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1.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0291839, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38709761

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The majority of children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) reside in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). NDDs are a public health concern in countries in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Nurturing care has been recommended as a pathway for addressing the developmental needs and unlocking the full potential of children, including those with NDDs. However, little information exists on the strategies to support children with NDDs using the Nurturing Care Framework in many countries in SSA. This review aims to synthesize information on nurturing care practices for children with NDDs in SSA. The review will also determine gaps in the provision of nurturing care for children with NDDs. Further, the review will highlight the drivers of care as well as the experiences of the caregivers. METHODS: The review will be implemented in six steps: specification of the research question, identification of relevant studies, selection of studies to be included, extracting, mapping, and charting the data, collating, summarizing, and reporting the results, and stakeholder consultation. We propose a database search followed by a manual search for the literature synthesis. We will search the following electronic databases: PubMed, ScienceDirect, Scopus, Open Grey and African Journals Online (AJOL). All studies published after May 2018 to May 2023 that include relevant terms will be identified and included. The research team will develop a data extraction form for use in capturing relevant information from each of the included studies. A patterning chart that will summarize and analyze the key findings of each article will be created. DISCUSSION: We anticipate that the study will provide evidence on the existing nurturing care practices and unearth gaps in the provision of nurturing care for children with NDDs. Key determinants of care and the experiences of the parents/caregivers of children will also be identified. The study will provide key recommendations on interventions to improve the quality of care for children with NDDs. Through this study, awareness of the unmet nurturing care needs of these children will be increased. The evidence generated may assist policymakers and stakeholders in addressing the needs of children with NDDs.


Subject(s)
Developmental Disabilities , Child , Humans , Africa South of the Sahara , Caregivers , Developmental Disabilities/therapy , Review Literature as Topic
2.
BMJ Open ; 14(5): e082381, 2024 May 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38719283

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Wildfires and deforestation potentially have direct effects on multiple health outcomes as well as indirect consequences for climate change. Tropical rainforest areas are characterised by high rainfall, humidity and temperature, and they are predominantly found in low-income and middle-income countries. This study aims to synthesise the methods, data and health outcomes reported in scientific papers on wildfires and deforestation in these locations. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will carry out a scoping review according to the Joanna Briggs Institute's (JBI) manual for scoping reviews and the framework proposed by Arksey and O'Malley, and Levac et al. The search for articles was performed on 18 August 2023, in 16 electronic databases using Medical Subject Headings terms and adaptations for each database from database inception. The search for local studies will be complemented by the manual search in the list of references of the studies selected to compose this review. We screened studies written in English, French, Portuguese and Spanish. We included quantitative studies assessing any human disease outcome, hospitalisation and vital statistics in regions of tropical rainforest. We exclude qualitative studies and quantitative studies whose outcomes do not cover those of interest. The text screening was done by two independent reviewers. Subsequently, we will tabulate the data by the origin of the data source used, the methods and the main findings on health impacts of the extracted data. The results will provide descriptive statistics, along with visual representations in diagrams and tables, complemented by narrative summaries as detailed in the JBI guidelines. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The study does not require an ethical review as it is meta-research and uses published, deidentified secondary data sources. The submission of results for publication in a peer-reviewed journal and presentation at scientific and policymakers' conferences is expected. STUDY REGISTRATION: Open Science Framework (https://osf.io/pnqc7/).


Subject(s)
Climate Change , Conservation of Natural Resources , Rainforest , Wildfires , Humans , Tropical Climate , Review Literature as Topic , Research Design
3.
BMJ Open ; 14(5): e079227, 2024 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38719307

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Person-centred care (PCC) is provision of care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs and values, and ensures that patient values guide all clinical decisions. While there is a large body of evidence on the benefits of PCC in high-income countries, little research exists on PCC in Ghana and Sub-Saharan Africa at large. Most studies on PCC have focused on maternity care as part of the global movement of respectful maternity care. The few studies on patient experiences and health system responsiveness beyond maternal health also highlight gaps in patient experience and satisfaction as well as discrimination in health facilities, which leads to the most vulnerable having the poorest experiences. The protocol for this scoping review aims to systematically map the extent of literature focused on PCC in Ghana by identifying patient expectations and preferences, barriers and facilitators, and interventions. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The protocol will be guided by the Arksey and O'Malley methodological framework and recommendations by Levac et al. A comprehensive search strategy will be used to search for published articles in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and the African Journals Online from their inception to August 2022. Grey literature and reference lists of included studies will also be searched. Two independent reviewers will perform the literature search, eligibility assessments and study selection. Any disagreements will be resolved through discussion with a third reviewer. A Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses flow diagram for the scoping reviews will be used to outline the study selection process. Extracted data from the included articles will be synthesised and reported under key concepts derived from the outcomes of the scoping review. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This scoping review does not require ethical approval. The findings will be disseminated through publications and conference presentations. SCOPING REVIEW REGISTRATION: OSF Registration DOI 10.17605/OSF.IO/ZMDH9.


Subject(s)
Patient-Centered Care , Humans , Ghana , Research Design , Patient Preference , Review Literature as Topic , Maternal Health Services/organization & administration , Maternal Health Services/standards
4.
BMJ Open ; 14(5): e080878, 2024 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38719324

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The realm of neurosurgery is currently witnessing a surge in primary research, underscoring the importance of adopting evidence-based approaches. Scoping reviews, as a type of evidence synthesis, offer a broad perspective and have become increasingly vital for managing the ever-expanding body of research in swiftly evolving fields. Recent research has indicated a rising prevalence of scoping reviews in healthcare literature. In this context, the concept of a 'review of scoping reviews' has emerged as a means to offer a higher level synthesis of insights. However, the field of neurosurgery appears to lack a comprehensive integration of scoping reviews. Therefore, the objective of this scoping review is to identify and evaluate the extent of scoping reviews within neurosurgery, pinpointing research gaps and methodological issues to enhance evidence-based practices in this dynamic discipline. METHODS: The method framework of Arksey and O'Malley will be used to conduct the scoping review. A thorough literature search will be performed on Medline, Scopus and Web of Science to find eligible studies using the keywords related to neurosurgery, scoping review and its variants. Two reviewers will independently revise all of the full-text articles, extract data and evaluate the study extent. A narrative overview of the findings from included studies will be given. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This review will involve secondary analysis of published literature, and therefore ethics approval is not required. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews checklist will be used to guide translation of findings. Results will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals and presented in conferences via abstract and presentation.


Subject(s)
Neurosurgery , Review Literature as Topic , Humans , Research Design , Systematic Reviews as Topic/methods , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods
5.
BMJ Open ; 14(5): e080822, 2024 May 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38719333

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patient engagement and integrated knowledge translation (iKT) processes improve health outcomes and care experiences through meaningful partnerships in consensus-building initiatives and research. Consensus-building is essential for engaging a diverse group of experienced knowledge users in co-developing and supporting a solution where none readily exists or is less optimal. Patients and caregivers provide invaluable insights for building consensus in decision-making around healthcare, policy and research. However, despite emerging evidence, patient engagement remains sparse within consensus-building initiatives. Specifically, our research has identified a lack of opportunity for youth living with chronic health conditions and their caregivers to participate in developing consensus on indicators/benchmarks for transition into adult care. To bridge this gap and inform our consensus-building approach with youth/caregivers, this scoping review will synthesise the extent of the literature on patient and other knowledge user engagement in consensus-building healthcare initiatives. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Following the scoping review methodology from Joanna Briggs Institute, published literature will be searched in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases from inception to July 2023. Grey literature will be hand-searched. Two independent reviewers will determine the eligibility of articles in a two-stage process, with disagreements resolved by a third reviewer. Included studies must be consensus-building studies within the healthcare context that involve patient engagement strategies. Data from eligible studies will be extracted and charted on a standardised form. Abstracted data will be analysed quantitatively and descriptively, according to specific consensus methodologies, and patient engagement models and/or strategies. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval is not required for this scoping review protocol. The review process and findings will be shared with and informed by relevant knowledge users. Dissemination of findings will also include peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. The results will offer new insights for supporting patient engagement in consensus-building healthcare initiatives. PROTOCOL REGISTRATION: https://osf.io/beqjr.


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Consensus , Patient Participation , Humans , Translational Research, Biomedical , Review Literature as Topic , Research Design , Transition to Adult Care
6.
BMJ Open ; 14(5): e081673, 2024 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38719322

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: After COVID-19, a global mental health crisis affects young people, with one in five youth experiencing mental health problems worldwide. Delivering mental health interventions via mobile devices is a promising strategy to address the treatment gap. Mental health apps are effective for adolescent and young adult samples, but face challenges such as low real-world reach and under-representation of minoritised youth. To increase digital health uptake, including among minoritised youth, there is a need for diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) considerations in the development and evaluation of mental health apps. How well DEI is integrated into youth mental health apps has not been comprehensively assessed. This scoping review aims to examine to what extent DEI considerations are integrated into the design and evaluation of youth mental health apps and report on youth, caregiver and other stakeholder involvement. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will identify studies published in English from 2009 to 29 September 2023 on apps for mental health in youth. We will use PubMed, Global Health, APA PsycINFO, SCOPUS, CINAHL PLUS and the Cochrane Database and will report according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses-Scoping Review Extension guidelines. Papers eligible for inclusion must be peer-reviewed publications in English involving smartphone applications used by adolescents or young adults aged 10-25, with a focus on depression, anxiety or suicidal ideation. Two independent reviewers will review and extract articles using a template developed by the authors. We will analyse the data using narrative synthesis and descriptive statistics. This study will identify gaps in the literature and provide a roadmap for equitable and inclusive mental health apps for youth. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval is not required. Findings will be disseminated through academic, industry, community networks and scientific publications.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Research Design , Telemedicine/methods , Mental Disorders/therapy , Review Literature as Topic
7.
BMJ Open ; 14(5): e079963, 2024 May 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38740505

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Vector borne diseases (VBDs) present significant public health challenges in Southeast Asia (SEA), and the increasing number of cases threatens vulnerable communities. Inadequate vector control and management have been linked to the spread of VBDs. To address these issues, community participation has been proposed as a promising approach to enhance health programmes and control of VBDs. This article outlines a protocol for a scoping review of the published literature on community-participation approaches to control VBDs in the SEA region. The primary research question is 'How does community participation complement the control of VBDs in SEA?' This review aims to provide an overview of various approaches and identify barriers and facilitators to effective implementation. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The research questions will guide the scoping review. In stage 1, peer-reviewed publications from PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus will be searched using predefined search terms related to community-based approaches and VBDs in the SEA region, English, Indonesian and Malay published between 2012 and 2022. In stage 2, the references from relevant articles will be screened for eligibility. In stage 3, eligible articles will be charted in Microsoft Excel to facilitate the review process, and studies will be characterised based on the investigated diseases; this review will also highlight the methodological context of these studies. In stage 4, a thematic analysis will be conducted to derive meaningful findings from the dataset relevant to the research inquiry, followed by writing the results in stage 5. This scoping review aims to be the first to explore community participation in VBD control in the SEA population, providing valuable insights for future research and stakeholders involved in disease control. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This scoping review does not require ethical approval because the methodology synthesises information from available articles. This review is planned for dissemination in academic journals, conference presentations and shared with stakeholders as part of knowledge sharing among those involved in VBD control.


Subject(s)
Community Participation , Vector Borne Diseases , Humans , Community Participation/methods , Asia, Southeastern/epidemiology , Vector Borne Diseases/prevention & control , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic , Animals
8.
BMJ Open ; 14(5): e084209, 2024 May 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38749690

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Preconception care is the provision of behavioural, social or biomedical interventions to women and couples prior to conception. To date, preconception research has primarily focused on maternal health, despite the male partner's contribution before birth to both short-term and long-term child outcomes. The objectives of the reviews are: (1) to identify, consolidate and analyse the literature on paternal preconception health on pregnancy and intrapartum outcomes, and (2) to identify, consolidate and analyse the literature on paternal preconception health on postpartum and early childhood outcomes. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A scoping review will be conducted following the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase, Scopus and CINAHL databases will be searched for articles published in English. Two independent reviewers will screen titles and abstracts and then full text using Covidence, with conflicts resolved by a third reviewer. Data extraction will be performed using Covidence. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval is not required for this scoping review. Results will be published in peer-reviewed journals as well as presented at relevant national and international conferences and meetings.


Subject(s)
Postpartum Period , Preconception Care , Humans , Pregnancy , Female , Preconception Care/methods , Male , Pregnancy Outcome , Research Design , Fathers , Review Literature as Topic , Infant, Newborn
9.
Enferm. foco (Brasília) ; 15: 1-9, maio. 2024. ilus, tab
Article in English | LILACS, BDENF - Nursing | ID: biblio-1553863

ABSTRACT

Objetivo: Mapear as teorias de enfermagem utilizadas nos diferentes contextos de assistência à criança e ao adolescente. Métodos: Revisão de escopo de acordo com a metodologia do Instituto Joanna Briggs, que incluiu estudos primários, publicados em inglês, espanhol e português, sem restrição de tempo, e disponibilizados nas bases de dados MEDLINE, WOS, BDENF, SCOPUS, CINAHL e SCIELO. Resultados: Foram incluídos nesta revisão 53 artigos, os quais evidenciaram 17 teorias de enfermagem aplicadas aos mais diversos contextos pediátricos, como hospitalização, terapia intensiva, cuidados para doenças crônicas e promoção da saúde. A teoria mais utilizada para direcionar o cuidado foi a Teoria da Adaptação de Roy. São várias as experiências exitosas no campo da pesquisa e prática assistencial com a utilização das teorias de enfermagem. Conclusão: Diferentes teorias de enfermagem embasam o cuidado de enfermagem pediátrica; e a escolha de cada teoria deve ser norteada por um propósito explícito ou assunto de interesse dos autores, com base em suas expectativas pessoais e nas evidências científicas. Por meio deste estudo foi possível vislumbrar o potencial de cada teoria para subsidiar a prática da enfermagem pediátrica. (AU)


Objective: To map the Nursing theories used in the different contexts of assistance to children and adolescents. Methods: Scoping review according to the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology and included primary studies, published in English, Spanish and Portuguese, with no time restrictions, and made available in the MEDLINE, WOS, BDENF, SCOPUS, CINAHL and SCIELO databases. Results: A total of 53 articles were included in this review, which evidenced 17 Nursing theories applied to the most varied pediatric contexts, such as hospitalization, intensive care, care for chronic conditions, and health promotion. The theory most used to direct care was the Roy's Adaptation Theory. There are several successful experiences in the field of research and care practice with the use of Nursing theories. Conclusion: Different Nursing theories support pediatric Nursing care; and the choice of each theory must be guided by an explicit purpose or subject of interest to the authors, based on their personal expectations and on the scientific evidence. Through this study it was possible to glimpse the potential of each theory to support pediatric Nursing practice. (AU)


Objetivo: Mapear las teorías de Enfermería utilizadas en los diferentes contextos de atención a la niñez y adolescencia. Métodos: Revisión de alcance según la metodología del Joanna Briggs Institute que incluyó estudios primarios, publicados en inglés, español y portugués, sin restricciones de tiempo, y disponibles en las bases de datos MEDLINE, WOS, BDENF, SCOPUS, CINAHL y SCIELO. Resultados: En esta revisión se incluyeron un total de 53 artículos, que evidenciaron 17 teorías de enfermería aplicadas a los más variados contextos pediátricos, como hospitalización, cuidados intensivos, cuidados de enfermedades crónicas y promoción de la salud. La teoría más utilizadas para dirigir el cuidado fue la Teoría de la Adaptación de Roy. Existen varias experiencias exitosas en el campo de la investigación y la práctica asistencial con el uso de las teorías de Enfermería. Conclusión: Diferentes teorías de Enfermería sustentan la atención de Enfermería pediátrica; y la elección de cada teoría debe estar guiada por un propósito explícito o tema de interés para los autores, con base en sus expectativas personales y en la evidencia científica.A través de este estudio se pudo vislumbrar el potencial de cada teoría para sustentar la práctica de la Enfermería pediátrica. (AU)


Subject(s)
Nursing Theory , Pediatric Nursing , Review Literature as Topic , Nursing Care
10.
BMJ Open ; 14(5): e071402, 2024 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38772589

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In the temperate world, Lyme disease (LD) is the most common vector-borne disease affecting humans. In North America, LD surveillance and research have revealed an increasing territorial expansion of hosts, bacteria and vectors that has accompanied an increasing incidence of the disease in humans. To better understand the factors driving disease spread, predictive models can use current and historical data to predict disease occurrence in populations across time and space. Various prediction methods have been used, including approaches to evaluate prediction accuracy and/or performance and a range of predictors in LD risk prediction research. With this scoping review, we aim to document the different modelling approaches including types of forecasting and/or prediction methods, predictors and approaches to evaluating model performance (eg, accuracy). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This scoping review will follow the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Extension for Scoping Review guidelines. Electronic databases will be searched via keywords and subject headings (eg, Medical Subject Heading terms). The search will be performed in the following databases: PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, CAB Abstracts, Global Health and SCOPUS. Studies reported in English or French investigating the risk of LD in humans through spatial prediction and temporal forecasting methodologies will be identified and screened. Eligibility criteria will be applied to the list of articles to identify which to retain. Two reviewers will screen titles and abstracts, followed by a full-text screening of the articles' content. Data will be extracted and charted into a standard form, synthesised and interpreted. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This scoping review is based on published literature and does not require ethics approval. Findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at scientific conferences.


Subject(s)
Lyme Disease , Research Design , Lyme Disease/diagnosis , Lyme Disease/epidemiology , Humans , Forecasting , Review Literature as Topic
11.
BMJ Open ; 14(5): e079942, 2024 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38772588

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Improving the health of Indigenous adolescents is central to addressing the health inequities faced by Indigenous peoples. To achieve this, it is critical to understand what is needed from the perspectives of Indigenous adolescents themselves. There have been many qualitative studies that capture the perspectives of Indigenous young people, but synthesis of these has been limited to date. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This scoping review seeks to understand the specific health needs and priorities of Indigenous adolescents aged 10-24 years captured via qualitative studies conducted across Australia, Aotearoa New Zealand, Canada, the USA, Greenland and Sami populations (Norway and Sweden). A team of Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers from these nations will systematically search PubMed (including the MEDLINE, PubMed Central and Bookshelf databases), CINAHL, Embase, Scopus, the Informit Indigenous and Health Collections, Google Scholar, Arctic Health, the Circumpolar Health Bibliographic Database, Native Health Database, iPortal and NZresearch.org, as well as specific websites and clearinghouses within each nation for qualitative studies. We will limit our search to articles published in any language during the preceding 5 years given that needs may have changed significantly over time. Two independent reviewers will identify relevant articles using a two-step process, with disagreements resolved by a third reviewer and the wider research group. Data will then be extracted from included articles using a standardised form, with descriptive synthesis focussing on key needs and priorities. This scoping review will be conducted and reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews guidelines. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval was not required for this review. Findings will be disseminated via a peer-reviewed journal article and will inform a broader international collaboration for Indigenous adolescent health to develop evidence-based actions and solutions.


Subject(s)
Indigenous Peoples , Qualitative Research , Research Design , Humans , Adolescent , Child , Young Adult , Adolescent Health , Australia , Health Services Needs and Demand , New Zealand , Canada , Review Literature as Topic , Health Services, Indigenous
12.
BMJ Open ; 14(5): e080659, 2024 May 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38772897

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Intersectoral collaboration is a collaborative approach between the health sectors and other sectors to address the interdependent nature of the social determinants of health associated with chronic diseases such as diabetes. This scoping review aims to identify intersectoral health interventions implemented in primary care and community settings to improve the well-being and health of people living with type 2 diabetes. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This protocol is developed by the Arksey and O'Malley (2005) framework for scoping reviews and the Levac et al methodological enhancement. MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, grey literature and the reference list of key studies will be searched to identify any study, published between 2000 and 2023, related to the concepts of intersectorality, diabetes and primary/community care. Two reviewers will independently screen all titles/abstracts, full-text studies and grey literature for inclusion and extract data. Eligible interventions will be classified by sector of action proposed by the Social Determinants of Health Map and the conceptual framework for people-centred and integrated health services and further sorted according to the actors involved. This work started in September 2023 and will take approximately 10 months to be completed. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This review does not require ethical approval. The results will be disseminated through a peer-reviewed publication and presentations to stakeholders.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Social Determinants of Health , Intersectoral Collaboration , Research Design , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Review Literature as Topic
13.
Syst Rev ; 13(1): 120, 2024 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38698429

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Systematic reviews are viewed as the best study design to guide clinical decision-making as they are the least biased publications assuming they are well-conducted and include well-designed studies. Cochrane was initiated in 1993 with an aim of conducting high-quality systematic reviews. We aimed to examine the publication rates of non-Cochrane systematic reviews (henceforth referred to simply as "systematic reviews") and Cochrane reviews produced throughout Cochrane's existence and characterize changes throughout the period. METHODS: This observational study collected data on systematic reviews published between 1993 and 2022 in PubMed. Identified Cochrane reviews were linked to data from the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews via their Digital Object Identifier. Systematic reviews and Cochrane reviews were analyzed separately. Two authors screened a random sample of records to validate the overall sample, providing a precision of 98%. RESULTS: We identified 231,602 (94%) systematic reviews and 15,038 (6%) Cochrane reviews. Publication of systematic reviews has continuously increased with a median yearly increase rate of 26%, while publication of Cochrane reviews has decreased since 2015. From 1993 to 2002, Cochrane reviews constituted 35% of all systematic reviews in PubMed compared with 3.5% in 2013-2022. Systematic reviews consistently had fewer authors than Cochrane reviews, but the number of authors increased over time for both. Chinese first authors conducted 15% and 4% of systematic reviews published from 2013-2022 and 2003-2012, respectively. Most Cochrane reviews had first authors from the UK (36%). The native English-speaking countries the USA, the UK, Canada, and Australia produced a large share of systematic reviews (42%) and Cochrane reviews (62%). The largest publishers of systematic reviews in the last 10 years were gold open access journals. CONCLUSIONS: Publication of systematic reviews is increasing rapidly, while fewer Cochrane reviews have been published through the last decade. Native English-speaking countries produced a large proportion of both types of systematic reviews. Gold open access journals and Chinese first authors dominated the publication of systematic reviews for the past 10 years. More research is warranted examining why fewer Cochrane reviews are being published. Additionally, examining these systematic reviews for research waste metrics may provide a clearer picture of their utility.


Subject(s)
Systematic Reviews as Topic , Humans , Bibliometrics , Review Literature as Topic
14.
Syst Rev ; 13(1): 133, 2024 May 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38750593

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This cross-sectional study investigated the online dissemination of Cochrane reviews on digital health technologies. METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from inception up to May 2023. Cochrane reviews with any population (P), intervention or concept supported by any digital technology (I), any or no comparison (C), and any health outcome (O) were included. Data on review characteristics (bibliographic information, PICO, and evidence quality) and dissemination strategies were extracted and processed. Dissemination was assessed using review information on the Cochrane website and Altmetric data that trace the mentions of academic publications in nonacademic online channels. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Out of 170 records identified in the search, 100 Cochrane reviews, published between 2005 and 2023, were included. The reviews focused on consumers (e.g. patients, n = 86), people of any age (n = 44), and clinical populations (n = 68). All reviews addressed interventions or concepts supported by digital technologies with any devices (n = 73), mobile devices (n = 17), or computers (n = 10). The outcomes focused on disease treatment (n = 56), health promotion and disease prevention (n = 27), or management of care delivery (n = 17). All reviews included 1-132 studies, and half included 1-10 studies. Meta-analysis was performed in 69 reviews, and certainty of evidence was rated as high or moderate for at least one outcome in 46 reviews. In agreement with the Cochrane guidelines, all reviews had a plain language summary (PLS) that was available in 3-14 languages. The reviews were disseminated (i.e. mentioned online) predominantly via X/Twitter (n = 99) and Facebook (n = 69). Overall, 51 reviews were mentioned in up to 25% and 49 reviews in 5% of all research outputs traced by Altmetric data. Dissemination (i.e. higher Altmetric scores) was associated with bibliographic review characteristics (i.e. earlier publication year and PLS available in more languages), but not with evidence quality (i.e. certainty of evidence rating, number of studies, or meta-analysis performed in review). CONCLUSIONS: Online attention towards Cochrane reviews on digital health technologies is high. Dissemination is higher for older reviews and reviews with more PLS translations. Measures are required to improve dissemination of Cochrane reviews based on evidence quality. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: The study was prospectively registered at the Open Science Framework ( https://osf.io/mpw8u/ ).


Subject(s)
Digital Technology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Information Dissemination/methods , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Biomedical Technology , Review Literature as Topic , Internet , Digital Health
15.
BMJ Open ; 14(5): e082247, 2024 May 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38754879

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Despite the evidence supporting the value of digital supports for enhancing youth mental health services, there is a lack of guidance on how best to engage with young people in coproduction processes during the design and evaluation of these technologies. User input is crucial in digital mental health, especially for disadvantaged, vulnerable and marginalised young people as they are often excluded from coproduction. A scoping review of international literature written in English will explore the coproduction processes with marginalised young people in digital mental health supports, from mental health promotion to targeted interventions. The review is guided by the research question: what are the most appropriate coproduction processes for engaging young people, especially marginalised young people, in the different stages of designing and evaluating digital mental health supports? The review aims to map and summarise the evidence, inform the overall research project and address the knowledge gaps. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The scoping review uses Arksey and O'Malley's framework and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Protocols Extension for Scoping Reviews. From 22-24 October 2023, PubMed, Scopus, EBSCO, ASSIA, Web of Science, Ovid MEDLINE, Cochrane database, Embase, Google Scholar, ProQuest, OAIster and BASE will be systematically searched. Papers from 2021 onwards with a range of study designs and evidence that illustrate engagement with marginalised young people (aged 16-25) in the design, implementation and evaluation of digital technologies for young people's mental health will be considered for inclusion. At least two reviewers will screen full texts and chart data. The results of this review will be summarised quantitatively through numerical counts of included literature and qualitatively through a narrative synthesis. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval is not required. Results will be disseminated through publications in peer-reviewed journals. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: This scoping review protocol has been registered with the Open Science Framework (https://osf.io/9xhgv).


Subject(s)
Mental Health Services , Humans , Adolescent , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Mental Health , Young Adult , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic
16.
BMJ Open ; 14(5): e076727, 2024 May 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38754883

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Dementia is a growing public health concern, and providing long-term care for individuals affected by this condition is challenging for their family caregivers. While researchers have explored various intervention options to provide psychological support for dementia caregivers, mentalising imagery therapy (MIT) has gained significant recognition as an effective programme. Despite its significance and effectiveness, there is a lack of comprehensive scoping reviews of MIT in dementia caregiving. Thus, conducting such a review can provide valuable insights into the status and outcomes of MIT, identify gaps in existing research and provide recommendations for a more effective clinical practice. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This study proposes a scoping review conducted according to the Joanna Briggs Institute, Arksey and O'Malley's methodological framework, as well as the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses-Scoping Review Extension. PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, Scopus, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases will be searched while grey literature will be retrieved via Google Scholar. Covidence will be used to manage the literature selection process and remove duplicate publications. Two researchers will independently screen the literature according to the inclusion criteria, with any discrepancies resolved through discussions with a third researcher. Data will be presented in a structured tabular format, with a narrative synthesis providing an overview of the findings on the identified research gaps and the effectiveness of MIT in the field of dementia caregiving. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: In a scoping review, no ethical approval is necessary. The results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: The scoping review protocol has been registered with Open Science Framework (https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/FHRG8).


Subject(s)
Caregivers , Dementia , Imagery, Psychotherapy , Research Design , Humans , Caregivers/psychology , Dementia/therapy , Imagery, Psychotherapy/methods , Review Literature as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic
17.
BMJ Open ; 14(4): e079698, 2024 Apr 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38684274

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Cleft lip and/or palate (CL+/-P) is a congenital malformation affecting the lip and palate, requiring long-term treatment due to potential associated complications. For this reason, it is important for the patient to be continuously monitored and followed for health promotion and prevention, as well as improving the quality of life. The aim of this scoping review protocol is to identify and map the available evidence regarding the application of digital resources and technologies in the monitoring and follow-up of patients with CL+/-P. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This scoping review protocol follows the guidelines recommended by the Joanna Briggs Institute Manual, employing the PCC acronym (Patient/Concept/Context). Searches will be conducted, in May 2024, of PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature, ScienceDirect, as well as grey literature indexed in ProQuest Open Access Dissertations & Theses and Google Scholar. The review will consider all types of published studies, including grey literature, in English, Portuguese and Spanish languages, and will consider studies regardless of publication date. Exclusions will apply to studies that do not address the use of digital resources and technologies in CL+/-P monitoring and follow-up. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: As this is a scoping review, no ethics committee approval is required. After completion, the plan is to publish results in scientific journals on craniofacial malformations. STUDY REGISTRATION: Open Science Framework, DOI:10.17605/OSF.IO/Y6AG8.


Subject(s)
Cleft Lip , Cleft Palate , Humans , Research Design , Quality of Life , Telemedicine/methods , Review Literature as Topic
18.
PLoS One ; 19(4): e0298927, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38625992

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Dyadic care, which is the concurrent provision of care for a birthing person and their infant, is an approach that may improve disparities in postnatal health outcomes, but no synthesis of existing dyadic care studies has been conducted. This scoping review seeks to identify and summarize: 1) dyadic care studies globally, in which the birthing person-infant dyad are cared for together, 2) postnatal health outcomes that have been evaluated following dyadic care interventions, and 3) research and practice gaps in the implementation, dissemination, and effectiveness of dyadic care to reduce healthcare disparities. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eligible studies will (1) include dyadic care instances for the birthing person and infant, and 2) report clinical outcomes for at least one member of the dyad or intervention outcomes. Studies will be excluded if they pertain to routine obstetric care, do not present original data, and/or are not available in English or Spanish. We will search CINAHL, Ovid (both Embase and Medline), Scopus, Cochrane Library, PubMed, Google Scholar, Global Health, Web of Science Core Collection, gray literature, and WHO regional databases. Screening will be conducted via Covidence and data will be extracted to capture the study design, dyad characteristics, clinical outcomes, and implementation outcomes. The risk of bias will be assessed using the Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Tool. A narrative synthesis of the study findings will be presented. DISCUSSION: This scoping review will summarize birthing person-infant dyadic care interventions that have been studied and the evidence for their effectiveness. This aggregation of existing data can be used by healthcare systems working to improve healthcare delivery to their patients with the aim of reducing postnatal morbidity and mortality. Areas for future research will also be highlighted. TRAIL REGISTRATION: This review has been registered at Open Science Framework (OSF, https://osf.io/5fs6e/).


Subject(s)
Academies and Institutes , Healthcare Disparities , Infant , Female , Pregnancy , Child , Humans , Databases, Factual , Gene Library , Infant Care , Review Literature as Topic
19.
BMJ Open ; 14(4): e078712, 2024 Apr 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38569711

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Responsive caregiving (RC) leads to positive outcomes in children, including secure attachment with caregivers, emotional regulation, positive social interactions and cognitive development. Through our scoping review, we aim to summarise the practices and outcomes of RC in diverse caregiver and child populations from 0 to 8 years. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will use the Arksey and O'Malley framework and the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology for scoping reviews. We shall present our findings as per the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines for scoping review. Only peer-reviewed, English-language articles from 1982 to 2022 will be included from PubMed, Web of Science, APA PsychInfo, APA PsycArticles, SocINDEX and Google Scholar databases. Reference lists of included articles will also be screened. The search strategy will be developed for each database, and search results will be imported into Rayyan. Screening will be done in two phases: (1) titles and abstracts will be screened by two authors and conflicts will be resolved by mutual discussion between both or by consulting with a senior author; and (2) full-texts of shortlisted studies from the first phase will then be screened using the same inclusion/exclusion criteria. A data extraction form will be developed to collate relevant information from the final list of included articles. This form will be pilot tested on the first 10 papers and iteratively refined prior to data extraction from the remaining articles. Results will be presented in figures, tables and a narrative summary. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No ethics approval needed as the review shall only use already published data. We shall publish the review in an open-access, peer-reviewed journal and disseminate through newsletters, social media pages, and presentations to relevant audiences.


Subject(s)
Emotional Regulation , Mental Health , Child , Humans , Academies and Institutes , Cognition , Databases, Factual , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic
20.
Syst Rev ; 13(1): 98, 2024 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38561810

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Executive functions (EFs) and episodic memory are fundamental components of cognition that deteriorate with age and are crucial for independent living. While numerous reviews have explored the effect of exercise on these components in old age, these reviews screened and analyzed selected older adult populations, or specific exercise modes, thus providing only limited answers to the fundamental question on the effect of exercise on cognition in old age. This article describes the protocol for a systematic review and multilevel meta-analytic study aiming at evaluating the effectiveness of different types of chronic exercise in improving and/or maintaining EFs and long-term episodic memory in older adults. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The study protocol was written in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Several databases will be searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in older adults aged ≥ 60 years providing any kind of planned, structured, and repetitive exercise interventions, and EFs and/or episodic memory measures as outcomes, published in English in peer-reviewed journals and doctoral dissertations will be included. Two independent reviewers will screen the selected articles, while a third reviewer will resolve possible conflicts. The Cochrane risk-of-bias tool will be used to assess the quality of the studies. Finally, data will be extracted from the selected articles, and the formal method of combining individual data from the selected studies will be applied using a random effect multilevel meta-analysis. The data analysis will be conducted with the metafor package in R. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: This review will synthesize the existing evidence and pinpoint gaps existing in the literature on the effects of exercise on EFs and episodic memory in healthy and unhealthy older adults. Findings from this meta-analysis will help to design effective exercise interventions for older adults to improve and/or maintain EFs and episodic memory. Its results will be useful for many researchers and professionals working with older adults and their families. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42022367111.


Subject(s)
Executive Function , Memory, Episodic , Humans , Aged , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Exercise , Review Literature as Topic
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