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1.
BMC Neurol ; 24(1): 125, 2024 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38622553

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with a stroke often cannot care for themselves after hospital discharge. Assessment of their self-care ability is the first step in planning post-discharge home care. This study aimed to design and validate a measure of perceived self-care ability (PSCA) in stroke patients. METHODS: A sequential-exploratory mixed method was conducted in Tehran, Iran, in 2020-2021. The qualitative phase involved in-depth semi-structured interviews with 12 participants. Transcripts were content analyzed. The results guided the development of 81 items. psychometric properties such as face validity (Impact Score > 1.5), content validity ratio (CVR > 0.63), content validity index (Item Content Validity Index: ICVI > 0.78, Scale Content Validity Index/Average: SCVI/Ave > 0.8) and Kappa value (Kappa > 0.7), internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha > 0.7), relative reliability (ICC: inter class correlation coefficient), absolute reliability (Standard Error of Measurement: SEM and Minimal Detectable Changes: MDC), convergent validity (Correlation Coefficient between 0.4-0.7), interpretability, responsiveness, feasibility, and ceiling and floor effects were assessed. RESULTS: Content analysis of the qualitative interviews yielded 5 major categories and 9 subcategories that reflected "Perceptual stability", "Cognitive fluctuations", "Sensory, Motor and Physical health"," The subjective nature" and "The dynamic nature" of PSCA. Results of face and content validity reduced the number of items to 32, capturing three dimensions of PSCA in chronic stroke patients; these dimensions included perceptual ability, threatened health status, and sensory, motor, and cognitive ability. The findings supported the reliability and validity of the measure. CONCLUSIONS: The PSCA questionnaire was developed and validated within the Iranian culture. It is useful in assessing the self-care of patients with stroke and in informing practice.


Subject(s)
Aftercare , Stroke , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , Iran , Self Care , Patient Discharge , Surveys and Questionnaires , Stroke/therapy , Psychometrics/methods , Antigens, Neoplasm , Neoplasm Proteins , GPI-Linked Proteins
2.
BMC Palliat Care ; 23(1): 102, 2024 Apr 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38627698

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Advanced cancer patients with good Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (score 0-1) are underrepresented in current qualitative reports compared with their dying counterparts. AIM: To explore the experiences and care needs of advanced cancer patients with good ECOG. DESIGN: A qualitative phenomenological approach using semi-structured interview was employed. Data was analyzed using the Colaizzi's method. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Purposive sample of terminal solid cancer patients on palliative care aged 18-70 years with a 0-1 ECOG score were recruited from a tertiary general hospital. RESULTS: Sixteen participants were interviewed. Seven themes were generated from the transcripts, including experiencing no or mild symptoms; independence in self-care, decision-making, and financial capacity; prioritization of cancer growth suppression over symptom management; financial concerns; hope for prognosis and life; reluctance to discuss death and after-death arrangements; and use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and religious coping. CONCLUSIONS: Advanced cancer patients with good ECOG have distinct experiences and care needs from their dying counterparts. They tend to experience no or mild symptoms, demonstrate a strong sense of independence, and prioritize cancer suppression over symptom management. Financial concerns were common and impact their care-related decision-making. Though being hopeful for their prognosis and life, many are reluctant to discuss death and after-death arrangements. Many Chinese patients use herbal medicine as a CAM modality but need improved awareness of and accessibility to treatment options. Healthcare professionals and policy-makers should recognize their unique experiences and needs when tailoring care strategies and policies.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Humans , Neoplasms/therapy , Palliative Care , Prognosis , Self Care , Qualitative Research
3.
PLoS One ; 19(4): e0301606, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38625953

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prompt access to evidence-based treatment for children and young people with eating disorders is important for outcomes, yet the gap in service provision remains pervasive. Record levels of young people are waiting for eating disorder treatment and access to care is limited. Guided self-help interventions that are brief and require minimal clinician support have the potential to meet the unprecedented demand for treatment quickly and effectively. OBJECTIVE: To examine the feasibility, acceptability and proof of concept of a novel, CBT guided self-help intervention for children and young people with threshold and subthreshold eating disorders. METHODS: A single-arm, proof-of-concept pilot study of the CBT guided self-help intervention will be conducted. Children and young people (aged 11-19) with threshold and subthreshold eating disorders will receive a self-help intervention covering the core components of CBT, supported by 8 weekly guidance sessions delivered remotely. Clinical outcomes (eating-related psychopathology and associated impairment, changes in weight, depression, anxiety, and behavioural difficulties) will be assessed at baseline and post-intervention (12 weeks). Feasibility and acceptability of the intervention will be measured using various outcomes, including adherence to, and engagement with the intervention, rates of recruitment and retention, measure completion and treatment satisfaction. Qualitative data will also be collected for future intervention refinement. DISCUSSION: If the intervention is shown to produce clinical benefits in this pilot study, a fully powered randomised pilot study will be warranted with the ultimate goal of increasing access to psychological treatment for children and young people threshold and subthreshold eating disorders. ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION: This study protocol (S1 File) adheres to the guidelines outlined in the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) checklist for trial protocols [1, 2] which can be found in S1 Checklist. The numbers in parentheses in this protocol correspond to the item numbers in the SPIRIT checklist. The order of items has been modified to group similar items.


Subject(s)
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Feeding and Eating Disorders , Child , Humans , Adolescent , Pilot Projects , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Anxiety , Self Care , Feeding and Eating Disorders/therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
4.
JMIR Hum Factors ; 11: e46811, 2024 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38578675

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have been positioned as useful tools to facilitate self-care. The interaction between a patient and technology, known as usability, is particularly important for achieving positive health outcomes. Specific characteristics of patients with chronic diseases, including multimorbidity, can affect their interaction with different technologies. Thus, studying the usability of ICTs in the field of multimorbidity has become a key element to ensure their relevant role in promoting self-care. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to analyze the usability of a technological tool dedicated to health and self-care in patients with multimorbidity in primary care. METHODS: A descriptive observational cross-sectional usability study was performed framed in the clinical trial in the primary care health centers of Madrid Health Service of the TeNDER (Affective Based Integrated Care for Better Quality of Life) project. The TeNDER technological tool integrates sensors for monitoring physical and sleep activity along with a mobile app for consulting the data collected and working with self-management tools. This project included patients over 60 years of age who had one or more chronic diseases, at least one of which was mild-moderate cognitive impairment, Parkinson disease, or cardiovascular disease. From the 250 patients included in the project, 38 agreed to participate in the usability study. The usability variables investigated were effectiveness, which was determined by the degree of completion and the total number of errors per task; efficiency, evaluated as the average time to perform each task; and satisfaction, quantified by the System Usability Scale. Five tasks were evaluated based on real case scenarios. Usability variables were analyzed according to the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of patients. A logistic regression model was constructed to estimate the factors associated with the type of support provided for task completion. RESULTS: The median age of the 38 participants was 75 (IQR 72.0-79.0) years. There was a slight majority of women (20/38, 52.6%) and the participants had a median of 8 (IQR 7.0-11.0) chronic diseases. Thirty patients completed the usability study, with a usability effectiveness result of 89.3% (134/150 tasks completed). Among the 30 patients, 66.7% (n=20) completed all tasks and 56.7% (17/30) required personalized help on at least one task. In the multivariate analysis, educational level emerged as a facilitating factor for independent task completion (odds ratio 1.79, 95% CI 0.47-6.83). The median time to complete the total tasks was 296 seconds (IQR 210.0-397.0) and the median satisfaction score was 55 (IQR 45.0-62.5) out of 100. CONCLUSIONS: Although usability effectiveness was high, the poor efficiency and usability satisfaction scores suggest that there are other factors that may interfere with the results. Multimorbidity was not confirmed to be a key factor affecting the usability of the technological tool. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT05681065; https://clinicaltrials.gov/study/NCT05681065.


Subject(s)
Multimorbidity , Self Care , Humans , Female , Middle Aged , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Quality of Life , Chronic Disease
5.
J Appl Res Intellect Disabil ; 37(3): e13236, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38561628

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Static and dynamic balance skills can be related to the activities of daily living (ADL) in children with non-syndromic intellectual disabilities, and the type of balance skills affecting ADL can differ depending on the domain of ADL (self-care, mobility, and social function). METHODS: The ADL capabilities of 66 children with intellectual disabilities were assessed using the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) and were examined in relation to static and dynamic balance skills. RESULTS: Significant positive correlations were found between the one-leg standing and PEDI (r = .841 for self-care, r = .700 for mobility, and r = .760 for social function). Our analysis showed that static balance skills affected self-care, dynamic balance skills affected mobility, and intelligence quotient affected social function. CONCLUSIONS: Improving balance skills is important for enhancing ADL capabilities, and the type of balance skills that need enhancement vary based on the domain of ADL.


Subject(s)
Activities of Daily Living , Intellectual Disability , Child , Humans , Self Care
6.
Nurs Adm Q ; 48(2): 151-155, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38564725

ABSTRACT

Self-care quickly became a buzzword for health care workers during the recent pandemic. Strategies to improve self-care and build resiliency for our first-line workers were often seen in the literature or as topics at conferences and webinars. One strategy that was missing was the importance of leaders to be self-care role models for our employees. Just as leaders need to role model the organization's values, they also need to role model self-care so employees can follow their example and be assured that their leader views self-care as important. Leadership coaching must now include self-care as a strategy to improve not only the leader's mental, physical, and emotional health but also the health and wellness of their team as well as the entire organization.


Subject(s)
Leadership , Mentoring , Humans , Self Care , Health Personnel
7.
Nurs Health Sci ; 26(2): e13117, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38566413

ABSTRACT

Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characterized by prolonged elevated blood glucose levels. Diabetes self-management education and support programs are widely used in western countries. The impact of social media education and support interventions such as a WhatsApp-based program and the nurses' role in supporting and implementing this self-management program unclear. Using a WhatsApp-based program, we evaluated the effects of a 6-week program in improving self-efficacy and education among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Saudi Arabia. Eligible participants (n = 80) were recruited with the support of nurses into a randomized controlled trial and randomly assigned into self-management intervention and control groups. The intervention group (n = 40) received the self-management program support and the usual care. The control group (n = 40) received only the usual care with nurses' support. Results from generalized estimating equation analysis showed a significant increase in self-efficacy, self-management, and education in the WhatsApp-based intervention support group compared with the control group at 6 and 12 weeks (follow-up). Implementing the program via social media improves self-efficacy. The use of social media platforms should be promoted for global diabetes management.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Self-Management , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Self-Help Groups , Self-Management/methods , Health Behavior , Self Care/methods
9.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(Suppl 1): 979, 2024 Apr 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38566003

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: HIV self-testing (HIVST) can use either oral-fluid or blood-based tests. Studies have shown strong preferences for self-testing compared to facility-based services. Despite availability of low-cost blood-based HIVST options, to date, HIVST implementation in sub-Saharan Africa has largely been oral-fluid-based. We investigated whether users preferred blood-based (i.e. using blood sample derived from a finger prick) or oral fluid-based HIVST in rural and urban Malawi. METHODS: At clinics providing HIV testing services (n = 2 urban; n = 2 rural), participants completed a semi-structured questionnaire capturing sociodemographic data before choosing to test using oral-fluid-based HVST, blood-based HIVST or provider-delivered testing. They also completed a self-administered questionnaire afterwards, followed by a confirmatory test using the national algorithm then appropriate referral. We used simple and multivariable logistic regression to identify factors associated with preference for oral-fluid or blood-based HIVST. RESULTS: July to October 2018, N = 691 participants enrolled in this study. Given the choice, 98.4% (680/691) selected HIVST over provider-delivered testing. Of 680 opting for HIVST, 416 (61.2%) chose oral-fluid-based HIVST, 264 (38.8%) chose blood-based HIVST and 99.1% (674/680) reported their results appropriately. Self-testers who opted for blood-based HIVST were more likely to be male (50.3% men vs. 29.6% women, p < 0.001), attending an urban facility (43% urban vs. 34.6% rural, p = 0.025) and regular salary-earners (49.5% regular vs. 36.8% non-regular, p = 0.012). After adjustment, only sex was found to be associated with choice of self-test (adjusted OR 0.43 (95%CI: 0.3-0.61); p-value < 0.001). Among 264 reporting blood-based HIVST results, 11 (4.2%) were HIV-positive. Blood-based HIVST had sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 71.5-100%) and specificity of 99.6% (95% CI: 97.6-100%), with 20 (7.6%) invalid results. Among 416 reporting oral-fluid-based HIVST results 18 (4.3%) were HIV-positive. Oral-fluid-based HIVST had sensitivity of 88.9% (95% CI: 65.3-98.6%) and specificity of 98.7% (95% CI: 97.1-99.6%), with no invalid results. CONCLUSIONS: Offering both blood-based and oral-fluid-based HIVST resulted in high uptake when compared directly with provider-delivered testing. Both types of self-testing achieved high accuracy among users provided with a pre-test demonstration beforehand. Policymakers and donors need to adequately plan and budget for the sensitisation and support needed to optimise the introduction of new quality-assured blood-based HIVST products.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections , Self-Testing , Humans , Male , Female , HIV , Cross-Sectional Studies , Malawi , Self Care , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Testing , Surveys and Questionnaires , Mass Screening/methods
10.
Nurs Sci Q ; 37(2): 148-153, 2024 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38491876

ABSTRACT

This retrospective study investigates the effectiveness of a nursing intervention based on Orem's self-care model of nursing with elderly patients with femoral head necrosis who underwent total hip arthroplasty. Postoperative outcomes in the intervention and control groups were assessed by the visual analog scale (VAS), Barthel index, and Harris Hip Score (HHS). Participants in the intervention group had significantly better outcomes in terms of VAS, Barthel index, and HHS. The occurrence of pneumonia was significantly different between the groups. Those who underwent Orem's self-care model of nursing intervention were highly satisfied with their status postoperatively compared with the control group.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Nursing Care , Humans , Aged , Retrospective Studies , Self Care , Nursing Theory
13.
PLoS One ; 19(3): e0300196, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38498512

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is 17% higher in rural dwellers compared to their urban counterparts, and it increases with age, with an estimated 25% of older adults (≥ 65 years) diagnosed. Appropriate self-care is necessary for optimal clinical outcomes. Overall, T2D self-care is consistently poor among the general population but is even worse in rural-dwellers and older adults. In rural Kentucky, up to 23% of adults in Appalachian communities have been diagnosed with T2D and, of those, 26.8% are older adults. To attain optimal clinical outcomes, social environmental factors, including social support, are vital when promoting T2D self-care. Specifically, peer support has shown to be efficacious in improving T2D self-care behaviors and clinical and psychosocial outcomes related to T2D; however, literature also suggests self-selected social support can be obstructive when engaging in healthful activities. Currently available evidence-based interventions (EBIs) using peer support have not been used to prioritize older adults, especially those living in rural communities. METHOD: To address this gap, we conducted formative research with stakeholders, and collaboratively identified an acceptable and feasible peer support EBI-peer health coaching (PHC)-that has resulted in improved clinical and psychosocial T2D-related outcomes among participants who did not reside in rural communities nor were ≥65 years. The goal of the proposed study is to use a 2x2 factorial design to test the adapted PHC components and determine their preliminary effectiveness to promote self-care behaviors and improve glycemic control among older adults living in Appalachian Kentucky. Testing the PHC components of the peer support intervention will be instrumental in promoting care for older adults in Appalachia, as it will allow for a larger scale intervention, which if effective, could be disseminated to community partners in Appalachia. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT06003634) in August 2023.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Humans , Aged , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/psychology , Feasibility Studies , Self Care/methods , Social Support , Appalachian Region/epidemiology
14.
PLoS One ; 19(3): e0299971, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38484001

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Health literacy is widely considered to be a determinant of self-care behavior in people with diabetes. However, the mechanisms underlying how health literacy is linked to self-care behaviors have not been clearly elucidated. The aim of the present study was to explore the mediating roles of access to healthcare, provider-patient interaction, motivation, self-efficacy in the effect of health literacy on diabetes self-care behaviors among diabetic patients with physical disabilities and investigate the moderating effect of age in a moderated mediation model. METHODS: The online survey was participated by a total of 214 diabetic patients with physical disabilities from November to December 2021. The moderated mediation analysis was examined using the Hayes' PROCESS macro modeling tool based on the bias-corrected bootstrapping method. RESULTS: After controlling for education, the results yielded a significant indirect effect of health literacy on diabetes self-care through motivation and self-efficacy. A partially mediating relationship also was confirmed, as there is a positive direct effect of health literacy on diabetes self-care. Furthermore, age groups (i.e., age <40 and ≥ 40) functioned as a moderator of the mediating effects of motivation and self-efficacy between health literacy and diabetes self-care. CONCLUSION: This study emphasized the important role of motivation and self-efficacy which play in linking health literacy and self-care behavior, especially for younger diabetic patients with physical disabilities. In the light of these findings, a health-literacy tailored motivation and self-efficacy enhancing program may be key targets for interventions promoting diabetes self-care behaviors in people with physical disabilities.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Health Literacy , Humans , Self Care , Motivation , Patients
15.
J Card Fail ; 30(3): 488-504, 2024 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38485295

ABSTRACT

Cognitive impairment is common among adults with heart failure (HF), as both diseases are strongly related to advancing age and multimorbidity (including both cardiovascular and noncardiovascular conditions). Moreover, HF itself can contribute to alterations in the brain. Cognition is critical for a myriad of self-care activities that are necessary to manage HF, and it also has a major impact on prognosis; consequently, cognitive impairment has important implications for self-care, medication management, function and independence, and life expectancy. Attuned clinicians caring for patients with HF can identify clinical clues present at medical encounters that suggest cognitive impairment. When present, screening tests such as the Mini-Cog, and consideration of referral for comprehensive neurocognitive testing may be indicated. Management of cognitive impairment should focus on treatment of underlying causes of and contributors to cognitive impairment, medication management/optimization, and accommodation of deficiencies in self-care. Given its implications on care, it is important to integrate cognitive impairment into clinical decision making. Although gaps in knowledge and challenges to implementation exist, this scientific statement is intended to guide clinicians in caring for and meeting the needs of an increasingly complex and growing subpopulation of patients with HF.


Subject(s)
Cognitive Dysfunction , Heart Failure , Adult , Humans , Heart Failure/complications , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnosis , Cognitive Dysfunction/epidemiology , Cognitive Dysfunction/etiology , Cognition , Self Care/psychology , Risk Factors
16.
BMC Womens Health ; 24(1): 151, 2024 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38431649

ABSTRACT

AIM: Breast cancer is the most prevalent type of cancer among women. One form of care related to early detection of breast cancer is breast self-examination (BSE). However, evidence on knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) of BSE and its determining factors are minuscule in an Indian context. Therefore, the present study primarily examined the prevalence of KAP of BSE. Further, its association with general self-care and cultural factors was determined. METHODS: This cross-sectional study obtained data from 412 women (Mn age = 26.63) from two rural localities of Vellore district, Tamil Nadu, India. Self-reported questionnaires of KAP of BSE, self-care, and cultural factors were applied. Statistical analyses include independent sample t-test and binomial logistic regression. RESULTS: The majority of the sample had inadequate knowledge (58%), unfavourable attitudes (73.8%), and poor practice (89.6%) of BSE. The general self-care among the sample was moderate. Self-care was found to be a significant predictor of knowledge (b = 0.07, p < .05) and attitude (b = 0.092, p < .05) toward BSE. Shyness was identified as a negative predictor of KAP. Discouraged breast health discussions predicted inadequate knowledge, and not being educated by family/friends had a negative impact on knowledge and practice. A preference for same-gender physicians led to an unfavourable attitude toward BSE. CONCLUSION: The observed negative trends in KAP of BSE are concerning. The results imply that girls and women should be educated and encouraged to practice BSE and promote self-care behaviours. At the same time, efforts to reduce cultural barriers may be helpful to promote the KAP of BSE.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Female , Humans , Adult , Breast Self-Examination , Cross-Sectional Studies , India , Self Care , Breast Neoplasms/diagnosis , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
J Christ Nurs ; 41(2): 106-111, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38436341

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Providing high-quality heart failure education through smartphone applications (apps) empowers patients to more successfully manage their disease process outside the hospital setting. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the addition of nurse navigators to increase engagement of newly-diagnosed heart failure patients with the GetWell Loop (GWL) technology program that assists patient learning and monitoring for self-care. Adding navigators increased patient engagement with the GWL over the use of the GWL without navigators.


Subject(s)
Heart Failure , Mobile Applications , Humans , Patient Participation , Self Care , Technology
18.
Br J Nurs ; 33(6): S3, 2024 Mar 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38512789
19.
Trials ; 25(1): 205, 2024 Mar 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38515201

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With one in five individuals aged 65 or older living with type 2 diabetes worldwide, it is crucial to acknowledge and address the challenges faced by this population. In this context, our study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a behavioral intervention model delivered through a smart speaker on mental health and diabetes self-care in the elderly with diabetes. METHODS: This is a single-center, pragmatic, parallel two-arm open randomized clinical trial involving elderly patients with type 2 diabetes. We plan to enroll a total of 112 individuals who will be randomized 1:1 to receive the Smart Speaker EchoDot 3rd Gen device (Amazon Echo®) for home use (intervention arm) or to maintain usual care (control arm). The primary outcome is mental distress, assessed using the 20-item Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) after a 12-week intervention period. Secondary outcomes include quality of life, adherence to diabetes self-care behaviors, perception of stress, glycemic control, blood pressure, and lipid profile. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) will be used to evaluate the effects of the intervention on the outcomes. DISCUSSION: This study assesses the effectiveness of an interactive virtual assistance system for enhancing mental health and glycemic control among elderly individuals with type 2 diabetes. The findings may introduce smart speakers as a valuable tool for promoting diabetes-related self-care in this population. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT05329376. Registered on 15 April 2022. Enrollment began on 20 June 2023 and the last update of protocol was on 13 December 2023.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Mental Disorders , Aged , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/psychology , Quality of Life , Self Care , Health Promotion , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
20.
Public Health ; 230: 96-104, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38521030

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The popularity of contracted family doctor services in China has been growing in recent years, but community-family-doctor-based type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) intervention programs have yet to be adequately studied. This study was to evaluate the short- and long-term effects of community-family-doctor-based self-management interventions for T2DM and to explore strategies for long-term glycemic control. STUDY DESIGN: This was a randomized controlled trial. METHODS: A total of 144 eligible participants were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups. The control group received only routine community diabetes care, and the intervention group received community-family-doctor-based interventions involving the same standard of care. The interventions lasted for 3 months, and the follow-up was continued for 15 months. Intention-to-treat analysis and generalized estimation equations were then used to determine the short- and long-term effects of the interventions on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), diabetes self-management, and medication adherence. RESULTS: There were statistically significantly greater improvements in all aspects of the intervention group after 3 months of intervention. Compared with baseline, changes in the attitude (ß = 0.384, 95% confidence interval [CI; 0.194, 0.574], P < 0.001), practice (ß = 1.751, 95% CI [0.762, 2.739], P = 0.001), and knowledge, attitudes, practice total scores (ß = 2.338, 95% CI [0.682, 3.995], P = 0.006) of patients in the intervention group were statistically significant after 15 months, and the HbA1c (8.19 ± 1.73%), knowledge (16.42 ± 3.21), and medication adherence (5.53 ± 1.76) scores were slightly better than those at baseline, although not statistically significant (P > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: T2DM self-management interventions based on community family doctors improved patients' HbA1c, diabetes self-management, and medication adherence, did not do so significantly in the long term.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Physicians , Self-Management , Humans , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Glycated Hemoglobin , Self Care
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