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1.
Ann Palliat Med ; 13(3): 568-574, 2024 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38834204

ABSTRACT

Spirituality-defined as "the way individuals seek and express meaning and purpose and the way they experience their connectedness to the moment, to self, to others, to nature, and to the significant or sacred"-plays important roles in the setting of serious illnesses such as cancer. The nature of oncologic emergencies, with their attendant imminent threat to life and urgent medical decision-making, renders more salient the frequent role of spirituality in the context of coping, spiritual needs, and medical decisions. Furthermore, these roles highlight the importance of spiritual care: recognition of and attention to patients' and their family's spirituality within medical care. Extant palliative care quality guidelines include spiritual care as a core domain of palliative care provision. Generalist spiritual care requires spiritual history-taking by clinicians and respect and integration of spirituality and spiritual values into medical care. Specialty spiritual care involves the integration of professionally trained spiritual care providers into the care of patients facing oncologic emergencies. Spiritual care is associated with better patient quality of life and greater transitions to more comfort-focused care; among family caregivers, it is associated with greater care satisfaction. Spiritual care is always patient-centered, and hence can be provided by clinicians regardless of their spiritual backgrounds. The integration of spiritual care into the care of patients and their families holds promise to advance holistic care and improve well-being in this setting of oncologic emergencies.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Palliative Care , Spirituality , Humans , Neoplasms/psychology , Neoplasms/therapy , Palliative Care/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology
2.
BMC Psychol ; 12(1): 326, 2024 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38835060

ABSTRACT

This study seeks to analyze the psychological construction of Unconventional Religious Orientations and their association with individual income level satisfaction within Generation Z. Generation Z, individuals born between 1995 and 2010, grew up in a socio-cultural context marked by digitization and globalization. This study identifies three key dimensions of Unconventional Religious Orientations: religious spiritual dependence, religious instrumental tendencies, and religious uniqueness identity. By combining rootedness theory, semi-structured interviews, and literature review, we constructed and refined a set of relevant scales. Using exploratory and validation factor analyses (EFA and CFA), we verified the structural validity of the scale. The results of the analyses revealed significant negative correlations between satisfaction with income level and all dimensions of Unconventional Religious Orientation for Generation Z, suggesting that Unconventional Religious Orientation tends to diminish as income satisfaction increases. In addition, the significant positive correlations between these dimensions of religious inclination imply that they may share certain underlying factors in their psychological structure. This study not only successfully developed a set of psychometric instruments for Unconventional Religious Orientations, but also provided a new psychological perspective for understanding the dynamic interaction between economic satisfaction and religious psychological attitudes in Generation Z.


Subject(s)
Income , Personal Satisfaction , Psychometrics , Religion and Psychology , Humans , Female , Psychometrics/instrumentation , Male , Adult , China , Middle Aged , Factor Analysis, Statistical , Spirituality , Surveys and Questionnaires/standards , Religion , East Asian People
4.
Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am ; 33(3): 411-421, 2024 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38823813

ABSTRACT

Religion and spirituality have long been known to impact both physical and mental health. Considering religion and spirituality as possible additions to social determinants of health, this article examines the current state of religion and spirituality in the United States and also discusses the ways in which they can contribute to the mental health of children and adolescents. Further, this article also discusses new approaches within religion and spirituality to address the changing needs of future generations.


Subject(s)
Spirituality , Humans , Child , Adolescent , United States , Mental Health , Religion and Psychology , Religion
5.
J Christ Nurs ; 41(3): 139, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38853309
6.
J Christ Nurs ; 41(3): 174-177, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38853317

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Living one's Christian faith and providing appropriate spiritual care in professional nursing practice can seem challenging. The IHS Global® Saline Process™ course equips Christian healthcare workers with knowledge and tools to provide appropriate spiritual support and consider how God is calling them to share his truth and love. After participating in a Saline Process™ course, ongoing engagement helps clinicians grow in practicing what they have learned. Nurses Christian Fellowship International (NCFI) partners with IHS Global® to bring the Saline Process™ to Christian nurses and other clinicians around the world, building the community of providers offering whole-person care.


Subject(s)
Christianity , Spirituality , Humans , Adult , Female , Male , Middle Aged
7.
J Christ Nurs ; 41(3): 191, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38853320
9.
J Christ Nurs ; 41(3): 194, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38853323
10.
J Christ Nurs ; 41(3): 193, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38853322
11.
J Christ Nurs ; 41(3): E47-E55, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38853327

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The professional nurse cares for an increasingly diverse population, varying in ethnicity, culture, and faith beliefs that influence health and wellness. The moral obligation of the nurse to provide individualized, holistic care of clients includes spiritual care. Supported by the Agape Model of Nursing, nurses should understand their personal religiosity and its impact on the care they provide. The purpose of this study was to better understand the self-reported religiosity and spirituality of registered nurses licensed to practice in the Commonwealth of Virginia.


Subject(s)
Christianity , Self Report , Spirituality , Humans , Virginia , Female , Adult , Male , Middle Aged
12.
BMC Psychol ; 12(1): 332, 2024 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38845048

ABSTRACT

Much research has focused on how emotional and spiritual intelligences promote well-being and help combat mental health issues. This comparative study, which was conducted in Israel and India with emerging adults enrolled in higher education, explored the relationship of emotional intelligence, spiritual intelligence, anxiety and depression, and satisfaction with life. The results in Israel showed a positive correlation of emotional intelligence with satisfaction with life, but in India, only spiritual intelligence correlated positively with satisfaction with life. In both groups, female participants scored higher on all variables than male participants. We offer initial explanations for these results.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Depression , Emotional Intelligence , Personal Satisfaction , Spirituality , Humans , India , Male , Female , Israel , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Young Adult , Adult , Sex Factors , Adolescent
13.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 43(6): 783-790, 2024 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38830169

ABSTRACT

Reimagining public health's future should include explicitly considering spirituality as a social determinant of health that is linked to human goods and is deeply valued by people and their communities. Spirituality includes a sense of ultimate meaning, purpose, transcendence, and connectedness. With that end in mind, we assessed how recommendations recently issued by an expert panel for integrating spiritual factors into public health and medicine are being adopted in current practice in the United States. These recommendations emerged from a systematic review of empirical evidence on spirituality, serious illness, and population health published between 2000 and 2022. For each recommendation, we reviewed current federal, state, and local policies and practices recognizing spiritual factors, and we considered the ways in which they reflected the panel's recommendations. In this article, we highlight opportunities for broader application and scale while also noting the potential harms and benefits associated with incorporating these recommendations in various contexts. This analysis, while respecting the spiritual and religious diversity of the US population, identifies promising approaches for strengthening US public health by integrating spiritual considerations to inform person- and community-centered policy and practice.


Subject(s)
Public Health , Social Determinants of Health , Spirituality , Humans , United States , Health Policy
14.
Wiad Lek ; 77(4): 710-715, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38865627

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Aim: To study the spiritual health in existential dimensions, as well as the meaning, value, and emotional components of spiritual health of Ukrainians under the wartime. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Materials and Methods: The theoretical and methodological framework of the paper is represented by the works of scholars in classical existentialism, contemporary philosophers, psychologists, medical psychologists, theologians, sociologists, etc. The complex nature of the issue necessitated the use of interdisciplinary approaches, philosophical, general scientific and special sociological methods of gathering, processing and analyzing information. RESULTS: Results: The article analyzes the perception of spirituality and spiritual health related to mental and social aspects in the philosophy of classical existentialism and existential-humanistic psychology. The paper justifies the heuristic potential of these approaches for maintaining spiritual health of Ukrainians, which is based on holistic approaches to human beings and their spiritual frames. The article represents the results of sociological research by the Institute of Sociology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, the Scientific Research Institute of Social and Economic Development of the City, and a survey of the PhD students of the Bogomolets National Medical University (N=103) made by the authors, representing the results of statistical treatment of the spiritual health characteristics: emotional, value and meaning components. CONCLUSION: Conclusions: The study has shown that the deterioration of mental health indicators of Ukrainians during the war is not accompanied by corresponding negative trends in their spiritual health. However, further research on this issue is necessary, including studies among respondents from other age groups (faculty, staff of the Bogomolets National Medical University).


Subject(s)
Spirituality , Humans , Ukraine , Male , Existentialism/psychology , Female , Adult , Mental Health
15.
Front Public Health ; 12: 1371110, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38873318

ABSTRACT

Objective: COVID-19 has varied manifestations and can cause complications that affect quality of life. Spiritual health may be a source of adaptation for these patients. This study investigated the relationship between spiritual health and quality of life among COVID-19 patients with long-term complications in the post-coronavirus era. Participants/methods: This study enrolled 475 COVID-19 patients through convenience sampling from medical facilities located in the Central Province of Iran. Data collection occurred between November 2022 and July 2023. A demographic checklist was utilized to ascertain the presence of potential COVID-19 complications. Patients exhibiting at least one long-term complication of COVID-19 were classified into the group with complications, while those without such complications were categorized into the group without complications. Subsequently, spiritual health and quality of life were assessed utilizing Paloutzian and Ellison's Spiritual Well-Being Scale and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), respectively. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS-20. Results: The mean scores of spiritual well-being and quality of life for participants without COVID-19 complications were 70.87 ± 22.44 and 61.30 ± 18.33, respectively. In contrast, the mean spiritual health scores and quality of life for participants with COVID-19 complications were 41.20 ± 12.49 and 33.66 ± 1.46, respectively. Moreover, spiritual well-being was positively associated with quality of life among COVID-19 patients (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This study indicates that COVID-19 complications can impair patients' spiritual health and quality of life, leaving them vulnerable and distressed. However, patients with higher spiritual health can cope better and enjoy a higher quality of life, despite challenges. Therefore, this study highlights the importance of addressing the spiritual needs of patients with COVID-19 complications and providing them with adequate support and care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Spirituality , Humans , COVID-19/psychology , Quality of Life/psychology , Male , Female , Iran , Middle Aged , Adult , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Aged
16.
PLoS One ; 19(5): e0302163, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38691525

ABSTRACT

Research arising from conversion practices, also known as conversion therapy and sexual orientation and gender identity change efforts, has generally been underpinned by an emancipatory discourse that has evolved to counter harmful practices by evidencing associated harms and estimating prevalence. Little attention, however, has focused on what is required to support survivors, inclusive of those currently or those having previously experienced conversion efforts. Within a context of Aotearoa New Zealand having recently criminalised conversion practices, this study adopted an in-depth qualitative research design, informed by a dual adherence to life history and an empowerment methodology. Twenty-three religious conversion practice survivors, who had experienced religious conversion practices across a range of Christian identified faith settings, were interviewed. Participants had a median age of 34 and the majority identified as New Zealand European, cisgender, and gay. Participant narratives were discursively analysed. Three primary discourses were identified that inform the needed development of interventions and supports: 1) pervasive framing of conversion practices as harm, rather than spiritual abuse, has minimised the impacts of conversion practices. Rather, conceptualising conversion as spiritual abuse positions conversion practices as requiring urgent intervention and ongoing support, inclusive of the development of policy and operational responses; 2) the coercive nature of spiritual abuse needs to be appreciated in terms of spiritual, social, and structural entrapment; 3) the metaphor of a pipeline was enlisted to encapsulate the need for a multidimensional array of interventions to ensure those entrapped within spiritual abuse have a "pipeline to safety". Holistic survivor-centric conversion-related responses to spiritual abuse are required. These need to be informed by an understanding of entrapment and the associated need for holistic responses, inclusive of extraction pathways and support for those entrenched within abusive religious settings, support immediately after leaving abusive environments, and support throughout the survivors' healing journeys.


Subject(s)
Spirituality , Humans , New Zealand , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , Gender Identity , Young Adult , Sexual Behavior/psychology
17.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 38(3): 148-150, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38709130

ABSTRACT

Both personal spirituality/religiosity and perception of a spiritually respectful work climate are inversely related to burnout among nurses. In addition to briefly reviewing the empirical evidence that consistently supports these assertions, this essay offers some practical suggestions for how nurses can promote a spiritually healthy work environment.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Spirituality , Workplace , Humans , Workplace/psychology , Workplace/standards , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Organizational Culture , Working Conditions
18.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 37(6): 298-303, 2024 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38767421

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the spiritual well-being and self-efficacy levels in patients with intestinal stomas. METHODS: For this descriptive study, researchers conducted face-to-face interviews with 51 participants. Data were analyzed using a descriptive characteristics questionnaire, the Stoma Self-efficacy Scale (SSES), and the Three-Factor Spiritual Well-being Scale (TF-SWBS). RESULTS: Participants had a mean SSES score of 56.98 ± 21.24. Education level and stoma type affected the SSES scores. Income level affected TF-SWBS scores. There was no correlation between SSES and TF-SWBS total scores. There was a positive correlation between TF-SWBS scores and stoma duration and age. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses should provide trainings to develop self-efficacy among and enhance psychosocial and spiritual support for patients with a stoma.


Subject(s)
Self Efficacy , Spirituality , Surgical Stomas , Humans , Male , Female , Middle Aged , Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Aged , Quality of Life/psychology , Enterostomy/psychology , Enterostomy/methods
19.
Am J Mens Health ; 18(3): 15579883241255187, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38794958

ABSTRACT

Although several studies have reported an inverse association between masculine discrepancy stress-the perceived failure to conform to internalized normative expectations of masculinity-and well-being, researchers have yet to consider the potential moderating or buffering role of religiosity. Regression analyses of data collected from a national sample of men (n = 2,018), the 2023 Masculinity, Sexual Health, and Politics survey indicated that masculine discrepancy stress was consistently associated with lower levels of subjective well-being, including poorer self-reported mental health, less happiness, and lower life satisfaction. We also observed that these associations were attenuated or buffered among men who reported regular religious attendance and greater religious salience. Taken together, our findings suggest that different expressions of religiosity may help to alleviate the psychological consequences of masculine discrepancy stress. More research is needed to incorporate dimensions of religion and spirituality into studies of gender identity and subjective well-being.


Subject(s)
Masculinity , Stress, Psychological , Humans , Male , Adult , Middle Aged , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Personal Satisfaction , Young Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States , Aged , Mental Health , Spirituality , Subjective Stress
20.
Adv Mind Body Med ; 28(1): 4-8, 2024.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38787680

ABSTRACT

Objective: Recent scientific literature points out that religiosity and spirituality play a relevant role in many aspects of life, including health issues. We aimed to evaluate the healthcare students' perceptions about approaching spirituality in their training and patient care in Brazilian universities. Methods: A cross-sectional observational study was conducted following the STROBE guidelines. Through an anonymous online survey, adult healthcare students from two universities in the city of Pelotas (Brazil) answered a questionnaire about their perceptions on approaching spirituality in their training and patient care. Chi-squared tests were performed, and P ≤ .05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 163 students were included in the analysis. Most believed that spirituality is important for their training (74.8%) and patient care (84%). However, a minority had had contact with the theme of spirituality during their training (48.5%) or had experienced a situation in which the spiritual aspects of a patient were addressed (47.2%). The students from the private university had more contact with the theme of spirituality in healthcare during their training. Nursing students had significantly more contact with the theme of spirituality in healthcare (P = .008) and had experienced more situations in which the spiritual aspects of a patient were addressed (P = .031) than other students. Conclusion: Most students believed that the theme of spirituality in healthcare is important for their training and patient care. However, they still had insufficient contact with it during their education. More studies with greater statistical power are needed to better understand this situation globally.


Subject(s)
Spirituality , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Male , Female , Adult , Young Adult , Surveys and Questionnaires , Patient Care , Brazil , Students, Health Occupations/psychology
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