPS-E was negatively correlated with the EPDS and GAD-7 demonstrating its discriminant validity. As expected, no significant correlation was found between PMPS-E total or subscale scores and mothers' age. In addition, statistically significant differences for parity were detected for C-PMPS-E total and subscale scores with multipara having higher scores. This was taken as further evidence of the scale known-groups discriminant validity. In terms of internal consistency, the Cronbach's alpha of the C-PMPS-E total scale was 0.950, and subscales ranged from 0.76 to 0.89. Furthermore, a ROC curve analysis was conducted to establish the ability of the C-PMPS-E to distinguish between symptoms of depression and symptoms of anxiety. A cut-off value of 55 was identified that resulted in good specificity and fair sensitivity. CONCLUSION: The C-PMPS-E is a reliable and valid tool to assess maternal parenting self-efficacy in a Chinese context.


Subject(s)
Mothers , Parenting , Postpartum Period , Psychometrics , Self Efficacy , Humans , Female , Adult , Parenting/psychology , Postpartum Period/psychology , Reproducibility of Results , Mothers/psychology , China , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Young Adult , Translations , Depression, Postpartum/psychology , Depression, Postpartum/diagnosis
17.
Lasers Med Sci ; 39(1): 121, 2024 May 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38722564

ABSTRACT

To develop and validate a 3D simulation model to calculate laser ablation (LA) zone size and estimate the volume of treated tissue for thyroid applications, a model was developed, taking into account dynamic optical and thermal properties of tissue change. For validation, ten Yorkshire swines were equally divided into two cohorts and underwent thyroid LA at 3 W/1,400 J and 3 W/1,800 J respectively with a 1064-nm multi-source laser (Echolaser X4 with Orblaze™ technology; ElEn SpA, Calenzano, Italy). The dataset was analyzed employing key statistical measures such as mean and standard deviation (SD). Model simulation data were compared with animal gross histology. Experimental data for longitudinal length, width (transverse length), ablation volume and sphericity were 11.0 mm, 10.0 mm, 0.6 mL and 0.91, respectively at 1,400 J and 14.6 mm, 12.4 mm, 1.12 mL and 0.83, respectively at 1,800 J. Gross histology data showed excellent reproducibility of the ablation zone among same laser settings; for both 1,400 J and 1,800 J, the SD of the in vivo parameters was ≤ 0.7 mm, except for width at 1,800 J, for which the SD was 1.1 mm. Simulated data for longitudinal length, width, ablation volume and sphericity were 11.6 mm, 10.0 mm, 0.62 mL and 0.88, respectively at 1,400 J and 14.2 mm, 12.0 mm, 1.06 mL and 0.84, respectively at 1,800 J. Experimental data for ablation volume, sphericity coefficient, and longitudinal and transverse lengths of thermal damaged area showed good agreement with the simulation data. Simulation datasets were successfully incorporated into proprietary planning software (Echolaser Smart Interface, Elesta SpA, Calenzano, Italy) to provide guidance for LA of papillary thyroid microcarcinomas. Our mathematical model showed good predictability of coagulative necrosis when compared with data from in vivo animal experiments.


Subject(s)
Laser Therapy , Thyroid Gland , Animals , Laser Therapy/methods , Laser Therapy/instrumentation , Thyroid Gland/surgery , Thyroid Gland/pathology , Swine , Computer Simulation , Models, Theoretical , Reproducibility of Results
18.
J Med Internet Res ; 26: e57963, 2024 May 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38722675

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As digital health services are increasingly developing and becoming more interactive in Serbia, a comprehensive instrument for measuring eHealth literacy (EHL) is needed. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to translate, culturally adapt, and investigate the psychometric properties of the Serbian version of the eHealth Literacy Questionnaire (eHLQ); to evaluate EHL in the population of primary health care (PHC) users in Serbia; and to explore factors associated with their EHL. METHODS: The validation study was conducted in 8 PHC centers in the territory of the Macva district in Western Serbia. A stratified sampling method was used to obtain a representative sample. The Translation Integrity Procedure was followed to adapt the questionnaire to the Serbian language. The psychometric properties of the Serbian version of the eHLQ were analyzed through the examination of factorial structure, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability. Descriptive statistics were calculated to determine participant characteristics. Differences between groups were tested by the 2-tailed Students t test and ANOVA. Univariable and multivariable linear regression analyses were used to determine factors related to EHL. RESULTS: A total of 475 PHC users were enrolled. The mean age was 51.0 (SD 17.3; range 19-94) years, and most participants were female (328/475, 69.1%). Confirmatory factor analysis validated the 7-factor structure of the questionnaire. Values for incremental fit index (0.96) and comparative fit index (0.95) were above the cutoff of ≥0.95. The root mean square error of approximation value of 0.05 was below the suggested value of ≤0.06. Cronbach α of the entire scale was 0.95, indicating excellent scale reliability, with Cronbach α ranging from 0.81 to 0.90 for domains. The intraclass correlation coefficient ranged from 0.63 to 0.82, indicating moderate to good test-retest reliability. The highest EHL mean scores were obtained for the understanding of health concepts and language (mean 2.86, SD 0.32) and feel safe and in control (mean 2.89, SD 0.33) domains. Statistically significant differences (all P<.05) for all 7 eHLQ scores were observed for age, education, perceived material status, perceived health status, searching for health information on the internet, and occupation (except domain 4). In multivariable regression models, searching for health information on the internet and being aged younger than 65 years were associated with higher values of all domain scores except the domain feel safe and in control for variable age. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that the Serbian version of the eHLQ can be a useful tool in the measurement of EHL and in the planning of digital health interventions at the population and individual level due to its strong psychometric properties in the Serbian context.


Subject(s)
Primary Health Care , Telemedicine , Humans , Serbia , Primary Health Care/methods , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Male , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Translations , Young Adult , Aged , Health Literacy/statistics & numerical data , Psychometrics/methods , Reproducibility of Results
19.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) ; 53(1): 26-31, 2024.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38724169

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to verify the psychometric qualities of the PID-5-FBF in a community sample of Brazilian adults. The internal consistency of the facets and the internal structure of the dimensions were checked. In addition, we verified the correlations between the PID-5-FBF facets and domains with a five-factor model measure. METHODS: The sample of this study consists of the 774 Brazilian adults aged 18 to 73 years (mean 28.9±11.58) who answered the PID-5-FBF and BFI-2S. RESULTS: The alpha values were adequate. The internal structure was similar to the PID-5 original form. All the factors and dimensions of the PID-5-FBF have a negative association with agreeableness, while, on the other hand, all correlations with neuroticism were positive. Neuroticism was the factor with the highest correlation with the PID-5-FBF, and openness was the one with the lowest number of correlations. CONCLUSIONS: This research contributes to adding evidence of validity to the PID-5-FBF in the Brazilian community sample. Our results are important because it is the first study with the PID-FBF in a Brazilian sample.


Subject(s)
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , Personality Inventory , Psychometrics , Humans , Brazil , Adult , Middle Aged , Male , Female , Young Adult , Aged , Adolescent , Reproducibility of Results
20.
Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf ; 33(5): e5787, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38724471

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Real-world evidence (RWE) is increasingly used for medical regulatory decisions, yet concerns persist regarding its reproducibility and hence validity. This study addresses reproducibility challenges associated with diversity across real-world data sources (RWDS) repurposed for secondary use in pharmacoepidemiologic studies. Our aims were to identify, describe and characterize practices, recommendations and tools for collecting and reporting diversity across RWDSs, and explore how leveraging diversity could improve the quality of evidence. METHODS: In a preliminary phase, keywords for a literature search and selection tool were designed using a set of documents considered to be key by the coauthors. Next, a systematic search was conducted up to December 2021. The resulting documents were screened based on titles and abstracts, then based on full texts using the selection tool. Selected documents were reviewed to extract information on topics related to collecting and reporting RWDS diversity. A content analysis of the topics identified explicit and latent themes. RESULTS: Across the 91 selected documents, 12 topics were identified: 9 dimensions used to describe RWDS (organization accessing the data source, data originator, prompt, inclusion of population, content, data dictionary, time span, healthcare system and culture, and data quality), tools to summarize such dimensions, challenges, and opportunities arising from diversity. Thirty-six themes were identified within the dimensions. Opportunities arising from data diversity included multiple imputation and standardization. CONCLUSIONS: The dimensions identified across a large number of publications lay the foundation for formal guidance on reporting diversity of data sources to facilitate interpretation and enhance replicability and validity of RWE.


Subject(s)
Pharmacoepidemiology , Pharmacoepidemiology/methods , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , Data Collection/methods , Data Collection/standards , Information Sources
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